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michael anh-vu nguyen selected portfolio pages


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This is a selection of works from the Undergraduate Program at UIUC School of Architecture [2008-2012]. [cover art] Parkour as a means of experiencing our physical landscape


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table of contents Krannert Quad

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Bronzeville Infill

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Chicago-LaSalle

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Energy Sciences Building

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Re-Thinking Shanghai

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Creative RĂŠsumĂŠ

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1 krannert quad project type Academic site Quad between Records Building and Spurlock Museum, Urbana, IL studio Landscape, Fall 2010 professor Therese Tierney

Our studio was responsible for proposing landscape interventions on a site which is currently a graded and level quad. The site resembles a “quad,” as it is flanked by buildings to the north, east, and south. Krannert Center for the Performing Arts sits across the street from the site. The programmatic functions of the buildings provided the motivation for creating an outdoor performance venue as the intervention. Our analysis revealed that the buildings – a museum, alumni center, administrative center, and performing arts center – all benefited from a proposed outdoor venue. The image of an outdoor venue also became an extension of the Krannert complex. The volume of the landscape intervention

descends lower and lower into the site, borrowing the language of the Krannert steps that connect the street to its entrance doors. The proposal included a stage stairway to allow for cross-circulation in the intervention. This cut, layer, and fold process created the below-grade form that allowed for the intervention to preserve the visual axis of the quad, allowing all buildings to remain connected to one another above ground.


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RECORDS BUILDING

ALICE CAMPBELL ALUMNI CENTER

LEVIS FACULTY CENTER SPURLOCK MUSEUM

SPURLOCK MUSEUM

RETENTION “POND”

RETAINING WALLS 11’ O.C.

10’ TERRACE

6” STEP; 1’ AT SIDE AISLES


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solution

The physical landscape resembles a palimpsest language written on a paper that we can erase and modify over time. How about modifying the paper itself? Can we cut, layer, and fold the landscape?

1. CUT

2. LAYER

3. FOLD

DRAINING PIPE

[1” = 13’] LONGITUDINAL SECTION


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2 bronzeville infill type Academic site 3673 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive Bronzeville Neighborhood, Chicago, IL studio Urban Studio, Spring 2012 professor Joy Malnar

Before our site visit to Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood, we had researched the history of the area and had discovered its rich and affluent history. We saw an opportunity to revitalize the original character of the neighborhood with our infill proposals. One of my first studies of the area was a façade study, which visually allowed me to define the height, scale, and proportionality of my proposal. Consequently, I opted for a “base, middle, top” format. Regarding materiality, I intended to reflect the area’s predominant usage of stone and brick masonry through a concrete structure with horizontal light strips. Usage of concrete echoed the qualities of mass and color of the adjacent residences.

Perhaps the greatest challenge of my infill proposal, not unlike other infill projects, was the ability to channel natural light deep into the core of the structure. I had achieved this through light wells, which were strategically placed and oriented following solar studies. The light wells also acted spatial buffers – patios that served as transitions from public to private areas within the residences. Meanwhile, the front façade makes use of louvers which doubled as light shelves, ultimately suggesting lower usage and cost of artificial lighting.


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Upon arriving at our infill site, we noticed that the neighborhood had submitted to an eclectic overtone; the residences of Adler and Sullivan’s time were either well-kept or in blighted condition.

NORTH ELEVATION

3’

9‘

21‘

WEST ELEVATION


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ht shelf

lig louver as

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DR.

REFLECTIVE

JUN 20, NOON

CO ATI NG

DN

DEC 21, NOON

e sk

th s on

y

eye

eye s

3’

9‘

21‘

SOUTH ELEVATION

3’

9‘

21‘

EAST ELEVATION

on t

he s

tree t


12 21‘

9‘

3’

N

DN

GREEN RF

D W TUB DN

UP DN

3RD LVL

3rd

UP

UP DN

DN

2 LVL ND

2nd

DN

UP DN

DN

DN UP

1ST LVL

UP

TUB

W

D

UP

UP UP

GARDEN LVL


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UPPER UNIT LIGHT WELL

MODEL IMAGES

LONGITUDINAL [E-W] SECTION 1/2” = 12’

GARDEN LVL


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3 chicago-lasalle type Academic site Northeast Corner Lot of Chicago Avenue & La Salle Boulevard studio Urban Studio, Spring 2012 professor Joy Malnar

As a corner lot in Chicago’s Near North Side, our design studio encountered a delicate opportunity to create a mid-rise, mixed-use structure. Extensive site analysis enlightened me of the diverse language and context of the area. As I crafted the intervention, not only did I intend to capitalize on the characteristics afforded by a corner lot, but also to preserve and represent an image of Chicago with my proposal. The structure represents an integration of the two predominant building typologies of the neighborhood – 1 to 2-story commercial structures, and residential high-rises. Thus, my proposal features a modified version of the classical “base, middle, top” architecture – reminiscent of

Chicago’s 20th century high-rises. Responding to the construction materiality of the area also proved challenging. I had observed that the majority of buildings visible from our site consisted of brick masonry, with concrete foundations that carried textures of strength and history. In light of this, the façade of my proposed intervention reflects a brick herringbone pattern; though instead of brick, structural concrete was used. The façade forms the exoskeleton structure of the building, but also echoes the building’s composition from façade to core, as I had discovered a way to arrange the units and structure of the building to once again speak to the materiality and form of masonry.


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SITE [LOOKING EAST]


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+60’

1 Scale of base

defined by average cornice heights and setbacks of adjacencies

1 12’ wide “bricks”

as determined by minimum width of average room

2

+

3 Pedestrian circulation

4 Maximize SW views,

3 Combine volumes

4 Rotate edge “bricks”

Combine scales of residential + commerical typologies

2 What if units could be arranged with the same process as laying herringbone bricks?

commercial exposure, and solar gain of base

and continue stacking on next side


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REF.

REF.

TYPICAL RESIDENTIAL FLR

lower flr unit

[above] anatomy of 2-bed unit

N


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6

5

1

UP

2 1ST FLR PLAN

4

7

3

8

9

N 1. 2. 3. 4.

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ramp to parking bike + storage room resident + office tenant lobby elevator + mail lobby

NE APPROACH

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5. 6. 7. 8.

mechanical equipment trash + loading zone trash chute commercial build-out space

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9. bus stop on chicago ave. 10. bus stop on lasalle blvd. 11. property line + adj building 12. sidewalk


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+218’

6) residential, +60’ 5) “rec deck”, +48’ 4) office, +36’ 3) office, +24’ 1) commercial, +0’

[top] 1ST FLR PLAN, 1/4”=12’ [bottom] W. ELEVATION, 1/4”=12’


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[left] SOUTH ELEVATION, 1/4”=12’ [right] EAST-WEST SECTION, 1/4”=12’


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4 energy sciences building type Academic site 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 studio Capstone Design, Summer 2012 professor Dr. Michael Kyong-il Kim team members ESB design team of HDR, Jenna Joo, Michael Nguyen Audrey Lin, Lauren Sutherland role Generating digital models, perspective drawings, renderings, animations, spatial diagrams, and study models.

Our capstone studio had the opportunity to work with professional designers, who played the roles of “expert consultant” and “client.” These professionals come from the design team responsible for the physical building that stands on this site today - the Energy Sciences Building [ESB] of Argonne National Laboratory [ANL]. We experienced firsthand the programmatic and financial parameters in a primarily client-driven project. The ANL administration expressed a desire to create a new “face” and “gateway” for ANL, one that would be a welcoming image, considering the site’s proximity to the front gate. The program requirements allowed for a maximum net square footage of 83,000 for an average occupancy of 216 individuals working in 4 types of laboratories. Furthermore, ANL requested that

the new ESB contained a connection to open both of the two buildings [221 and 223] directly to the south of the site. ANL also emphasized the notion of creating an image of high-tech innovation, sustainability, and transparency for the ESB. Progamatically, ANL intended to capitalize on this new structure as an opporutnity to create a center forinterdisciplinary work among all ANL scientists and researchers. Therefore, spaces for formal and informal collaboration were paramount to a successful design proposal. The esoteric facets and principles of laboratory design governed our design approach. Despite stringent codes and requirements characteristic of laboratory structures, we were able to explore many creative design responses under the guidance of our Professor, Dr. Michael Kim.


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Parking

Coffee

Office Conference

Cafeteria Huddle

Laboratory

lab modules

[above] CIRCULATION + COLLABORATION SPACES [left] ADJACENCY MATRIX BASED ON CLIENT NEEDS [below] RESULTING SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS

workstations offices café

BUILDING ADMIN

building admin/IT conference

CAFÉ

seminar collaborative area

INFORMAL COLLABORATION

minimal adjacency no preference moderate adjacency maximum adjacency

LAB AREA

LAB AREA

OFFICES

OFFICES COLLABORATION

CONFERENCE WORKSTATIONS

WORKSTATIONS

SEMINAR LAB MODULES

LAB MODULES

LAB SUPPORT

LAB SUPPORT


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1) main entrance greeted by “open arms” concave 2) allow for creation of “energy quad” with building 223

1 6

3) preserve north-south axis to eventually create “pedestrian meridian” 4) anchor ESB to building 223 with multi-level connection

2 3

4

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5) borrow use of existing loading/unloading utility zone shared by building 223 and 222 6) borrow curb cut of existing building to the north [for driveway access to main entrance of ESB] 7) remaining footprint results in overall form and orientation of ESB


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N

N

[top] OFFICE HALLWAY PERSPECTIVE [right] 1ST FLR PLAN, 1/4”=12’

metal cap sheathing concrete masonry unit spandrel glass

+54’ +50’ 6’

vision panel snap-on mullion cover

10’

fire stopper anchor

+34’

interstitial space

6’

structrual column 10’ rigid insulation

+18’

horizontal mullion concrete flooring

6’

vertical mullion soffit 12’ gypsum board sandstone concrete panels grade

+0’

6’ drop ceiling

[above] MODULAR LABS PERSPECTIVE [right] NORTH WALL SECTION

12’

reinforcing steel concrete footing

-18’


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x3

x3

x3

x3

x3

x3

x3

x3

x3

x3

x3

x3

Starting with the structural grid, we utilized the column bays as a means of lab module organization. Through full scale studies, we concluded that 3 modules (2 full modules + 2 half modules) could be arranged in one bay and repeated in subsequent bays. The adjacent lab support and mechanical spaces were further broken down into thirds, following sizing of ducts and lab exhaust equipment. A double loaded corridor arrangement proved most efficient in terms of net square footage, occupant circulation, and HVAC distribution.


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NE APPROACH FROM MAIN ENTRANCE

MAIN ENTRANCE


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SW APPROACH FROM “ENERGY QUAD”

W APPROACH FROM PARKING LOT


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metal cap sheathing concrete masonry unit spandrel glass

STUDY MODEL HIGHLIGHTING GREEN ROOF


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GREEN ROOF

Researchers at the Energy Sciences Building will be engaged in research in the areas of biofuels, modified photosynthesis, and other aspects of environmental science. South-facing PVC panels promote the development of Argonne’s “organic solar cells.”

layer of recycled tire rubber promotes drainage

els” “organic solar panels” nne developed by Argonne researchers

“green” concrete slab featuring higher fire rating, strength, and less shrinkage Installation of a water collection pipe to a basement cistern provides greywater management solution; satistifes LEED “sustainable sites” category for stormwater management off roof - helps to mitigate the 827mm of precipitation and flash floodings annually.

waterproofing membrane

filter fabric

5” growing medium


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Once a highway for industry and commerce, Suzhou Creek reinforced the status of Shanghai as a port city, as well as a hub for culture and traded goods. In this sense, we believe that Suzhou Creek retains the potential to reconnect with the better times of yesteryears and become a microcosm of Shanghai, a model for sustainable development. Our concept intends to address large-scale social issues in Shanghai, including stagnant economic development and water pollution along the underutilized creek. Our inspiration for this project represents a fusion between the Hanging Gardens of Babylon and the profitable “food trucks� of the United States. We propose a system of floating gardens along Suzhou Creek, detachable and attachable to the banks of the creek. In form, the modular system encourages the banks of the creek and the shape of the creek to transform over time, as gardeners relocate their gardens to provide their crops to other areas down-creek or up-creek. For this process we propose makeshift market areas between the gardens and the Suzhou creek access roads. The residents are literally redefining their own boundaries of sustainability. This system

promises local and organic sources of produce and flowers. Other residents may simply choose to use pleasure gardens. Vegetation within the gardens will benefit from an irrigation system directly connected with Suzhou creek. As the creek water filters into the soil of the gardens, soil layers of decreasing porosity gradually filter the water and send back cleaner water to the creek through PVC pipes embedded below the gardens. These gardens maintain a surface area that allows them to naturally stay afloat, pending the amount of vegetation present. These garden units can move by themselves down the current but can also serve as mini-boats or towage of larger boats. To promote commerce, the city shall market these gardens as miniature parcels of real estate that people can purchase or sell at any time. To promote community, installations of green corridors will accompany the gardens. Civic gathering spaces will increase exponentially as residents will not only garden in close proximity but also share public green space. Gardening remains as much of a social activity as much as a means of self-sustainability.


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5 re-thinking shanghai type Competition entry connect [re]connect site Shanghai, China date Spring 2012 team members Jun Li Michael Nguyen Alina Hsieh result Honorable Mention featured on10design.co/think/competitions


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0’-0”

10’-0”


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Treehouse Dec 2012 in Long Grove, IL


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Red line May 2011 in Chicago, IL


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Graphite collage Fall 2009


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acknowledgements My family for supporting my passion for design My studio friends for their feedback and encouragement My teachers for teaching me how to question and how to learn My co-workers at AT&T, D13, and JTS for providing insight into my future All my mentors for nurturing my growth - professional, academic, and individual


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Rebar Jan 2013 in Los Angeles, CA


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Profile for Michael Nguyen

Architecture Portfolio  

Selected pages/works from undergraduate years at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign [2008-2012]

Architecture Portfolio  

Selected pages/works from undergraduate years at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign [2008-2012]

Profile for m-nguyen
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