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UP-LEVELING LIKES Smashing the unrealistic beauty standards on social media

Melissa Gisoni “Because Mom Said So”

Issue 03 | SPRING 21

In Bloom

Floral Inspired Beauty looks for Spring

Win Place Home

LAURA

The Non-Profit Rescuing Retired Racehorses

VANDERVOORT

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Editor in Chief / Creative Director / Graphic Design / Retouching / Writer Bec Doyle @becdoyle_ Photographer/ Writer / Hair Stylist Glenn Nutley @glennnutley Videographer / Photographer Greg Levitt @greglevittphotography

C O N T R I B U T O R S

Photographer Jeff Kravitz @jeffkravitzphoto Copy Editor Caren Singer-Simon @simonsez277 Writer Elisabeth Hower @elisabethhower Writer Clementine Heath @iamclementineheath Writer Josephine Coiscou @ladieej_ Writer Scott Ashley @scottashleysays Stylist Gabriel Langenbrunner @langy Stylist Linda Medvene @lindamedvenestyling Stylist Shamia Hussain @shamia_irshana Stylist Andrea Edelstein @andreaedelstein Make-Up Artist Stevi Christine @naturallyby Make-up Artist Brittany Paige Lambert @peckisme Make-up Artist Mina Abramovic @abramovim Make-Up Artist Erik Smithwick @eriksmithwick_makeupartist Hair Stylist Stefani Terzo @stefaniterzo Hair Stylist Nathaniel Cheli @nathaniel_kimvosalon Hair Stylist Paige Achov @paigeachov

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Model Agency It Model Management @itmodelmanagement


ON THE COVER Laura wears

KenzieDress wears by sweater Alexis via by Ralph Lauren @milkboutique

Photographer : Glenn Nutley @thecontentcollective Wardrobe Stylist : Gabirel Langenbrunner @langy Make up Artist : Stevi Christine @naturallyby Hair Stylist : Stefani Terzo @stefaniterzo

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IN THIS ISSUE Vandervoort 34 Laura On Women Supporting Women & Her Directorial Debut

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A Place To Call Home 10 Winning The Non-Profit Org Rescuing Retired Race Horses Wilking Horan 16 Susan & The Icobnic Animated Trailblazer Betty Boop Gisoni 50 Melissa “Because Mom Said So”

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: Empowered Women 86 SPOTLIGHT Female Powerhouse Bronwyn Jones

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FASHION For Metallics 20 Mood The Soft Metallic Hues on Trend For Spring

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Brooklyn In Retrograde Vintage Threads NY Style

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BEAUTY

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Bloom 66 InFloral Inspired Beauty looks For Spring Pure 71 Bio The New & Improved Beauty Blender

66 66 10

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Likes 72 Up-Leveling Smashing The Unrealistic Beauty Standards on Social Media

HEALTH & WELLNESS Got Me Back 75 IFinding yourself again after a toxic relationship Ashley 76 Scott How Covid 19 Transformed The Fitness Industry For Good Kitchen 78 Lo’s Simple and Delicious Plant Based Recipes For Spring

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Winning A @winplacehome

“I want to do whatever is necessary for these horses to have the best life possible, even though it’s overwhelming.”

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Place To Call Home Words By Elisabeth Hower Photographs By Glenn Nutley It’s eight o’clock in the morning at a quiet barn in Canyon Country, California. Thoroughbred racehorses, once flying down the tracks in Santa Anita and Del Mar, now graze on flakes of timothy and alfalfa at Win Place Home, the aftercare charity where they’ve landed before finding forever homes. CJ Marinaccio, founder and trainer, carries two grooming boxes, one in each hand. She’s got a lunge line flung over her shoulder, a couple halters over the other. She can’t remember the time she took a day off. “Last spring?” she asks herself genuinely. But she doesn’t look weighed down, nor does she seem tired. There’s a perennial twinkle in her eye that comes from her clarity of vision. “I went to school for animation, and was actually getting some traction,” she says, “but then I realized I didn’t want to spend a single day without the horses… I called up Disney and asked for my portfolio back before they even reviewed it.” Without looking back, Marinaccio, a California native, dove headlong into carving out her place within the world of the animals she loves so much. At first she managed show barns; eventually her made way to the racetrack. She quickly worked her way up in what is still a man’s world to become an assistant trainer at Santa Anita Race Track, where Seabiscuit’s staged his famous comeback. After that, she became a vet tech on the track for several years. It was during this time she realized she could do a lot more for these athletes off the track than on, which led her to found Win Place Home, a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to rehabbing, retraining, and rehoming retired racehorses in the winter of 2015. “They’re very well taken care of while they’re racing,” she explains, “But once they retire, there’s a lot less support.” Support is an understatement, considering the lifespan of most of these horses is between 25 and 30 years. And considering the slew of bad press the sport has attracted the last few years, wouldn’t it be better to ban the sport altogether? “That would be catastrophic,” Marinaccio says without hesitation. “So many more horses would die.” She’s not the only one that thinks so. ►

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“You can’t ban racing… That would be harmful [f o r t he ho r ses] , ” e xp l a ins Madeline Auerbach, owner of M. Auerbach Racing here in Southern California. She’s responding to the growing number calling for its end, evidenced by the protesters stationed outside tracks across the country. Auerbach’s given it plenty of thought. So much so, she founded the non-profit CARMA, or, the California Retirement Management Account, to raise money for retired racehorses. Dr. April Mauro, DVM, who worked at Santa Anita Racetrack for years agrees with her. “Sure, these horses are being used for sport, people are gambling on them, but they’re treated better than 90% of horses in the world. Travel almost anywhere outside of the U.S., you’ll see.” Plus, as Monty Roberts, the original horse whisperer himself, reflected in a recent demonstration “Horses love to run. You see them in the wild, they’re racing each other. It’s instinct.” And yet, despite being centuries old, the future of horse racing is at risk. Especially following the spike in serious injuries, or breakdowns, that took place in 2019 at Santa Anita Race Track, during which nearly two dozen horses were euthanized by March. However, outlawing racing might not result in stopping it. “People are going to race horses,” says Auerbach bluntly. “So how do you want it to happen? In the shadows where it’s not regulated? Or do you want it out in the open, where everybody can see what goes on and there are regulations and a level of protection for these animals?” Marty Irby, executive director for Animal Wellness Action, a public policy organization, concurs: “It would go underground. Look

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at cockfighting. It’s rampant in the United States. There’s a tremendous amount in California… None of that is regulated.” For the moment, racing continues, and thousands for horses leave the track each year due to injury or because they simply weren’t fast enough; some retire as young as two years old. That’s where aftercare charities like Win Place Home step in. “Our aim is to teach them confidence and trust, to set them up for success wherever they go next,” she explains as she leads a petite bay mare named Misty. That training includes desensitization exercises, positive reinforcement, and a light, kind touch. It took a full year for the charity’s first horse to be adopted. But since then, “we’ve grown exponentially,” Marinaccio explains excitedly. Win Place Home now cares for 20 horses, and has successfully adopted out another 23. “There’s a job for every horse,” she says. “Just this week I have one going to be a therapy horse at a drug rehabilitation center, and it’s perfect for him. He’s going to do great.” And with a recent partnership with the Monty Roberts’ Mustang and Transition Horse Program, she’s poised to be able to help a great deal more. But what did happen at Santa Anita in 2019— and was it avoidable? Patrick Battuello, founder and president of the non-profit Horseracing Wrongs, which is headquartered in New York, but is active in California, believes regulations are not enough: his organization is dedicated to the complete eradication of horse racing in the United States. “I use the word ‘carnage’ a lot, because that’s what it is,” he says. PETA’s stance is equally clear. ►


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“We don’t support the cruelty of horse racing,” says Kathy Guillermo, the organization’s Senior VP. And while Irby isn’t aiming for a ban, he’s observed an increase in calls to ban across the mainstream sector of animal advocacy. The deaths, the bad press, the whips… “None of it looks good,” he says. With high-overhead costs and no way to earn their keep, many of the horses could end up on a truck bound for a much more tragic fate. Horse slaughter is illegal in the United States, but there are auctions where horses can be sold and sent to Canada or Mexico, where it is still very much legal. Irby explains that not many owners would keep their horses; they wouldn’t be able to feed them. “Probably about 90% of horses out there would be sent to slaughter.” Counters Guillermo, “That’s not a reason to continue horse racing.” Still, those within the industry have been responding to the concerns. The Stronach Group, who owns Santa Anita, and matches all purse contributions to CARMA, has long supported the yet-tobe-passed Horse Racing Integrity Act —something Churchill Downs has yet to do. Over the past two years, Santa Anita has added regulatory vets to oversee the track. The result? The strictest regulations of any track in the country. “What’s happening there now was unheard of before,” Mauro explains, “People are flying in from Europe to learn the system.” Why? Santa Anita currently has one of the lowest breakdown percentages out there. “But nobody’s reporting on that,” Marinaccio laments. In the meantime, aftercare programs like Marinaccio’s are making a difference. “If we had more, we’d have no problem placing all [the horses],” says Sarah Birch, another racetrack vet. She herself has adopted a gelding she met on the track, and donates her time, expertise and many medical supplies

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as the resident vet at Win Place Home. But due to Covid-19 restrictions preventing live fundraising events, CARMA and Win Place Home have each raised only a third of their previous years funding. It may never be a perfect system. But at the heart of most who weigh in on these issues is a love for the horses. Of the animal advocates she’s spoken to, Auerbach says their hearts “are in the right place.”However, “They’ll often say, ‘They don’t need to be taken care of, just turn ‘em all loose. Put them all out on the infield in Santa Anita, take them out to the mountains and let them run wild.’ And then you show them the charts. About 50% of horses born in the wild don’t make it to their first birthday.” While the great racing debate will continue to rage, you’ll find Marinaccio at the barn every morning, greeting the horses one by one, with equally and deeply felt affection for each one of them. “Hi Galadriel! You’re so beautiful, mama!” To another, “Sting! I see you, I love you.” If those names sound familiar, it’s because they’re all endearingly taken from places or people in Lord of the Rings. Bilbo was adopted just before Christmas, and Shire will soon be departing. Why the namesakes? “Usually I say I’m a bit of a Tolkien nerd,” she laughs, “but it’s a little deeper than that.” She explains, “I want to do whatever is necessary for these horses to have the best life possible, even though it’s overwhelming.” Saving them is a little like trying to save Gondor, she explains. “There are so many in need and the funding is so limited.” But she’s not giving up. The love Marinaccio has for these animals is as clear the vibrant blue eyes responsible for the certainty of vision that’s created a track record these horses can trust. To learn more about Win Place Home, or if you’d like to learn how you can help, go to www.winplacehome.org. ▪


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S u s a n Wi l k i n g H o r a n

& The Iconic Animated Trailblazer

BETTY BOOP

Words By Bec Doyle

I had the pleasure of speaking with a truly inspirational woman, Susan Wilking Horan, to discuss her latest book, “Betty Boop’s Guide to a Bold and Balanced Life: Fun Fierce Fabulous Advice Inspired by the Animated Icon.” Susan is a businesswoman, attorney, wellness advocate, author, and threetime cancer survivor. Yes, you read that right! And much like the infamous Betty Boop, with whom Susan shares a deep connection, Susan has courageously used her own harrowing experience and wellness journey to empower others. In Susan’s words: “Strong women lift each other up.”

for… a cancer which usually strikes people in their 60’s or 70’s.” After extensive and tireless research Susan discovered this particular cancer ran in her family. “So I started learning all of these different things about cancer. How one of the greatest risk factors is heredity. As I started to speak to groups, and talk to people and get involved as a motivational speaker, either people wanted to know how to prevent cancer, or for those who had it, about treatment and survival.” This inspired Susan to write her first book “The Single Source Cancer Course”, which was broken down into two volumes. She explains the goal of writing these books was to try and get all the information that anyone diagnosed with cancer could ever possibly want, in one place. “When you’re diagnosed with cancer, you do not have time. You don’t have time to do a lot of research. You need to know what to do, you need to have a plan. So that was my goal, to offer all the information that I knew I ever wanted to get, in one place.”

“Betty had her beginnings when everything was going wrong in the world, she taught people at that time how to face it, how to fight it and how to survive it - and she’s still doing the same today”

Susan explains it wasn’t long after she began practicing as an attorney that she was diagnosed with colon cancer. Susan says she was athletic, young, slim, a vegetarian and a non-smoker, but began to experience symptoms that she couldn’t make sense of. After the first Doctor laughed and dismissed her concerns, she seeked out a second opinion. “I went to another doctor because my intuition told me... I knew something was wrong,” she says. And unfortunately, after the appropriate testing, she was right. Susan credits this moment as the beginning of her journey as a wellness advocate, “that was a cancer that was totally unexpected and I was completely unprepared 16 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03

After beating colon cancer, Susan was diagnosed with breast cancer, and although it did not run in her family she was at greater risk of developing breast cancer due to a condition called fibrosis. “Women with that kind of breast tissue are more susceptible to


not only developing breast cancer, but it’s also more difficult to diagnose. It’s important for women with this type of breast tissue to not only get a mammogram, but to also get an ultrasound,” she explains. Since overcoming breast cancer Susan has also been diagnosed with different types of skin cancer, but fortunately adds that none have been life threatening. “The really hopeful thing that everyone should understand about cancer is that early detection is key. So it’s so important to be proactive. If you know a certain cancer runs in your family, get the tests that you need, and know how often you need to be reevaluated.” With her tremendous amount of personal experience and knowledge, it was obvious for her to share all she had learned. Susan reflectively quotes the famous ancient Chinese proverb “To know the road ahead, ask those coming back.” Susan explains that over the years she has learned there is so much more to wellness than focusing on cancer, disease, treatment or surgeries. “There are so many different disciplines and things that we can do to help ourselves stay healthy. Eating right, eastern philosophies, meditation, imagery. One of the greatest things I’ve learned also is humor!”, she says with a laugh. “Humor and positivity are so important!” And Susan is blessed to be connected to the ultimate icon of female empowerment and positivity, Betty Boop. Susan and her husband Mark Fleischer run Fleischer Studios. Max Fleischer, Mark’s grandfather, started Fleischer Studios and was the pioneering animator who created beloved characters such as PopEye and Betty Boop in the 1930’s. Today Fleischer Studios focuses on the licensing and merchandising of their beloved characters, which led to the inception of Susan’s latest book “Betty Boop’s Guide to a Bold and Balanced Life: Fun Fierce Fabulous Advice Inspired by the Animated Icon”. ► 17 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03


And what an Icon Betty Boop was, and remains to this day. “Betty had her beginnings when everything was going wrong in the world, she taught people at that time how to face it, how to fight it and how to survive it - and she’s still doing the same today,” Susan explains. Taking classic themes from the original Betty Boop cartoons, Susan and her co-writer Kristi Ling Spencer thought it would be a fabulous idea to take some of the life lessons from Betty’s cartoons and incorporate each of those life lessons into a chapter. “We had to whittle it down, so we whittled it down to 10 chapters; independence, love, kindness, accentuating the positive, cultivating courage, because Betty’s always so courageous through her cartoons, humor, health, respect and going in style, because of course Betty is a style icon!” The book is also packed with lots of scientific studies and quotes from various empowering women such as Florence Nightingale, Rosa Parks, even pop culture icons like Katy Perry. Susan explains how they

“In every cartoon, through it all, she remained positive, sassy and independent and just full of life, always looking on the bright side of everything”

wanted the book to be helpful and useful as well as inspiring

for women of all ages. “The message of the book and her message as a character is even stronger now than it was a year ago when [the book] came out, because of everything that has happened in the last year. Her whole message is ‘keep going, no matter what’,” Susan exclaims. Susan and her co-writer had no idea what was ahead when they released the book in early 2020, but there is something awfully kismet that at a time of immense pain, tragedy and struggle in the world, Betty reemerged with her same profound message and values. “Betty had her beginnings when everything was going wrong in the world and she taught people at that time how to face it, how to fight it and how to survive it, and she’s still doing the same today,” Susan explains. Historically speaking Betty was the original feminist, a trail blazer and an inspiration. Created in 1930 by Max Fleischer, she was a product of ‘The Great Depression’, and a symbol of positivity and hope. “In every cartoon, through it all, she remained positive, sassy and independent and just full of life, always looking on the bright side of everything. That is why she has survived 18 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03


nearly 100 years and is still so popular today, because of that fabulous inspiring positive attitude, so I wanted to write a book that reflected that,” Susan says. Betty was indeed a trailblazer, being the first woman, real life or cartoon character, to attempt many feats, including running for president! In the 1934 cartoon ‘Betty Boop for President’, Betty runs on the motto ‘Don’t Be A Poop, Vote For Boop’, and wins! “This was long before any woman, cartoon character or real life, ever did.. She was such a trailblazer that she was also one of the first, again real life or animated characters, to stand up for animal rights,” Susan proudly exclaims. Susan goes on to detail the cartoon “Be Human” in which Betty stands up to a horrible bully who was mistreating his animals. Adding, “This was around 1935 when people were not thinking in those terms, and she was! In another cartoon Betty is into recycling and repurposing. So there were all these wonderful themes.” One thing Betty is most certainly known for is her fearless signature style, so it made perfect sense for long time Betty Boop fan and renowned fashion designer Zac Posen, to write the foreword. “When he was a kid he grew up watching Betty Boop, he absolutely loved the Betty Boop cartoons,” Susan explains. Zac Posen also facilitated Betty’s appearance on Project Runway as a guest judge in 2018. Betty truly has done it all.

“She was such a trailblazer that she was also one of the first, again real life or animated characters, to stand up for animal rights”

Betty Boop is an iconic role model for women and humanity, if there ever was one, and we have Susan to thank for this incredibly special book, that so simply demonstrates the most important, yet basic of human values in fun and clever ways, and allows Betty’s message to live on. “Common basic human values, they don’t change over time, and I think what the last year has taught us, it’s given us time, time to reflect on our basic values. And just the little things in life, the day to day things that can make our lives just a little bit better. A smile! Smiling at someone can make their day.” After speaking with Susan; hearing her journey; her positive outlook on life; discussing the new book and how she is personally inspired by Betty Boop, it is clear the world would be a better place if we were all a little more like Betty.▪ 19 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03


THIS PAGE Kenzie wears Navy Sweater by Loro Piana. Tights by Calvin Klein. OPPOSITE PAGE Kenzie wears Shorts and Jacket by Lexi. Grey sweater by Celine.

THIS PAGE Olivia wears Top & Skirt by V. Chapman, Earrings by Celeste Starre, Shoes by Le Clique by Kat Maconie “Kirby Kitten Heels” in seashell/gold Price: $210 20 Where to buy: KatMaconie. M . @katmaconie CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE com

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MO O D f o r M E TA L L I C S PH OTOG R A PH ER: G R EG LE VITT @ G R EG LE VITTPH OTOG R A PH Y M A K E - U P A R T I S T: B R I T TA N Y P A I G E L A M B E R T @ P E C K I S M E H A I R S T Y L I S T : N AT H A N I E L C H E L I @ N AT H A N _ K I M V O S A L O N W A R D O B E S T Y L I S T: S H A M I A H U S S A I N @ S H A M I A _ I R S H A N A M O DEL : O LIVIA MIDDLEBROO KS @OO LIVIAJA N E

Spring is now upon us, and with it comes one of the season’s hottest fashion trends: metallics in beautiful soft hues. Model Olivia Middlebrooks rocks the trend head to toe, or with just an accent t o g i v e t h e c l a s s i c B l u e J e a n s & Te e a n e d g e . Whether you’re going out or keeping it casual, this season’s hottest trend compliments any outfit.

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THIS PAGE Olivia wears Top & Skirt by V. Chapman @vchapmanstudio, 22 Earrings by Celeste Starre M . C@celestestarre ITIZEN MAGAZINE

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THIS PAGE Olivia wears Dress by Show Me Your Mumu @showmeyourmumu Earrings by Ettika @ettika

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Olivia wears Top by V. Chapman @vchapmanstudio, Skirt by Show Me Your Mumu @showmeyourmumu Earrings & Bracelet by Celeste Starre 24 @celestestarre, Shoes by BCMFootwear . C I T I Z E N @bcfootwear MAGAZINE | ISSUE

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THIS PAGE Olivia wears Dress by Show Me Your Mumu @showmeyourmumu, Jacket by Boyish @boyishjeans, Necklace by Celeste Starre @celestestarre, Earrings by Ettika @ettika, Shoes by Veerah @veerahofficial

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THIS PAGE Olivia wears Dress by Show Me Your Mumu @showmeyourmumu Earrings & Bracelet by Celeste Starre @celestestarre

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THIS PAGE Olivia wears Dress by Show Me Your Mumu @showmeyourmumu Earrings & Bracelet by Celeste Starre @celestestarre

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THIS PAGE Olivia wears Dress by Show Me Your Mumu @showmeyourmumu Earrings & Bracelet by Celeste Starre @celestestarre Shoes by Le Clique by Kat Maconie “Bovina Heel” in gold Price: $215 Where to buy: KatMaconie.com 29 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03


Olivia wears Tee by Boyish @boyishjeans , Jeans by Show Me Your Mumu @showmeyourmumu Necklace by Nickho Rey @nickhorey , Earrings by Celeste Starre @celestestarre, Shoes by BC Footwear @bcfootwear


THIS PAGE Olivia wears Sweater by Boyish @boyishjeans, Skirt by Show Me Your Mumu @showmeyourmumu, Earrings by Ettika @ettika 32 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03


THIS PAGE Olivia wears Sweater by Boyish @boyishjeans, Skirt by Show Me Your Mumu @showmeyourmumu, Earrings by Ettika @ettika Shoes by Veerah @veerahofficial

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LAU R A

VANDERVOORT @superva nd ie @my s oultota kef ilm

W o m en S u p p o r t i n g W o m e n On our Spring cover shoot at the Win P l a c e Ho m e R e s c u e , a c t re s s , w r i t e r, p ro d u c e r a n d d i r e c t o r, L a u r a Va n d e r v o o r t , sat down to discuss her bold move to d i r e c t h e r f i r s t f i l m M y S o u l t o Ta k e . Wi t h 2 2 y e a r s i n t h e i n d u s t r y, s t a r r i n g in cult favorites like Smallville, Bitt e n , S u p e r G i r l , a n d V Wa r s . It t o o k the isolation of quarantine and the encouragement of strong talented female filmmakers for Laura to take the brave leap into a new chapter of storytelling and artistic expression.

PHOTOGR APHER: GLEN N NUTLE Y @THECONTENTCOLECTIVE MAKE UP: STE VI CHRISTI N E @NATUR ALLYBY HAIR : STEFAN IE TER ZO @STEFAN IE TER ZO ST YLIST: GABIEL L ANGEN BRU N N ER @L ANGY WOR DS BY : B EC DOY LE @B ECDOY LE_

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Laura wears White Dress by Alexis via @milkboutique, booties by Oscar Tiye

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THIS PAGE Laura wears Dress by Alexis via @milkboutique, Boots by Aldo

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“During the first quarantine I

was really in a dark place, depressed, I couldn't sleep, so I downloaded this sleep app and instead of helping me sleep it gave me the idea for this film,” Laura explains. She spent 13 days or so in quarantine writing the psychological thriller My Soul To Take that touches on a number of relevant themes, including isolation, depression, losing our individuality under the pressures of social media and the dark side of technology. “I think I lean more toward dark films, moody films, and real subject matter,” Laura adds. While a lot of her work as an actress has revolved around sci-fi and supernatural genres Laura admits it wasn’t a genre she was naturally drawn to, “I just kind of fell into it,” she says. Writing and producing her own content has served as a way to break away from the usual characters she portrays. “I think I just got to the point where I wanted more control, I wanted to control the content and the story I was telling.” Once Laura finished writing the script, she sent it to a group of predominantly female filmmakers, including Kim Derko and Jessica Petelle, whom she had previously worked with. Laura was genuinely surprised and elated when they all agreed to sign on. Laura had been inspired to direct, after working with director Jessica Petelle on the short film Age of Dysphoria, “She really encouraged me, along with other female directors that

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I spoke to, to step into that position and give it a try.” Laura adds, “I was so excited and also terrified, but overall I think it went really well. It really took a group of strong, empowered, intelligent, artistic, creative women to make me feel comfortable trying it.” Laura explains that it was only recently she began to work with female directors, and until experiencing that, had never thought it was something she could do, “I've only had 3 female directors, which blows my mind. And the fact that I didn't even realize because I hadn't seen it in front of me says a lot about the industry… the minute I worked with my first female director (Lee Rose) something clicked and I realized, why didn't I think that was a possibility for me?” Worried a lack of knowledge on the technical side of filmmaking would hold her back, Laura was reassured by her strong network that there are multiple ways to approach directing. As an ‘actors director’ and a ‘visual director', all her experience in front of the camera gave her the tools needed to understand the ‘actors’ language’ and needs. “It was instinct and also my DP kind of holding my hand. I would be able to visually tell her what I wanted, I'd even draw it out for her and she would tell me what lens that would need to be,” Laura explains. “I felt like my mind was on fire the entire time shooting, because I was constantly learning.” ►


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“I felt like my mind was on fire the entire time shooting, because I was constantly learning.”

THIS PAGE Laura wears Romper by Alexis via @milkboutique , Boots 42 & Jewels by Joy by Aldo M . C I TJewlery IZEN MAGAZINE Dravecky

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THIS PAGE Laura wears dress by Mr. Self-Portrait via @milkboutique and jewels by Joy Dravecky Jewlery

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THIS PAGE Laura wears dress by Mr. Self-Portrait via @milkboutique and jewels by Joy Dravecky Jewlery, Boots by Aldo 44 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03


THIS PAGE Laura wears Romper by LoveShackFancy & Jewels by Joy Dravecky Jewlery OPPOSITE PAGE Laura wears Dress by Mr. SelfPortrait via @milkboutique and jewels by Joy Dravecky Jewlery

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THIS PAGE Laura wears vegan leather top and pant by Nanushka via @milkboutique & jewels by Joy Dravecky Jewlery

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Working on a production during the pandemic meant the extra challenge of raising even more money to ensure all the safety and compliance protocols were met as well as the necessary Covid testing for cast and crew. “We did crowdfunding. I sold off all of my Smallville merchandise to fund the film. And our fans really showed up for us,” Laura explains. With the film currently in post-production, Laura reveals she just saw the first edit of the film yesterday, and shared some insight into the casting process. “Casting was actually the easiest part of the entire process,” Laura says. Envisioning Jenny Raven as Quinn, and good friend Rainbow Sun Francks as the Sandman/Narrator from the get go. For the role of Fred she explains; “I took a shot in the dark… I sent it to [Colm Feore] after working with him and he agreed. So for a first time female director to have someone of his calibre agree to be in your film, was incredible and terrifying.” Laura adds, “ I couldn’t have made this film overall if it weren’t for the talented cast, crew and producers in Canada. If I could list off every person who was crucial in the making of this film, it would fill up 3 pages. So thank you to my team for your creative eye, talents, hard work and support.”

And what's ahead for Laura? “Everything!” She says with a laugh. Her fearless and bold outlook is inspiring. After hearing how she pushed through her own fears and self doubt to create a film of such outstanding calibre, as her directorial debut, is even more inspiring. Laura remains grounded despite her huge accomplishments and widespread success, “I'm still in kindergarten in the director's chair. For now I think it's safer to direct my own little ideas and if I start to really fall in love with it, then maybe venture out and see if I can do other projects. But for now I still feel like I'm a fraud,” She laughs. Her self deprecating humor is both endearing and relatable. As women we need more role models like Laura, pushing the boundaries of societal and sometimes our own self-imposed limitations, to pave the way and break the mold. And what's even better is she was able to take this huge step in her career surrounded by a team of incredible female filmmakers, “They were right behind me, over my shoulder, giving me notes, supporting me and I couldn't have done it without them, and that's why I think women supporting each other in the industry and lifting each other up is so important,” she says with a smile. ▪

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“bvuiebvcou chuibcu v “I vuebvuabvuoa hv supporting think women uabvuio each vguavbhuavh other in the industry vubuohoasuichucuab” and lifting each other up is so

important”

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THIS PAGE Laura wears Dress by Alexis via @milkboutique, Rings by Joy Dravecky Jewlery

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Melissa Gisoni “Because Mom Said So” @melissagisoni

Words by Bec Doyle

Mellissa could never have imagined where her journey would lead after being approached by producer John Corella to audition for a show called “Just Dance”, which would go on to air as “Dance Moms”, on the Lifetime network 10 years ago. And what a journey it’s been! Now residing predominantly in LA, getting back to Pittsburgh for Christmas or summer vacation (prior to the pandemic), the self-professed once “clueless” dance mom has successfully navigated the industry for her daughters; rising stars Maddie and Kenzie Zeigler, using her motherly instinct and genuinely kind heart to guide them through.

they were like evil.. evil reality producers.” The show went on to air as ‘Dance Moms’, and quickly garnered a cult following, propelling the moms and the young dancers to stardom, and scrutiny, growing up in the public eye. Despite the somewhat overwhelming entrance into the entertainment industry for herself and her girls, Melissa admits she wouldn’t change a thing. “If I could rewind time I would still do it, because the girls wouldn’t be where they are today without the show.” Maddie,18, has appeared in numerous music videos for Sia, including the infamous video for “Elastic Heart” alongside Shia Labeouf. She is a New York Times Best Seller; and recently landed a role as one of “The Jets” in the upcoming Steven Spielberg screen adaptation of the classic broadway musical “West Side Story”, slated for release later this year. Kenzie, who graced the cover of our Winter Issue, has been forging her own identity in the industry at only 16 years old; launching a music career with the release of a slew of original tracks each garnering over 20 million views online; launching “Bubble” a skincare line developed by teens for teens; and recently appearing on FOX’s “The Masked Dancer” as ‘Tulip’.

“ The editing was so bad.. we used to get so mad at the producers because they were like evil.. evil reality producers.”

When first approached Melissa exclaims “We were Pittsburgh moms that were so clueless”. Production had originally planned on casting moms from around the country, but after seeing their audition tapes, they loved the group of Pittsburgh moms so much that they decided to focus the show around them. “They had us filming saying ‘my daughter’s the best’, you know all that fake stuff.” Admitting some naivety when it came to the entertainment industry, Melissa recalls “They kind of forced us into signing a contract, and we were like, wait what? But we never thought it was going to amount to anything.” They filmed 6 episodes of what was slated to be “Just Dance”, Melissa adds, “They told us what to do and what to say.. and we just did it.” Melissa explains aside from the premier episode that the whole cast watched together in Pittsburgh, she chose not to watch the show. “I could see on twitter how people thought I was like this woman who would do anything for my daughter to get a private… the editing was so bad.. we used to get so mad at the producers because 50 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03

Melissa credits their time on the show as the groundwork in preparing the girls for the demanding realities of life in the entertainment industry. “Those kids worked their butts off, and I think that is why they have such a good work ethic.” The girls were just 6 and 8 when they began filming Dance Moms and Melissa explains it was hard work, filming year round


THIS PAGE Melissa wears White tank top by Top Shop, denim jacket by AG, White jeans by Paige.

PHOTOGR APHER: GLEN N NUTLE Y @THECONTENTCOLECTIVE MAKE UP: MI NA ABR AMOKVIC @ABR AMOVICM HAIR : GLEN N NUTLE Y @GLEN N NUTLE Y ST YLIST: LI N DA MEDVEN E @LI N DAMEDVEN EST YLI NG _

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THIS PAGE Melissa wears Dress by Karina Grimaldi, Bracelets by Cartier. Whisper is wearing Hermes scarf. OPPOSITE PAGE Melissa wears White top by O’Neill Blue Jeans by Frame, Bracelets by Cartier, Necklace by Adina jewels

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“If I could rewind time I would still do it, cause the girls wouldn’t be where they are today without the show.”

“I just had no idea that that’s what happened, that they were boiled alive… so I have been responsible for the death of millions of little silkworms! So I thought I best right that wrong, and start learning. ”

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with barely any time off. “It was hard, these kids work so hard. The moms would take turns driving all the kids to school. They’d go to school from 8:30am - 12:30pm, then they would have lunch, then walk across the street to the studio, and us moms would meet them there. Then we would film till 4:30pm. Then the girls had to do dance till like 9:30pm or 10pm.” After 6 seasons working on Dance Moms, including a move out to LA, where production began filming in 2015, the girls expressed a desire to move on from the show. “My kids just one day said to me - I don’t want to do this anymore and I said ok.. They just were not happy anymore - and they wanted to pursue other things.” The ‘Dance Moms’ Cast forged lifelong friendships. Melissa laughs about a text she received from Brooke (Hyland) this morning, “We’re all like family” she says. And it’s no surprise given they embarked on this journey all together. “We’re really lucky to have o ne a n oth e r - a nd so ar e the kids.” Melissa and the “moms” Jill Vertes, Holly Frazier and Kelly Hyland, are so close they started their own podcast series “Because Mom Said So”, where they focus on various “light subjects” such as cooking and cleaning hacks, beauty secrets and episodes dedicated to answering fan questions. “It’s a lot more work than you think it is, but I enjoy the work.” With plans to take the podcast series on the road later this year, fans of the moms and their podcast will get a chance to participate in the live audience shows.

brings more of the business side of the industry, teaching them responsibility and scheduling, as well as an important focus on themes like body positivity. Melissa adds future plans could include a summer camp and performing arts academy. Beyond the entertainment industry and life in the public eye Melissa is a passionate humanitarian and animal advocate. “The organization that I’m really involved with is ‘My Friends Place”, it’s for the homeless youth in LA.” After Maddie and Kenzie presented Marne Levine (former COO of instagram), with an award at the “My Friends Place 30th Anniversary Gala”, Melissa and her girls got involved with the organization and began volunteering; serving meals every 3 weeks at their Hollywood location. “My Friend’s Place helps homeless youth have an address, so they can get a job, they also do job training, they teach them skills, they have counselling, showers and a store in the back so they can get clothing,” Melissa explains. “I love to do service work, it’s kind of my passion.” When you see Melissa interacting with all her animals, including Kenzie’s new rescue puppy Ivy, from the Labelle Foundation, and rescue bunnies, from ‘Little Horse on the Prairie’, you get a sense of just how big her heart is. With the pandemic bringing in-person volunteering to a halt at “My Friends Place”, Melissa began helping to feed the homeless every Sunday, with a group of other passionate individuals, by making hot meals and delivering them to people in need, “We’re feeding 125 people spaghetti tomorrow” she cheerfully adds.

“My kids just one day said to me - I don’t want to do this anymore - and I said OK.. They just were not happy anymore, and they wanted to pursue other things.”

Melissa has also begun filming with best friend BP Major in the Youtube series ‘Major Minors’, showcasing BP as he mentors the budding careers of Gia Pater and Danika Hemmer along with a growing cast of young talented performers. When it came to her involvement Melissa remarks “It just kind of happened.. BP is sooo incredible with the kids,” Melissa explains the different roles they take on as mentors, BP trains the young performers in acting, singing and dancing, while Melissa

With all the years Melissa dedicated to her children and developing their careers, it’s certainly time for this altruistic, fun-loving mom to enjoy all the opportunities on the horizon, as she and the other moms embark on the exciting new journey ahead. “You know we’ve been taking care of the kids and going to dance competitions for all these years, it’s time for the moms to do something too,” Melissa concludes affectionately. ▪ 55 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03


Brooklyn In

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n Retrograde P H OTO G R A P H E R : J E F F K R AV I T Z @J E F F K R AV I T Z P H OTO M O D E L : N I C O L E TA _VA C U LO V @N I C O L E TA _VA C U LO V M A K E U P A R T I S T: E R I K S M I T H W I C K @ E R I K S M I T H W I C K _ M A K E U PA R T I S T H A I R S T Y L I S T: PA I G E A C H K O V @ PA I G E AC H KO V S T Y L I S T: A N D R E A E D E L S T E I N @A N D R E A E D E L S T E I N

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In Blo o m PHOTOGR APHER : GLENN NUTLEY @THECONTENTCOLLEC TIVE MODEL : M ADISON HAUCK @M ADISONHAUCK M A K E - U P A R T I S T : B R I T TA N Y PA I G E L A M B E R T @PECKISME

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ENVIOUS LILLY Skin: Dior Airflash 203 / YSL touche eclat #1. Brows: K.A. True Feather Brow Marker and Gel Duo in brunette. Cheeks: Rituel De Fille- Inner Glow Creme in Delirium. Eyes: MUFE S-312 and ME-338. Lips: Rituel De Fille Enchanted Lip Sheer in Datura

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TWILIGHT HOUR Skin: Kevyn Aucoin sensual skin enhancer SX04 and MUFE Matte Velvet Skin Powder Y245. Cheeks: Hourglass Ambient Lighting in Surreal Effect. Eyes: MUFE Flash Palette custom mixed shade. Liner: K.A. The Precision Liquid Liner. Lashes: BM Deluxe Individual Range 10mm & 12mm. Lips: Burt’s 68 Bees Lip Gloss in Rosy Dawn

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HIBISCUS HONEY Skin: Kevyn Aucoin sensual skin enhancer SX04, YSL Touche Eclat #1. Brows: K.A. True Feather Brow Marker THIS PAGE Kenzie wears and Gel Duo in brunette Navy Sweater by Loro Mascara: K.A. Indecent Piana. Tights by Calvin Mascara. Eye and Cheek Klein. OPPOSITE PAGE Highlight: Rituel Del Fille Kenzie wears Shorts highlighter in The Sorcerer. and Jacket by Lexi. Grey Lips: YSL Rouge Pur Couture sweater by Celine. lipstick in Mystery Red

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SPRINGTIME SASS Skin: Dior Airflash 203 / YSL touche eclat #1. Brows: K.A. True Feather Brow Marker and Gel Duo in brunette. Eyes: K.A. The Pure Powder Glow Blush in Dolline. Lashes: BM Artist Delux Pro Range C 10mm C12mm. Lips: Rituel Del Fille Enchanted 70 Lip Sheer in Bloodroot

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B I O PURE

T he N ew & I m prove d Beautyble nder Words by Glenn Nutley

As a makeup and hairstylist who is primarily plant based, environmentally conscious and concerned with the sustainability of the products we use and consume in our day to day lives, it warms my heart when brands I love and have used for years, release new, even more sustainable products. Rea Ann Silva, creator and CEO of the Original Beautyblender and I first met in 2012 while working on X Factor together, she was working with L.A. Reid, and I was working with Britney Spears that season. It was during this time that she introduced me to the relatively new and revolutionary Beautyblender sponge which she created and I have been using it ever since!!

“The creation of Beautyblender itself is based on the pillars of sustainability.” Rea Ann said, “technology has advanced to where now we can create this product and make it 60% plant based, it has given me the opportunity to make that product… and bring up the issue of environmentally sound practices and sustainability again.. which has always been a part of Beautyblenders DNA”. Well thank you Rea Ann Silva, we are here for it.

The first generation Beautyblender is more environmentally friendly in itself, prior to this product makeup artists saw makeup sponges as single use and disposable, having a constant supply which we would throw out after each client. Until the Beautyblender came along and with proper washing, cleansing and sanitizing, can be used for a long time… But now Rea Ann has revolutionized the industry once again, releasing the new Bio Pure incarnation of the original sponge. This plant based beauty is made of 60% sugar cane which is a renewable and ethically sourced resource. Even the canister packaging is made from 100% recycled material, creates less water waste and off-setts CO2 emissions, making your favorite makeup staple more sustainable than ever. 71 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03


Up-leveling Likes

Words By Elisabeth Hower

A stran ger s en t me a di r e ct me ssa g e t o suggest I find a “real nice photographer” because the images on my Instagram wall didn’t do me “justice.” Before I go on, clock your initial reaction to this comment. Got it? I had a few in rapid succession, but my very first was fascinating: I felt guilty. I had let him down. What photos was he looking at? And were they disappointing? Was I? My mind reeled as I scrambled to see what was so offensive he decided to take the time to tell me that I’m not as pretty as he thought I was.

that’s taught him women are most valued for their beauty; a woman that isn’t showcasing that always is actually doing self- harm. His intention was to encourage me to display my physical appearance with confidence, to, “share it with the world,” when he’s actually saying I’ve fallen short of the standards he has for me. Which is a shame because if o nl y I m e t t h e m I m ig h t h a v e mor e … attention? money? career heights? Where was my gratitude for him saving me from myself?

“Haven’t we yet learned that it’s ridiculous to suggest the most important attribute a woman holds is her beauty?”

Frustratingly for my inner feminist, upon first glance at my recent posts, I agreed with him. This stranger had enjoyed my performance on a television show in which I wore lingerie in a few scenes, and in which I had a professional hair, make-up, and lighting team working for my benefit. As I recall, one of the wardrobe assistants was on “nipple duty” due to the silicone cutlets placed strategically beneath my breasts, pushing them up more than Victoria ever thought possible. Because I had presented that way once or twice, did that mean I had to… always? It reminded me of a documentary I watched that followed two women pursuing plastic surgery to, quite literally, look like their FaceTuned selves. They didn’t want to meet those they’d met online in person until they were “corrected,” for fear of not being accepted. One of them opted for a non-surgical route using fillers that will absorb and need to be replaced every 4-6 months… at anywhere from $500-1000 a pop. It’s clear the man that wrote me did not understand the implications of his words, nor does he understand the culture 72 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03

Until recently, I might have swallowed my reaction. Kept silent. Absorbed it and the accompanying shame. Thankfully, the increasing volume of women’s voices the last few years have made it abundantly clear how out of date these kinds of comments are. We’re no longer letting things slide. We’re finally, consistently, saying, “F%&#! ENOUGH.” I didn’t need to explain anything to my female friends, I simply relayed the message. Some of my “woke” male friends, however, still labeled it “innocuous.” So many of us still, including myself to a large degree, are completely unaware of the culture of consumption that creates these types of thoughts in the first place, let alone the sense of entitlement to share them with a complete stranger. Haven’t we yet learned that it’s ridiculous to suggest the most important attribute a woman holds is her beauty? And that it’s equally egregious to submit that if she doesn’t highlight that to the fullest extent, she’s missing an opportunity to be VALUED? According to his comment, to do myself “justice” — in other words, according to Google, “to perform as well as one is able to” (in life? as an actress? a


woman?) requires leaning into the most conventional and commercially accepted ideas of beauty that I can squeeze into, and also purports that’s what I want people to most value about me. Forget everything else. Best to curate (censor) myself. Best to find a photographer who can light me perfectly. Hide the rest away, unfit for my wall. Unfit for consumption. Why would I do myself the disservice of posting simply when I’m happy? When I feel beautiful? Or silly, or vulnerable, or messy? That’s not on-brand, I suppose… It seems there’s never a moment wherein women are allowed to rest the standards of beauty to which we’re often forced to ascribe in order to be “successful” in life. If I can’t go through a day without make up now, during a pandemic, when life has been fully and utterly disrupted, then when? We live in a world both of deep disconnection to each other and our real value, as well as being deeply, intimately connected to the culture that tells us we are not enough.

and don’t go outside unless you’ve #fixedit. Otherwise we’ll be disappointed in you and withhold the rewards we’ve promised you. And, by the way, if you are aesthetically appealing, regardless of the effort required, there’s a great possibility we won’t take you seriously, because after all, you’re just so pretty. A few weeks ago I was playing tourist for a day with a friend in Solvang, California. A tiny, Danish-inspired wine destination. Strolling by a beauty supply shop, a sales rep, we’ll call him Johnny, offered free samples of a “lifechanging” cream. Sure it was likely snake oil, but what the hell. And then suddenly, undeterred by my mask, his unwashed hands were touching my skin, applying a potion of which I knew none of the ingredients. He told me I’m beautiful, but “could be so much more,” all the while I just stood there, feeling wildly uncomfortable, wondering why on earth I didn’t back away. (Any woman reading this knows: because we’re taught to be polite. Wasn’t I over that by now?) “Don’t you want to look twenty-two?” Johnny asked rhetorically, holding the shiny red bottle of self-esteem, a commodity, easy to purchase. “You know, Johnny,” I said finally, stepping away, “I’m all full up on my worth. But thank you.” Not knowing what else to do, he simply offered, “Uh… have a good day.” And you know? I really did. ▪

“ We live in a world both of deep disconnection to each other and our real value, as well as being deeply, intimately connected to the culture that tells us we are not enough.”

Before you say, “just ignore messages like this, don’t look at them,” consider this: it’s impossible. The messaging about how women are treated based on their looks, youth, sex appeal is as pervasive to our days as the air we breathe. Be beautiful, but let us imagine that’s how you wake up. Be perfect,

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I Got Me Back

“I lost who I thought I was. I let my old self die with my relationship. Who I am now is a woman who is black, speaks freely, and is mentally liberated.” B y Jos eph ine Coisco u For as long as I can remember I was chasing a life that I thought I was meant for, one where I was based in NYC and had the dream job and the apartment with the man I love just like any other woman. The problem with this was that I was basing it off of being with the man I loved. There’s nothing wrong with being in love or caring deeply for someone as long as it’s done with a clear mind. I now realize I don’t want to be madly in love anymore because it’s not just an expression, at least not for me. I allowed the love to consume me and my life. I used it as a starting point for everything I wanted for myself and I made him my life. Just like most women, I pictured our wedding day and our life together, but I didn’t have those thoughts for myself. I then realized I was giving up any possibility of exploring the world and having lifechanging experiences with people in a place I’d never thought of on my own. I made his life my life. I became the maid, the lover, and the wanna-be wife as if I was trying to prove why I’m the one. I was auditioning. I did all of this without really getting very much in return because I let love consume me so hard. I was literally blinded by love. I was in so deep that the thought of losing him at any moment was unbearable. I realized why wasn’t I more scared to lose myself? It’s now that I’ve grieved the end of the relationship, after five years, that I’ve taken the time to really get to know myself. And I’ve accomplished more than I could’ve ever imagined. As a black woman, having it all is not something that comes easily. We have to work twice as hard to be taken seriously at work and just as hard to be treated properly in our romantic encounters. The healing process of my relationship is the best thing that could’ve ever happened to me because it brought me back to me. As a black woman in my 20s, I

realized I need to live my life for myself. I’ve learned to embrace my black beauty and love myself, my self-esteem has reached a new high and continues to rise. I’ve been angry and I’ve cried. Now I laugh. I smile. I engage. I breathe. I have sex. I am liberated now more than ever. I lost who I thought I was. I let my old self die with my relationship. Who I am now is a woman who is black, speaks freely, and is mentally liberated. I wouldn’t say it was a religious experience but the next best thing, I would call it an epiphany. I had what I would call a moment of clarity once I woke up. I’d reached my peak in my healing process. I started trying things that seemed interesting to me. I remembered I’m still young and I have so much to look forward to. I started wearing new clothes, gave my natural hair some TLC, and experimented with wigs and locs and other hairstyles. It hit me how much I forgot to love myself for so long. I know it can be difficult to pull yourself out of the dark and think why should I even bother? I say do it because you’re still here. You were put on this earth in this lifetime for a purpose. Your existence matters. You are a treasure. Think about things that give you passion or make you feel calm, centered, and at peace. Whether it’s painting, music, dancing/singing, exercise, movies, etc. Anything that lights you up. As black women, we’re born with a fire in our souls. We’re a powerful being full of beauty. Always remember, you are black girl magic. You are a flame that can’t be extinguished. Find one thing that brings you peace and joy at the same time. Mine is being in the sunlight.Sunlight gives you a boost within. Pick a song that makes you relaxed, happy, or in a good mood. Play the song and stand in the sun. This is the best thing I could’ve done. I chose the song Toast by Koffee. Find solace in prayer and meditation. Find peace, connect with your soul. Remember, you are a Goddess. You are a Queen. You are radiant. You must find love and happiness within you. Embrace every inch of you inside and out. Embrace the fire in your spirit. ▪ 75 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03


How COVID-19 Transformed The Fitness Industry For Good

By Scott Ashley

2020 was a year that the world will remember as one of the most unpredictable and cinematic years of our time. Covid-19 was a global attack on human health, mentally and physically pushing people to look at their worlds differently. Every type of industry was affected. Many were negatively hit and others thrived. My industry for the past 9 years has been focused inside the h ea lth and fitne ss w o r ld an d I hav e s e e n a huge development during this time and Covid-19 accelerated some of the c h a nges . Historically we would buy health and fitness magazines, books, videos and dvd’s. Then the internet offered us blogs, downloadable fitness plans and YouTube became a source of free education and motivation. This was quickly followed by Instagram. Health a nd fi tn es s cont e n t w as b e i n g po ste d by professionals and enthusiasts from all over the world, every second of everyday, and this trend has skyrocketed due to the pandemic. Many people were no longer commuting to work with global lockdowns and furloughs. Many were forced to stay home unless they had an essential work role, with the exception of f o od s hoppin g an d o ut do o r e xe r c is e . Gyms were closed, so the only exercise people could do was outside or in their homes . O n li n e f i t n e ss e xpl o d e d . People were now looking to fill their free time and find ways to feel good again, and many people championed online 76 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03

health guru’s to help them through t h e s e s t ra ng e a nd t e s t ing t im e s. We sa w a dramatic increase in outdoor running, which was something I personally was e x c it e d t o s e e . R u nning h a s a l w a ys be e n such a mental release for me. If I’m tired, stressed or feeling low I know a 30 m inu t e ru n wil l s o l v e it a l l . I have gone from someone who travelled day to day, from client to client at private residences, to then working on camera from my studio in L o nd o n. W o rk ing w it h c l ie nt s ove r se a s, in all different time zones. I believe as the world begins to open up, life will resume, people will return to the gym and enjoy the social aspect that gyms bring to people’s lives. However there will also be those who have loved digital fitness, taking group classes on zoom and instagram live workouts. With this new demand, it means that fitness professionals have new opportunities to build online platforms and create new financial revenue streams. In my opinion, everyone should get outside if possible. Absorb vitamin D, fill your lungs with fresh air and enjoy the benefits nature has to offer. We are social beings who thrive off interaction from others, so I hope that although the online fitness world has taken off, people will still find the time and motivation to be at gyms, pools, parks and sporting activities. It is these places we meet new people, exercise social skills and create necessary positive changes for our mental health. ▪


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L O ’ S K I T C H E N @loskitchen5

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RAINBOW ‘SPRING’ ROLLS

1 Pack of rice paper 1 avocado

1. Prepare all your vegetables and cut into thin strips 2. Wet the rice paper quickly by submerging it in a big bowl of water. Take it out and place on a glass plate, if you use a wooden board it will stick 3. Load your vegetables in the middle of the rice paper, careful not to overload them

2 carrots

Half a cucumber

Half a red pepper

6-8 asparagus spears

Small bunch of cilantro

4. Wrap your rolls like a burrito bringing in the sides until fully rolled up 5. Cut in half and stand the rolls up on a board “For the dipping sauce I do a comb ination of GF soy sauce, sesame oil and rice wine vinegar. Sweet chilli or peanut sauce also work great with these rolls.” Lo

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SWEET PEA & ASPARAGUS

200g of Spaghetti Handful of frozen peas 5 asparagus spears 1 white onion 2 garlic cloves Olive oil Fresh parsley 3 Tbs vegan cream cheese Half a lemon

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VEGAN CARBONARA

1. Chop your onion, garlic and asparagus 2. Heat your boiling water and boil your pasta till al dente 3. In a pan heat up a few tbs of olive oil and saute your onion and garlic till soft 4. Next add your frozen peas asparagus and the juice of half a lemon. Cook a few minutes till the veg is cooked through 5. When your pasta is ready, drain and add the remaining ingredients together, mix well and add 3tbs of the vegan cream cheese 6. Remove from the heat and plate up 7. Top with grated lemon zest and fresh parsley

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VEGAN COCONU In 4 Easy Steps 1. Pre heat your oven to 375f and line a metal baking sheet with parchment paper 2. Mix all your ingredients together in a bowl till combined 3. With your hand form small balls about 1tbs of mixture and place on the baking tray. 4. Bake for 20 mins until the edges start to brown

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T MACAROONS

2 cups of desiccated shredded coconut 1⁄2 cup of coconut milk 2 tsp of coconut oil 1⁄4 corn starch 1 tsp of almond essence 2 tbs of sugar

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S pecialt y Spr ing Cockta il

Ube Gin Fizz

by @CaliCraftCocktails

1 oz lemon juice 3/4 oz simple syrup 3 tbs aquafaba powder (vegan egg white) 2 oz gin top with soda ube float

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For our Spring Cocktail M. Citizen Magazine once again turned to the professionals at Cali Craft Cocktails. And they did not dissapoint with this floral inspired delicious Ube Gin Fizz. Cali Craft Cocktails is a mobile bartending company specializing in high-end, hand-crafted cocktails. All their drinks are made fresh onsite with premium, organic ingredients and nothing artificial. They have provided the bar at over 500 weddings, plus countless corporate gigs and private parties. And the best part; they bring everything to fit out the bar area including the bar itself, back bar, shelving, everything right down to the trash cans! An all inclusive, white glove service. In the wake of Covid-19, Cali Craft Cocktails have taken the pandemic very seriously and upon opening back up, have implemented the following protocols to keep your friends and family safe: Covid-19 Measures They are taking the following precautions to combat Covid-19 transmission: •

Temperatures taken before and during shift;

FDA approved food handling gloves;

Regular sanitizing;

Face masks.

Covid-19 Assurances And If you have to cancel or postpone your event date, your deposit is fully transferrable to another date within the next two years. They can also arrange for on-site Covid-19 testing before your event for $20pp, fingerprick tests, with results within 2-5 minutes.

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SP OT L IGH T : FEMA LE POWE Words By Clementine Heath Photo by Whitney Pieper @DeCastellaneCreative

Introducing the mega-powerhouse Bronwyn Jones. Her career reflects a lifetime of commitment to sustainability and wellness, internationally recognized as a global advisor, Jones masterfully navigated her way through mostly male dominated terrain with class, thoughtfulness and poise. She is the Founder, President and CEO of Coral Sustainable Services, and a luxury agent at Compass Real Estate, in Newport Beach.

Q . What does being an Empowered Woman mean to you?

A . A woman that has compassion, grace and

class, yet isn’t afraid to speak her mind and walk in her truth no matter who or what she’s up against. She is a woman who wants to make the world a better place and who makes that part of her life’s work.

Hailing from the golden sandy shores of Bondi Beach in Sydney, Australia, after many years in a small pond, Jones took the leap internationally. A beautiful woman with a business brain, she navigated her way through an industry dominated by men, she skillfully carved out a path for her own ambitions, passions and pursuits. Integrating knowledge acquired over the years from her consulting work in greentech, wellness, and sustainable innovations, her passion for the planet and humanity always at the forefront.

Q . Who are some empowering women you

Jones founded Coral Sustainable Services in 2013, providing strategic consulting and business acceleration services for Greentech, Sustainability and Wellness companies; emphasizing cross-border industry in Australia, New Zealand, Asia Pacific India, China, and the United States. Not one to be pigeonholed, Jones expanded her already impressive resume to include real estate joining the exclusive team of luxury agents at Compass Real Estate in early 2020, a real estate consulting firm with a focus on sustainability.

who?

Name: Bronwyn Leigh Jones Hometown: Sydney, Australia Occupation: Founder and CEO of Coral Sustain Services and Luxury Agent at Compass Real Estate, Newport Beach. Currently Residing: Newport Beach and Los Angeles 86 M. CITIZEN MAGAZINE | ISSUE 03

admire?

A. Journalist Christian Amanpour and Oprah

Winfrey. Sarah Blakely (Spanx inventor), Elle Macpherson and Paris Hilton I admire for their entrepreneurial achievements. They are all incredible business women that have created brands for themselves while also inspiring and empowering other women.

Q . Best advice anyone ever gave you, and from A . “Don’t try to do too many things in one day. Choose the three highest priority tasks and do them well to completion.” - The Effective Executive.

Q. Biggest lesson you’ve learned throughout your career?

A . Don’t always assume people have the best intentions just because you do.

Q . Biggest challenge you overcame to lead you on your successful path?

A.

I stopped comparing myself to other women in my field. I’m very vast with my interests and skill sets, and over the years I’ve learned to stop trying to fit into the boxes that I thought I needed to fit into. I’ve learned that I don’t need to label myself career wise. It’s ok


RHO US E B RON W YN J ONES

@bronwynleighjones

to use all of your talents if it can add value to someone or move a project forward, as long as there is focus and direction. I like to be of service to others and humanity. That’s why I started a diverse consulting firm eight years ago. My firm has since morphed and grown into different industries over the years because I have grown with different interests and passions.

Q. Best advice you can offer to any woman wanting to be a risk taker and follow their own dreams and ambitions, even if that means starting over?

A. Surround yourself with people who want

you to succeed and who lift you up. Believe in yourself and support your dreams and goals, and walk away from the people who don’t, as hard as it may be. I always say that if people aren’t laughing at your goals and dreams then your goals aren’t big enough! Surround yourself with people with integrity aligned with the values you uphold. And don’t ever be afraid to ask for help.

Q. What is an essential part of the process to becoming successful and continued growth?

A . Have a really good mentor! Especially if

you’re a woman. Women need a mentor, and that doesn’t mean it has to be another woman. Mentors are vital. It’s also important to recognize that mentors will change over the years throughout your career as your career evolves. Two of my current mentors are Kacey Taormina, my team leader at Compass (Newport Beach), and Jason Oppenheim from the Netflix TV series Selling Sunset.

Q . What insightful books do you recommend?

A . The life you were born to live - Dan

Millman, Power vs Force Stephen Hawking, The 10 X rule - Grant Cardone

Q . Final words of wisdom? A . Keep going and keep

moving and hope the Universe has your back. Resilience, good karma, be trustworthy, have integrity with everything you do… it pays off in the end. ▪

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M. Citizen Magazine Issue 3 Spring 2021  

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