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2019-2020 COURSE CATALOG Vers 3.0 4/16/19


Academic Information .......................................................................................................................................................................2 Registration ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 2 Dropping/Adding Courses .................................................................................................................................................................. 2 Advanced Placement Overview ......................................................................................................................................................... 2 One Schoolhouse’s Online School for Girls ........................................................................................................................................ 2 Classical and Modern Languages .......................................................................................................................................................3 French .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Latin and Greek ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 3 Spanish ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4 Mandarin ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 English ...............................................................................................................................................................................................7 History and Social Sciences ................................................................................................................................................................9 Mathematics ................................................................................................................................................................................... 11 Information Technology Electives.................................................................................................................................................... 13 Religious Studies ............................................................................................................................................................................. 14 Science ............................................................................................................................................................................................ 16 Signature Programs ......................................................................................................................................................................... 18 Italian Cultural Studies Program .......................................................................................................................................................... 18 Engineering, Architecture & Design for the Common Good Program ................................................................................................. 18 Leadership Institute in Finance Program ............................................................................................................................................. 19 Visual Arts ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 20 Studio Art ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 20 Digital Design and Film......................................................................................................................................................................... 21 Other Visual Art Offerings .................................................................................................................................................................... 21 Performing Arts ............................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Music .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Theatre ................................................................................................................................................................................................. 22 Dance ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Communications and Publications................................................................................................................................................... 23 Physical Education, Health and Wellness ......................................................................................................................................... 23 College Counseling .......................................................................................................................................................................... 24

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Academic Information School of the Holy Child, a college preparatory high school, is registered by the New York State Board of Regents and is accredited by the New York State Association of Independent Schools (NYSAIS) as a secondary school for girls. Holy Child offers a college preparatory diploma. All courses are college preparatory courses. Registration Students register during the second semester for the coming year. The elective courses listed in the course catalog may be changed or cancelled at the discretion of each department, or dependent on enrollment or scheduling limitations. All electives are not offered each trimester. Courses marked with an asterisk require approval of current teacher and/or department chair during the registration process. Dropping/Adding Courses The deadline for dropping/adding a course is two weeks after the beginning of a course. The drop/add period for an AP course may be longer. Any student who wishes to drop or add a course must reach out via email to the Dean of Student Academic Affairs for approval. All requested changes are dependent upon schedule compatibility. Advanced Placement Overview School of the Holy Child offers Advanced Placement (AP) in many disciplines. An AP course is designed to be at the level of a freshman level college class. Every AP course at Holy Child is audited and approved by the College Board and follows a College Board certified syllabus. These classes require diligent students to complete extensive reading, writing, and research requirements. To enroll, students must have the approval of the current teacher in the discipline and/or Department Chair. Students are required to sit for the May exam if they have signed up to take an AP course. Recommendations for AP Courses are made after discussions with faculty, Department Chairs, and careful review of each student’s progress. These recommendations are based on the following criteria: 1. Maintaining a final grade of 90% or higher trimesters 1, 2 and 3 and on the Exam/teacher recommendation 2. A consistent, engaged work ethic in the subject area 3. A passion and desire to study a particular discipline 4. Excellent critical thinking and problem-solving skills 5. Consideration of overall course load While Holy Child does not limit the number of AP classes a student may take, we do stress the importance of a balanced academic life. We encourage students to take on the most challenging course load, while still being able to achieve and maintain success. One Schoolhouse’s Online School for Girls In addition to Holy Child’s course requirements, students in grades eleven and twelve may also elect to enroll in classes through One Schoolhouse’s Online School for Girls (OSG). The Online School for Girls provides an exceptional all-girls educational experience by connecting girls worldwide through relevant and engaging coursework in a dynamic online learning community. Course descriptions can be found at: https://www.oneschoolhouse.org/for-students.html Students interested in enrolling in OSG courses must have approval from the Dean of Student Academic Affairs.

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Classical and Modern Languages French French I Prerequisite: none This course develops the four skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing, as well as introducing students to the culture of French-speaking countries. It is designed for students with little or no experience with the French language. As much as possible, classes are conducted in French. The student is introduced to elementary conversation, pronunciation and vocabulary, as well as basic grammatical structures. French II Prerequisite: French I or placement testing The second year course is a continuation of French I, developing the skills of listening and speaking, while promoting reading and writing skills more prominently. The culture of French-speaking countries is studied in greater depth. As much as possible, classes are conducted in French. New tenses and grammatical structures are introduced, as well as more detailed vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. French III Prerequisite: French II or placement testing This course is designed to review skills learned in French I and French II and study new grammatical structures including the subjunctive mood and compound tenses. Students are required to apply and manipulate language in more depth. There is greater emphasis on composition, oral ability and expanding vocabulary. Selected literary excerpts provide additional practice and stimulus for discussion. French IV * Prerequisite: French III or equivalent knowledge French IV aims to perfect the student’s mastery of French skills through an extensive review emphasizing the application of grammar. Readings include short stories by well-known French authors. Oral fluency is attained through in-class discussion of literature, current events and the construction of stories based on a sequence of pictures. Newspaper and magazine articles and short literary passages aid with students’ comprehension of the written language. Compositions on a variety of subjects, incorporating the key elements studied, are submitted regularly. This class is conducted exclusively in French. Students may be encouraged to take the French SAT Subject Test concurrently or upon completion of this course. French V * Prerequisite: French IV This course is designed to be an alternative to AP French Language. The class includes discussion of themes of interest to young people, as well as current events, based upon readings from newspaper and magazine articles, and listening to news on French television as well as podcasts. French culture, poetry, literature, and dramatists, painters and musicians, as well as French cinema, are studied. One major piece of literature will be read. The class is conducted exclusively in French. Students may be encouraged to take the French SAT Subject Test concurrently or upon completion of this course. AP French Language and Culture * Prerequisite: French V with minimum A-, or equivalent knowledge This is a college level course. The class is conducted exclusively in French. There will be a systematic review of grammar along with regular writing assignments. The students will read a complete work of literature as well as a number of shorter works and magazine articles. Audio materials will be used to prepare students for the AP exam. The student’s oral skills will be developed through daily discussions of topics and stories. Students may be encouraged to take the French SAT Subject Test concurrently or upon completion of this course.

Latin and Greek Latin I Prerequisite: none Latin I is an introductory course geared toward achieving reading ability in the language. Selected readings from the textbook and from outside sources concentrate on Roman mythology, lifestyle and culture and are designed to develop an understanding of the influence of these on the language. The basic grammar, learned as a tool for translating Latin, helps the student in her understanding of English grammar. The study of word derivation from Latin increases the student’s knowledge of English vocabulary. *Current teacher and/or department chair approval required 3


Latin II Prerequisite: Latin I or placement testing Latin II is a continuation of the foundation studies in grammar, syntax, vocabulary and style begun in Latin I. Roman mythology and history (which provide background material for topics covered in other literature, language and history courses) are studied. By the third trimester the students are beginning to translate Roman authors. Latin III Prerequisite: Latin II or placement testing The Latin III curriculum provides students with an overview of Latin authors. The students translate and analyze selections from Cicero’s letters, orations and philosophica, Pliny’s letters, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. Through exposure to the works of these authors, the student gains insight into the political, social and economic situation of the times. Latin IV * Prerequisite: Latin III or placement testing Now that the student has mastered most grammatical structures and possesses a strong vocabulary, she is able to proceed to Latin IV. Fourth year Latin is primarily devoted to reading major portions of Virgil’s Aeneid. By doing research projects, including an essay presenting a feminist critique of Virgil’s treatment of women, primarily Dido, in the Aeneid. Attention is also given to the art, architecture, politics of the time as well as Virgil’s influence on English literature. Latin V * Prerequisite: Latin IV or equivalent knowledge This class is conducted on a tutorial basis with two to three meetings a week. The decline and fall of the Roman Republic is studied with intensive readings of Cicero and Sallust in Latin. The third trimester is flexible, with advanced readings of the Latin poets or Latin Stoic philosophy. Introduction to Classical Greek * Prerequisite: Latin I or equivalent knowledge This class is conducted on a tutorial basis with two to three meetings a week. Introduction to Greek employs an excellent text, Athenaze, which enables the student to read fairly complex and interesting stories from the first days of the class. By the third trimester, the student is in a position to read some selections from the original text of the Odyssey.

Spanish Spanish I

Prerequisite: none This course is designed for students who have had little or no experience in Spanish. Spanish I lays the foundation for the four basic language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. The student is introduced to elementary conversation, pronunciation and vocabulary, as well as basic grammar structures. The groundwork is also laid for a study of Hispanic culture. Spanish II Prerequisite: Spanish I or placement testing This course continues to build on the foundation laid in Spanish I. Basic points of grammar are refined and new points are introduced. Increased emphasis is placed on conversation and comprehension as the class is conducted almost entirely in Spanish. New grammatical topics include the imperfect, future and conditional, as well as a review of the perfect tense. Spanish III Prerequisite: Spanish II or placement testing Spanish III is designed to review and reinforce the skills learned in Spanish I and Spanish II. New topics include compound tenses, commands, the present and imperfect subjunctive, and their uses. There is greater emphasis on composition, oral ability and expanding vocabulary. Throughout the year selected literary excerpts provide additional practice and stimulus for discussion. Spanish IV * Prerequisite: Spanish III or equivalent knowledge Spanish IV aims to perfect the student’s mastery of Spanish through an extensive grammar review emphasizing its usage in context. Readings include short stories by well-known Spanish and Latin American authors. Oral fluency is attained through class discussion of literature, current events and constructing stories based on a sequence of pictures. The class is conducted entirely in Spanish. Newspaper and magazine articles and short literary passages aid students’ comprehension of the written language. Students may be encouraged to take the Spanish SAT Subject Test concurrently or upon completion of this course. *Current teacher and/or department chair approval required 4


Spanish V *

Prerequisite: Spanish IV, Completion of AP Spanish Language and Culture, or equivalent knowledge This course is designed to be an alternative to the AP Spanish Language and Culture course. The class includes discussion of themes of interest to young people, as well as current events, based upon readings from newspaper and magazine articles, and listening to news on Spanish television as well as podcasts. Spanish and Latin American poetry, literature, dramatists, painters, musicians and cinema are studied. AP Spanish Language and Culture *

Prerequisite: Spanish IV, Completion of Spanish Conversation and Composition with minimum A-, or equivalent knowledge AP Spanish is a college level course, which prepares students to take the College Board Advanced Placement examination. This course, which is taught entirely in Spanish, includes an extensive grammar review, study of idiomatic Spanish and an exploration of culture in both contemporary and historical contexts. Readings include an anthology of short stories by contemporary Spanish and Latin American authors, which are analyzed and discussed in class. The students further develop awareness and appreciation of products, both tangible and intangible; practices; and perspectives. Students complete essays and directed oral responses on a weekly basis. Students may be encouraged to take the Spanish SAT Subject Test concurrently or upon completion of this course. AP Spanish Literature and Culture * Prerequisite: AP Spanish Language and Culture The AP Spanish Literature and Culture Course is an introductory course to formal study of most representative Peninsular Spanish, Latin American, and U.S Hispanic literature written in Spanish. The course is conducted entirely in Spanish, and students are required to speak only in Spanish in order to strengthen their three modes of communication (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) at a more advanced language level. Students are provided full texts of each literary work and additional readings in Spanish. Students are taught the techniques of literary analysis (essays, prose, poetry, and drama), works and literary trends, as well as literary theory, and criticism. In particular students are encouraged and expected to develop critical thinking through literary analysis, textual and text analysis (short answers and essays), art comparison, thematic comparisons on the required reading list and non required readings in class discussions, essays, oral presentations, and listening comprehension.

Mandarin Mandarin II Prerequisite: Mandarin I or placement testing This course continues to develop all the skills learned in Mandarin I. It will emphasize on practicing Pinyin and tones pronunciation, writing Chinese characters of more strokes, and better fluency in conversation. Grammar structures will focus on more advanced sentence patterns. Chinese geography, history, and culture will be discussed. Mandarin III Prerequisite: Mandarin II or placement testing This course will strengthen listening, speaking, reading and writing skills in the Chinese language. Students will increase their vocabulary and bolster their knowledge of grammatical structures. Emphasis will be on longer sentence structure, real-life conversation and reading comprehension. Selected poems and idioms will be studied in order to introduce Chinese literature and literacy into the classroom. Chinese geography, history, and culture will also be discussed. Mandarin IV * Prerequisite: Mandarin III or equivalent knowledge This course is designed to further develop oral and reading skills to communicate in a Chinese speaking environment. Students will increase vocabulary and extend grammatical structures. Throughout the year, there will be a systematic review of grammar and vocabulary along with regular writing assignments. The emphasis will be on real-life conversation and literature. The class will be conducted mostly in Mandarin. Mandarin V * Prerequisite: Mandarin IV or equivalent knowledge This course is designed to further develop oral and reading skills to communicate in a Chinese speaking environment. Students will increase vocabulary and extend grammatical structures. Throughout the year, there will be a systematic review of grammar and vocabulary along with regular writing assignments. The emphasis will be on real-life conversation and literature. The class will be conducted almost exclusively in Mandarin. Students may be encouraged to take the Mandarin SAT Subject Test concurrently or upon completion of this course. *Current teacher and/or department chair approval required. 5


AP Chinese Language and Culture * Prerequisite: Mandarin IV or equivalent knowledge This course is designed to be comparable to fourth semester (or equivalent) college/university courses in Mandarin Chinese. These courses, which deepen students’ immersion into the language and culture of the Chinese-speaking world, typically represent the point at which students complete approximately 250 hours of college-level classroom instruction. Developing students’ awareness and appreciation of the elements of the culture of Chinese-speaking people is a pervasive theme throughout course. The course engages students in an exploration of both contemporary and historical Chinese culture. Because the course interweaves language and culture learning, this exploration occurs in Chinese.

*Current teacher and/or department chair approval required. 6


English English 9: World Literature The ninth grade English course, a survey of world literature, introduces students to a variety of literary works and genres from across the planet and throughout history, all of which not only serve as examples of excellent writing but also allow students to think critically about how each protagonist moves from childhood or adolescence to adulthood, considering those ideas, persons, or cultures that challenge them physically, emotionally, or psychologically. Through the study of these literatures and use of supplementary materials (both print and electronic), students improve their writing, practice literary analysis, extend their grasp of grammar, build vocabulary, and gain confidence in public speaking. Students are expected to complete a number of written assignments connected to their reading. Students study grammar in context in their writing, reviewing specific points of grammar as needed. The major texts studied may include Things Fall Apart, The Kite Runner, and The Merchant of Venice. English 10: British Literature This course is an introduction to the important authors and movements in British literature, but with added readings that explore the far-reaching impact of Britain’s vast colonial system. We will begin the year with a foundational text for all of British literature, Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, and examine the work for its themes of gender and religion. From there, we will study The Tempest, one of Shakespeare’s works that explores questions of racial identity and equity. Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre will bring together our study of religion, gender, and racial identities, setting us up for the post-colonial works, Wide Sargasso Sea and Annie John. These course texts will develop and challenge our idea of British literature, providing insight into life during and after colonial rule, reflecting on the consequences of accommodating oneself to a foreign culture. A study of poetry will be interspersed throughout the year, as we will examine major forms and movements, from sonnets and Romantic poetry to free verse. To help us become better readers and writers, we will engage actively with this literature on a regular basis through a range of writing-to-learn techniques as well as through the drafting and revision of formal and informal pieces. Finally, we will select unfamiliar words from the readings to develop our vocabulary and study grammatical concepts, such as phrases and clauses that will enrich our writing on the sentence level. English 11 AP English Language and Composition may be substituted The eleventh grade course centers its focus on the concepts of the American dream and the evolution of American Literature and literary movements. This, in conjunction with the students’ American History course, strengthens their exploration of ideas such as the definition of success, the movement towards greed, the woman’s role in society, the public and private self, the pluralistic society, and American trends in music, art, and culture. The reading syllabus may include works such as The Scarlet Letter, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, The Great Gatsby, and The Things They Carried. Students continue to write critically and argumentatively, as well as debate and present information to the class as part of their daily work. In the final weeks of the course, students will work to brainstorm topics, write, and revise the personal essay for their Common Application. AP English Language and Composition * AP English Language and Composition is a course designed to engage students in the examination of a writer's purpose in accordance with the writer's use of rhetoric. Through their reading and writing, students are made aware of the interactions among a writer's purposes, audience expectations, and subjects. Students write in a variety of modes, thereby developing a sense of personal style and an ability to analyze and articulate how the resources of language operate in any given text. The rhetoric of visual media, such as photographs, films, and advertisements, is also studied. The course will emphasize the critical reading of various prose styles and require students to prepare a variety of essays, including narration, description, definition, synthesis, and argument/persuasion. They will learn how to link technique and meaning into well-organized, supported, logical responses to complex texts, all of which are written by influential Americans. In May, all students will sit for the AP English Language and Composition exam. In the final weeks of school, students will work to prepare their Common Application personal essay.

*Current teacher and/or department chair approval required. 7


English 12: Students select one of these two courses to satisfy their full year English course requirement. Journey from Darkness into the Light This course will focus on the theme of journeys, particularly of the self through one’s own character. Special focus will be on enlightenment journeys concerning sin and redemption, good and evil, selfishness and selflessness, self-awareness, ignorance and enlightenment. Philosophy through Film and Literature This course will be an introduction to the central questions of philosophy, approached through literary works and films instead of traditional philosophical texts. The basic goal of this course is to teach students how to speak about artworks – in our case, poems, plays, novels, and films–philosophically, that is, to instill in them a sense of art as a site of philosophical reflection and discovery. AP English Literature and Composition * This course is the equivalent of a college freshman English course with a focus on literary analysis. Through reading a series of novels and plays appropriate for a college level class, AP English Literature and Composition students will develop their abilities to read analytically and to write critically about literature. The writing curriculum will focus on the thesis-driven essay, which seeks to persuade a knowledgeable reader of the essay writer’s theory about a text. AP English Lit students will also have the opportunity to practice the kinds of reading and writing required on the Advanced Placement English Literature And Composition Exam, which they will take in May.

*Current teacher and/or department chair approval required. 8


History and Social Sciences World History I - Grade 9 The World History I course is designed to help students develop a greater understanding of historical forces that have shaped our planet. The course focuses on the evolution of global processes, the interaction of societies, the nature of changes and continuity in understanding global forces and their causes and consequences. The study of world history begins with the development of early humans, the Neolithic Revolution and the beginnings of civilization in Mesopotamia, Asia, Africa and the Americas. Next, the classical civilizations are examined, and the year ends with the study of the post-classical period leading up to the modern era. Students will compare major societies and explore the principles of physical and cultural geography. World History II - Grade 10 World History II A may be substituted This course will begin with the study of the historical development of people, places, and patterns of life from 1500 to the present, ranging from the Renaissance in Europe, to Reformation, the Enlightenment, Industrialization, Nationalism and Imperialism. Students will investigate causes for the French Revolution, the impact of the Industrial Revolution in Great Britain, global industrial expansion and the effect on labor. Students will understand the causes and consequences of the great military and economic events of the past century, and will examine the push and pull factors of global migrations. Students will analyze both primary and secondary documents, maps, pictures, stories, diagrams, charts, chronological skills, inquire/research skills and technology skills to write historical, critical-thinking essays. World History II Advanced * - Grade 10 This Tenth Grade honors course considers the geography, global processes, social interactions, international frameworks, and cross-cultural comparisons necessary for an understanding of World History during the time period of 1400 A.D. to the present. World History II Advanced offer an in-depth examination of modern politics, economics, philosophy, technology, and society. Interpretative and analytical skills will be emphasized. Students will analyze both primary and secondary documents, maps, pictures, stories, diagrams, charts, chronological skills, inquire/research skills and technology skills to write historical, critical-thinking essays. United States History - Grade 11 AP U.S. History may be substituted This course traces the development of the United States from the age of exploration to modern times. It emphasizes such topics as the American Revolution and the Constitution, the development of American political institutions, the institution of slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, the Industrial Revolution, the Great Depression, World War II and the Cold War, as well as the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements. Emphasis is placed on written and oral expression, and on analysis of written documents. Tests, essays, multimedia presentations, individual and cooperative group projects and papers are required. AP United States History * - Grade 11 This is a college level survey course for students of United States History who have exceptional aptitude for and an interest in the subject. The class traces the development of the United States from the Age of Exploration to the present. This course requires a serious commitment from its students because of its fast pace and heavy work load. Students should have superior reading comprehension skills and strong writing skills, and must be familiar with the historical method; i.e. be able to assess the relevance and importance of historical materials. Students will be responsible for outside research and for written and oral reports. All students enrolled in the course are required to take the Advanced Placement examination in May. Students may be encouraged to take the History SAT Subject Test concurrently or upon completion of this course. Economics - Grades 11 and 12 elective This semester long course provides students with the fluency necessary to understand and interpret economic events occurring in a globally interdependent world. Concepts will include supply and demand, profit and loss, opportunity cost, financial markets and institutions, interest rates, inflation, unemployment, international trade and currency, and the purpose and function of stock and capital. Students will use a textbook as well as newspapers including The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. Students will learn hands on by managing virtual investment portfolios and by taking field trips to financial institutions. Personal financial skills will also be taught. *Current teacher and/or department chair approval required. 9


Screening America: US History through Film since 1900 - Grades 11 and 12 elective This course critically examines modern American society and culture through film. It treats film as a text/document to be analyzed in its appropriate historical context. We will combine critical analysis of cinema with a careful examination of the print sources that support the visual images in order to develop historical thinking skills and a sophisticated understanding of the cultural history of the United States. Semester 1 will focus on representations of gender in film from the Silent period through the 1980s. Semester 2 will examine the way race and politics has shaped American cinema from the Silent era to the Present. The primary assessment for the course will be a “Video Essay� that develops valuable digital media editing and presentation skills. Students are welcome to take a full year of Screening America OR chose either Semester 1 or Semester 2. AP U. S. Government and Politics * - Grade 12 The AP U.S. Government and Politics introduces students to key political ideas, institutions, policies, interactions, roles and behaviors that characterize the political culture of the United States. The course examines politically significant concepts and themes, through which students learn to apply disciplinary reasoning, assess cause and consequences of political events, and interpret data to develop evidence base-based arguments. American History Independent Research Seminar * - Grades 11 and 12 (By Teacher Recommendation Only) This course will introduce students to formal historical research methodologies and writing. Students will develop, research, and write a 4,000 to 6,000 word research paper with the goal of publishing in The Concord Review (TCR.org) and submitting their work to the National Writing Board for evaluation. This requires students to independently read and analyze Academic Scholarship such as scholarly articles, non-fiction books, and a wide array of original source material. Students will also be introduced to historical research methods: selecting a manageable topic, locating, processing, and interpreting original source materials, and using evidence to support a historically significant and contextualized thesis. In this course, students will develop the writing skills necessary to complete a substantial collegelevel research paper that includes a correctly formatted bibliography and in-text citations.

*Current teacher and/or department chair approval required 10


Mathematics Algebra I Prerequisite: Eighth Grade Math This course includes the structure and operations of real numbers, solving linear equations and inequalities, verbal problems, absolute value equations, operations with monomials, polynomials and rational expressions, systems of linear equations, radicals, quadratic functions, and introduction to functions, matrices and probability. Geometry Prerequisite: Algebra I or placement testing This course covers the concepts of plane geometry. It includes the study of congruent and similar triangles, polygons, circles, area, coordinate geometry, Pythagorean Theorem, right triangle trigonometry, surface area and volume. It introduces formal proof, including logic proofs, and seeks to develop analytical and logical thinking. Geometry A * Prerequisite: Algebra I or placement testing This course presents a rigorous study of Euclidean geometry including congruent and similar polygons, circles, area, coordinate geometry, Pythagorean Theorem, and locus. It includes using formulas for surface area and volume. Writing formal, original proofs in both logic and geometry is stressed. It reinforces algebra skills acquired in Algebra I. Algebra II/Introduction to Trigonometry Prerequisite: Geometry Algebra II is a course designed to help students develop strong quantitative reasoning skills as well as further develop their algebra skills. Topics covered include basic concepts of algebra, equations, inequalities, absolute value, products and factoring polynomials, rational expressions, quadratic equations, irrational and complex numbers, variation, exponential and logarithmic functions, right triangle trigonometry, and sequences and series. This course may not be offered every year. Algebra II/Trigonometry Prerequisite: Geometry or Geometry A This course reinforces the fundamentals of algebra taught in Algebra I. It includes linear and quadratic relations and functions, systems of linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, manipulating rational and irrational expressions, complex numbers, exponents, logarithms, introduction to trigonometry, and applications using verbal problems. Algebra II/Trigonometry A * Prerequisite: Geometry or Geometry A This course is an in-depth study of algebra and trigonometry designed for the mathematically able student. It uses all of the topics in Algebra I and expands on them to include the quadratic formula, complex numbers, higher degree polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, operations with matrices, sequence and series, verbal problems, exponential growth and decay, and trigonometry. Advanced Concepts in Mathematics Prerequisite: Algebra II/Introduction to Trigonometry This course limited to seniors and is designed to prepare them for a freshman year college math course. This class covers various topics in algebra, geometry, measurement, number systems, set theory, number theory, probability, statistics and math in the real world. Problem solving is highlighted throughout the curriculum. Students will explore both the practical and conceptual aspects of various mathematical topics. Pre-Calculus Prerequisite: Algebra II/Trigonometry or Algebra II/Trigonometry A This course includes trigonometry, and elementary functions with an emphasis on applications using the graphing calculator. Topics of study include polynomial functions, higher degree polynomial equations, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, complex numbers, trigonometry, and polar coordinates. Pre-Calculus A * Prerequisite: Algebra II/Trigonometry or Algebra II/Trigonometry A This course is designed to prepare students for either AP Calculus or a first year college calculus course. Topics include a further look at logarithms and trigonometry, applications using polar coordinates, linear, polynomial, exponential, and rational functions, sequence and series, limits, definition of derivative, rules for taking derivatives, and verbal max/min problems using the graphing calculator.

*Current teacher and/or department chair approval required. 11


Calculus * Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus or Pre-Calculus A This course is an introduction to topics in calculus including limits, derivative rules, max/min. problems, related rates, Riemann sums, rules of integration, area and volume. AP Calculus AB * Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus A This college-level course meets the AP Calculus AB course curriculum standards set by the College Board. Students study limits, continuity, derivatives, applications involving derivatives, integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus, advanced techniques of integration, differential equations, applications of the definite integral, and limits with indeterminate forms and L'Hopital's Rule. Students will explore each major concept in 4 ways: graphically, symbolically, verbally, and numerically. The course culminates with the AP Calculus AB exam in May. AP Calculus BC * Prerequisite: ‘A’ in Pre-Calculus A This college-level course meets the AP Calculus BC course curriculum standards set by the College Board. Students study all AB Calculus topics and the following additional BC only topics: derivatives and integrals of parametric functions, slope of a polar curve, integration by parts, integration by partial fractions, arc length and perimeter, improper integrals, motion along a planar curve, Euler's method, logistic growth, and sequences and series. Students will explore each major concept in 4 ways: graphically, symbolically, verbally, and numerically. The course culminates with the AP Calculus BC exam in May.

*Current teacher and/or department chair approval required. 12


Information Technology Electives Introduction to Computer Science Grades 9-12 Students will use the CodeHS.com curriculum to learn the basics of computer science in JavaScript and/or Python, beginning with Karel the Dog or Tracy the Turtle and ultimately building their own game. The CodeHS introduction to computer science curriculum teaches the foundations of computer science and basic programming. Once students complete the course, they will have learned material equivalent to a semester college introductory course in computer science and be able to program in JavaScript or Python. VEX EDR Robotics Grades 10-12 Students will walk through the design and build a mobile robot to play a sport-like game. During this process they will learn key STEM principles, and robotics concepts. At the culmination of this class, they will compete head-to-head against their peers in the classroom. Web Design Grades 10-12 This project-based course teaches students how to build their own web pages. Students will learn the languages HTML and CSS, and will create their own live homepages to serve as portfolios of their creations. By the end of this course, students will be able to explain how web pages are developed and viewed on the Internet, analyze and fix errors in existing websites, and create their very own multipage websites. It is designed for complete beginners with no previous background in computer science. The course is highly visual, dynamic, and interactive making it engaging for students new to computer science. The course has a strong focus on creation. Students will be able to use their own personal interests and creativity to drive their development process. App Development Grades 10-12 Apple's App Development course will teach students elements of app design using Swift, one of the world’s most popular programming languages. Students will learn to code and design fully functional apps, gaining critical skills in software development and information technology. AP Computer Science Principles * Grades 10-12 Students will use the CodeHS.com curriculum to gain a broad-based understanding of computer science and equip them to successfully pass the AP Computer Science Principles Exam at the end of the school year. AP Computer Science Principles introduces students to the foundational concepts of computer science and explores the impact computing and technology have on our society. The course goes beyond simply programming and provides a unique focus on creative problem solving, collaboration and real-world applications. Student projects will include: building a website, writing a program to draw a digital image, creating a web comic, developing an encryption algorithm and a final project that allows students to apply the different concepts covered in the course.

*Current teacher and/or department chair approval required. 13


Religious Studies Introduction to the Bible - Grade 9 In this yearlong course, students study the Bible in a literary, historical and spiritual context, focusing on the morality that stems from it. During the first half of the year, students study the formation of the Bible, including the processes of authorship and inspiration, as well as various methods of criticism and interpretation. Students read and explore much of the Hebrew Scriptures, focusing on key themes and messages. During the second half of the year, students examine the New Testament and learn about the life and teachings of Jesus Christ and its part in the Judeo-Christian tradition. Social Justice - Grade 10 In this course students acquire a robust understanding of the concept of social justice and learn that promoting justice is fundamental to the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the Catholic faith. Students study the biblical and theological roots of social justice, as well as the tenets of Catholic Social Teaching (CST). The girls look at how other Christian traditions, secular organizations, and prophetic individuals work to achieve goals similar to those identified as priorities by CST. Students are also introduced to a range of current justice issues and are asked to form their own opinions and reflect on how to engender positive social change. The course cultivates interdisciplinary skills essential for helping to eliminate injustice, such as prayer, public speaking, active listening, research and analysis, community organizing, and storytelling through the arts. To this end, students are asked to utilize books, articles, documentary films, podcasts, oral histories, sermons, songs, photographs, and poems. The goal of this course is to enhance students' awareness of the needs of the world and foster a personal faith that calls them to action. Christian Theology and World Religions - Grade 11 This course is designed to give students an education in global religions. It encourages critical thinking and revolves around the question of what constitutes a religion. Does a religion need doctrines? Must it involve rituals? Should it contain an inherent morality? What about consistent services or liturgies? Does it have to involve the divine or sacred texts? Do all of these “elements� need to exist in a coherent and rational system of beliefs and practices? We examine this series of questions by engaging in a comparative study of lived faiths around the world, including Indigenous religions, Hinduism, Buddhism, and the Abrahamic faiths of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam amongst others. The class also explores secular ideologies and branches of atheism in order to uncover the convictions that lie at the heart of these systems of thought. In exploring global religions, students will gain a deeper appreciation for the Christian religious tradition. Students will explore Christian systematic theology and follow the Church's liturgical calendar, encouraging students to reflect on how this year's study affects their own beliefs and relationship with God. Finally, this course pays particular attention to religious symbolism and art. Alongside our conversation of what constitutes a religion, we explore the elements of religious artistic expression. Throughout the year, students will have the opportunity to travel to various museums and houses of worship in order to bolster their own work and projects in this area of study. Religious Studies 12 Ethics fall semester Ethics is a rigorous, trimester-long Religious Studies course, which introduces students to variety of classic ethical theories (Cultural Relativism, Social Contract Theory, Utilitarianism, Virtue Ethics, and Kantian Ethics) and requires them to apply these theories to contemporary dilemmas. The purpose of the course is to investigate questions such as the following: What is the relationship between ethics, morality, law, religion, and etiquette? What are the sources of human morality? How do we find meaning in our life? What are some basic ethical theories? How can these theories be applied to certain moral dilemmas? How do our own ethics influence the life we live? In addition, this course makes use of films, such as Dead Man Walking and The Shawshank Redemption, to help explain the role of ethics in situations of social justice. Students also explore Victor Frankl's theory of Logotherapy as a way to find meaning and purpose in life. Grade 12 Spring Semester Students select one of these two courses to satisfy their second semester Religious Studies course requirement.. Social Justice in the Criminal Justice System Beginning with an explication of justice in the Bible and in Catholic Church documents and Christian writings, the course will turn to examine aspects of the modern criminal justice system in the U.S. In particular, the course will focus on 14


issues that plague our current system as well as models of restorative justice. Topics will include: mass incarceration, mandatory minimums sentencing, the death penalty, intersections of poverty and race, and the themes of crime, punishment, restoration, forgiveness, and redemption. In addition, students in the course will grapple with the ills of our nation's past, particularly slavery and actions in the post-slavery period, and will discuss current events issues present in national debate. Technology, Morality and the Future of Humanity In works of literary fiction and film, such as Brave New World, The Handmaid’s Tale, The Walking Dead, and Black Mirror, we see the manipulation and commodification of humanity. This course will use modern and contemporary works to discuss what it means to be human, what we will do to survive, and what affect technology will have on our future. Touching also on the theory of the state of nature in political philosophy, we will ask the ultimate question of what our human nature dictates to us about our reason and responsibility.

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Science Biology This course introduces students to the excitement of biology and allows them to explore the complexities of living systems. Using a molecular approach, topics such as organic compounds, cell structure and function, enzyme activity, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, cell division, classical and modern genetics, protein synthesis, DNA technology, evolution and ecology are covered. The molecular approach to this course will prepare students for further scientific study, as well as enable them to make informed decisions about the ever-growing role of biotechnology in our lives. Laboratory work is an essential part of this course. Its inquiry-based approach is designed to develop critical thinking skills and powers of observation. Chemistry Chemistry A may be substituted Chemistry is the study of matter and the changes that it can undergo. This course introduces students to the major concepts in chemistry and emphasizes its importance in our everyday lives. Topics include measurement and conversions; modern atomic theory; the periodic table; bonding; principles of chemical reactions; moles; states of matter; gases and gas laws; solutions; acids and bases; redox reactions; organic chemistry; and nuclear chemistry. Lab work is an integral part of the course and includes formal lab reports. Chemistry A * This course is designed for the scientifically oriented student with a strong math background. It is similar to Chemistry, but moves at a faster pace and topics are covered in more depth. These topics include measurement and conversions; modern atomic theory; the periodic table; bonding; principles of chemical reactions; moles and stoichiometry (including limiting reactants); states of matter; gases and gas laws; solutions; thermochemistry; reaction rates; chemical equilibrium; acids and bases; redox reactions; organic chemistry; and nuclear chemistry. Lab work, with formal writeups, will correspond with material covered in class. Physics I

Prerequisite: Prior Algebra II/Trigonometry recommended Physics A may be substituted This course is a rigorous introduction to classical Newtonian physics and examines the mechanics of the physical world. Students will study the phenomena and theories associated with the following topics: matter and energy; forces and motion; wave behavior; sound; light and optics; electricity (both static and circuits). Lab work, with its formal write-ups, will correspond with material covered in class. Physics I A * Prerequisite: Prior / Concurrent Pre-Calculus or Pre-Calculus A This course is similar to Physics but moves at a faster pace and more topics are covered. The scope of the course includes linear motion, forces, energy, rotational motion, oscillations, thermodynamics, wave behavior, electric forces and fields, electricity, magnetism; optics, and modern physics. Lab work, with its formal write-ups, will correspond with material covered in class. AP Biology * Prerequisite: Minimum A- in Biology and Chemistry AP Biology is a college-level class designed for in-depth investigation of living systems. The course design allows for significant exploration of the topic by the student both in the classroom and in laboratory situations. Topics of study range from biochemical processes to molecular genetics and evolutionary theory. The student soon realizes that indepth study often raises more perplexing questions than are answered. Laboratory investigations include enzyme activity, DNA fingerprinting and bacterial transformation. This course meets in double periods, and requires a large time commitment. Students are required to take the AP exam in May.

*Current teacher and/or department chair approval required.

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AP Chemistry * Prerequisite: Minimum A- in Chemistry The AP Chemistry course provides students with a college-level foundation to support future advanced course work in chemistry. Students cultivate their understanding of chemistry through inquiry-based investigations, as they explore topics such as: atomic structure, intermolecular forces and bonding, chemical reactions, kinetics, thermodynamics, and equilibrium. Students are required to take the AP exam in May. AP Physics C: Mechanics *

Prerequisite: Minimum A- in Chemistry and Physics and Concurrent AP Calculus AB or BC The course is equivalent to a one-semester, calculus-based college-level physics course, especially appropriate for students planning to specialize or major in physical science or engineering. The course explores topics such as kinematics; Newton’s laws of motion; work, energy and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; and oscillations and gravitation. Introductory differential and integral calculus is used throughout the course. This course meets in double periods and requires a large time commitment. Students are required to take the AP exam in May. Human Anatomy and Physiology Grades 11 and 12 elective This course is an in-depth study of the structure and function of the human body. Students first master the language of anatomy: body planes, directions, regions, cavities, and tissue types. An in-depth exploration of organ systems follows, including the digestive, skeletal, muscular, integumentary, respiratory, cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine, and lymphatic systems. In addition to the use of models and computer simulations, dissections of the rat, dogfish, fetal pig, cow femur, sheep brain, goat heart, and cow eye enhance students' appreciation of the miraculous workings of the body. Other activities supplement our understanding of body functions, such as learning to measure blood pressure, listening to heart sounds with a stethoscope, eliciting reflexes, testing for visual acuity, color blindness, and astigmatisms, and studying bone fractures and soft tissue injuries through the examination of X-rays and MRIs. Note: While students are encouraged to take part in dissections, participation in them is not a requirement. Environmental Science Grades 11 and 12 elective This course is an in-depth study of major ecological concepts and environmental problems that affect the world we live in. The course begins with a look at our Earth as a system, focusing on basic ecological concepts: ecosystems, geology, and resources. Students will then apply those concepts to investigate current environmental issues, such as sustainability, energy, the rise of organic food, and wildlife conservation. Major focuses of the course will be both global and local biodiversity, an in-depth study of the Hudson River, an analysis of New York City through the eyes of an urban ecologist, and environmental politics. Research writing and laboratory investigations, including river analysis, recording animal behavior, soil testing, and determining forest health will be important components of the course.

*Current teacher and/or department chair approval required. 17


Signature Programs Italian Cultural Studies Program Italian Cultural Studies 11

Prerequisite: Interested students must complete an application and interview in the spring of their sophomore year.

Italian Cultural Studies is a one-year college level humanities course that ICS Scholars complete their junior year. This interdisciplinary seminar provides students with a strong foundation in the civilizations, peoples and cultures of Italy and its regions from Antiquity through the present. The curriculum is built around the idea of a thread of unified “Italian” culture, in spite of the nation’s recent political unification, strong regional loyalties, and even its lingering dialects. Therefore the course is organized in units that address periods known for cultural or political unity, and that contribute to the concept of “Italian culture”: Rome, the Renaissance and Modern Italy. It is designed with an emphasis on collaborative inquiry and discussion, often driven by regular reading assignments and research. Field trips and cultural programming, as well as a 3-week immersion in Italy during the summer, will complement classroom learning. Italian Cultural Studies 12 Prerequisite: Italian Cultural Studies 11 Following their summer immersion in Italy, ICS Scholars participate in a senior research seminar. This course teaches research skills such as fair use attribution and critical source assessment, while students independently pursue a topic of their choice in Italian culture or history. Students develop their thesis project into a 15-20 page paper, which they present to the school community in late May. This course provides a unique opportunity for high school students to conduct original research at the college level.

Engineering, Architecture & Design for the Common Good Program Engineering, Architecture & Design 11

Prerequisite: Interested students must complete an application and interview in the spring of their sophomore year. Engineering, Architecture & Design 11 is a one-year advanced high-school course that EAD Scholars complete during their junior year. The interdisciplinary STEAM curriculum combines the study of art and architecture with science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Arts education is key to the creativity that drives the innovation necessary for new products and industries and an important component of the course. As such, an accomplished architect will teach students design principles one morning a week. Students will also explore the four main disciplines of engineering: chemical, civil, electrical/computer science and mechanical. Students will have the opportunity to attend lectures on engineering principles by college professors, meet practicing engineers and architects and visit companies where they can see the many different forms engineering and architecture take in the real world. Throughout the year, students will participate in hands-on design labs making interdisciplinary connections not typically experienced at the secondaryschool level. The year-long seminar will culminate with a two-week immersion program in June where students will begin the community-based engineering and design project that will become the subject of their senior thesis. Engineering, Architecture & Design 12 Prerequisite: Engineering, Architecture & Design 11 Following their summer immersion program, EAD Scholars complete an independent community-based STEAM design project where they can showcase their inquiry and critical thinking skills. The goals of the project are to develop expertise in some area of architecture or engineering, to give back to the community by addressing a real-world problem and to articulate, both in writing and verbally, their project work. During trimester 1, students will continue to define their project, participating in hands-on design labs as necessary to acquire the skills needed to complete their project. In trimester 2, the students will focus on meetings with their community partner and their independent design project work. The project will be completed early in trimester 3 and students will spend the balance of the school year documenting their work in the form of a senior thesis and presenting their project to an interdisciplinary audience.

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Leadership Institute in Finance Program Leadership Institute in Finance 11

Prerequisite: Interested students must complete an application and interview in the spring of their sophomore year. Leadership Institute in Finance 11 is a one-year advanced high-school course that LIF Scholars complete during their junior year. The interdisciplinary curriculum combines the study of financial analytic principles, their impact on the economy, and the importance of ethical leadership. Students will learn financial terminology, tools, techniques, and analytical frameworks that impact an organization and study leadership styles, theories, and strategies in a variety of contexts. Students will have the opportunity to attend lectures on finance and leadership principles by business executives and visit companies where they can explore finance and leadership in the real world. Throughout the year, students will participate in business case studies where they learn to identify the problem, perform analysis of root causes, consider alternatives and make recommendations. The year-long seminar will include a one-week immersion program in March where students will begin to define the area of finance or leadership that will become the subject of their senior project. Leadership Institute in Finance 12 Prerequisite: Leadership Instiute in Finance 11 Following their junior year seminar, LIF Scholars complete an independent project where they can showcase their inquiry and critical thinking skills. The goal of the project is to analyze an issue in finance or leadership as it relates to business. The junior year immersion program and senior year internship experiences allow students to gain real world experience that contributes to their independent project. At the end of the year, students will submit a written report and present their project to an interdisciplinary audience.

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Visual Arts Studio Art Studio Art I Students will be expected to solve the proposed assignments through exciting 2-D and 3-D scenarios, allowing for great depth in understanding and interpretation. Consideration of artistic process through planning, execution, and amending will generate habits that help unveil unique style. The elements of art and principles of design will be thoroughly reviewed and students will develop artistic skills through a variety of techniques introduced. A range of artists will be used as examples and guides for solving and completing projects. Studio Art II: Prerequisite: Studio Art I Students will expand their breadth of skills and visual art pursuits through a variety of mediums. Students enrolled in the year course will develop compositions that build upon the foundations they learned in Studio Art I. The mediums covered are: Drawing and Painting Each student will improve her technical skills and application of color theory. This course will focus on drawing and oil painting. Students may need to purchase and care for some of their own supplies, such as palettes and brushes. Printmaking This will feature traditional printmaking: woodcuts, linoleum cuts, embossing and mono-prints on Plexiglas. The class will also include more experimental and improvisational monotype printmaking on plywood and other materials. Sculpture Sculpture introduces students to the unique concepts and challenges of three dimensional art. Students will explore composition, balance and movement by creating a variety of projects using simple materials, as well as clay, stone and wood. Students will learn to create functional and nonfunctional sculptural forms, as well as the reductive sculptural methods of wood or stone carving. Mixed media work including the idea of installation or site-specific art will also be explored. Due to limitations of space, class size may be limited. Advanced Art

Prerequisite: Completion of Digital or Studio Art Levels I and II Department Chair Recommendation Advanced Art course trains students in traditional techniques blended with contemporary methods. Skills are fine-tuned and styles emerge as students take ownership of the conceptualization of their work. The classical studies of drawing are learned including studies in the figure, the face, still life, landscape, and composition. The language of art takes precedence in formal critiques. A self-directed concentration ends the year. Senior Portfolio

Prerequisite: Completion of Digital or Studio Art Levels I and II Department Chair Recommendation Students who are planning to pursue art studies at the college level will need to present a portfolio in the college admission process. The goal of this course is for each student to build a strong body of work that demonstrates their skills in a variety of techniques and media. In the first trimester, guidance is provided for the portfolio presentation and digital images of the student’s work. During the second and third trimester, students will choose a theme and build a cohesive body of work based on this theme or concentration. The works will be displayed in a senior exhibition that will be designed and curated by the members of the class.

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Digital Design and Film Digital Media I: This introductory one-year course considers what components make for a strong photograph and strong film. The course starts in studies of composition and camera settings, then into digital photo editing software, and ends with a trimester dedicated to transitioning into the moving picture. Students are expected to find creative and original solutions to projects, showing voice and unveiling style. Major trends in digital art and art history are integrated into lessons, as well as a consideration of how photo and film are used in the business world. Finally, students will be expected to maintain an organized digital portfolio using current online technology and participate in local and community art exhibitions. Digital Media II: Prerequisite: Digital Media I Students will expand their breadth of skills and digital art pursuits through a variety of forms. Students enrolled in the year course will build upon the foundations they learned in Digital Media I. The variety of forms includes: Digital Photography which focuses on teaching students the basic operations and functions of a digital single lens reflex camera and how to achieve meaningful results by manipulating its settings. Students will gain an understanding of the elements of art as they apply to photography including lighting, composition, and design. Students will develop the ability to speak and write about their own and others photographs through critical analysis of aesthetic, expressive and technical components of the work. Students will learn to use software for image editing and manipulation as well as how to archive, organize and optimize photographs for output to print or the web. Students are encouraged to pursue their interests and develop their unique point of view. Digital Video which builds upon the skills learned in the Digital Media I course. Students will learn storytelling, project management, capturing and editing video and audio to produce a completed, concept driven digital video. Students gain experience through real-world projects that help them understand the various roles and processes involved in digital video production. Experience will be gained by working both independently and in group collaboration. Students will engage in peer-to-peer evaluation through periodic class critiques and learn to communicate their concepts and principles to an audience. Completed work will be presented at a group exhibition at the end of the course. No prior knowledge of digital video design software or hardware is required. Digital Design in which students explore the world of designing and creating graphic and animated digital media content. Students will create original content using different technologies as expressive tools, including but not limited to Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and After Effects. The media content created in the course may be used in various campus publications, posters, and events. The course also examines graphical design in print, advertising, app design, and online media while focusing on color, composition, and style. Students will work to develop an artistic vision and learn how to use digital design to bring their ideas to life.

Other Visual Art Offerings Art History and Appreciation (one semester) This course will introduce students to the various forms of the visual arts, such as painting, sculpture, film, and more. Students will learn how to look at a work of art, identify and compare key characteristics in artworks, and understand the role art has played throughout history. Through hands-on activities, museum visits, discussion, and research, learners will develop an overall appreciation for the art they encounter in their daily lives. Focus will be on Renaissance to Modern art historical periods.

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Performing Arts Music Music Theory This class uses an engaging, practical approach to cover the basics of music theory. Topics such as scales, chords, key signatures, and musical form are explored by both analyzing musical examples and composing original pieces. Students explore the ways in which various musical artists have used the same basic musical materials, and learn the interconnectedness of various musical genres, from traditional classical to modern pop. Chamber Ensemble This course will introduce students to a range of musical genres including classical, liturgical, jazz, and rock. This is a general instrumental ensemble open to all instrument types, and students may vary from beginner to advanced. Over the course of the year, students will learn to play individually and as an ensemble. Students will meet as a group several times per cycle, and in rotation on an individual or small group basis one to two times per cycle. Students will learn basic fundamental skills in reading music and create arrangements for performance. Students must rent or buy their own instruments (except piano). Limited financial aid is available. This is a repeatable course. Cappella Nova Cappella nova is a beginner to intermediate choir open to all students. Special emphasis is placed on vocal production, expressive singing, as well as singing in three parts. Students wishing to join Cappella Nova must pass a basic audition which includes a range assessment. Repertoire is drawn from the music of many countries and genres, from 11 th century chant to contemporary gospel. Also included are solo and small group opportunities, including vocal jazz. Students perform in the Winter and Spring Concerts, as well as in smaller concerts throughout the year. This is a repeatable course. Madrigals Prerequisite: Audition and Approval of the Choir Director Madrigals is an advanced, audition-only, chamber choir open to students in grades 10-12. Members study and sing primarily 4-part a cappella repertoire. Madrigals should be considered as preparation for collegiate a cappella and other select singing groups. Students perform in the Winter and Spring Concerts, as well as in smaller concerts throughout the year. This is a repeatable course.

Theatre Theatre I: Introduction to Theatre (minimum enrollment required)

This course is an introduction to basic acting, improvisation, and movement techniques, as well as vocal training. Students will also be exposed to various movements and important periods in theatre history. This is a repeatable course. Musical Theatre Performance: This course is designed for students with an affinity for combining music and theatre. Study will include scene analysis, character development, movement, singing, and acting. Students will apply the aspects of movement, music, and drama in performance-based assessments. Students will improve their audition skills through practice and performance. Upon completion, students will leave with a working portfolio containing a solid list of contrasting repertoires.

Dance Advanced Dance

Prerequisite: Approval of Arts Director

(minimum enrollment required)

These are intermediate to advanced level movement classes. Some dance experience or the completion of Dance I is required to enroll in this series of courses. The objective in each is to build on the dance skills and training that the student already possesses and to enhance the student’s understanding of movement and form. This is a repeatable course.

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Ballet and Modern Dance This is a foundational course focusing on exposure and exploration of both ballet and modern dance forms. Students will learn technique, vocabulary and performance elements throughout the trimester. Students with little to some experience may join this trimester long class. This course can also fulfill the Physical Education requirement. Jazz and Hip Hop This is a foundational course focusing on exposure and exploration of both the jazz and hip hop dance forms. Students will focus on technique, rhythm, body isolation and performance styles throughout the trimester. Students with little to some experience may join this trimester long class. This course can also fulfill the Physical Education requirement.

Communications and Publications International Relations/Model UN Grades 9-12 The fall semester, International Relations class will provide a framework for studying the complexities of timely international issues and examining United States foreign policy. Students will play close attention to current events, global problems, and their historical context. Students will be expected to participate in discussions, debates and simulations related to international relations. Students will learn about the United Nations (U.N.) and engage in an authentic simulation of the U.N. system, learning skills of debate, compromise, conflict resolution and negotiation. Model U.N. participation is mandatory. Public Speaking and Debate Grades 9-12 Public Speaking and Debate is a year-long elective course designed to develop students’ verbal and intellectual skills. The aspects of logical reasoning and argumentation are studied, as well as the basics of good communication. Students will research and present arguments on current issues, learn case construction, refutation, and cross-examination techniques. A basic overview of individual and debate related events for competition under the auspices of the New York Catholic Forensic League and the National Forensic League will be followed. Newspaper and Yearbook Grades 9-12 This course is designed to teach the basics of yearbook and newspaper journalism, including theme, coverage, copy writing, graphic design, and photography. Students will design and produce the annual school yearbook. Students will also build and publish trimester editions of the school newspaper. Students will learn the importance of working as a team to complete tasks successfully and on time. Students will also conduct interviews, write in a variety of journalistic forms, and plan and design layout for both publications. This is a repeatable course.

Physical Education, Health and Wellness Students are required to take one trimester of Physical Education, Health and Wellness each year that they are enrolled in the Upper School. Physical Education course options vary annually. Health and Wellness (Required, 1 trimester annually) The goal of this course is to address real life issues of body image, self-esteem, adolescent choices, sexuality, health and ethics. Students in grades 9-12 will learn the basics of good nutrition, informed decision making, and the importance of the mind/body connection. Students will revisit topics regarding sexuality, drug and alcohol abuse, and destructive relationships. This is a discussion-based class where students are expected to meaningfully contribute through journal writing and oral presentations. This class is graded as Pass/Fail.

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College Counseling College Counseling I (Required, 2 trimesters) The purpose of this class is to prepare juniors for the college application process in an organized, systematic manner. Each student takes the time to get to know herself and her academic goals so that she can find several colleges that are “good fits� for her. Topics that we will cover include: PSAT overview, timing of SAT I and subject tests, ACT, test prep, planning for junior summer, planning for senior year, completion of a detailed self-assessment form, creation of a resume, college visits and interviews, discussion of Common Application online, effective use of the College Board website, writing an autobiography, individual and parent interviews with the college counselor, ideas for your SIPs senior year, and how to write a good college essay. College Counseling II (Required, 1 trimester) This course is to help seniors prepare for, organize, and successfully apply to college in a timely manner. It meets once a week during the first trimester, but our guidance work with seniors will continue throughout the year as the application process progresses. Students will work on college visits and interviews, essays, filling out applications, testing strategies and financial aid. The goal is for each girl to feel she is in control of the application process.

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Holy Child 2019-2020 Course Catalog  

Holy Child 2019-2020 Course Catalog  

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