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MARTIN SMITH SELECTED WORKS 2

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A rule-based drawing, created with graphite and stencil for GD1 studio, aggregates a single unit until a new, branching-out pattern emerges.


table of contents

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THE SOLAR GROTTO

2

Montessori school - puerto rico

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marsception competition

4

the iron cradle

5

diagenesis pavilion


the solar grotto Fall 2019 studio, led by Victor Pechaty, was tasked with designing a flexible office space for a site located in the Warehouse District of Minneapolis, MN. Working off the idea that "form-accommodates-function," students were given freedom to explore generative design ideas based on site analysis or a conceptual agenda. The only major requirement was 70K sqft allotted to office space program. Curiosities from the beginning of the semester (see the "Diagenesis Pavilion") stuck with me when giving this building a geologically-derived name; however, the first generative idea I explored was actually related to the constrained mixing of pedestrians that occurs inside the skyway system downtown. This led me to the idea of creating a "public courtyard" which occurs on the 3rd floor (approximately the same elevation as the skyway across the street). Daylight factor analyses in Ladybug helped me study various skylight configurations for getting daylight down into the "courtyard," which led to a synthesis of ideas: an illuminated biophilic atrium could serve as the primary "mixing device," with the top level acting as it's final destination (a greenhouse). The geometry of the "solar cloak" (black BIPV modules), perhaps aiding in the hiddendiscoveries-lie-within factor, was created with an algorithm that optimizes a roof for maximum solar gain.

A narrative-driven biophilic experience for a public facing flexible workplace


PUBLIC OFFICE MIXING

Mixing Floors

A

C

a

B

3

A

D

a

5

E

a

8 A. small office B. public "courtyard" C. restaurant D. coffee shop + public deck E. greenhouse


Solaxess BIPV modules galvanized steel sheeting 3" corrugated steel deck w-flange girder (W23x55 typ.) alum. extrusion & fireproofing 6" continuous batt insulation vapor barrier 6" metal stud BIPV module clips 24"x28" concrete girder (typ.) 24"x34" concrete girder (atyp.)

a


MINNEAPOLIS SOLAR POTENTIAL MAP

circle sizes and colors associated with rooftop square footage

If outfitted with a rooftop solar array as shown, the parking ramp "C" could trade power with the Solar Grotto; a "sustainable rider" free parking program could also incentivize workers to drive electric vehicles. In order for the office space to operate during "off-hours," an array of large batteries will need to be charged daily; a multi-mode inverter (as shown) could either transfer the energy or push it back into the grid.


montessori school - puerto rico Our Spring 2018 studio, led by Jacob Mans, focused on a real world adaptive reuse project in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico. We visited the site during spring break, where we were able to take measurements of the existing building, perform a site analysis, and meet our "client" - Soammy Acevedo, founder of the Fundacion Superheroes non-profit. After interviewing her in person and asking programmatic questions, we took on the task of designing a 5-classroom montessori school for children with autism and special needs. The studio was split into two groups; I was part of the building group, working alongside James Goman, Whitney Zeibel, and Kaitlin DeAngelis. As the subject of this studio was climate resilience, our group decided we needed to take a multi-purpose approach that not only tied together program, but also sustainable design strategies. We decided our design should incoporate plenty of flexible space and should leave ample room for future growth. These guidelines, formed early on, inherently forced us to work together as a team to accomplish a system of design moves that are well connected to each other and form a coherent circulation. Sustainability strategies sometimes took the lead, such as when creating an open-air lobby for passive ventilation. They also fell into place; rainwater catchment on the 2nd floor overhang could provide a graywater system for the outdoor classroom garden nooks and bathrooms directly below.

Climate resilient school for children with autism and disabilities

The final model, made with insulating foam (base), newspaper, gesso paint, foam core and spackle (model), spray paint, balsa wood, dowels, and saplings. I was responsible for designing and modeling the front elevation shutters and planter system, as well as the 2nd floor expansion.


SOLAR ARRAY & BATTERY STORAGE

INTEGRATED SHUTTER SYSTEM & SHADED WALKWAYS

PASSIVE VENTILATION

admin / lobby

therapies

GRAYWATER SYSTEM

cafeteria

classrooms

bathrooms

maintenance


A

B

A

B


ANNUAL WIND STUDY

Ground Floor

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3

6

9

12 15 18 21 24 26 28 30

2nd Floor

UNIVERSAL THERMAL CLIMATE INDEX

Ground Floor

F⁰ <68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 >81

2nd Floor


marsception competition In eager anticipation of the AA Jordan summer workshop in June 2018, which focused on urban-scale Martian habitats, I submitted a design to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marsceptionâ&#x20AC;? competition hosted by the magazine Volume Zero. With the objective to create a Martian habitat for 5+ astronauts, a hexagon form was divided into compact modules - small enough to be delivered as cargo in the SpaceX BFR spaceship. Taking a research-based approach, I reached out to planetary mapping scientist Mateusz Pitura, who created a website for the Hebrus Valles exploration zone. He shared some high-res satellite imagery and guided my decision to use the JMARS (Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing) software for downloading Mars 3D topography. Mateusz, along with other NASA researchers, believe that building habitats inside of craters could help to avoid a lot of direct radiation and strong winds. Placing a structure at least partially underground would also boost energy efficiency, as below-ground temperatures are warmer. The final bit of research-related design, which prompted the hexagon core module's "nostalgia chamber," is concerning astronaut psychological health. NASA has a full team of behavioral scientists whose objective is to lessen the mental impact of space travel's I.C.E. (isolated, confined, and extreme) environment.

Research-based design project exploring modular habitats for Mars


Desired future (+5 years)

Main base (project goal)

Drone-built foundation (-2 years)


Radiation Shielding Cladding

foundation

nostalgia

mech.

bedrooms

Internal Structure

sanitation

airlock

kitchen

living

Insulation & Airtight Layer

research

farming

storage

biosupport flex space


The nostalgia chamber, which sits on the top floor of the core module, features integrated holographic technology that can alter elements within the room to match the chosen vernacular architecture of astronauts' home countries.

Longitudinal Section


the Iron cradle For our final project in Fall 2018 studio, led by Gayla Lindt and Chris Wingate, students were tasked with conducting a site analysis for a plot of land in the industrial neighborhood of Northeast Minneapolis, on the corner of 14th Ave and Quincy St. I was particularly interested in exploring the freight train and the railroad tracks that run parallel to the site, as well as the non-building, purely functional geometry that surrounds the site and creates industrial-like conditions (water towers, brewery distillery tanks, and grain elevators). Through exploratory diagrams, I studied two eatery precedents that involved passing through extra program (e.g. rooftop bar located on top of a hotel) before arriving at your destination. My design proposal’s “program+,” which was required for the project, is a seedbank; this includes a large four story chamber filled with cryopreservation tanks (seed vaults filled with liquid nitrogen). Guests enter the building from across the railroad tracks, where a tunnel entrance protrudes out of the ground and leads them to the lowest floor, deep underground. The essence of the architecture is an extended entry sequence through a monumental space which rewards users with multiple big moment, framed views.

An extended entry sequence through a monumental space

The render, top of next page, shows a framed view of the seed vaults that guests will experience via a transparent elevator shaft as they make a gradual ascent from deep underground to the top floor, where the eatery is located.


Ground Floor (Service Entry)

Longitudinal Section (A)

Eatery Main Floor

Eatery Top Floor (Entry)


diagenesis pavilion We kicked off Victor Pechaty's Fall 2019 studio with a 4-week pavilion project; after studying precedents of our choosing from the Serpentine Galleries and MoMa PS1 winners, we were asked to create our own siteless pavilion based on a generative idea. My project's geological theme perhaps began early-on when I was building rough study models with clay and cardboard, which were very landscape focused. Simultaneously, I worked on a script in Rhino's visual programming tool, Grasshopper, which involves an "attractor" (a curve geometry in this case) which pulls shapes towards it, gradually morphing them as the "force" (a multiplier) becomes larger. A confluence of ideas occured when the earthy physical modeling of "soil walls" met with the computational morphing of "digital walls." Realizing that the primary driver of this pavilion would be a hidden force underground that causes a field of walls to mutate over time, I did some additional research into geological processes and found that suffosion (the scientific term for sinkhole formation) can slowly cause sand and clay-rich soils to cave in. The process of diagenesis, which refers to sediment gradually hardening as mineral crystals cement grains together, explains why the walls become sediment-rich and thicker towards the center of the sinkhole.

Hidden geological processes gradually morph and amalgamate a field of walls


Void formation begins

Soil and walls washing into cave

sandy soil

clay-rich soil

limestone

Cave creates fissures and "soil walls"


w-flange columns hidden in larger walls

steel tube framing "roof" structure

concrete foundation walls & monolithic slabs

100 years

500 years

2500 years

12,500 years

Profile for m.archsmith

Martin Smith - 2020 Portfolio  

linkedin.com/in/martin88smith | smi00680@umn.edu | 703-999-5807

Martin Smith - 2020 Portfolio  

linkedin.com/in/martin88smith | smi00680@umn.edu | 703-999-5807

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