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BUDGET HOBBIES PTY LTD ACN 077355205

 

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General Meeting Calendar for 2015 Commencing at 2 pm. The last meeting for the year is going to be held on Saturday 28th November. Venue to be advised. Hope to see you there.


M.A.A.Q. Executive and Office Bearers President: Tyson Dodd

0417 727981

president@maaq.org

Vice Pres: Mick Dallman

0411 285 665

vicepresident@maaq.org

Secretary: Kathy Moody

mobile: 0421 844079

home: 0746 344078

Treasurer: Barry McDonald

07 5483 2201

secretary@maaq.org treasurer@maaq.org

C.F.I.: Warren Hathaway

0457 456001

cfi@maaq.org

R/C Admin : Randall Mowlam

0414 312586

rcadmin@maaq.org

Airflow Editor: Doug Moody.

07 4634 4078

F/F Admin: Vacant

airflow@maaq.org freeflight@maaq.org

C/L Admin: Vacant cladministrator@maaq.org PRO : Vacant

pro@maaq.org

PLEASE NOTE THE CUT OFF DATE FOR CONTRIBUTIONS FOR THE OCTOBER-DECEMBER EDITION WILL BE THE 4TH OF DECEMBER 2015. Front cover: Lovely DH4 owned by Brian Sawtell (Lower Tweed club) Turnigy 52 cc petrol. Wingspan 3 metres, gunner rotated with the rudder,32 kilos in weight. Middle: Nicely built from a kit & prepared by Warren (Wazza) Hathaway this 3 metre Lysander is powered by a 3mm53 cc petrol 10 kilos in weight. Owned by Chris Gratton. Bottom: Very nice Sopwith Tripeplane powered by an Evolution 7 cylinder Radial engine. Cover by Jim Henry RSSF

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Welcome to the first of the full electronic versions of Airflow. While the newsletter is in its first teething problems going electronic, I hope that the readers can enjoy a bit more content as the page number is not so critical now but I will endeavour to keep the pages to an even number and as full as i can possibly get them to give you the reader the best value. For those who dont have access to a computer and would like to have a hard copy you can fill out the annual subscription on page 5 and send $6.00 to the Treasurer Barry Mc Donald and you will then get a copy of the newsletter sent to you. The copied version will be of double sided and in color . You may find that the print quality is not quite as good as the original professionally printed copies but you can gain information from its pages. Below is ths subscription form which you can fill out and sent to the treasurer if you wish to subscribe for the paper version. In this bumper edition there is quite a few write ups including a report from the Kingaroy club and a club feature on the Calvert (CRAMS) club . Doug

AIRFLOW SUBSCRIPTION FORM FOR A 12 MONTH PERIOD 4 EDITIONS I (name) .................................................................................VH Number..................... of (current postal address............................................................................................ wish to subscribe to receive the Airflow newsletter by post for the period of 12 months for the cost of $6.00 for 12 months . Signed ............................................................... PLEASE POST YOUR FORM ALONG WITH $6.00 TO THE TREASURER BARRY MCDONALD 284 LAGOON POCKET ROAD GYMPIE QLD 4570

WANTED : Has anybody out there got a Kraft signature series transmitter?

My name is Peter Rieksts, VH 7565. I’m looking to get into classic/vintage F3A pattern flying. Many years ago I used Kraft radio control, namely their Signature Series radio. My contact details are Email: peterandmila@bigpond.com.au and/or mobile 0419302087. There is a huge level of interest overseas, especially in the US. I think that with the right push we could get a vintage F3A class flying in Australia. Anything to get more interest in our sport has got to be good. And why not have Queensland lead the way! Look forward to your reply. Best regards Peter Rieksts Member Gold Coast Model Flying Club

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Old Timers come to CRAMS club. After running a number of successful O/T (old timer) competitions at CRAMS (Calvert Radio Aircraft Modellers ) it has been decided by the o/t group in CRAMS to start a regular series of open competitions for Old Timer model aircraft. The competitions will be run to the current MAAA national rules with the possible addition of scramble events and events for Radian a/c. We are currently establishing the firm dates for these contests but they will be held in October (probably the long week end) March and our traditional competition in June which is generally accepted as the state championships. We have an experienced group of o/t flyers including Jim Hardy, Dave Paton, Paul Nightingale, Mick Walsh and an original Vintagent / SAM 84 member Kim Turner. Kim, assisted by other club members, will be our designated Competition Director. The competitions will be held at Gratton Field, Calvert. This field is about 10 minutes drive west from Rosewood which is west of Amberley.Air force base. Gratton Field, for those who have not been there is arguably the best field in SE QLD if not QLD. Check out the CRAMS / Gratton Field website for further information. The group is available and willing to offer assistance in all aspects of O/T flying including teaching you hope to fly these models, how to select and build suitable models for the various categories and in some cases even selling models and engines. We can be contacted through the CRAMS website should you require any further information or assistance.

Notice of the first old timer event : The contest date is Sunday October 18th Events will be Duration, Texaco, and a 1/2A postal. The 1/2A postal is an international one for the Frank Ehling Trophy. It is currently held by SAM 2001.   The duration and texaco events will be held according to the MAAA 2013 rules.   Event fees have been set at $5.00 each for the 2 main events and non CRAMS club members will have to pay an additional $10.00 field fees.  The event fees will go to pay for “prizes” for first, second and third place getters in each of the main events. We will have full catering on the day. Event start time will begin with a general pilots briefing at approximately 0830hrs. For further information and to register your interest please e mail either Jim Hardy (jch_7@ bigpond.com) or Trevor Carey (tjc240z@gmail.com).

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BRISBANE FREE FLIGHT SOCIETY MONTH

DATE

START

January

Saturday 31st

March

John’s place

Sunday 8

7am-2pm

Coominya

Saturday 21st

7am-12pm 1pm-4pm 7am-2pm 7am–1pm

 2 Minute class models (all in, 3 flights)  Vic Smeed event F1C State Champs (5 flights) Open Power State Champs (3 flights) F1J State Champs (5 flights) Dale’s Fun and Friend’s Day

4pm-7pm

Indoor IHLG/Catapult State Champs

Sunday22nd nd Sunday 22 th

Saturday 28

th

th

Friday 17 – th Friday 24

Saturday 2nd

rd

Saturday 23 th Sunday 24

Sunday 31st

Dalby

(P20,CLG and special Ladies event, Sport and limited RC)

4pm-7pm 7am-2pm 7am-2pm

68 Nationals (R/C, C/L and Indoor)

Various

Southern Cross, (Kotuku Cup) and AFFS Champs

W-Wyalong and Narrandera

Indoor F1L State Champs F1A State Champs (5 rounds + 2 for team selection) F1B State Champs (5 rounds + 2 for team selection)

BSHS Dalby Dalby Coominya

Scale, HLG and CLG State Champs

th

June

Saturday 6 th Sunday 14 th Saturday 27 th Sunday 28

July

Coominya BSHS

th

Saturday 11 th – Sunday 19

May

LOCATION

Club meeting plus “show and tell”

th

April

EVENT

12pm-4pm

4pm-7pm 7am-1pm 12pm-4pm 7am-2pm

Indoor Hanger Rat State Champs F1G State Champs (5 flights) Club AGM meeting plus “show and tell”  P30  A1 Sailplane (both 3 X 2 min flights)

BSHS Coominya John’s place Coominya

Saturday 11 th Sunday 12 th Sunday 26

4pm-7pm 7am-2pm 7am-1pm

Indoor P18 club sponsored State Champs  100gm Coupe  KKK (both 3 flights) Dale’s Fun and Friend’s Day

BSHS Coominya

th

7am-2pm

th

(P20,CLG, ½ hour Scramble, special Ladies event, Sport and limited RC)  ½A Power  QDP ( both 3 X 2 min flights)

August

Sunday 16

September

Saturday 12 th Sunday 13 th Sunday 27

4pm-7pm 7am-1pm 7am-2pm

Indoor Peanut Scale State Champs F1H State Champs (5 X 2 min flights)  Open Rubber State Champs (3 X 3 min)  Comb. Open % (3 flights)

BSHS Coominya

October

Sunday 11 th Sunday 25

th

7am-3pm 7am-1pm

 LSq/100 (3 X 3 min)  No Frills (5 X 3 min) Dale’s Fun and Friend’s Day

Coominya

th

th

November

Sunday 8

7am-3pm nd

Sunday 22 th Saturday 28

7am-1pm 12 noon

John Lewis 3848 4280

(P20,CLG, ½ hour Scramble, special Ladies event, Frog, Sport & Ltd RC)  Col’s Comb. Vintage (3 X 3 min) plus  2 Minute class models (all in, 3 flights)

General flying day Xmas party and presentation

CONTACTS:

Malcolm Campbell 3263 9339

Coominya

Coominya TBA

Bremer Waters

Albert Fathers 0755 343490

2015 FREE FLIGHT CALENDAR Ver 4 PLEASE NOTE THIS CALENDAR IS THE REVISED EDITION FROM LAST QUARTERS NEWSLETTER.

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May 17, 2015

MAAA POLICY ON NON MEMBERS

Policy 2015 As amended at the 2015 Council Conference.

MAAA would like to thank members who contribute by providing services for training and proficiency testing to maintaining and investing in our infrastructure. Due to questions regarding another association, MAAA needs to clarify the position to our membership with regard to other associations and their members. We are all proud of the entitlements which come with our MAAA membership:

1. 2. 3. 4.

Entitlement to use any of the MAAA materials and programs. The wings and flight instruction system, the inspector and permit to fly system and the MAAA MOPs. These are not part of CASA or any public domain material or system, the copyright is owned by MAAA. Entitlement to participate in any, rallies State, National or International competitions, and all other events sanctioned by MAAA. Entitlement which is associated only with MAAA membership and model aircraft flying being recognised as a Sport by the Federal Government

Entitlement to insurance cover provided by the MAAA and therefore the use of any sites where the MAAA insurance applies as a sanctioned MAAA activity. This applies as follows: a)

b) c) d) e)

f)

The MAAA does not endorse more than one insurance policy covering the same MAAA sanctioned activity, be it at a club field or other location.

All clubs that affiliate with the MAAA must ensure that all flying members of the club are affiliate members of the MAAA. Clubs who consider having a mixture of MAAA members, and members of another like association who are not also members of the MAAA, will not be affiliated.

Persons flying at MAAA affiliate club sites or sanctioned activities must do so in accordance with the MAAA Visitors Policy. (See MOP042)

MAAA members flying at non MAAA affiliate club sites or activities covered by another Association’s insurance should clearly understand that they will not be covered by the MAAA Insurance for this activity. Therefore any insurance claim incurred, must be made against the relevant Association’s insurance.

All persons flying at MAAA affiliated club fields or MAAA sanctioned activities must fly in accordance with MAAA MOPs.

MAAA will vigorously defend its intellectual property rights.

MAAA will vigorously defend any Club or Member who exercises this policy.

It needs to be clear that non MAAA members will not be able to fly at flying sites of clubs affiliated with MAAA or operating as an MAAA sanctioned activity unless signed in as MAAA Visitors under the provisions of MOP042. There are safety and legal implications if this were to be allowed.

MAAA is committed to providing the best system to develop and foster Aeromodelling throughout Australia. The great strength of our association is the friendship and selfless contribution by our membership to further the cause. It is through these services and the judicious use of MAAA funds that allow us to continue to meet the needs of members, and are able to plan for the long term future of Aeromodelling in Australia. ------------oOo----------

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A Newbie’s View of NEFR 15 Being relative new to electric flying, and having previously only flown in the Radian event at NEFR, I decided this year to enter F5J as well as the scramble. Someone has to come last I thought. This NEFR was being held at the National Aeromodelling & Aviator Society’s Willy Emmett field on the Naas Road, ACT. Wow I thought, must be a decent place to have the road named after the flying club. Wrong, just a clever acronym and club name for a great field located in the head waters of the Naas Creek which was settled back in the middle 1800’s. The field was great. Set in between two hills with the field being clear of trees and other obstacles (like rocks), which have been banished by enthusiastic club members over time. There were grazing sheep, but it appears they must have been trained to avoid model aircraft. The weather was initially kind, and even when it rained later, it wasn’t enough to dampen the dedication of the assembled flyers and events were held pretty much according to their scheduled time. I enjoyed the scramble. Great event for a new flyer as it forces you to concentrate on elapsed time, piloting your model to be in a good place ready for landing. Also wonderful exercise for the wife who had to chase the model on those occasions the pilot didn’t quite get the model “back to base”. Didn’t win the event, but didn’t come last either, and had heaps of fun. Radian is always a great event. 25 odd radians all going up in a mass launch is a sight to see. The challenge was to find the thermals, but everyone was facing the same challenge. It was great to see the sense of achievement from other relatively new pilots when they did a spot on five-minute flight. Didn’t win the event, but didn’t come last either, and had heaps of fun. F5J was the event that worried me. Could not see me getting anywhere near the flight duration required. I’d had the odd practice at home, but hadn’t really thought much about spot landings, or how to approach them. Never mind, as I said, someone had to come last. So, psychologically prepared, out I went and flew. It was great! Everyone faced the same elements together. It was great flying around and picking the odd thermal. Spot landing was a challenge, and certainly let me down, but before the next NEFR I’ll go practice those. Really enjoyed my first attempt at F5J. Didn’t win the event, but didn’t come last either, and had heaps of fun. The NAAS club did a superb job of catering, and according to my wife (who is a self confessed food snob) the Sunday night roast lamb dinner was the best meal of our whole trip! I think that’s pretty good endorsement of the NAAS cooks. Rumour has it that NAAS could well be next year’s hosts. I would certainly like that. The field is at a top location in the Nation’s Capital, and it’s easy to extend your holiday around Easter to give you time to take yourself, and family, to see the highlights of the ACT. If you’re new to flying, don’t be put off. EVERYONE has fun and enjoys the flying, why not join them and mark the date in your diary now. DAVID LUCAS Peter Pine has advised of this video link for those interested in improving their F5J flying https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-AfezktmGjs

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F5J Electric Glider

In 2011 the FAI approved provisional rules for a new electric glider competition that does not require a fast climb; it puts the emphasis on finding thermals and staying in them. You do not need hi-tech equipment or big dollars to participate and be competitive. In fact a simple ready built foam glider such as the Radian 2 metre is currently doing well in F5J comps. The rules of this event are simple. Fly for 10 minutes then land near a spot as close to 10 minutes as you can. Only a gentle climb is required since you are penalised for every metre of altitude when you cut the motor. The event is scored on the total flight time, less the penalty for how high you climbed,plus a modest spot-landing bonus. In practice, the length of the flight is the most critical aspect, the height you climbed is a secondary consideration, and the event is certainly not decided by spot landings. A true Thermal event. Full rules may be found on the Australian Electric Flyers Association web page at www.aefanet.com along with other interesting info. So, how do we know what height you achieve in your climb? You fit your glider with a height limiting devices and data logger. Several are available commercially. Have a look at www.flyelecric.com The AEFA promotes the event by freely handing out a collection of these devices and a few hand-held readers, so that fliers can come to an event without a device and still take part. These are still available, but many fliers now have their own devices, and the AEFA runs a monthly postal competition where fliers log their own flights and submit the results to a central point and a winner for the year is declared. Great for practicing. One of the most recent devices is the Altis V.4, which has an LCD display on the device itself, so you do not need a hand-held reader. You launch your aircraft as the hooter sounds the beginning of the 10-minute window. You can switch off at any time up to 30 seconds in to the flight. Some brave fliers have even tried switching off under 50m when they perceive thermal activity! If you keep running your motor, it will be automatically stopped by the device after 30 seconds and you must not start it again. Some devices do not allow a restart per F5J rules, but more recent ones allow a restart in an emergency situation with a zero score being recorded in an event, but the aircraft can be saved! The F5J event is now popular in many overseas countries. Slovakia has developed a web site to publicise international events in F5J. You can see details here: http://www.rivamodels.sk/f5magazin_en.html So dust off your electric gliders and join the F5J revolution!

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Some of the many F5J glider designs. The humble Parkzone Radian makes an ideal learning model. Models range from 2 metres to over 4 metres in wingspan and are mostly almost ready to fly (ARF) composite and foam with a few scratchbuilt designs available from a plan service .

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AUSTRALIAN MODEL FLYING DAY © MAAA

Be part of the Australian Model Flying Day 24 – 25 October Buy a $5.00 badge to support the Royal Flying Doctor Service

▶ Register your club’s participation with the MAAA Secretary secretary@maaa.asn.au ▶ Let the MAAA Secretary know how many badges your club would like to purchase. ▶ Send a cheque with your request or receive a tax invoice for badges. (Cheques made out to MAAA Australian Model Flying Day) ▶ Receive MAAA Australian Model Flying Day 2015 badges ▶ Plan one day during the weekend of 24 - 25 October and organise a club activity: flying event, BBQ, swap and sell day, indoor, display or just a get together of members. ▶ Badge purchases are the only form of RFDS donation for the day ▶ When you donate $5.00 for the Royal Flying Doctor Service and receive your badge, you are participating with modellers around Australia in a worthy cause similar to other charity events, (Red Nose Day, Pink Ribbon Day etc.) ▶The event does not need to be a flying display (unless your club wishes to do so) therefore no approvals are required. It would be great however, to see members of the public encouraged to come along and take part in our sport! ‘Fully Approved and Supported by the Royal Flying Doctor Service’ Come on, join in, and show that aeromodelling as a sport can give something back to the community, especially such a worthy cause. ……………….oOo………………

Club Name:

Contact Name:

Postal Address:

Number of Commemorative badges required:

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Looking for something to toss off the slope - I found this for those scratch builders out there. Would electrify ok .

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The Scale Aircraft Society Of South Australia (S.A.S.O.S.A.) is a Special Interest radio control group comprising members from South Australian clubs which are affiliated with the MAAA, who build and fly scale model aircraft. This group will be conducting the South Australian State Championship competitions for Radio Control Scale Models FAI/MAAA during two days of the Easter Holidays in 2016. The dates are Saturday the 25th and Sunday 26th March, 2016, we have chosen the Easter Holidays so that interstate competitors are able to travel to South Australia on Good Friday & Easter Monday or a spare day on the Easter Monday if required. This is the Society’s first notification for the above event, giving advance notice for prospective entrants to plan their flying itinerary/building schedule for the future. The venue chosen for this event is the Constellation Model Flying Club Inc, located at Brooks Rd, Waterloo Corner SA 5120. (This is approx 22 Km North of Adelaide CBD). Some members may recognise this location as that used for the biennual Golden Era Air Races. The location coordinates are: - Brooks Road, Waterloo Corner. GPS: S 34º 42.303’ E 138º 32.032’

All entrants must possess current MAAA membership and show their MAAA card and large model permit when requested.

There will be 4 classes of scale competition held at this event and these are:

1. F4C as per FAI 2015 rules processing, static and flying judging 2. Standoff scale

3m static, & flying judging

3. Large Scale

3m static, & flying judging, and

4. Flying only

flying judging only (no static judging.)

It is anticipated that there will be entrants in all classes accommodating the serious F4C modellers who are judged on building and flying, through several levels to many modellers who more readily embrace ARF models where scale flying is considered to be the challenge.

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First, second and third prizes will be awarded in each of the events listed above. As the event becomes closer, I will follow up this letter with additional details, suggestions for some caravan parks, Motels, and practice venues/times. Yours sincerely Trevor Woolfitt 22 Kingswood Crescent PARALOWIE SA 5108 Phone (08) 8250 2353, Mobile 0402 815 957 trevorwoolfitt@virginbroadband.com.au Secretary/Treasurer S.A.S.O.S.A.

F1D World Championships Team Trial A Team Trial will be held in Adelaide by the Adelaide Aeromodellers Club, with support from MASA, to select team members for the 2016 F1D World Championships to be held in the Slanic Salt Mines in Romania. A new ‘Boyd Felstead’ perpetual trophy will be awarded to the winner. To find out more about competing, or to register, please contact the Contest Director preferably by email at tim.haywardbrown@gmail.com (ph 0419 825 541). Rubber-powered free flight F1D models are the slowest recognized fixed wing aircraft in the world. An F1L (EZB) competition will be held concurrently. Come along and see a unique and unusual side of the hobby. Visitors are welcome and admission is free. Date: Sunday 29 November 2015 (3pm to 8pm) Venue: The Gardens Recreation Centre, Parafield, South Australia.

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Another warning on lipos and a bit of club news from KAMS. I was very lucky not to lose all my modelling gear and shed. I was charging an old, slightly puffy 3.3mAh 11.1 volt lithium polymer battery ready for the day’s model aircraft flying. I had slipped inside to get changed to go out and returned to find my shed full of smoke and soot. Fortunately I had placed the battery in a Turnigy explosion proof stainless steel battery bunkers. The battery had, had a catastrophic failure. Fortunately I had lined the shelf where I charge the batteries with fibro. The explosion was contained in the battery bunker but the intense heat from the vent ignited the charger plug module and the Dremel flex handle that was supported by a cup hook near the charger. The fire was out when I got to it but the battery bunker with the battery remains in it was too hot to handle. I dropped it into a bucket of water to cool it down. You can see in the photos, the mate of the failed battery that exploded. It was a Turnigy, nano – tech 3300 mAh 40-80c 11.1v 3s battery. I have now discharged and retired its mate to be recycled. As part of the replacement of the burned equipment I have installed a fire extinguisher and smoke detector in the shed as I’m not sure how I would have extinguished the fire if I was there when it happened.  On a brighter note, we had an excellent turn out for our Sunday KAMS flying session on 26 July. Unfortunately mother nature wasn’t very kind with the wind. Good to see Jo and Reka Allotta from Murgon, (Jo will have to remember to bring his batteries in future if he wants to fly!!) Dean Eckart was flying well again and a big welcome back to Clint Andrewartha who has been missing in action for a couple of years, with his new Pitts from RC Trader. Great to have Secretary Daggsy fly over in his full size Yak complete with a roll to say g’day.  A little bit of history on KAMS – the club was founded in 1983. We currently have 15 members. The club has had 3 sites over the time of its existence. We have been at the current site for 20 years. We have an excellent working relationship with the property owner. To attain $12245 grant

to upgrade our facilities with QLD Gambling Community Benefit Fund, we had to produce evidence of tenure over the land. We drafted up a proposal from the internet and had it signed by both parties and it was accepted. No solicitors involved. We also had the proposed upgrades agreed to by the property owner. What we did with the grant : ·         Upgraded our rusted out galvanised tank with a larger poly tank ·         Removed the small shed and long drop toilets and replaced them with a 20 foot container and 2 chemical toilets ·         Removed the old dog wire and star stake fence and replaced it with a 5 strand plain wire fence around the pits. ·         Repainted the structures and replaced the shade cloth over the pits area ·         Painted the existing open shed and closed in 3 sides with shade cloth. It’s now known as the ‘KAMS Hilton’ ·         Installed a solar charger on the container to trickle charge the zero turn mower battery.  Our next event will be our Fly Day and celebration of our facility upgrade on 25th October as per the flyer in this edition of Airflow.  Regards,   

John Box  President Kingaroy Aero Modellers Club 2014 15

2 Rita Court Kingaroy 4610  Phone: (H) 0741624466  Mobile: 0408879286          Email:john.box@hotmail.com

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Flight line at KAMS

The burnt remains of the lipo,charger and dremel hand piece.

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FREE FLIGHT WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS MONGOLIA July 2015 report and photos by Malcolm Campbell

Eleven Australian competitors and five helpers flew to Mongolia in July for the free flight world championships and three supporting events. Mongolia is a very large country situated between Russia and China, so it is very remote and a long way from our shores. The capital is Ulaanbaatar, situated in northern Mongolia, where most of the country’s 2.5 million people live. Our flying field was just 50 km from this, which seemed ideal, until we saw the roads. The highways are improving but the potholes were enormous, probably because of minus 40 winters. The dirt road in to the flying field offered many choices thanks to the many route changes that have to be made when it rains. Thankfully a “forward scout party” attended the Asian Oceanic Championships just 12 months before, so we had advanced warning on what to expect. As for the driving experience, it is not recommended as the signage where present is not readable and the roads require skills not found in Aussie drivers. Mongolians don’t use indicators, drive on both sides of the road (to avoid the numerous potholes) and always seem to harmoniously blend in before any “head-ons” occur. Horns are used enthusiastically when overtaking and at all inner city traffic jams, and very few cars show signs of collision damage. I have never seen so many Toyota Prius vehicles; Mongolia being an obvious drop spot for second hand Japanese cars. Above: Mongolians don’t use indicators and drive on both sides of the road The trip was a wonderful experience. The Mongolians were warm and friendly and the preparation for the championships exceptional. It was amazing to think such a small country could muster the manpower, train people who knew nothing about aeromodelling and then put on such a first class effort. CIAM chairman Ian Kaynes was in close contact with authorities and I’m sure his contribution was very much appreciated. Television coverage was extraordinary, with Mongolian TV supplying 5 cameras, one mounted on a truck and about ten crew present on all days of the competition. Their coverage is now on their national TV network with a full one hour dedicated to each of the three classes – probably a world first. So we arrived in Ulaanbaatar about midnight on 18 July and were off to our camps the next day. 32 countries attended the events and we were spread out across various camps 30 – 40 minutes from the field. The Australian team were split into two camps, the majority staying in an excellent camp with an extensive menu of western food and modern gers with heated bathroom floors! Two of the F1A team including myself and an F1B team member stayed closer to the flying field in basic but comfortable huts with a practice field just outside our rooms. This was the main attraction, and we got used to the more authentic Mongolian food. The fact that it was an active gyrocopter field was a bonus – we all tried that! The organisers had set up a field camp less than 2 km from the flight line and that appealed to many countries. It had a restaurant, coffee shop and beer tent – most civilised. Well, let’s not mention the toilets.

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Top left: The fact that it was an active gyrocopter field was a bonus Top right: Mongolia had a variety of simple accommodation to choose from I forgot to mention – many of us became instant millionaires when we exchanged US dollars for the national currency (tugriks, or tuggers as we called them). You get nearly 2,000 tugriks for one US dollar, so bulging wallets are the norm and their cash registers are a sight to be seen, as they simply cannot close the cash drawer! Left: Our wallets couldn’t handle the currency The landmark near our camp was one of Mongolia’s major tourist attractions, the giant Chinggis Khan monument, a 40 m high structure where a mighty Chinggis is astride a huge horse, with an observation tower in the horse’s head! The structure is clad in 250 tonnes of gleaming stainless steel and was built in 9 months. It can be seen from over 10 km away, with Chinggis looking out across the plains and was built there after historically important relics were found in the area. This is where the Opening Ceremony and the closing Awards Ceremony were held. We heard an exceptional flautist who was also a throat singer, something for which Mongolia is famous. Acrobats also featured in the ceremonies. The recruited timers showed more talent by putting on two flash mob dance sequences in the Closing Ceremony. Left: Mongolia’s major tourist attractions, the giant Chinggis Khan monument.

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Above left: Australian team at the Opening Ceremony . Above right: Awards Ceremony.

Flautist and throat singer at the

A strange phenomenon on the flying field was the arrival of flying ants at 10 am most mornings. They swarmed and were quite annoying, but were gone in an hour or so. I guess Australia has our flies, and I’m not sure if the flying ants were indicative of thermals. Flying conditions varied each day. Weather changed quickly and when rain came through it didn’t hang around. We soon learnt you could get sunburnt in Mongolia! Some days were quite cool and thermal picking was difficult at times. There were rounds with virtually no breeze and also some with 6 - 7 m/sec and events that were shortened when speeds of 9 – 11 m/sec were crested. We had long retrieves on those days. A flare, fired from a handgun, arced high across the sky to signal the start or end of each round. This was a novel and effective way to communicate with competitors. Fired from the control tent a kilometre away, it was easily seen and universally understood. However, it gained little support when fired off 5 metres behind the Australian starting pole during the first F1B World Champs fly-off! As for the first fly-off for the F1C World Champs, it concluded at 7 pm and soon after a monster storm hit. While hail and water damage occurred in the capitol of Ulaanbaatar, we only got the wind and it wasn’t enjoyable. Some people were blown off their feet and the control tents were badly damaged. Worse still, the beer tent back at the flying field camp was totally destroyed. The gers on the other hand stood up very well as, being round with no overhangs like very short fat candles, they were virtually indestructible.

The beer tent at the MASA flying field camp was totally destroyed ( above left), but was back in business the following morning (above right).

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There were two lead-up competitions to the World Championships. These were the Tuvshin’s Memorial Cup and the Mongolia Cup. F1A, B and C classes were flown. The World Champs were followed by a novel event called MixMan where all three classes combined and a cash prize pool of 3,000 euros was offered. Some elected not to fly in this for fear of unsportsmanlike behaviour once money was involved. This proved unfounded and the event was like any other until the winds blew it out at the end of Round 3. To fly F1A, B and C all in the one event was unique. Competitions commenced on 22 July and finished on 1 August. So, many of us flew all 4 competitions and, on the days we were not competing, we were helping fellow team mates in their events and, when no comps were on, we’d usually be out practising. With fly-offs starting at 6.30 am we were up at 4.45 am and would be on the field by 6.15 am through all rounds and then the fly-offs at 7 or 8 pm. By the time these were over and we got back to camp for dinner we would never be in bed before 10 pm. While we got used to it, by the second week it seemed relentless. But we wouldn’t be doing it if we didn’t like it! The Australian team did very well. 76 flyers competed in the F1A event, 75 in F1B and 45 in F1C. I believe we can claim to have produced very good results when viewed at the team level. Standout performance was NSW flyer Roy Summersby who won the F1C world championship in France in 2013. He went on to prove his skill by getting second place at Mongolia this year. He was just 33 seconds behind the winner in the ten minute second fly-off. Roy was a media sensation, surrounded by cameras and reporters at each launch. I think he liked the attention. Fellow NSW flyer Terry Bond placed 8th and could have done even better had he not dropped 5 seconds short in the first F1C fly-off.

Above left: NSW flyer Roy Summersby flew exceptionally well Above right: Roy Summersby, 2013 F1C World Champion, proved his skill by getting second place at Mongolia this year Long term F1A flyer Phil Mitchell from NSW placed 10th and I managed 28th, something I am very pleased about. I established target objectives before I left for Mongolia and exceeded all of them. Our team manager and fellow Queenslander Albert Fathers burdened by management duties experienced equipment problems that cruelled his chances. Albert has been team manager three times for Australia. He treats this role very seriously and performed accordingly.

AIRFLOW 20


Above: Kathy Burford retrieves my F1A in one of the events Victorians Craig Hemsworth and Vin Morgan flew strongly in all F1B competitions placing 21 st and 47th respectively. West Aussie Paul Rossiter was also maxing all rounds until disaster in an unpredictable form struck. Paul’s model was pulled off the retrieval bike at the end of R5 for random processing. The motor weighed in at 30.42 gm = immediate disqualification (30 gm limit). Paul was shattered, although he has an assumption for the overweight motor. As the motor was shredded, all pieces were tipped out and weighed. Perhaps one piece from a previous broken motor may have been in the motor tube when the R5 motor was loaded? Was this the rogue piece that made him overweight?

Above: Victorian Craig Hemsworth flew strongly in all F1B events

AIRFLOW 21


NSW flyer Gary Goodwin came with us to fly in the supporting events but was let down by electronic failure. He went on to become a great help to all every day. At the end of the day, the host country was elated when Mongolian Bojan Gostojic was declared the F1B World Champion, the only one to make 7 minutes in the second fly-off! A real surprise for the competitors was mini Nadaam Festival put on by the organisers at the flying field. Some might know that the Nadaam Festival is the premier tourist event held in July in Mongolia’s summer, and it was so good that we got to see an extract of what goes on. Nadaam encompasses horse racing, wrestling and archery but it’s not the horse racing we know. It’s for male and female children aged between 5 and 13 racing small light horses across open fields without saddles. We saw a rendition of the finish with about 20 horses involved.

above left: A real surprise for the competitors was mini Nadaam Festival Above right: There was horse racing, wrestling left: Talented musicians and great food The all-male wrestling was a spirited affair with two bouts conducted jointly with eliminations until the final winner was found. Archery is over a 75 metre distance and it was here it deviated from the Nadaam principals. Flyers were invited to compete, and it was our very own Roy Summersby who won. Well he had to; he was the only one who hit the target! The festival also included singing, dancing, playing the morin khuur and throat singing. Mongolia was a great experience and should be acknowledged for what was achieved. The field was excellent and the organisation of each event outstanding. One aspect that stood out every day was timing. The timers were spot on, always cheerful and were so easy to work with. Some will no doubt become modellers, and Mongolia will soon develop a strong base of world-class flyers, I am certain of that!

MAL CAMPBELL

AIRFLOW 22


2015 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS MONGOLIA JULY 2015 F1A RESULTS 1 2 3 10 28 74

Eyal Galor Enes Pecenkovic Szilard Sijjarto Phil Mitchell Malcolm Campbell Albert Fathers

F1B RESULTS 1 2 3 21 47

Gongor Mijiddorj Stepan Stefanchuk Oleg Kulakovskyy Craig Hemsworth Vin Morgan

F1C RESULTS 1 2 3 8 41 42

Alexandrov Viacheslav Roy Summersby Yuan Gao Terry Bond Niel Pollock Gary Pope

F1A Tuvshin's Memorial Cup 1 2 3 6 14

Emmanuel Ragot Jama Danier Tumur Sanjaa Malcolm Campbell Phil Mitchell

F1B Tuvshin's Memorial Cup 1 2 3 6 10 18

Gongor Mijiddorj Sukhbat Batsuuri William Booth Vin Morgan Craig Hemsworth Paul Rossiter

F1C Tuvshin's Memorial Cup 1 2 3

Artem Babenko Artur Kaitshuk Yury Perchuk

F1A Mongolia Cup 1 2 3 32 50

Jama Danier Avner Studnik Jim Parker Malcolm Campbell Phil Mitchell

F1B Mongolia Cup 1 2 3 13 14 35

Batzorig Davaa Ondrej Parpel Sukhbat Batsuuri Craig Hemsworth Paul Rossiter VIN Morgan

F1C Mongolia Cup 1 Alexander Vyazov 2 Avraham Elyakim 3 Erdenebat Batzorigt

Mixman F1A, B, C and P 1 2 3 16 16

William Booth Szilard Sijjarto Jim Parker Phil Mitchell Malcolm Campbell

76 FLEW

ISR BIH ROU AUS AUS AUS 75 FLEW

MGL UKR UKR AUS AUS 45 FLEW

UKR W/C CHN AUS AUS AUS 44 FLEW

FRA CAN MGL AUS AUS 28 FLEW

MGL MGL USA AUS AUS AUS 22 FLEW

UKR RUS RUS 67 FLEW

CAN ISR USA AUS AUS 48 FLEW

MGL CZE MGL AUS AUS AUS 24 FLEW

RUS ISR MGL 48 FLEW

USA ROU USA AUS AUS

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

Round 5

Round 6

Round 7

Total

FO1

FO2

210 210 210 210 210 210

180 180 180 180 180 21

180 180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180 85

180 180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180 88

180 180 180 180 180 180

1290 1290 1290 1290 1290 944

300 300 300 300 287

473 409 407 315

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

Round 5

Round 6

Round 7

Total

FO1

FO2

240 240 240 240 240

180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 143

180 180 180 180 180

1320 1320 1320 1320 1283

300 300 300 223

420 380 376

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

Round 5

Round 6

Round 7

Total

FO1

FO2

240 240 240 240 192 84

180 180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 29 132

180 180 180 180 145 180

180 180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180 138

1320 1320 1320 1320 1086 1074

300 300 300 295

600 567 457

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

Round 5

Total

FO1

210 210 210 210 210

180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180

930 930 930 930 930

300 275 238 186 21

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

Round 5

Total

FO1

240 240 240 240 240 212

180 180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180 178

180 180 180 180 180 180

960 960 960 960 960 930

417 404 398 365 300

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

Round 5

Total

FO1

240 240 240

180 180 180

180 180 180

180 180 180

180 180 180

960 960 960

600 509 476

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

Round 5

Total

FO1

FO2

210 210 210 210 142

180 180 180 180 59

180 180 180 137 180

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

300 300 300

420 409 342

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

570 570 570 527 381

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

Round 5

Total

FO1

FO2

240 240 240 240 240 240

180 180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180 166

180 180 180 180 180 180

960 960 960 960 960 946

420 420 420 420 420

401 358 340 241 238

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

Round 5

Total

FO1

FO2

240 240 240

180 180 180

180 180 180

180 180 180

180 180 180

960 960 960

420 420 420

379 275 246

Round 1

Round 2

Round 3

Round 4

Round 5

Total

FO1

240 240 240 240 240

180 180 180 180 180

180 180 180 180 180

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

274 267 265

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

Not flown

600 600 600 600 600

AIRFLOW 23


Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems The Dawning of a New Age in Aviation by Kelvin Hutchinson Drones, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, UAVs, Remotely Piloted Aircraft or whatever you like to call aerial robots are soon going to play a significant role in our lives, and actually much more than we think. Technological breakthroughs, robotic innovation and the ability to write unique and complex algorithms are being fueled by an avalanche of very clever technical engineers and individuals, like you and I, interested in these ever-evolving technologies. ‘Aerial Robotics’ is one area that has captured the imagination of many and so has grown exponentially with would-be entrepreneurs wanting to have the first business model that will create significant disruption, hence sustainable profitability, to many existing supply chains. In Australia probably the most notable user of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (RPAS) is Channel 7. Current affairs programs, sport and documentaries regularly have the low to high steady pan shots creating a great effect. The movie and advertising industries are also using RPAS contractors to create great effects. Farmers are using RPAS to undertake aerial surveillance of livestock and for crop evaluation. Operators are evaluating RPAS for coastal surveillance, search and rescue using high definition and infrared cameras with arrangements soon to be announced. Larger operators such as Boeing, Airbus and Google are already well advanced with designs of semi-autonomous aircraft, vehicles and items around the home and at work that will make life easier, safer and cheaper. Ten years from now robotics, automation and new forms of computer technology and communications will be a well accepted and an affordable way of life. The explosion of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems (official ICAO term for an aerial robot, RPAS) has not gone unnoticed by aviation authorities worldwide. Our Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) has led the world with RPAS legislation, licensing and operational certification. Australia has close to one hundred CASA approved Unmanned Operator’s Certificate (UOC) holders and RPAS Controller’s Certificate (CC) pilots number almost two hundred. The problem for CASA is that many hundreds of RPAS are operating around Australia with no form of license or professional training. Costs associated with securing an RPAS Controllers Certificate and an Unmanned Operators Certificate can be up to $30,000. RPAS under 2kg currently do not require any form of license or pilot training. Individuals who own and fly these small aerial robots cannot undertake any form of commercial operation. If you are CASA approved to operate an RPAS business you have significant responsibilities. CASA treats RPAS as an aircraft. Size is irrelevant as far as CASA is concerned, so if it travels in airspace it needs management and regulation. Public safety (in the air and on the ground) is paramount! So where are the opportunities for Aerial Robots in Australia and is there money to be made? The good news is that there are opportunities in most industries and lots of financial potential! The bad news is that the barriers to entry are high, expensive and complex.

AIRFLOW 24


The CASA approval process naturally is rigorous and arduous but essential. The opportunities are endless, but, getting existing companies associated with agriculture, mining, surveying, government etc to consider RPAS in lieu of existing supply chain solutions, is time consuming and expensive. The lure of many is that these major industry operators are keen to have aerial robotic solutions in their industries, if it saves them time and money, but the solutions being offered currently by many RPAS entrepreneurs are not up to a standard they find acceptable. This situation will change over time. The most significant impediment to RPAS operators advancing in these industries is ‘sensor processing’ software. RPAS Operators typically have gigabytes of Hyperspectral, Multispectral or Lidar images with metadata to stitch, process, interpret and submit in a useful and meaningful format to clients. This is what makes the money, not owning and flying an RPA. In the following months we will explore topics such as what is involved in setting up an RPAS business, RPAS payloads that make money, the approval process with CASA, training and workshops, types of RPAS you will need in a commercial operation and costs involved. If you are interested in RPAS any existing operator would advise you to start small. Consider building a semi-autonomous RPAS under 2kg and practice using the computer controls (RPAS are computer programmed and controlled), autopilot and manual controls. All this can be achieved for around $450.00. Kelvin Hutchinson is the President of Warwick Aero Modellers (WAM) and a Chief Flying Instructor in the aviation sector and has a wide range of RPAS operations including an RPAS Training Academy based out of Warwick Aerodrome in Queensland. Contact Kelvin at kelvin@rpas.net.au or on 0407733836.

AIRFLOW 25


German design “MAJA built in EPP foam.

WE COVER:

UAV Controllers Certificate issued Multirotor or Fixed Wing Training Radio and English Proficiency covered

Remotely Piloted Aircra (Drone) theory and flight training and licensing from $3490.00

0407 733 836 AIRFLOW 26

OEM / Type Training available Warwick QLD or in Capital cities

|

www.rpas.net.au


AIRFLOW 27


Calvert Radio Aeromodellers Society

Nestled in the valley of the Little Liverpool range bordering Western Creek lies the settlement of Calvert on the Laidley -Rosewood Road. The main range railway line runs thru this small community which is steeped in history. The main railway line is the first narrow gauge mainline to be constructed in the world and commenced at Roma Street station and extends to Toowoomba in the west. This line was opened to Grandchester in July 1865. The Calvert Radio Aeromodellers Society (CRAMS) field is located just off the Calvert Station Road over Western Creek at Lot 131 Bourke’s Road West. CRAMS recently held the 2015 Model Air Fair for models over 80 inches in span. The event was very well attended with in excess of 70 models there on Saturday and Sunday with Pilots travelling from as far away as Sydney to attend the meeting. There was a great variety of models including first and Second World War models, civilian aircraft, aerobatic models, turbines and a number of large scale gliders and aero tow aircraft on display. There were also a number of stands for the buy swap and sell set up for people looking for a bargain. The Aviation Museum display bus was on site with an excellent display of memorabilia plus many examples of metal model kits and aircraft for sale. The club is open to all MAAA affiliated members and welcomes all modellers and perspective new members along for a day or weekend of flying. Casual flying for the day will cost $10.00 or you can join the Calvert Aeromodelling Society for $200.00 per year plus the standard MAAQ/MAAA fees. A number of special interest groups run events at the field. In the past the Old Timer SIG have had numerous successful events including the recent Queensland Nationals. The warbird events and special open days have been a success over the years with many attending from interstate and overseas. Calvert Aeromodellers are a wide ranging group of people who have the owner’s written permission to operate model aircraft at Gratton Field. A great variety of models ranging from small electric models to large scale replicas of the real thing are flown regularly. The field hosts Miniature War Bird events on a regular basis as modelling and flying scale military aircraft has a huge following and large numbers of models and modellers attend these events. The long wide runway is great for those long touch & go’s with plenty of room on approaches both to the east and west ends of the strip. The area is well maintained and has a large club house with hot water, refrigeration, cold drinks, BBQ, microwave and covered eating area. Flushing toilets and showers are provided for men and women and the disabled, cabins available for hire & powered camp sites large enough for caravans and motor homes are on offer. Calvert Aeromodellers and Gratton Field combine to offer a great Club environment and facilities that make a day visit, an overnight stop on a weekend or a short holiday acceptable to the whole family. A great place to stay to enjoy the peace and quiet. The following photos are from the recent Model Air Fair held in August.

AIRFLOW 28


AIRFLOW 29


No. 4 - 2015

Aerobatics with remote controlled model aircraft The desire to freely move around in the third dimension of the airspace around us is probably as old as mankind itself. Every day, we see the birds doing it. Once the first humans conquered the art of flying, they soon wanted to make the most of this new freedom and began to experiment with aerobatics.

.

RC Aerobatic Power Model Aircraft

The first aerobatic pilots The first aerobatic pilots used wires to control their models, which is the origin of the international designation Control Line flying. This method of flying manoeuvres is still done very successfully and World Championships are very popular. These days, model aircraft are powered by combustion engines or electric motors and fly fixed schedules that are judged by experts. 1

/2015 AIRFLOW 30

RC Indoor Aerobatics This relatively new discipline is for very lightweight RC model aircraft weighing between 60 and 90 grams. As the prescribed schedules of manoeuvres are flown indoors, all models are powered by electric motors. The maximum duration of an aerobatic display is 5 mins.

Two classes for RC aerobatic power models have become established in recent years: The traditional class for models with a maximum weight of 5 kg which has existed for about 60 years and is now designated "F3A" by the FAI, and the newer class “F3M” for semiscale big model airplanes (max. 20 kg). While F3A World Championships have been regularly held by the FAI since 1960, there have not been any FAI World Championships for the big models. There are, however, numerous competitions held in the USA and in Europe by American and European organizers.

Public Letter · 4 – 2015 by Emil Ch. Giezendanner


F3A is popular around the world While 20 years ago a majority of competitors designed and built their own aerobatic models, not many selfdesigned aircraft can be seen at competitions today. Most models are bought prefabricated or complete, given an individual finish if required and fitted with propulsion and an RC system. 2003 saw the beginning of the big trend towards the use electric motors which now dominate at competitions.

Demanding schedules of manoeuvres Sophisticated propulsion and control technology let participants conjure up ever more demanding manoeuvres. The concept, which is now 30 old, requires one manoeuvre to be flown in each of the middle, the right-hand side and the left-hand side of the flying window. This results in long performance times of around 8 minutes. The points given by the judges are standardised using a complex statistics program.

Aerobatic window – manoeuvres must be executed on a plane between the left und the right marker

Aerobatics is versatile Power model aircraft ¥ Aerobatics with control line model airplanes (F2B) ¥ Indoor precision aerobatics ¥ Outdoor precision aerobatics - models up to 5 kg (F3A) ¥ Outdoor precision aerobatics with semi-scale big model airplanes (20 kg) Aerobatics with model gliders

Precision Aerobatics with model helicopters F3C/N Aerobatic Helicopter F3P Indoor Aerobatic Model Aircraft

F3M Aerobatic Model Airplane

2 /2015

Aerobatic Glider

Public Letter · 4 – 2015 by Emil Ch. Giezendanner

AIRFLOW 31


QTFly-in 2015 After lots of cold weather in south east Queensland it was awesome to spend 3 days flying at Maryborough Airport with temperatures in the mid 20’s. QTFly-in 2015 had 51 pilots registered to fly over 100 models including many successful maiden flights. We had military, civilian and airliners as well as sport jets filling the skies with skilful piloting. This is the Queensland Turbine Flyers second year of the event which is kindly hosted by the Maryborough council and the local Aero Club. Everyone has made us very welcome for this successful event so we hope to continue in future years. Many pilots travelled from the southern states to enjoy our sunshine and hospitality and this event rivals the southern jet events. An impressive amount of Jet A1 was burnt over the 3 days and the trophies and prizes assembled for the event were amazing. The highlight was the Kingtech K120G kindly supplied by KMRC jets. We had many awards for the event and hope to see everyone back next year. Anyone interested can check out the QTF facebook page and ask us questions about this great part of aeromodelling.

AIRFLOW 32


AIRFLOW 33


AUSTRALIAN MODEL FLYING DAY & t.r.a.c.s 45TH BIRTHDAY 24/25th October 2015

Come and be a part of the first National Model Flying Day organised by MAAA. Cost is $5 and in return you will receive a badge to commemorate the occasion with the proceeds being donated to the Royal Flying Doctor Service. Also, this year we celebrate the Club’s 45th Birthday, so we are asking all past and present members, family and friends to come and join in the celebration! During the weekend there will be something for everyone: Saturday 24th Oct 

Sunset flying commencing 4pm followed by family BBQ,

Night flying and Camping for those who want to stay the night.

Sunday 25th Oct 

BBQ breakfast from 7:30am,

General flying during the day, including some glider and combat events.

This should be a great occasion, so dig up the phone numbers of those flyers you haven’t seen for years and get them out to the field to share a yarn and see how the club has changed. RSVP by 19th October to tracsclub@hotmail.com for catering purposes!

For futther details please contact: Craig Burkhardt TRACS President Ph: 0427 118365 Or email tracsclub@hotmail.com

AIRFLOW 34


2015 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

www.southerncrossairforce.com

AIRFLOW 35


Invitation AUSTRALIAN MODEL FLYING DAY Also a special day to celebrate with the:

KINGAROY AERO MODELLERS SOCIETY The club facilities upgrade

Sponsored by a grant from the ‘Gambling Community Benefit Fund’

Sunday, 25 OCTOBER 2015

At the KAMS flying field - Booie Crawford Road, Booie

Activities Start at 8:30am with a club pilots breakfast … Followed by general model flying … 10am - Official speeches followed by morning tea … General flying and the opportunity to have a go!!

Come and check out aeromodelling as a sport.

AIRFLOW 36

ALL DONATIONS WILL GO TO


R/C Indoor Flying for all MAAA current members @ Sleeman Sports Complex 3rd Friday of the Month Flying from 7pm to 10pm (Starting 19th June 2015) - $10/member to subsidise venue cost

Indoor Venue: Chandler Arena = J3 Best Carparking: Carpark 3 @ F3 or Carpark 2 @ L2

Open to all MAAA members with all types of electric powered models ONLY - Venue is the size of 3 basketball courts; - 20m high roof - Power outlets available for charging - $10/member to assist in venue hire. Facilitated by Phil Collings on behalf on MAAQ Email Contacts: Phil: phylow@squirrel.com.au Tyson: president@maaq.org Michael: info@wiredrc.com.au

AIRFLOW 37


2015 EVENTS CALENDAR

AUGUST 29-30

SCAF WARBIRDS AT GLADSTONE CONTACT TROY JOSEFSKY 0411 397139

29

MAAQ GENERAL MEETING LOCATION TO BE ADVISED

SEPTEMBER 5-6

CONTROLLINE AT CLASII- F2D STATE CHAMPS

19-20

CONTROL LINERS ROCKY RALLY & F2B STATE CHAMPS

19-20

SCAF WARBIRDS AT TAA CONTACT PETER LOVE 0412 633549

OCTOBER 17-18

SCAF WARBIRDS AT MARYBOROUGH CONTACT CRAIG PASKINS 0427 762320

31-1ST NOV

CONTROL LINE AT MARYBOROUGH F2A,F2C STATE CHAMPS

31-1ST NOV

IMAC BAYSIDE BUZZ UHLMANN ROAD MORAYFIELD (SAAMBR)

CONTACT DAN IMHOFF- DANIMHOFF@GMAIL.COM

NOVEMBER 7

QLD TURBINE FLYERS AT SUNCOAST (SMF)

14-15

SCAF WARBIRDS AT SAAMBR CONTACT DAVE MOUNT 0427 650737

28

MAAQ GENERAL MEETING LOCATION TO BE ADVISED

DECEMBER 12-13

TEAM SELECTION 2016 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIPS FOR SCALE MODEL AIRCRAFT F4H

MARCH 2016 25-28

WARBIRDS OVER WANAKA IN NEW ZEALAND

25-27

SCALE AIRCRAFT OF SOUTH AUSTRALIA STATE CHAMPS

PLEASE NOTE THAT FLYERS ARE ALSO PLACED ON THE MAAQ WEB SITE-WWW.MAAQ.ORG. YOU CAN FIND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ,ENTRY FORMS & CONTACTS PERTAINING TO EVENTS FROM THIS WEB SITE.

tHERE ARE NO FURTHER EVENTS SO FAR FOR 2016- NOW IS THE TIME TO GET IN EARLY TO SUBMIT YOUR EVENTS FOR NEXT YEAR TO AVOID CLASHES WITH OTHER EVENTS IN YOUR CLUBS PROXIMITY.

AIRFLOW 38


Imagine, the satisfaction you receive as your Warbird (painted in air force colours) rolls out onto the runway in front of an enthusiastic crowd, some of whom have come from hundreds of kilometres away to experience the thrill of being part of a military aircraft display. As the engine/s are given full throttle, the visitors watching from behind the safety fence with their cameras in hand, are ready to experience your presentation of fly pass and aerobatic manoeuvres.

How awesome is that!

Since 1998, the Southern Cross Air force has encouraged many aero modellers in the construction and operation of radio controlled Warbird aircraft of all sizes. The SCAF defines a “Warbird Aircraft� as any aircraft used for military purposes by any country at any time. The model aircraft must be a scale or semiscale rendering, recognizable as such, and marked accordingly. Any prototype offered to the military but not accepted by them would also fall in this category. ARF Warbirds are quite acceptable assuming that they display a good scale quality. Scale military helicopters also fall into the Warbird Aircraft class. Although wet and windy weather has upset our calendar, two very successful displays have been given this year, the first one being at Tingalpa on the 15th March and the 2nd one at Tin Can Bay on the 2nd and 3rd May.

Be part of the action. Come along and join us at the next display which will be at Bundaberg on the 6th, 7th and 8th June, 2015 Public Relations: Peter Johnson

For photos and details go to

www.southerncrossairforce.com

AIRFLOW 39


Airflow sep 2015  
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