Page 1

LYON & TURNBULL AUCTIONEERS EDINBURGH SCOTTISH PAINTINGS & SCULPTURE

182 Bath Street, Glasgow G2 4HG Tel. +44 (0)141 333 1992 Fax. +44 (0)141 332 8240

78 Pall Mall, London SW1Y 5ES Tel. +44 (0)20 7930 9115 Fax. +44 (0)141 7930 7274

9TH JUNE, 2016

33 Broughton Place, Edinburgh EH1 3RR Tel. +44 (0)131 557 8844 Fax. +44 (0)131 557 8668 Email. info@lyonandturnbull.com www.lyonandturnbull.com

Thursday 9th June, 2016 33 Broughton Place Edinburgh

Scottish Paintings & Sculpture


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture Including The Robertson Collection The Wood Collection

Thursday, 9th June, 2016 at 6pm Sale Number LT466

Viewing Times Saturday, 4th June 12 noon - 4pm Sunday, 5th June 12 noon - 4pm Monday, 6th June 10am - 5pm Tuesday, 7th June 10am - 7pm Wednesday, 8th June 10am - 5pm Thursday, 9th June 10am - 1pm

Enquiries Lyon & Turnbull Ltd. 33 Broughton Place Edinburgh EH1 3RR Tel. 0131 557 8844 Fax. 0131 557 8668 Email. info@lyonandturnbull.com www.lyonandturnbull.com

Catalogue: ÂŁ15

Front Cover Lot 58 (detail)

Inside Front Cover Lot 12 (detail)

Inside Back Cover Lot 38 (detail)


Buyer’s Guide This sale is subject to our standard Conditions of Sale (available at the back of every catalogue and on our website). If you have not bought at auction before we will be delighted to advise you.

Buyer’s Premium & Other Charges The buyer shall pay the hammer price together with a premium, at the following rate, thereon. 25% up to £50,000 / 20% thereafter. VAT will be charged on the premium at the rate imposed by law (see our Conditions of Sale). Additional VAT † VAT at the standard rate payable at the standard rate on the hammer price * 5% import VAT payable on the hammer price No VAT is payable on the hammer price or premium for books bought at auction. Droit de Suite § indicates works which may be subject to the Droit de Suite or Artist’s Resale Right, a royalty payment for all qualifying works of art. Under new legislation which came into effect on 1st January 2012, this applies to living artists and artists who have died in the last 70 years. This royalty will be charged to the buyer on the hammer price and in addition to the buyer’s premium. It will not apply to works where the hammer price is less than €1,000 (euros). The charge for works of art sold at and above €1,000 (euros) and below €50,000 (euros) is 4%. For items selling above €50,000 (euros), charges are calculated on a sliding scale. More information on Droit de Suite is available at www.dacs.org.uk

Registration

Catalogue descriptions

All potential buyers must register prior to placing a bid. Registration information may be submitted in person at our registration desk, by email, by fax or on our website. Please note that all first time bidders at Lyon & Turnbull will be asked to supply the following documents in order to facilitate registration:

All item descriptions, dimensions and estimates are provided for guidance only. It is the buyer’s responsibility to inspect all lots prior to bidding to ensure that the condition is to their satisfaction. If potential buyers are unable to inspect lots in person (public viewing times listed in every catalogue), our specialists will be happy to prepare detailed condition reports and additional images. These are for guidance only and all lots are sold ‘as found’, as per our Conditions of Sale.

1 – Government issued photo ID (Passport/ Driving licence) 2 – Proof of address (utility bill/ bank statement). We may, at our option, also ask you to provide a bank reference and/ or deposit.

Import/Export

Removal of Purchases

Prospective buyers are advised that several countries prohibit the importation of property containing materials from endangered species, including but not limited to; rhino horn, ivory, coral and tortoiseshell. Accordingly, prospective buyers should familiarise themselves with all relevant customs regulations prior to bidding if they intend to import lots to another country. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any relevant export or import licence. The denial of any licence or any delay in obtaining licences shall neither justify the recession of any sale nor any delay in making full payment for the lot.

Responsibility for packing, shipping and insurance shall be exclusively that of the purchaser. Further information on Collection & Shipment, including professional packers and shippers known to us, can be found at the back of the catalogue or on our website.

Endangered Species Please be aware that lots marked with the symbol Y contain material which may be subject to CITES regulations when exporting outside the EU. For more information visit http://www.defra.gov.uk/ahvla-en/ imports-exports/cites

By registering for the sale, the buyer acknowledges that he or she has read, understood and accepted our Conditions of Sale (available at the back of every catalogue and on our website).

Bidding & Payment For information on bidding options see our Guide to Bidding & Payment at the back of the catalogue.


Meet the Specialists At Lyon & Turnbull we want to make buying at auction as easy and enjoyable as possible. Our specialist team are on hand to assist you; whether you are looking for something in particular for your home or collection; require more detailed information about the history or current condition of a lot or just want to ďŹ nd out more about the auction process.

Nick Curnow

Charlotte Riordan

Carly Shearer

Iain Gale

nick.curnow@lyonandturnbull.com

charlotte.riordan@lyonandturnbull.com

carly.shearer@lyonandturnbull.com

iain.gale@lyonandturnbull.com

How to Find Us in Edinburgh Lyon & Turnbull Saleroom

T

P

Parking Multi-storey car parking is available at Greenside Place and in the St. James Centre; ďŹ ve minutes walk from the saleroom

T

York Place Tram Stop

S

Waverley Station


4 Lyon & Turnbull

1ยง HD466/3 GEORGE HOUSTON R.S.A., R.S.W., R.I. (SCOTTISH 1869-1947) HOME THROUGH THE FIELDS Signed, oil on canvas 41cm x 51cm (16in x 20in)

ยฃ2,000-3,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 5

2 HE337/10 JOSEPH MILNE (SCOTTISH 1857-1911) HARBOUR DOCKS Signed, oil on canvas 41cm x 61cm (16in x 24in) £1,500-2,000


6 Lyon & Turnbull

3 HE337/4 JAMES WATTERSON HERALD (SCOTTISH 1859-1914) MORNINGSIDE HALLS - AFTER THE CONCERT Signed and dated 1888, watercolour 28cm x 21cm (11in x 8in) £2,000-3,000

4 HE337/5 JAMES WATTERSON HERALD (SCOTTISH 1859-1914) ON THE HARBOUR QUAY, ARBROATH Signed, watercolour 51cm x 38cm (20in x 15in) £2,000-3,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 7

5 HD466/6 JAMES PATERSON P.R.S.W., R.S.A., R.W.S. (SCOTTISH 1854-1932) BOY FISHING BY A STREAM Signed inscribed and dated ‘Moniaive 1885’, watercolour 36cm x 53cm (14in x 21in)

£4,000-6,000


8 Lyon & Turnbull

6 HD740/1 WILLIAM STEWART MACGEORGE R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1861-1931) GATHERING BULLRUSHES Signed, oil on canvas 61cm x 51cm (24in x 20in) Provenance: Fine Art Society Ltd 1979, no.6929

£3,000-5,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 9

7ยง HE403/3 SPENCE SMITH (SCOTTISH 1880-1951) HAYSTACKS AND COCKERELS Signed, oil on board 61cm x 76cm (24in x 30in)

ยฃ2,000-3,000


10 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 11

8§ HD213/1 CHARLES OPPENHEIMER R.S.A., R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1876-1961) IN THE EVENING LIGHT Signed, oil on canvas 63cm x 76cm (25in x 30in) Note: For a very similar but larger composition see My Garden at Twilight, property of the National Trust for Scotland, Broughton House, Kirkcudbright.

£10,000-15,000

Charles Oppenheimer is regarded as a quintessentially Scottish artist, although he was born in Oldham and did not settle north of the border until 1908.

had a talent for capturing the fall of light on water. He painted landscapes and townscapes and also designed a number of iconic posters for British Rail.

Oppenheimer trained under Walter Crane at Manchester School of Art and also in Italy. He was instinctively drawn to Scotland, although to the lowlands and the pastoral landscapes of Kirkcudbrightshire, rather than the rugged Highlands. Famously his paintings often depict the same view at different times of year. He was a keen fisherman and

Oppenheimer was elected R.S.W. in 1912, A.R.S.A. in 1927 and R.S.A. in 1934. The picture offered here is a view of Oppenheimer’s house at 14 High Street, Kirkcudbright, where he lived between 1908 and 1931. He rented the house from E.A. Hornel, who lived next door, in Broughton House (now in the care of the National Trust for Scotland).

By the time that Oppenheimer settled there, Kirkcudbright had long been a centre of artistic activity. Artists had been drawn there since the 1880s and by 1900, the little town was attracting artists from Glasgow and Edinburgh including E.A. Walton, A.S. Hartrick, James Lawton Wingate, David Gauld and D.Y. Cameron. Oppenheimer moved there in 1908, and, having served with the Royal Artillery during the Great War, returned to Kirkcudbright at its close, finding many new friends. Among them were the book illustrator Jessie M King and her husband, E.A. Taylor who, having lived in Kirkcudbright before the war, had returned there in 1915. From 1929 the crime writer Dorothy L Sayers and her husband also rented a studio in The High Street, next door to Oppenheimer, and became good friends. Oppenheimer painted several similar views of his home at number 14. One now hangs in Oldham Art Gallery and another in Broughton House itself. While the Broughton picture shows the house at twilight, with the evening sun reflecting off the windows, that in Oldham shows the same scene on a bright, sunny day in which the whitewashed walls seem to belong more to the Midi, than Kirkcudbright.


12 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 13

9 HD919/1 ALEXANDER NASMYTH (SCOTTISH 1758-1840) THE CHILDREN OF WILLIAM RAMSAY OF BARNTON Inscribed, and with the children’s names and dated 1782, oil on canvas 91cm x 122cm (36in x 48in) Provenance: Sir Arthur Steel Maitland Bt. and thence by descent. Sold on the instructions of the Trustees. Exhibited: Scottish Art, London 1931; Old Master paintings, Stirling 1960 Literature: J.C.B. Cooksey, Alexander Nasmyth H.R.S.A., 1785 -1840. A Man of the Scottish Renaissance (Scotland, 1991), catalogue number N43A, illustrated.

£40,000-60,000

Alexander Nasmyth is well known as one of Scotland’s finest landscape artists. He is perhaps less renowned though as a portrait painter and the arrival at auction of a major example of his work in this genre is a cause for some excitement. The Children of William Ramsay of Barnton is a vitally important example of the 18th century cult of child portraiture and one of the key works in Nasmyth’s oeuvre. Redolent with detail and symbolism, it has not been seen on the market since it was commissioned in 1782 by the Edinburgh banker William Ramsay, (whose portrait by Raeburn was sold by Lyon & Turnbull in May 2008). Pictured against the backdrop of Warriston House, each of William Ramsay’s six children is identified by the initials painted beneath their likenesses: From left to right these are: MB, WW, PR, AN (Alison), GR (George) and WR (William). An inscription on the reverse of the painting further identifies the sitters as, from left to right: Agnes, wife of Col Matthew Baillie of Cairnbrae Mary, wife of Captain Charles Hope Watson RN Peter Ramsay Alison, wife of Sir John Marjoribanks Bt of Lees George Ramsay William Ramsay George Ramsay, the eldest boy, shown in the picture wearing a red coat and a

straw hat, holds a fishing rod while he brings his younger sister his catch, laying it in her apron. Close by, his brother holds George’s fishing bag, completing the central focus of the painting which connects the gaze of the two brothers in a line through the eyes of their sister, thus creating a psychological relationship between the siblings. An unwitting fourth participant in this dynamic is the family dog, who gazes up adoringly at his young master, while held by the youngest brother. Interestingly the inclusion on the left of the remarkably tame swans appears to have been a conceit of Nasmyth’s and he uses it again in the group portrait of Mr and Mrs Archibald Swinton and Their Children, which dates from 1787. This painting and the Barnton portrait share other, similar qualities, including the reversed pose of the child leaning on the dog (in the Swinton painting a horse) and the inclusion of a rose bush. Notably absent in the Barnton painting of course, are the parents. It is further possible, comparing this work with the Swinton painting, to detect the beginnings of the change in Nasmyth’s work which takes hold after 1787, chiefly in the treatment of the landscape, which in the later painting hints at the influence of the artist’s trip to Italy, where he studied from December 1782 to 1785. The Barnton painting is thus also

important in being one of the last works in this genre painted by Nasmyth, before the stylistic changes brought about by his Italian sojourn, by which his sitters become more integrated into their surroundings. Nasmyth had begun his career as a portraitist with a palette of blue, pink, lilac and purple and an attention to fabric and texture, which emulated that of his early master Allan Ramsay, with whom he worked in London from 1774 to 1778. His earliest portraits were principally of single sitters, but from 1780 Nasmyth began to paint groups in the manner of Zoffany, notably The Duke of Atholl and his Family of that year and Patrick Miller and His Children, dated to 1782, the same year as the Barnton painting. Nasmyth prefers to place his groups in a pastoral setting, often with their residence in the background, as seen here and also in his portraits of the The 3rd Earl Rosebery and his Family in the Grounds of Barnbogle Castle (1784, Dalmeny House) and Lady Honyman and her Family (c.1790, National Galleries of Scotland). Revealingly, Nasmyth is at pains to create a sense of realism in these works, placing them in the context of an actual event, generally the return from a shoot, a pony ride or, as so charmingly depicted here, from a successful fishing expedition.


14 Lyon & Turnbull

10 HE436/1 ALLAN RAMSAY (SCOTTISH 1713-1784) ALEXANDER LESLIE, 5TH EARL OF LEVEN Inscribed with sitter's name, bears typed label verso stating 'From the Collection of Ethie Castle, Arbroath', oil on canvas 74cm x 63cm (29in x 25in) Note: This attribution has been confirmed on inspection by Dr. James Holloway.

£10,000-15,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 15

11 HE337/9 DAVID FARQUHARSON A.R.A., A.R.S.A., R.S.W., R.O.I. (SCOTTISH 1840-1907) THE FOREST OF ATHOLE Signed, inscribed and dated 1881, oil on canvas 31cm x 51cm (12in x 20in)

and a companion a pair ‘The Allan Water’ (2) £3,000-5,000


16 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 17

12 HE238/1 JOSEPH FARQUHARSON R.A. (SCOTTISH 1846-1935) BENEATH THE SNOW ENCUMBERED BRANCHES Signed, oil on canvas 51cm x 76cm (20in x 30in) Provenance: Richard Green Fine Paintings, London, J.988 Note: A painting of this title was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1901

£80,000-120,000

By the beginning of the twentieth century Joseph Farquharson had established himself as the foremost landscape painter in Scotland, making the subject of snowcovered Deeside his true domain. Throughout his life he balanced his artistic career with the inherited responsibility of laird of the family estate, Finzean in Aberdeenshire, where the Farquharson family has lived since 1579. He studied at the Edinburgh Trustees’ Academy, where he was greatly influenced by Peter Graham, and from 1880 onwards spent time in the studio of CarolusDuran in Paris where he met and became friends with American painter John Singer Sargeant. Paris at the end of the nineteenth century was a hotbed of artistic development and Farquharson was able to assimilate many of the concerns of the Impressionists and the Naturalists exhibiting there at the time. Most importantly, he understood the importance of working en plein air in front of the motif and depicting nature at different times of day and in different atmospheric conditions. An early example of the scale and power of his canvasses is A Joyless Winter Day (1883), now in the Tate Gallery,

London. It depicts an icy snowstorm, which remarkably the artist painted in situ, from a specially constructed mobile painting hut, which even contained a stove. Farquharson frequently included a human figure in his compositions, introducing a sense of scale and presence in the frequently unwelcoming landscape. A factotum at the estate frequently used to help the artist by posing as a shepherd and one of the surviving anecdotes tells us how his model was getting rather blue during one sitting session in the winter, and the artist invited him to go into the mobile studio and warm up. The factotum however asked the artist whether he had finished or not and when they established he had not, he said that he would wait a little longer until Farquharson had completed his study. Such a figure is seen in the present canvas, tending his sheep. Farquharson sent one painting to the Royal Academy every year between 1894 and 1925, with the exception of 1914. He managed to create innovative and imaginative compositions every time, by finding an unexplored corner of his estate, going out to paint at different times of the day, and in different weather conditions, and even adopting a slightly elevated point of

view as he has done here. The light filtering through the tree branches is at once dramatic and balanced against the coolness of the snow in the foreground. The violence and pathos of the sunset adds poetry to an otherwise mundane scene of a shepherd tending his sheep. Every rock, tree and shrub is lovingly described and mapped out, as only someone who really knows and understand the landscape and the local geography can paint it. Farquharson’s landscapes not only serve to depict the Deeside countryside beautifully, they also serve as points of reflection and contemplation. The dramatic yet subtle juxtaposition of a winter landscape with a beautiful light bathing the scene offers the viewer space for reflection on the life of those living on the land, or more abstractly, on the lyrical beauty of nature.


18 Lyon & Turnbull

13 HE146/2 EDWARD ATKINSON HORNEL (SCOTTISH 1864-1933) OVERLOOKING THE BAY Signed and dated 1929, oil on canvas 51cm x 61cm (20in x 24in)

£7,000-10,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 19

14 HE146/1 EDWARD ATKINSON HORNEL (SCOTTISH 1864-1933) AMONGST THE BLUEBELLS Signed and dated 1929, oil on canvas 51cm x 61cm (20in x 24in)

£6,000-8,000


20 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 21

15§ HE403/1 HARRY KEAY (SCOTTISH 1914-1994) MILL UNDER SNOW Signed and dated 1948, oil on canvas 86.5cm x 112cm (34in x 44in) Exhibited: Russell Cotes Gallery, Bournemouth, Work of present-day painters in oil, 1949 Dundee Art Gallery on loan returned 2/8/82

£10,000-15,000

Harry Keay trained at Dundee College of Art. During World War 2 he was exempted from military service due to a bad right arm (thus a left-handed painter), but remained involved through a role in the observer corps. Following the War and for much of the rest of his life, he devoted his life to the teaching and practicing of art. As with many Scottish artists, Keay had strong connections to, and derived a huge amount of inspiration from, his peers – specifically, he was taught by James Cowie and had a close friend and mentor in James McIntosh Patrick, an influence that shines clear in the offered work. Often focused on stilllife subjects, such as those in Dundee’s public collection, a strong Dutch influence runs through Keay’s work. In Mill Under Snow Keay creates a snow scene that captures the crisp sparseness of a Scottish winter. This distinctive atmosphere is

captured through Keay’s technical talent and close attention to detail. He offers a specific view out across the unfolding landscape, from a position of height, but drawing the viewer’s attention down to the human scene below – the abandoned mill building and the figures heading out sledging. The close details of both industry and nature: crisp bare branches, curling barbed wire, distinct building textures of red brick and stone, broken wooden shutters, a winding stream, are juxtaposed. These contrasting details make ‘Mill Under Snow’ a compelling scene, continually drawing the viewer back to discover more of the contrasts of this modern Scottish landscape.


22 Lyon & Turnbull

16 HE403/2 HARRINGTON MANN R.P., R.E. (SCOTTISH 1867-1937) ITALIAN GIRL Signed, inscribed and dated ‘Rome 1889’, oil on panel 28cm x 21.5cm (11in x 8.5in)

£2,000-3,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 23

17 HE350/1 ROBERT GEMMELL HUTCHISON R.B.A., R.O.I., R.S.A., R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1855-1936) SUMMER AFTERNOON Signed, oil on board 22cm x 29cm (8.75in x 11.5in) £6,000-8,000


24 Lyon & Turnbull

18 HC141/1 ROBERT GEMMELL HUTCHISON R.B.A., R.O.I., R.S.A., R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1855-1936) PICNIC IN THE DUNES, LOSSIEMOUTH Signed, indistinctly inscribed on label verso, oil on canvas 63cm x 76cm (25in x 30in)

£8,000-12,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 25

19ยง HD911/1 JOHN MACLAUCHLAN MILNE R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1886-1957) FISHING BOATS, EAST NEUK HARBOUR Signed, oil on canvas 41cm x 51cm (16in x 20in)

ยฃ5,000-8,000


26 Lyon & Turnbull

20ยง HD911/2 JOHN MACLAUCHLAN MILNE R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1886-1957) BRODICK BAY, ARRAN Signed, oil on canvas 51cm x 61cm (20in x 24in)

ยฃ15,000-20,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 27

21ยง HD911/3 JOHN MACLAUCHLAN MILNE R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1886-1957) REFLECTIONS AT CORRIE Signed, oil on board 51cm x 61cm (20in x 24in)

ยฃ15,000-20,000


28 Lyon & Turnbull WILLIAM MCCANCE Hugh MacDiarmid, the famous poet and driving force behind the ‘Scottish Renaissance’ movement of the early 20th century named William McCance “the most advanced Scottish artist of his day”. Despite the calls of figures like MacDiarmid and J.D. Fergusson (perhaps the only Scottish artist to have been both present at, and instrumental in, the birth of Modernism in Paris), there were only a handful of Scottish artists who embraced the same politically progressive and modern artistic outlook. William Johnstone and William McCance were the most significant amongst them. The Cambuslang-born and Glasgow School of Art trained McCance was vocal in his support of ‘Scottish Renaissance’ ideologies, emoting in one of their magazines ‘The Modern Scot’:

“When the Scot can purge himself of the illusion that Art is reserved for the sentimentalist and realise that he, the Scot, has a natural gift for construction, combined with a racial aptitude for metaphysical thought and deep emotional nature, then out of this combination can arise an art which will be pregnant with Idea, and have a seed of greatness”. McCance possessed all of the foundation stones of artistic greatness: passion, intellect and a receptive, critical mind. Yet, despite being a proud Scot and his professed allegiance to the Scottish artistic cause at this time, the melting pot in which his modernist style developed was in fact the West London art scene. Making a living there as a teacher and an art critic for the Spectator, McCance moved in the same circles as artists like Eric

Kennington, William Robertson (who rented a flat from McCance in Earl’s Court) and Leon Underwood. He would have known and been well aware of the work of the Vorticists, including the group’s leader Percy Wyndham Lewis. Like them, he adopted elements of Cubism, including the use of pure colour as a formal device, and Futurism, including the somewhat sinister references to the ‘mechanisation’ of the humanform. The landscapes shown here are early examples of McCance’s boundary-pushing work; Movement dates to 1923, produced a year after the first recorded example of his artworks in this manner. His landscapes have been described as “aggressive” and here there is certainly something somewhat violent to the juxtaposition of vivid colours, as well as a sharp,

edgy angularity to the shapes which make up his compositional structure. As a Modernist, McCance is undoubtedly an important name in the story of Scottish, and for that matter, British art. Why this sharply intelligent, highly progressive artist’s name is not of greater renown is answerable by the fact that his interests were perhaps too wide-ranging: criticism, typography, sculpture, economics and design all numbered amongst his skills and occupations. Polymathic in ability, McCance was subsequently unfocused on his artistic output, and was also reticent about exhibiting his work. The National Galleries of Scotland have rightly been making efforts to rectify this in recent decades, keen to raise awareness of the unique and important position of McCance in early 20th century art and art theory.


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 29

23§ HE304/1 WILLIAM MCCANCE (SCOTTISH 1894-1970) MOVEMENT IN A LANDSCAPE Signed with initials and dated ‘23, oil on canvas laid down 25.5cm x 35.5cm (10in x 14in) Provenance: Graeme Mundy Gallery, Glasgow

£3,000-5,000

22§ HE304/2 WILLIAM MCCANCE (SCOTTISH 1894-1970) ROOFTOPS Oil on board 26cm x 35cm (10.25in x 13.75in)

£5,000-7,000 See illustration opposite


30 Lyon & Turnbull

24§ HE302/1 WILLIAM CROSBIE R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1915-1999) STILL LIFE OF MIXED FLOWERS Signed and dated ‘42, oil on board 51cm x 36cm (20in x 14in)

£4,000-6,000


The Robertson Collection


32 Lyon & Turnbull

25§ SV730/27 JOAN EARDLEY R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1921-1963) GIRL NURSING A CHILD Pastel on buff paper 28cm x 23cm (11in x 9in) Provenance: Roland, Browse and Delbanco, London

£15,000-20,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 33

26§ SV730/33 JOAN EARDLEY R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1921-1963) TINKER’S CAMP Pastel 14cm x 24cm (5.5in x 9.5in) Provenance: The artist’s studio reference no. ED1189 Exhibited: Aitken Dott & Son, Joan Eardley, June 1988, no.25

£2,000-3,000


34 Lyon & Turnbull

27ยง SV730/48 DAME ELIZABETH BLACKADDER D.B.E., R.A., R.S.A. (SCOTTISH b. 1931) CATTLE IN THE SNOW Signed, watercolour 55cm x 77cm (21.75in x 30.5in) Exhibited: Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolour The Scottish Arts Council, Elizabeth Blackadder Retrospective no.35 Note: This painting dates from 1963

ยฃ2,000-3,000


John Duncan Fergusson


36 Lyon & Turnbull

The late Ian and Anne Robertson collected Fergusson’s art to preserve a family connection; Anne’s father was James Macmillan Marshall, a friend of, and sitter for, the artist. Family tradition had it that the pair met at Edinburgh University in the 1890s while attending an anatomy lesson: Macmillan Marshall as a medical student and Fergusson out of artistic interest. Macmillan Marshall always told Anne that Fergusson was one of the greatest talkers he had ever met. The Robertson’s reestablished the family connection with Fergusson in

1949, when Anne’s grandmother viewed Fergusson’s portrait of Macmillan Marshall in London, spurring her on to make contact. Fergusson immediately invited them to his studio and a friendship unfolded. The couple were gifted a selection of works by Fergusson and were determined to purchase more, a surprisingly difficult task. In a conversation with a Fergusson Gallery Curator, Anne reminisced about visiting Fergusson in his studio, where he would only have one painting on display, the one on his easel, with all the rest stacked neatly

28§ SV730/20 JOHN DUNCAN FERGUSSON R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1874-1961) GIRL WITH A HOOP Inscribed and dated ‘Jardin de Luxembourg, Paris 1908,’ conté 20cm x 11cm (8in x 4.25in) Exhibited: Aleaxander Meddowes, Edinburgh, A tribute to Fergus 2004, no.39

£1,500-2,000

against the walls. The Robertson’s had to take opportunities when Fergusson left the room to rummage through the stacks, and sometimes bought without a chance to see the whole composition, as when they purchased The Picnic having only seen half of it! After Fergusson’s death, Margaret Morris came to stay with the couple in Edinburgh, a testament to the strong connection and friendship they shared. Although known as a Scottish Colourist, Fergusson had distinctive traits that set him apart from the other members of the group: including his lack of formal art

education, emphasis on figurative work and commitment to the promotion of the arts. Despite sharing an artistic sensibility, he was also distinguished from the other three artists by his international and political outlook. The Robertson Collection demonstrates the many varied facets of Fergusson’s artistic career, and allows his individual talent to shine.


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 37

29§ JOHN DUNCAN FERGUSSON R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1874-1961) PHILOSOPHY Bronze 13.5cm (5.5in) Literature: J.D.Fergusson Exhibition Catalogue, National Galleries of Scotland Edinburgh 2013, Ill.Pl. 34 Note: Another cast of this sculpture was exhibited at the exhibition. This sculpture dates from 1919 although it was cast at a later date.

£6,000-9,000

Sculpture was something that Fergusson dabbled in throughout his career and is an important part of his oeuvre, demonstrating his distinctive artistic identity and talent. Philosophy, a stylised female figure glowing golden with a flourish of flowers blooming out of one side and a single geometric bird balancing on her other hand and shoulder, is strikingly modern yet has a timeless quality. Anne Robertson clearly remembered walking with Margaret Morris, carrying the plaster cast of Philosophy, to have it cast in bronze. It was cast in two editions, a larger and smaller, and Anne requested one from the smaller edition for her collection. Morris always maintained that the sculpture was to be well-polished to maintain a high-shine appearance.


38 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 39

30§ SV730/38 JOHN DUNCAN FERGUSSON R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1874-1961) GREENHOUSE BOTANIC GARDENS Signed, inscribed and dated verso, ‘7 Sept ‘51’, oil on canvas 54cm x 64cm (21.25in x 25.25in)

£40,000-60,000

War interrupted Fergusson and Morris’ sunny idyll in the South of France and eventually they chose to settle in Glasgow, which Fergusson felt to be the most Celtic Scottish city, an important accolade from an artist who was endlessly proud of his Scottish ancestry. Together they set to engaging and enlivening the Glasgow arts scene and it was around this time that Fergusson began to receive establishment recognition, following a successful touring retrospective in 1948. Greenhouse, Botanic Gardens from the early 1950s, demonstrates Fergusson’s endless commitment to his established technique and

subject matter; observing city folk at their leisure in the botanic garden whilst capturing the green lushness and utilising the Cezanneesque brushstrokes and hints of the Fauvist complementary colours that he first encountered and adapted at the turn of the century. It also demonstrates why he came to be known as a colourist, in this, the colours remain brilliantly fresh and clear. Anne Robertson remembered this being on the easel, the painting Fergusson was currently working on, on their first visit to his studio.


40 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 41

31§ SV730/22 JOHN DUNCAN FERGUSSON R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1874-1961) AT A CAFÉ TABLE Oil on board 24cm x 19cm (9.5in x 7.5in) Exhibited: Arts Council - Scottish Committee, J.D. Fergusson Memorial Exhibition, 1961/62, no.20 Note: The label is inscribed ‘To Anne & Ian from Fergus & Meg with love Nov. 1962’

£50,000-70,000

France played a key role in Fergusson’s life, and became a second artistic home. Fergusson was drawn to Paris, where the café society offered him endless amusement and subject matter, as he tried to capture the effects of each passing, stylish moment in small-scale works such as At a Cafe Table. The materiality of the paint on the board just adds to the atmosphere of this charming scene, demonstrating the fashionable dress and engaging social activity that surrounded the artist. As Fergusson himself noted in Paris, “something new had started and I was very much intrigued. But there was no language for it that made sense in Edinburgh or London.”


42 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 43

32§ SV730/21 JOHN DUNCAN FERGUSSON R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1874-1961) THE PICNIC Signed, inscribed and dated ‘Lefévre 1928’, oil on canvas 66cm x 76cm (26in x 30in) Exhibited: Arts Council of Great Britain Scottish Committee, J.D.Fergusson Memorial Exhibition 1961/62 no.95

£80,000-120,000

Despite the endless entertainment and stimulating artistic company and opportunities in Paris, by 1913, Fergusson was looking for something new, ‘I had grown tired of the north of France; I wanted more sun, more colour; I wanted to go south.’ The South of France became a place to which he and his partner, the dancer Margaret Morris, returned again and again for long, luxurious summers. Together they held strong views on the

importance of leading a healthy outdoor lifestyle in a warm, sunny environment. So Morris hosted her summer schools while Fergusson sketched the dancers and bathers that would become recurring subjects in sundappled works like The Picnic, with its Cezanne-inspired brushwork and chalky white tones conveying the strong heat and bright sunshine.


44 Lyon & Turnbull

33§ SV730/6 JOHN DUNCAN FERGUSSON R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1874-1961) TREES BY THE SEA, SOUTH OF FRANCE Watercolour 25.5cm x 20cm (10in x 8in)

£1,500-2,000

34§ SV730/5 JOHN DUNCAN FERGUSSON R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1874-1961) THE ROAD TO THE MORVEN, HARLECH Signed, inscribed and dated 1918 on a contemporary label verso, mixed media 34cm x 25.5cm (13.5in x 10in)

£5,000-7,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 45 SIR WILLIAM GEORGE GILLIES Gillies was born at Haddington in East Lothian in 1898, the son of a tailor and tobacconist. Largely selftaught in his youth, he gained a place at Edinburgh College of Art in 1916. No sooner had he joined, however than his education was interrupted by military service in World War I. Gillies joined the Scottish Rifles (Cameronians) and served for two years on the Western Front, being both gassed and wounded. With the end of hostilities, Gillies resumed his studies at Edinburgh and along with some of his fellow students embraced the brave new world of Modernism, looking across the channel to the Post-Impressionism of Van Gogh, the ‘wild beasts’ Matisse and Derain and the radicalism of Picasso and Braque. His contemporaries at Edinburgh included Sir William MacTaggart and William Crozier and in 1922 with them and six other graduates of the E.C.A. he founded the 1922 group. The

following year he travelled on a scholarship to France with another fellow student, William Geissler and studied in Paris under the minor Cubist painter Andre Lhote. Although Gillies later denied Lhote’s influence, his early work evinces the effect of the French modernists, in particular of Cezanne and Gris, albeit in a less radical style of the genre. Back in Scotland Gillies began a teaching career at the E.C.A., which would last for the next forty years. His early style soon gave way to a looser touch, although in 1931 Gillies saw the Society of Scottish Artists’ influential Munch exhibition in Edinburgh and was deeply affected. He now began to paint in two distinct styles of oil and watercolour, the one being planar and owing much to Bonnard, Matisse and Munch, the latter being loose and expressive, with a feel for the quality of the medium, tempered by sound pencil work.

Gradually, Gillies changed to a more naturalistic style of landscape and still life and became known chiefly for his watercolours, particularly those inspired by the landscapes of rural Midlothian, where he lived for the remainder of his life. Gillies was a member of the Society of Scottish Artists, the 1922 Group and the Society of Eight. In 1940 he was elected A.R.S.A. and R.S.A. in 1947. He became President of the R.S.W. in 1963, was made C.B.E. in 1957 and knighted in 1970. The pictures included here cover Gillies’ career from the late 1940s until the year before his death and offer a good overview of his development. One of the earliest, Roseberry Reservoir, a watercolour painted in 1948, is a moody essay in expressionist form and colour. In contrast, the view of Mount Lothian is in Gillies’ more precise style using pencil to define features as he does again in a Studio

Interior, painted in 1964, a rare and evocative example of the artist’s mature domestic interiors. The gouache of Pigeons on a Doocot, exhibits Gillies’ ongoing interest in the power of pure form and line. Almost abstract in character and relying for its impact on plane and colour, it translates the Scottish rural tradition into the context of international modernism. The latest images here were both exhibited at Aitken Dott’s Christmas show in 1972. One, a watercolour of Letham Farm is as simple and spontaneous as Gillies can be, an expression of a spirit of place through pastoral tones, planar recession and confident brushstrokes. The other, an oil of Pittenweem, exhibits Gillie’s skill in the medium, harking back to his early French influences and a Matisse-like simplicity but at the same time bringing to both an essentially Scottish palette and character.

35§ SV730/4 SIR WILLIAM GEORGE GILLIES C.B.E., L.L.D., R.A., R.S.A., P.R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1898-1973) PIGEONS ON A DOO COT Signed, gouache 26cm x 38cm (10.25in x 15in)

£1,500-2,000


46 Lyon & Turnbull

36§ SV730/47 SIR WILLIAM GEORGE GILLIES C.B.E., L.L.D., R.A., R.S.A., P.R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1898-1973) STUDIO INTERIOR DUSK Signed and dated ‘64, pencil and watercolour 66cm x 102cm (26in x 40in) Exhibited: Royal Scottish Society of Painters in Watercolour The Scottish Arts Council, William Gillies Retrospective, no.203

£3,000-5,000

37§ SV730/31 SIR WILLIAM GEORGE GILLIES C.B.E., L.L.D., R.A., R.S.A., P.R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1898-1973) MOUNT LOTHIAN NEAR HOWGATE Signed, pencil and watercolour 25.5cm x 36cm (10in x 14in)

£1,500-2,000


Various Properties

38§ HD388/23 SIR WILLIAM GEORGE GILLIES C.B.E., L.L.D., R.A., R.S.A., P.R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1898-1973) PITTENWEEM Signed, oil on canvas 61cm x 91.5cm (24in x 36in) Exhibited: ‘Christmas Exhibition, 1969’, cat. no.11, Aitken Dott, Edinburgh

£8,000-12,000


48 Lyon & Turnbull

39§ HD388/22 SIR WILLIAM GEORGE GILLIES C.B.E., L.L.D., R.A., R.S.A., P.R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1898-1973) LETHAM FARM Signed, watercolour 44.5cm x 55.5cm (17.5in x 21.75in) Exhibited: ‘Christmas Exhibition, 1972’, cat. no. 10, Aitken Dott, Edinburgh

£2,000-3,000

40§ HD980/1 SIR WILLIAM GEORGE GILLIES C.B.E., L.L.D., R.A., R.S.A., P.R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1898-1973) ROSEBERY RESERVOIR Signed and dated 1948, watercolour 38cm x 56cm (15in x 22in)

£2,000-3,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 49

41 HD981/1 GEORGE LESLIE HUNTER (SCOTTISH 1877-1931) HYDE PARK Signed, crayon 41cm x 56cm (16in x 22in) Provenance: Dr T.J. Honeyman and thence by descent

£7,000-10,000


50 Lyon & Turnbull

42 HD981/2 GEORGE LESLIE HUNTER (SCOTTISH 1877-1931) FIFE STREET SCENE Signed, pen and ink and crayon 29cm x 38cm (11.5in x 15in) Provenance: Dr T.J. Honeyman and thence by descent Note: For an oil painting of the same subject see T.J. Honeyman, Introducing Leslie Hunter 1937, no.27

£3,000-5,000

43 HD981/3 GEORGE LESLIE HUNTER (SCOTTISH 1877-1931) ROWING BOATS AT LOW TIDE Signed, pen and ink and crayon 30.5cm x 38cm (12in x 15in) Provenance: Dr T.J. Honeyman and thence by descent

£3,000-5,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 51

44§ HD742/1 SIR ROBIN PHILIPSON R.A., P.R.S.A., R.S.W., R.G.I. D.LITT., L.L.D. (SCOTTISH 1916-1992) WOMEN OBSERVED Signed on the backboard, dated 1977 on the label verso, watercolour 33cm x 35cm (13in x 13.75in)

£1,000-1,500

45§ HE 171/1 JOAN EARDLEY R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1921-1963) HAYSTOOKS Watercolour and gouache 23cm x 56.5cm (9in x 22.25in) Provenance: The artist’s studio ED1267 Exhibited: Aitken Dott & Son, Edinburgh, Joan Eardley 1981, no.6

£3,000-5,000


52 Lyon & Turnbull

46ยง HE403/5 SIR ROBIN PHILIPSON R.A., P.R.S.A., R.S.W., R.G.I. D.LITT., L.L.D. (SCOTTISH 1916-1992) MEN OBSERVED 1 Signed on the reverse, dated 1981 on label verso, oil on canvas 56cm x 66cm (22in x 26in)

ยฃ3,000-5,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 53

47§ HE197/2 ALBERTO MORROCCO R.S.A., R.S.W., R.P., R.G.I., L.L.D. (SCOTTISH 1917-1998) STILL LIFE WITH GUITAR AND LAY FIGURE Signed and dated ‘93, oil on canvas 51cm x 51cm (20in x 20in)

£15,000-20,000


54 Lyon & Turnbull

48ยง HE197/1 DAVID MCCLURE R.S.A., R.S.W., R.G.I. (SCOTTISH 1926-1998) FLOWERS WITH GRAZING HORSE Signed, oil on canvas 71cm x 56cm (28in x 22in)

ยฃ4,000-6,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 55

49ยง HE201/2 ADAM BRUCE THOMSON O.B.E., R.S.A., P.P.R.S.W., H.R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1885-1976) BRIDGE OF ST. MARTIN, TOLEDO Signed, oil on canvas 76cm x 63.5cm (30in x 25in) Exhibited: Royal Scottish Academy 1911, no.540 Exhibited: Scottish Gallery, Edinburgh Adam Bruce Thomson 2013, no.12 (Illustrated)

ยฃ3,000-5,000


56 Lyon & Turnbull

50§ HD922/36 JAMES MORRISON R.S.A., R.S.W., L.L.D. (SCOTTISH b. 1932) STRATHELLA Signed and dated 19.vi.2001, oil on board 101.5cm x 152.5cm (40in x 60in)

£4,000-6,000

James Morrison is one of the country’s leading and most popular landscape artists. He was born in Glasgow in 1932 and completed his studies there at the Glasgow School of Art in the early 1950s. Morrison then took up a teaching post in Duncan of Jordanstone, Dundee, before turning to painting full time in Montrose. He has since been settled there for many years and his work has become synonymous with the area.

The artist’s handling of oil paint - reducing it to fluid, almost liquid washes of colour - is both instantly recognisable and beautifully distinctive. His faithful depictions of Angus and the Western Highlands are suspended somewhere between realism and impressionism. Eloquent brushstrokes are used to create a sense of texture and movement; be it rolling clouds

on the horizon or blusters of wind through grass. His markmaking has a deceptive simplicity that can only accompany a sophisticated level of technical skill. From a distance, the overall effect is almost photographic in accuracy. In proximity, however, his technique cleverly disassembles into wisps and mere suggestions of form.


The Wood Collection


58 Lyon & Turnbull

Unsurprisingly given the healthy market for Scottish art and the scarcity of significant collections, the Wood Collection is highly anticipated. Representing Hunter, Peploe and Cadell, the works offered include strong examples by each. Far from being a cohesive movement as many assume, the term “Scottish Colourist” was in fact posthumously bestowed on the trio in the 1940s. J.D. Fergusson, who lived until the mid-1960s, was categorised as the fourth Colourist even later still. This dates the Wood Collection’s origins to those early days when the phrase “Scottish Colourists” had yet to be coined. The paintings were purchased between the 1920s and the 1940s by the Edinburgh collector Walter Quarry Wood,

President of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh. As well as being a personal friend and supporter of F.C.B. Cadell, Quarry Wood was advised by Duncan Macdonald of the renowned dealers Reid and Lefevre. The works hung for many years in his family’s residence in the city’s New Town. Wood was originally from the Scottish Borders and was a personal friend of Anne Redpath, whose pictures also feature in the collection. Upon his death in 1958, his daughter Elizabeth Wood inherited his artworks, and a lasting appreciation for art. Quarry Wood’s only child, Elizabeth in fact met and sat for Cadell as a young girl. Sadly, Wood spent the last decade of her life in a nursing home due to failing health, but retained a great interest

in modern Scottish art to the end of her life. The collection has consequently not been seen on the market since the day they were originally purchased by her father. Quarry Wood’s collection clearly demonstrates a shrewd eye, and there is a key note from each of the artist’s oeuvres: Still lives by Peploe and Hunter, and Edinburgh interiors and Ionian landscapes from Cadell. Many of the works have an interesting exhibition history; Cadell’s The Wedgwood Vase in particular has long been considered of particular note by curators assembling important Cadell and Colourist retrospectives over the decades.

51§ SV824/18 SIR WILLIAM GEORGE GILLIES R.S.A., R.S.W., C.B.E., R.A. (SCOTTISH 1898-1973) SPRING Signed, watercolour 25.5cm x 35.5cm (10in x 14in) Exhibited: Aitken Dott & Son, W.G.Gillies Exhibition 1952, no.6

£1,000-1,500


Francis Campbell Boileau Cadell


60 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 61

52 SV824/14 FRANCIS CAMPBELL BOILEAU CADELL R.S.A., R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1883-1937) ROINA IN THE SOUND OF MULL Signed, and inscribed on a label verso, oil on board 38cm x 46cm (15in x 18in) Exhibited: Royal Scottish Academy Festival Exhibition 1949, Peploe, Cadell & Hunter

£50,000-70,000

Along with an impeccable sense of style, Cadell also demonstrated ample versatility as an artist. The beautiful landscape offered here is evidence of this. He was particularly attached to and spiritually stimulated by the island of Iona. Indeed, during Cadell’s time in the trenches during World War 1, his letters to his close friend S. J. Peploe speak of his longing to return to Iona and the safe haven that it represented to him. Interested in (and adored by) the local community on Iona, he often painted the abbey, crofts, and the farmers herding their cows or working

their crops. Ever reluctant to return to Edinburgh where his financial realities awaited him, the work Cadell produced en plein air in Iona reveals a different aspect of his character to the elegant still lifes and interiors painted back in Auld Reekie. Here his work exudes an upbeat freshness. His technique loosened as his mood unwound and his Iona subjects display a deft airiness evocative of breezy, carefree summer days.


62 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 63

53 SV824/12 FRANCIS CAMPBELL BOILEAU CADELL R.S.A., R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1883-1937) THE WEDGWOOD VASE Signed, signed and inscribed verso, oil on canvas 46cm x 38cm (18in x 15in) Exhibited: Society of Eight 1928, no.64 National Gallery of Scotland, Memorial Exhibition 1942, no.131 Fine Art Society, Centenary Exhibition 1983, no.57 Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, F.C.B. Cadell, 2011 Literature: Tom Hewlett, Cadell - a Scottish Colourist 1988, p.73

£250,000-350,000

Quarry Wood was both a friend and patron of F.C.B. Cadell, and it is therefore unsurprising that works by this artist are amongst the highlights of the collection. Cadell’s character is often described as being as colourful as his artworks. Though eccentric, he did not necessarily fit the role of the stereotypical “bohemian”, instead preferring the good life; luxury, orderliness and all things beautiful. These preferences over-spilled abundantly into his life and art and are especially evident in the decoration of his Edinburgh studios which Cadell would appoint with a meticulous eye. The huge floor to ceiling windows characteristic of the Edinburgh New Town would flood the spacious rooms with light. The floor was a lacquered black, the furniture

and woodwork painted in scarlet, lapis or jade, and the walls a distinctive lilac hue, as seen here in the magnificent The Wedgwood Vase. A painting of rare and exceptional quality, it embodies Cadell’s inarguable high artistic skill. After WW1 he began maximising his use of colour whilst simultaneously minimalising his handling. In this manner he was able to cleverly stylize and pare-back complicated compositions, producing a clean, sophisticated effect which nodded to the Art Deco movement of the time. What he doesn’t say with his paintbrush – leaving some sections of the canvas virtually bare or suggesting forms with the most minimal of brushstrokes - is as important to the whole as the areas which are depicted in

meticulous detail, like the vase itself. The elegant black marble fire place is picked out in sleek, blockish licks of paint, the high-shine of its surface reflecting the carefully curated selection of beautiful objects arranged on the mantle. Cadell was known to hang his own paintings about his walls and it is likely that we see one here in the upper left corner; vibrant green fronds of foliage in a dark gold frame. This in turn picks out the gilded accents on the smooth white vase which forms the focal point of the composition. This painting is the epitome of all of the elements that made and indeed still make Cadell so irresistible to collectors: his innate artistic flair, an inherent sense of style and a seemingly effortless technical skill.


64 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 65

54 SV824/2 FRANCIS CAMPBELL BOILEAU CADELL R.S.A., R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1883-1937) A STILL LIFE OF ROSES Signed, oil on board 38cm x 46cm (15in x 18in) Exhibited: Stirling Fine Art Association, 1932 no.2

£200,000-300,000

Cadell admirers will know that he made a small number of versions of this particular composition; a beautiful, angular cobalt-blue jug filled with delicate pink roses, set against the lilac ground of his Ainslie Place studio walls. A charming feature of many of the Colourists’ work is the reoccurrence of particular props in their still lifes; in this case we can see the same jade green bowl that sits on the mantelpiece in Cadell’s The Wedgwood Vase. It was the early 1920s and Cadell, having moved away from his more Impressionistic, Edwardianera style after WW1, was fully

immersed in the Modernist innovations which were taking hold on the Continent at the time. Pure colour is used to create volume and form; texture – be it smooth porcelain or crisp white linen is suggested by his brushwork, and inventive blue outlines set the palette singing and lend the work a graphic, highly distinctive aesthetic. Though this period of bright, sophisticated still lives is among the most popular area of his oeuvre with today’s collectors, their reception in conservative Edinburgh society at the time couldn’t have been more different.

Cadell became the subject of a month-long debate in the Scotsman, which became known as “The Bolshevism of Colour”. His high-hued and stylised renderings caused much controversy amongst the traditionalists who frequented the RSA at the time, while other notable art world figures sprang to the defence of his parameter – pushing treatment of the still life genre.


66 Lyon & Turnbull

55 SV824/1 FRANCIS CAMPBELL BOILEAU CADELL R.S.A., R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1883-1937) SANDBANK AND THE SOUND OF MULL Signed, inscribed verso, oil on board 38cm x 46cm (15in x 18in) Exhibited: Fine Art Society, Centenary Exhibition 1983, no.27

£30,000-50,000


Samuel John Peploe


68 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 69

56 SV824/5 SAMUEL JOHN PEPLOE R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1871-1935) STILL LIFE OF ROSES IN A GREEN VASE Signed, oil on canvas 51cm x 41cm (20in x 16in) Provenance: Alex, Reid & Lefevre, Glasgow

£120,000-180,000

Although Peploe produced many stunning portraits, landscapes and figurative subjects, the still-life afforded him a lifetime of possibilities and today he is recognised as perhaps the most important still-life painter in Britain in the twentieth century. Two distinct phases of his still-lifes are shown here: Roses in a Green Vase, it’s angular, faceted brushwork dating it to c.1924, and the slightly later Tulips in a Vase which

demonstrates a looser, more textural technique. By the mid-1920s Peploe was painting with total virtuosity. Though his work was pushed through several evolutionary stages, very little of his output exhibits anything other than a sense of total surety. It is a rare work which features elements that struggle to work within his compositions, Roses in a Green Vase being no exception. Peploe would meticulously envisage his

approach to each canvas before he picked up a paintbrush. When writing about his friend’s technique fellow Colourist J.D. Fergusson confirmed that this preparatory process engendered a confidence which Peploe hoped could be tangible to the viewer.


70 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 71

57 SV824/4 SAMUEL JOHN PEPLOE R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1871-1935) STILL LIFE OF TULIPS IN A VASE Signed, oil on canvas, with a portrait of a lady verso 51cm x 41cm (20in x 16in)

£100,000-150,000

There is so much in these mere objects, flowers, leaves, jugs, what not – colours, form, relation – I can never see mystery coming to an end’ - Peploe to a fellow artist in 1929, on the endless appeal of the stilllife.

By the late 1920s, from which Tulips in a Vase dates, Peploe returned with more subtlety to the muted colours of Cézanne. His subsequent paintings are cooler in palette, weightier in form and focused on tonal harmony, with loose brushwork and splashes of warm colour enlivening the overall effect.


72 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 73

58 SV824/6 SAMUEL JOHN PEPLOE R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1871-1935) IONA ABBEY Signed, oil on canvas 63cm x 76cm (25in x 30in) Literature: Philip Coupe, Paintings of Iona Cadell and Peploe 2014, Ill.Pl. 12

£80,000-120,000

Peploe was first encouraged to visit the isle of Iona by his friend and fellow Scottish Colourist, F.C.B. Cadell, and both artists were to be endlessly inspired by its cool, crisp light and constantly changing weather and coastline. It became a place to which Peploe returned for many summers with his young family, offering relaxation and a fresh perspective. Iona Abbey is a

key landmark of the isle, and here Peploe’s light yet confident handling renders it as the key compositional element in a work that views it from nearby high ground; gliding over nearby crofts to the Abbey and then out towards the expanse of sea and other Western Isles beyond. A Colourist by name, Peploe deftly uses a palette of soft greens, whites and yellow with sparse highlights of a

stronger blue to create a harmonious composition that captures the distinctive atmosphere of the West Coast of Scotland.


74 Lyon & Turnbull

59 SV824/17 SAMUEL JOHN PEPLOE R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1871-1935) TREE STUDY CASSIS Signed, inscribed and dated verso ‘This was painted at Cassis 1928’ written by Mrs Peploe 1948, oil on canvas 41cm x 46cm (16in x 18in)

£50,000-70,000

The Scottish Colourists were united in their love of the landscape and culture of France as well as the painting developments occurring there in the early 20th century. Peploe’s vital attachment to the South of France, in particular, is also present in this collection, in an important, typically paletoned study of trees in a landscape, painted in Cassis in 1928 and inscribed by the artist’s wife. It was his

painting colleague J.D. Fergusson who originally convinced Peploe to visit France when he was growing tired of Edinburgh, and Peploe rapidly reacted to the bright, sparkling light of the continent in his paintings with a clear, fresh palette and looser brushwork. In this study, his soft, creamy and chalky tones immediately convey the heat and beautifully dappled light of the Mediterranean.


George Leslie Hunter


76 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 77

60 SV824/15 GEORGE LESLIE HUNTER (SCOTTISH 1879-1931) A STILL LIFE OF ROSES AND FRUIT Signed, oil on canvas 46cm x 41cm (18in x 16in)

£50,000-70,000 G.L. Hunter was the most peripatetic of the four Colourists spending his all to brief life principally in Scotland, the USA and France. He was also unique in originating from the west of Scotland. Hunter was born in Rothesay, Bute in 1877, the son of a chemist. In 1892 the family emigrated to California where his father had invested in an orange farm, near Los Angeles. While the family returned to Scotland eight years later, however, Hunter, then aged 22, chose, with an elder brother, to stay on and settled in San Francisco. If Fergusson and Peploe had been enthused by the intellectual café society of Paris, it was the equivalent environment of San Francisco that now inspired Hunter. Although he had had no formal training, such was the quality of his early work that in 1901 he showed at the San Francisco Arts Association and in 1902 in the first exhibition of the California Society of Artists. We know that he first visited Paris in 1904-5 and returned to San Francisco the following year only to find that a huge amount of his work had been destroyed in the San Francisco earthquake. Probably as a consequence he returned to Scotland to live with his mother in Glasgow.

Frustrated by having to make a living through illustration, in 1910, at the age of 33, he moved to London and it seems possible that he met Peploe and Fergusson for the first time in Paris in 1911 and it is either here or in London that he also befriended E.A. Taylor and his wife Jessie Marion King. He showed at Alexander Reid’s gallery in Glasgow in 1913 and again in 1916 and his work from this early period exhibits a distinct Dutch influence, married to some of the PostImpressionist lessons that he must have learnt from France. In 1915 he showed for the first time at the R.S.A. Following the outbreak of war and for the duration, he worked on his uncle’s farm, near Larkhall. By 1922 Hunter was painting in Paris, Venice and Florence and also travelling in Fife, painting and sketching extensively, ever in search of the perfect light. While in Paris he visited Epstein and Matisse and increasingly, his palette now became altogether brighter and more vibrant A short visit to the States in 1924 was followed by further work in Fife and at Loch Lomond and a solo show at Aitken Dott in Edinburgh and another at Reid’s. The following year, apparently frustrated with the shortcomings of Glasgow as an artistic milieu, he moved to the south of France and

began to paint in St Tropez and Antibes. In 1928 he joined Fergusson and Peploe at Cassis but despite Reid organising shows of his work the sales failed to materialise. In response Hunter tried the US market and in 1929 showed in New York. Returning to France he threw himself into his work with new vigour. But this intensity also had its down side. He had always been prone to bouts of temper and mood swings and his mind now became increasingly unstable, inclining him to prolonged periods of isolation. Alone in his studio one day, mistaking a bottle of turpentine for something more palatable, he caused himself dreadful harm and was rushed to hospital in Nice before returning to Glasgow. The effects of this accident persisted and his health grew

steadily worse. Sadly, Hunter died just two years later in 1931 aged 54, learning just days before his death that a painting of his had been bought by the French government and hung in the Musée du Luxembourg. A Still Life of Roses and Fruit, is typical of Hunter’s work of the mid 1920s, using a backdrop of drapery and with the foreground objects set on a table, angled towards the viewer. By this date Hunter has moved away from the predominating Dutch influence of his early still-lifes, with their dark backgrounds and jewel-like fruit and there is a tendency to abandon perspective and group the objects as arrangements on a single plane. He has yet however, to embrace the fullblown Cloissonism of the very late still-lifes.


78 Lyon & Turnbull

61 SV824/9 GEORGE LESLIE HUNTER (SCOTTISH 1879-1931) BOATS IN HARBOUR Signed, oil on panel 25.5cm x 35.5cm (10in x 14in)

£10,000-15,000

Of the two works on offer here, Boats in Harbour has a distinctly French, PostImpressionist flavour, being reminiscent of Van Gogh, particularly in tone and colouring. We know from Honeyman’s biography that Hunter had a notebook containing a detailed analysis of Van Gogh’s palette and this work demonstrates that enduring admiration. It was at this time, when, as the other Colourists were moving

towards greater structure, that Hunter began to do quite the opposite, painting with broader, looser strokes. The painting depicts a view from the pier at Largo in the East Neuk of Fife, which Hunter painted a number of times. This work is painted from exactly the same viewpoint as that taken by the artist in a similar, though slightly, smaller painting, Summer Day, Largo now in Kelvingrove Art Gallery,

Glasgow - even including several of the same boats. The painting would appear to date from the early 1920s. Hunter had first visited Fife in 1919 and continued to paint there throughout the next few years, staying in Ceres and Largo. However, a visit to Italy in 1922 so overwhelmed him that he became disappointed by the cooler light of the Fife paintings.


Anne Redpath


80 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 81

62§ SV824/7 ANNE REDPATH O.B.E., A.R.A., R.S.A., L.L.D., A.R.W.S., R.O.I., R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1895-1965) A STILL LIFE OF SPRING FLOWERS Signed, oil on board 66cm x 53.5cm (26in x 21in)

£50,000-70,000

As a personal friend of Anne Redpath, Walter Quarry Wood included some lovely examples of her still-life work within his collection, alongside the work of the Scottish Colourists. In an interview, where Anne Redpath discussed the collection of items featured in her house, the artist exposed the blurred boundary of art and life as she lived and painted; ‘They are a mixture but they have all been chosen for me and therefore live quite happily, and they all have memories too – memories of places that I have been to, and also of my life. I read once long ago that you can’t have art without experiences, and I feel that all the things I have, that I live amongst, have both memories and experiences and are part of my painting.’ This sentiment is particularly true of her still-life paintings, in which her own personal collection of objects, especially ceramics, feature heavily. Still-life subjects were an enduring area of interest for Redpath, and as these examples demonstrate, colour and texture were of the utmost importance in her compositions. In her travels as an art student she had admired the dry, flat quality of frescoes in Siena and

spoke often of how powerful an influence she found the white-washed walls of her Mediterranean accommodation. Redpath was also interested in the relationship between two and three dimensions and the decorative quality of compositional elements; often flattening perspective, depicting assemblages from a high vantage point and converting featured objects into decorative compositional components, as with the red chair in A Still-Life of Spring Flowers, which becomes areas of pure textural colour. In A Still-Life of Spring Flowers the extravagance of flowers

fills the pictorial plane, spilling out to the top right and bottom left corner; these are beautifully balanced out by the superficial, decorative lines of the red chair back and Redpath’s distinctive looping signature, to the bottom right. This was a convention she often used, harnessing her signature script as a distinct compositional element. The background colours remain a soft background for the contrasting strong blues, pinks and fresh white to stand against, but the texture comes purely from the paint.


82 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 83

63§ SV824/8 ANNE REDPATH O.B.E., A.R.A., R.S.A., L.L.D., A.R.W.S., R.O.I., R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1895-1965) STILL LIFE OF FLOWERS IN A BLUE AND WHITE JUG Signed, inscribed on a label verso, oil on canvas 61cm x 46cm (24in x 18in)

£40,000-60,000

Both paintings offered here clearly reveal Redpath’s love of all types of colour, from bright and lush, to quiet and soft. In Still-Life of Flowers in a Blue and White Jug, her use of white throughout the composition gives a feeling of freshness to the whole work. Here, as often in her paintings, she builds a textured background in soft colours, often in grey tones, against which the warm pink and orange flowers, strong dark blue of the vase’s decoration and splash of yellow pop. She likened this ability to create vivid yet harmonious palettes to her father’s profession as a textile designer, ‘I do with a spot of red or yellow in a harmony of grey what my father did in his tweed.’ The composition of Still-Life of Flowers in a Blue and White Jug is beautifully balanced, and

this careful arrangement of objects fit into Redpath’s wider view of life, in which beauty and art could find its expression in the most personal and straightforward of settings; a meal amongst friends, a pretty setting for tea, or our everyday objects. Redpath was endlessly fascinated with the pursuit of beauty in art and life, and the eternal decorative possibilities of colour and composition.


Various Properties

64ยง HE197/3 ANNE REDPATH O.B.E., A.R.A., R.S.A., L.L.D., A.R.W.S., R.O.I., R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1895-1965) COLOURED AWNINGS Signed, watercolour 28cm x 38cm (11in x 15in)

ยฃ6,000-8,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 85

65ยง HE334/1 ANNE REDPATH O.B.E., A.R.A., R.S.A., L.L.D., A.R.W.S., R.O.I., R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1895-1965) STILL LIFE OF PEONIES Signed, oil on board 38cm x 51cm (15in x 20in) Provenance: GIfted by the artist to Murray and Evelyn Aitken on the occasion of their wedding, Hawick, 1948

ยฃ30,000-50,000


86 Lyon & Turnbull

66ยง SV0244/29 ANNE REDPATH O.B.E., R.S.A., A.R.A., L.L.D., A.R.W.S., R.O.I., R.B.A. (SCOTTISH 1895-1965) HILLSIDE - THE CANARY ISLANDS Signed, oil on board 62cm x 75cm (25in x 30in) Provenance: Collection of Roy and Mairi Rankin Exhibited: The Scottish Arts Council - Scottish Committee, Four Scottish Painters, 1963, no.34

ยฃ8,000-12,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 87

67ยง HE403/4 ELIZABETH BLACKADDER D.B.E., R.A., R.S.A., R.S.W., R.O.I. (SCOTTISH b. 1931) STILL LIFE ON BLACK TABLE Signed, oil on canvas 63cm x 76cm (25in x 30in) Exhibited: The Scottish Gallery November 1961, no. 18

ยฃ5,000-7,000


88 Lyon & Turnbull

68 WEDGWOOD BONE CHINA PEDESTAL VASE AND COVER, EARLY 20TH CENTURY cream glaze with gilt embellishments, bears initials in gilt to the body, FC, the whole raised on a square plinth base, impressed maker’s mark under base WEDGWOOD (broken and repaired) (2) 30.5cm high Note: This vase featured in a number of Cadell’s still lifes and interiors including lot 53 The Wedgwood Vase.

£300-500


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 89

69 HE433/1 FRANCIS CAMPBELL BOILEAU CADELL R.S.A., R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1883-1937) BEN MORE FROM CLACHANACH Signed, oil on board 35.5cm x 44.5cm (14.5in x 17.5in) Exhibited: Royal Academy, Scottish Art, 1939, no.597 Fine Art Society Ltd, November 1978 as Mull from Iona Provenance: G.M. Service Esq Literature: P.M. Coupe, Paintings of Iona - Cadell and Peploe 2014, Illustrated p.43 together with photo of the actual scene

£30,000-50,000


90 Lyon & Turnbull

70ยง HC576/1 SAMUEL JOHN PEPLOE A.R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1871-1935) STILL LIFE WITH VIOLIN Signed, oil on canvas 31cm x 48cm (12.25in x 25in) Exhibited: Bears gallery label verso for 'J. L. W. Baird Fine Art Dealers'

ยฃ20,000-30,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 91

71 HE242/1 GEORGE LESLIE HUNTER (SCOTTISH 1879-1931) PEONIES IN A CHINESE VASE Signed, oil on canvas 61cm x 51cm (24in x 20in)

£20,000-30,000


92 Lyon & Turnbull

72§ HE435/1 SIR WILLIAM MACTAGGART P.P.R.S.A., R.A., F.R.S.E., R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1903-1981) FIELDS OF BARLEY Signed, oil on board 18cm x 25.5cm (7in x 10in) Exhibited: Roland Browse and Delbanco, London

£4,000-6,000

73§ HE403/7 SIR WILLIAM MACTAGGART P.P.R.S.A., R.A., F.R.S.E., R.S.W. (SCOTTISH 1903-1981) RED HARVEST MOON Signed, oil on board 25.5cm x 35.5cm (10in x 14in)

£2,000-3,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 93

74ยง HD922/34 ARCHIE FORREST (SCOTTISH b. 1950) BUSY TABLE Signed, oil on canvas 91cm x 96.5cm (36in x 38in)

ยฃ4,000-6,000


94 Lyon & Turnbull

75§ HC179/2 ALEXANDER GOUDIE R.P., R.G.I. (SCOTTISH 1933-2004) UNE BELLE SOIREÉ, LOCTUDY Signed, oil on canvas 71cm x 91cm (28in x 36in)

£3,000-5,000

76§ HE403/6 ALBERTO MORROCCO R.S.A., R.S.W., R.P., R.G.I., L.L.D. (SCOTTISH 1917-1998) NIGHT IN THE VILLAGE Signed and dated 1991, oil on canvas 43.5cm x 31cm (17in x 12in) Exhibited: The Scottish Gallery, Opening of Dundas Street Exhibition 1993, no.56

£4,000-6,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 95

77§ HD922/22 ALBERTO MORROCCO R.S.A., R.S.W., R.P., R.G.I., L.L.D. (SCOTTISH 1917-1998) STILL LIFE WITH OIL LAMP Signed and dated ‘81, oil on canvas 61cm x 91cm (24in x 36in) Exhibited: Scottish Gallery, Edinburgh, Works from the artist’s studio 1990, no.19

£5,000-8,000

78§ HD922/29 ELIZABETH BLACKADDER D.B.E., R.A., R.S.A., R.S.W., R.G.I. (SCOTTISH b. 1931) INTERIOR, MORNING Signed and dated 1971, watercolour 68.5cm x 104cm (27in x 41in)

£5,000-7,000


96 Lyon & Turnbull

79§ HE343/1 WILLIAM GEAR R.A., F.R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1915-1997) AUTUMN GARDEN Signed and dated ‘83, signed, inscribed and dated verso, oil on canvas 152.5cm x 122cm (60in x 48in)

£8,000-12,000


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 97

80 HE403/8 JOHN BELLANY C.B.E., R.A., H.R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1942-2013) HOMAGE TO DAVID B - II Signed, oil on canvas 152.5cm x 120cm (60in x 47.5in) Note: This work is a version of Homage to David B in the possession of Tate, London. It was presented to Tate in 2003 upon the death of Dr David Brown, curator of the Tate Gallery between 1974-84.

£8,000-12,000

John Bellany was a respected and sought after portrait painter. The work shown here is a version of ‘Homage to David B’, an important painting held in the collection of Tate, London, painted in 2002. The ‘David B’ in question is David Brown, former curator at the Tate from 1974-84. Before this, Brown had worked as assistant to the director at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in Edinburgh where he had begun an enduring relationship with Bellany, endeavouring to create a supportive platform for Scottish artists south of the border. These works were created in his memory.


98 Lyon & Turnbull


Scottish Paintings & Sculpture 99

81§ HE435/2 JOHN BELLANY C.B.E., R.A., H.R.S.A. (SCOTTISH 1942-2013) SEA PEOPLE Oil on canvas 142cm x 132cm (56in x 52in)

£8,000-12,000 END OF SALE

John Bellany drew heavily on his background to create a compelling and instantly recognisable visual language. Born in 1942 in the small fishing town of Port Seton on the east coast of Scotland, his subject matter is informed by the experiences of his coastal upbringing and the folklore of his ancestry, connected to the ocean. The community was strictly Calvinist, and the rigidity of its guilt-inducing doctrine also permeates his work. These contextual reference points were illustrated in Bellany’s inventive figurative style. Though the aesthetic is entirely and distinctively his own, Bellany’s compositions deliberately borrow from the religious tableaus of the Old Masters (including his frequent adoption of the triptych format), and his expressionistic representation of the human form and emotive use of colour from

inter-war era German artists like Max Beckmann. Like these artists before him, Bellany used visual symbols to represent and allude to moods and messages within his work. In Sea People, for example, he combines the traditional artistic motif of the dog - representative of matrimonial fidelity - and the owl - a cipher for wisdom with his own invented stock of imagery. This includes a puffin’s colourful beak, and a black-eyed and somewhat sinister seagull. They occupy the narrow deck of a fishing boat, sailing on an ominously still, intensely blue ocean. The captain of the ship, his face half obscured, bears a resemblance to the artist himself, and something or someone appears to be wearing the façade of the seagull as a cloak. It was painted in the early 1970s, a point when Bellany was increasingly reflecting on the

human condition. In these monumental works, the ship represents our voyage through life to death. Deliberately impenetrable and oblique to the viewer, his paintings hold both deeply personal meaning whilst simultaneously hinting at more universal issues including fate, sex, guilt and death.


Index Bellany, J., 80, 81 Blackadder, Dame E., 27, 67, 78 Cadell, F.C.B., 52-55, 69 Crosbie, W., 24 Eardley, J., 25, 26, 45 Farquharson, D., 11 Farquharson, J., 12 Fergusson, J.D., 28-34 Forrest, A., 74 Gear, W., 79 Gillies, Sir W.G., 35-40, 51 Goudie, A., 75

Houston, G., 1 Hunter, G.L., 41, 42, 43, 60, 61, 71 Hutchison, R.G., 17, 18 Keay, H., 15 MacGeorge, W.S., 6 MacTaggart, Sir W., 72, 73 Mann, H., 16 McCance, W., 22, 23 McClure, D., 48 Milne, J., 2 Milne, J.M., 19, 20, 21 Morrison, J., 50 Morrocco, A., 47, 76, 77

Paterson, J., 5 Peploe, S.J., 56-59, 70 Philipson, Sir R., 44, 46 Ramsay, A., 10 Redpath, A., 62-66 Smith, S., 7 Thomson, A.B., 49 Wedgwood 68

Nasmyth, A., 9 Herald, J.W., 3, 4 Hornel, E.A., 13, 14

Oppenheimer, C., 8

Glossary The following expressions with their accompanying explanations are used by Lyon & Turnbull as standard cataloguing practice. Our use of these expressions does not take account of the condition of the lot or the extent of any restoration.

Name(s) or Recognised Designation of an Artist without any Qualification In our opinion a work by the artist

Buyers are recommended to inspect the property themselves. Written condition reports are usually available on request.

Studio of ... / Workshop of ... In our opinion a work executed in the studio or workshop of the artist, possible under his supervision

Attributed to... In our opinion probably a work by the artist in whole or in part.

Circle of ... In our opinion a work of the period of the artist and showing his influence. Follower of ... In our opinion a work executed in the artist’s style but not necessarily by a pupil. Manner of ... In our opinion a work executed in the artist’s style but of a later date After ... In our opinion a copy (of any date) of a work of the artist.

Signed ... / Dated ... / Inscribed ... / In our opinion the work has been signed/dated/inscribed by the artist. Bears Signature ... / Date ... / Inscription ... / In our opinion the signature/date/inscription appears to be by a hand other than that of the artist. Dimensions are given height before width.


Conditions of Sale SELLERS 1. DEFINITIONS

3. PREPARATION FOR SALE

In these Conditions of Sale (Sellers):

(a) Lyon & Turnbull shall decide the way in which a lot may be included in the sale, how any lot is described and illustrated in the catalogue or any report, and the marketing, promotion, date, place and conduct of the sale.

“Auctioneer” means Lyon & Turnbull Ltd or its authorised auctioneer, as appropriate; “Buyer“ is the person who makes the highest possible bid or offer accepted by the auctioneer, and/or such person’s principal where bidding as agent; “Buyer‘s Premium” is the commission payable by the Buyer on the Hammer Price at the rates set out in the Sale Catalogue Guide to Prospective Buyers and an amount in respect of applicable VAT; “Hammer Price” is the highest bid accepted by the auctioneer by the fall of the hammer or in the case of a post-auction sale, the agreed sale price; “Item” means each and every item consigned for sale following express written agreement between Lyon & Turnbull and the Seller; “Lot“ means each Item offered for sale by Lyon & Turnbull; “Lower Estimate” means the low estimate provided by Lyon & Turnbull to the Seller in relation to each Item, or in relation to any Item which Lyon & Turnbull holds on behalf of the Seller; “Lyon & Turnbull” means the company which has its registered office at 33 Broughton Place, Edinburgh, EHI 3RR registered in Scotland No. 191166

(b) Lyon & Turnbull will instruct, consult with, and rely on, any outside experts or restorers, agents or other third parties, and carry out such other due diligence, inquiries, research or tests in relation to the property or its provenance, either before the Proposed Sale as it may deem appropriate in its reasonable discretion. (c) Any oral or written estimate or evaluation or report provided by Lyon & Turnbull is a genuinely held opinion only. It may not be relied on as a prediction of the selling price or value of the Item, and may in Lyon & Turnbull’s absolute discretion be revised at any time. (d) The Seller acknowledges that attribution of Items is a matter of opinion and not of fact, and is dependent upon (amongst other things) information provided by the Seller, the condition of the property, the degree of research, examination or testing that is possible or practical in the circumstances, and the status of generally accepted expert opinion at the time of cataloguing 4. TERMS OF SALE

“Net Sale Proceeds” are the Hammer Price, less commissions and other charges, of the Lot sold, to the extent received by Lyon & Turnbull in cleared funds;

The Seller acknowledges that lots are sold subject to these Conditions and on the Terms of Consignment as notified to the consignor at the time of the entry of the lot.

“Proposed Sale” means the intended sale through which the items will be sold on

5. STANDARD SELLER FEES AND CHARGES (Subject to VAT)

“Purchase Price” is the Hammer Price and applicable Buyer‘s Premium;

(1) Commission: 15% is charged on the selling price of each lot, (subject to a minimum charge of £30). Loss and damage warranty: 1.5% on value of lots sold. Photography: min charge £30. Online Listing: £10 per lot.

“Reserve” means the lowest price below which an item cannot be sold; “Upper Estimate” means the high estimate provided by Lyon & Turnbull to the Seller in relation to each Item, or in relation to any Item which Lyon & Turnbull holds on behalf of the Seller; “Terms of consignment” means the stipulated terms and rates of commission on which the Auctioneer accepts instructions from Sellers or their agents; “You”, “Your” means the seller. The Seller means you are the owner of the lot or, if you are not the owner of the lot (whether or not you have notified us that you are acting as an agent for a principal), you are duly authorised by the owner of the lot to sell it. “Without reserve” where there is no minimum price at which a lot may be sold (whether at auction or by private treaty). “Us”, “Our”, “We” etc refers to Lyon & Turnbull Ltd The singular includes the plural and vice versa as appropriate. 2. WARRANTY OF TITLE AND AVAILABILITY The Seller warrants:(a) that you are the true owner of the property consigned or are properly authorised by the true owner to consign it for sale and are able to transfer good and marketable title to the property free from any third party claims. (b) that all requirements have been complied with, legal or otherwise, relating to any export or import of the property consigned, all duties and taxes in respect of the export or import of the lot have (unless agreed in writing with us) been paid and, so far as you and any principal for whom they are acting in relation to the lot are aware, all third parties have complied with such requirements in the past. (c) that you have provided Lyon & Turnbull with any and all information concerning the item’s provenance or any concerns expressed by third parties concerning its ownership, condition, authenticity, attribution, and export or import history; and (d) Unless the Seller advises Lyon & Turnbull in writing to the contrary on delivery of the item to Lyon & Turnbull, there are no restrictions on Lyon & Turnbull rights to reproduce photographs or other images of the item in connection with the sale or any other marketing which will be done in accordance with good taste and decency.

(2) Transport: Items for sale must be consigned to the sale room by any stated deadline and at your expense. We may be able to assist you with this process. When organised on the Seller’s behalf the provision of transport will be contracted to third parties. Fees for transport will be deducted at the initial settlement. (3) Illustrations: The cost of any illustrations will be borne by the Seller , unless agreed otherwise prior. The copyright in respect of such illustrations shall be the property of us, the auctioneers, as is the text of the catalogue. 6. RESERVES (a) You are entitled to place, prior to the auction, a reserve on any lot consigned, being the minimum hammer price at which that lot may be sold. Reserves must be reasonable and we may decline to offer goods which in our opinion would be subject to an unreasonably high reserve. The lot will be sold without reserve unless a reserve has been agreed. (b) Firm reserves may be no greater than lower pre-sale estimate level. (c) A reserve once set cannot be changed except with our agreement. (d) You may not bid or instruct or permit any other person to bid on your behalf on your own property. If the Seller breaches this prohibition, Lyon & Turnbull may treat the Seller as bound as Seller and as Buyer but without the benefit of Lyon & Turnbull Authenticity Guarantee or the reserve, and/or pursue other remedies. (e) We may sell lots below the reserve provided we account to you for the same sale proceeds as you would have received had the hammer price been the reserve. 7. LOSS & DAMAGE WARRANTY (a) Subject to condition 7(c) below Lyon & Turnbull will assume liability for loss or damage to an item, commencing at the time that item is taken into physical control and possession by Lyon & Turnbull and ceasing on the earliest date of; (i) when risk passes to the Buyer of the lot following its sale; (ii) for unsold lots, when the lot is released to the Seller, or, within 3 months of the sale;or (iii) 6 months from the date of delivery to Lyon &

Turnbull for items still in the possession of Lyon & Turnbull but not consigned for sale (unless part of a long-term storage agreement). (b) Lyon & Turnbull shall charge a loss and damage warranty fee of 1.5% of the hammer price, plus VAT. (c) If any loss or damage should occur to the lot during the period identified in paragraphs (a) above, Lyon & Turnbull’s liability to compensate the Seller in respect of that loss shall be restricted to a maximum of the upper estimate, or actual loss incurred, whichever is lower. This compensation will be subject to a deduction of a 1.5% loss & warranty fee (subject to VAT). 8. UNSOLD ITEMS (1) If an item is unsold it may, with your consent, be reoffered at a future sale. Where in our opinion an item is not suitable for a future sale we may either request (a) you collect such items from the saleroom promptly on being so informed. We shall be entitled to charge you for storage costs, charges shall be made at a reasonable daily rate;or (b) suggest that the item be transferred to a secondary saleroom for sale without reserve. All transferred lots will be sold for the best price on the day, this may not bear any reflection on the item’s original estimate. Lyon & Turnbull are not liable for any items (whether it be selling price or loss & damage) when transferred. (2) Aftersales: We reserve the right to accept an afterauction offer on a lot on behalf of the seller, at the agreed reserve price or above, for up to 48 hours after the original auction. In which case the same charges will be payable as if such lots had been sold at auction and so far as appropriate these Conditions apply. 9. LOT WITHDRAWAL If a Seller wishes to withdraw a lot organised for sale, a withdrawal fee will apply; (a) if withdrawn over 28 working days prior to the sale, this will be charged at 10% of the mid estimate along with any ancillary charges incurred (such as photography), all subject to VAT at the current rate. (b) if withdrawn within 28 working days of the sale, this will be charged at 20% of the mid estimate along with any ancillary charges incurred (such as photography), all subject to VAT at the current rate. (c) Lyon & Turnbull may withdraw a lot from the proposed sale without any liability if: (i) Lyon & Turnbull reasonably believes that there is any doubt as to the lot‘s authenticity or attribution; or (ii) it reasonably doubts the accuracy of any of the Seller’s warranties; or (iii) the Seller breaches any provisions of the Conditions of Sale in any material respect; or (iv) the lot suffers from loss or damage so that it is not in the state in which it was when Lyon & Turnbull took delivery of it. (d) if an item is withdrawn from sale under Condition 9(c) (i), or (iv), the Seller shall not be charged a withdrawal fee and the item shall be returned to the Seller or dealt with pursuant to Clause 8, as the Seller decides. 10. AUTHORITY TO DEDUCT COMMISSION AND EXPENSES AND RETAIN PREMIUM AND INTEREST. The Seller authorises us to deduct commission at the stated rate, and all expenses incurred for your account from the hammer price, and consents to our right to retain beneficially the premium paid by the Buyer in accordance with these Conditions of Sale and any interest earned on the sale proceeds until the date of settlement. 11. NON-PAYMENT BY THE BUYER (a) Lyon & Turnbull will, where it considers appropriate, take reasonable steps to investigate the ability of bidders to pay for lots and will use reasonable endeavours, in consultation with the Seller, to enforce payment of the Hammer Price by any Buyer. (b) Lyon & Turnbull, in consultation with the Seller, will decide whether to pursue any of the remedies available to it, including those set out in Condition 10 of the Condition of Sale (Buyers) including the right to cancel the sale and return the property to the Seller. Lyon & Turnbull will inform the Seller of any action which it contemplates taking against the Buyer.


(c) lf the Seller elects to take action against any Buyer on its own behalf Lyon & Turnbull will provide the Seller with such assistance as may be reasonably necessary to pursue that action. (d) The Seller hereby agrees to inform Lyon & Turnbull of any action which it chooses to take against the Buyer to enforce payment of the amount due to the Seller. (e) In the event that a Buyer fails to pay for a lot in accordance with the Conditions of Sale for Buyers, that lot will be treated in the same way as an unsold or collected lot. 12. SETTLEMENT PAYMENTS Subject to full payment by the Buyer, payment of the net proceeds of sale due to you will be made over to you 28 working days following a sale. Provided we have received cleared funds. Payment will be made by cheque or BACS (if requested).

14. THIRD PARTY LIABILITY

16. AGENCY

All members of the public on our premises are there at their own risk and must note the lay-out of the accommodation and security arrangements. Accordingly neither the auctioneer nor our employees or agents shall incur liability for death or personal injury (except as required by law by reason of our negligence) or similarly for the safety of the property of persons visiting prior to or at a sale.

Lyon & Turnbull acts as agent solely for and in the interests of the Seller. We do not act for Buyers in this role and does not give advice to Buyers.  When Lyon & Turnbull make a statement about a lot it is doing so on behalf of the Seller of the lot. 

15. GENERAL

17. DATA PROTECTION

(a) We shall have the right at our discretion, to refuse admission to our premises or attendance at our auctions by any person.

In connection with the management and operation of our business and the marketing and supply of Lyon & Turnbull’s services, or as required by law, we may ask the Seller to provide personal information about themselves or obtain information about the Seller from third parties (e.g. credit information). Lyon & Turnbull will not give out personal information except as may be required by law.

(b) Any notice to any Buyer, Seller, bidder or viewer may be given by email, or if not available then first class mail, in which case it shall be deemed to have been received by the addressee 48 hours after posting.

(a) The same Conditions of Sale (Sellers) shall apply to sales by private treaty.

(c) Notices to Lyon & Turnbull should be in writing and addressed to Nick Curnow at 33 Broughton Place, Edinburgh EH1 3RR, quoting the reference number specified at the beginning of the sale catalogue.

(b) Private treaty sales made under these Conditions are deemed to be sales by auction and subject to our agreed charges for Sellers and Buyers.

(d) Should any provision of these Conditions of Sale be held unenforceable for any reason, the remaining provisions shall remain in full force and effect.

(c) Lyon & Turnbull undertakes to inform the Seller of any offers it receives in relation to an item prior to any Proposed Sale, excluding the normal method of commission bids.

(e) These Conditions of Sale are not assignable by either party without the other’s prior written consent, but are binding on the seller’s successor and representatives. No act, omission or delay by Lyon & Turnbull shall be deemed a waiver or release of any of its rights.

13. SALE BY PRIVATE TREATY

(d) For the purposes of a private treaty sale, if a lot is sold in any other currency than Sterling, the exchange rate is to be taken on the date of sale.

(f) The contract between the parties may be varied by the parties by agreement and in writing.

The Auctioneer normally acts as agent only and disclaims any responsibility for default by Sellers or Buyers.

If you would like further information on Lyon & Turnbull policies on personal data, or to make corrections to your information, please contact us on +44 (0)131 557 8844. 18. LAW AND JURISDICTION (a) Governing Law: These Conditions of Sale and all aspects of all matters, transactions or disputes to which they relate or apply shall be governed by, and interpreted in accordance with, Scots law (b) Jurisdiction: The Seller agrees that the Courts of Scotland are to have exclusive jurisdiction to settle all disputes arising in connection with all aspects of all matters or transactions to which these Conditions of Sale relate or apply.

BUYERS The Auctioneer carries on business with bidders, Buyers and all those present in the auction room prior to, or in connection with, a sale on the following General Conditions and on such other terms, conditions and notices as may be referred to herein.. 1. DEFINITIONS In these Conditions of Sale (Buyers): "Auctioneer" means Lyon & Turnbull Ltd or its authorised auctioneer, as appropriate; "Hammer price" means the level of bidding reached (at or above any reserve) when the Auctioneer brings down the hammer; "Lot" means each Item offered for sale by Lyon & Turnbull; "Purchase Price" is the Hammer Price and applicable Buyer's Premium; "Reserve" means the lowest price below which an item cannot be sold; "Total amount due" means the hammer price in respect of the lot sold together with any premium, Value Added Tax or other taxes chargeable and any additional charges payable by a defaulting Buyer under these Conditions; “You”, “Your” means the Buyer “Us”, “Our”, “We” etc. refers to Lyon & Turnbull Ltd The singular includes the plural and vice versa as appropriate. 2. AGENCY Lyon & Turnbull acts as agent solely for and in the interests of the Seller. We do not act for Buyers in this role and does not give advice to Buyers. When Lyon & Turnbull make a statement about a lot it is doing so on behalf of the Seller of the lot. The Auctioneer normally acts as agent only and disclaims any responsibility for default by Sellers or Buyers. 3. BIDDING PROCEDURES AND THE BUYER (a) Bidders are required to register their particulars before bidding and to satisfy any security and credit references or arrangements before entering the auction room to view or bid; (b) The maker of the highest bid accepted by the Auctioneer conducting the sale shall be the Buyer and any dispute shall be settled at the Auctioneer's absolute discretion.

(c) Once made, no bid may be withdrawn. (d) Our right to bid on behalf of Sellers is expressly reserved up to the amount of any reserve. (e) The right to refuse any bid is also reserved. (f) Commission Bids: While prospective Buyers are strongly advised to attend the auction and are always responsible for any decision to bid for a particular lot and shall be assumed to have carefully inspected and satisfied themselves as to its condition we shall, if so instructed, clearly and in writing execute bids on their behalf. Neither the Auctioneer nor our employees nor agents shall be responsible for any failure to do so. Where two or more commission bids at the same level are recorded we reserve the right in our absolute discretion to prefer the first bid so made. (g) Telephone Bids: If a prospective Buyer makes arrangements with us prior to the commencement of the sale we will use reasonable efforts to contact them to enable them to participate in bidding by telephone. We do not accept liability for failure to do so or for errors and omissions in connections. (h) Online Bidding: We will use reasonable efforts to carry out online bids and do not accept liability for equipment failure, inability to access the internet or software malfunctions related to execution of online bids/ live bidding. 4. INCREMENTS Bidding increments shall be at the Auctioneer's sole discretion. 5. THE PURCHASE PRICE For each lot purchased a Buyer's Premium of 25% is payable on the first £50,000 of the hammer price, 20% thereafter. VAT at the appropriate rate is charged on the Buyer's Premium. No VAT is payable on the hammer price or premium for printed books or unframed maps bought at auction. Live online bidding is subject to an additional 3% premium (charged by the live bidding service provider Invaluable). This additional premium is subject to VAT at the appropriate rate as above. 6. VALUE ADDED TAX Value Added Tax is charged at the appropriate rate prevailing by law at the date of sale and is payable by Buyers of relevant lots. (1) Lots affixed with (†): Value Added Tax on the hammer price is imposed by law on all items affixed with

a dagger (†). This imposition of VAT maybe because the Seller is registered for VAT within the European Union and is not operating under a Margin Scheme. (2) Lots affixed with (*): A reduced rate of Value Added Tax on the hammer price of 5% is payable. This indicates that a lot has been imported from outwith the European Union. This reduced rate is applicable to Antique items. (3) Lots affixed with [Ω]: Standard rate of Value Added Tax on the hammer price and premium is payable. This applies to items that have been imported from outwith the European Union and do not fall within the reduced rate category outlined above. 7. DROIT de SUITE This symbol § indicates works which may be subject to the Droit de Suite or Artist's Resale Right, which took effect in the United Kingdom on 14th February 2006. We are required to collect a royalty payment for all qualifying works of art. Under new legislation which came into effect on 1st January 2012 this applies to living artists and artists who have died in the last 70 years. This royalty will be charged to the Buyer on the hammer price and in addition to the Buyer’s premium. It will not apply to works where the hammer price is less than €1,000 (euros). The charge for works of art sold at and above €1,000 (euros) and below €50,000 (euros) is 4%. For items selling above €50,000 (euros), charges are calculated on a sliding scale. All royalty charges are paid to the Design and Artists Copyright Society (‘DACS’) and no handling costs or additional fees are retained by the auctioneer. Resale royalties are not subject to VAT. Please note that the royalty payment is calculated on the rate of exchange at the European Central Bank on the date of the sale. More information on Droit de Suite is available at www.dacs.org.uk. 8. PAYMENT (1) Within 7 days of a lot being sold you will: (a) Pay to us the total amount due in cash or by such other method as is agreed by us. We accept cash, bank transfer (details on request), debit cards and Visa or MasterCard credit cards. We do not accept American Express. (b) Please note there is a surcharge of 2% when using credit cards. (c) Please note that under The Money Laundering Regulations 2007 we cannot accept cash payments over €15,000 (euros). (2) Any payments by you to us may be applied by us


towards any sums owing by you to us howsoever incurred and without agreement by you or your agent, whether express or implied.. 9. TITLE AND COLLECTION OF PURCHASES (1) The ownership of any lots purchased shall not pass to you until you have made payment in full to us of the total amount due. (2) You shall at your own risk and expense take away any lots that you have purchased and paid for not later than 7 working days following the day of the auction or upon the clearance of any cheque used for payment whichever is later. We can provide you with a list of shippers. However, we will not be responsible for the acts or omissions of carriers or packers whether or not recommended by us. (3) No purchase can be claimed or removed until it has been paid for. (4) It is the Buyer’s responsibility to ascertain collection procedures, particularly if the sale is not being held at our main sale room and the potential storage charges for lots not collected by the appropriate time. (5) Export of goods: Buyers intending to export goods should ascertain (a) whether an export licence is required and (b) whether there is any specific prohibition on importing goods of that character, e.g. items that may contain prohibited materials such as ivory or rhino horn. It is the buyer’s sole responsibility to obtain any relevant export or import licence. The denial of any licence or any delay in obtaining licences shall neither justify the recession of any sale not any delay in making full payment for the lot. 10. REMEDIES FOR NON·PAYMENT OR FAILURE TO COLLECT PURCHASES (1) If any lot is not paid for in full and taken away in accordance with these Conditions or if there is any other breach of these Conditions, we, as agent for the Sellers and on their behalf, shall at our absolute discretion and without prejudice to any other rights we may have, be entitled to exercise one or more of the following rights and remedies: (a) to proceed against you for damages for breach of contract; (b) to rescind the contract for sale of that lot and/or any other lots sold by us to you; (c) to resell the lot (by auction or private treaty) in which case you shall be responsible for any resulting deficiency in the total amount due (after crediting any part payment and adding any resale costs). (d) to remove, store and insure the lot in the case of storage, either at our premises or elsewhere and to recover from you all costs incurred in respect thereof; (e) to charge interest at a rate not exceeding 1.5% per month above the current base rate on all sums outstanding for more than 7 working days after the sale; (f) to retain that or any other lot sold to you until you pay the total amount due; (g) to reject or ignore bids from you or your agent at future auctions or to impose conditions before any such bids shall be accepted; (h) to apply any proceeds of sale of other lots due or which become due to you towards the settlement of the total amount due by you and to exercise a lien over any of your property in our possession for any purpose until the debt due is satisfied.satisfied. 11. DESCRIPTIONS AND CONDITION (1) Whilst we seek to describe lots accurately, it may be impractical for us to carry out exhaustive due diligence on each lot. Prospective Buyers are given ample opportunities to view and inspect before any sale and they (and any independent experts on their behalf) must satisfy themselves as to the accuracy of any description applied to a lot. Prospective Buyers also bid on the understanding that, inevitably, representations or statements by us as to authorship, genuineness, origin, date, age, provenance, condition or estimated selling price involve matters of opinion. We undertake that any such opinion shall be honestly and reasonably held and only accept liability for opinions given negligently or fraudulently. Subject to the foregoing neither we the auctioneer or our employees or agents accept liability for the correctness of such opinions and no warranties, whether relating to description, condition or quality of lots, express, implied or statutory, are given. Please note that photographs/images provided may not be fully representative of the condition of the lot and should not be relied upon as indicative of the overall condition of the lot.

(2) Condition reports: Condition reports are provided on our website or upon request. The absence of a report does not imply that a lot is without imperfections. Large numbers of such requests are received shortly before each sale and department specialists and administration will endeavor to respond to all requests although we offer no guarantee. Any statement in relation to the lot is merely an expression of opinion of the Seller or Lyon & Turnbull and should not be relied upon as an inducement to bid on the lot. Lots are available for inspection prior to the sale and you are strongly advised to examine any lot in which you are interested prior to the sale. Our condition reports are not prepared by professional conservators, restorers or engineers. Our condition report does not form any contract between Lyon & Turnbull and the Buyer. The Condition Reports do not affect the Seller’s obligations in any way. (3) Estimates: Estimates are placed on each lot to help Buyers gauge the sums involved for the purchase of a particular lot. Estimates do not include the Buyer’s Premium or VAT. Estimates are a matter of opinion and prepared in advance. Estimates may be subject to change and are for guidance only and should not be relied upon. (4) Catalogue Alterations: Lot descriptions and estimates are prepared in advance of the sale and may be subject to change. Any alterations will be announced on the catalogue alteration sheet, made available prior to the sale. It is the responsibility of the Buyer to make themselves aware to any alterations which may have occurred. (5) Electrical Goods: are sold as “works of art” only and if bought for use must be checked over for compliance with safety regulations by a qualified electrician first. Use of such goods is entirely at the risk of the Buyer and no warranties as to safety of the goods are given.

14. SALE BY PRIVATE TREATY (a) The same Conditions of Sale (Buyers) shall apply to sales by private treaty. (b) Private treaty sales made under these Conditions are deemed to be sales by auction and subject to our agreed charges for Sellers and Buyers. (c) Lyon & Turnbull undertakes to inform the Seller of any offers it receives in relation to an item prior to any Proposed Sale, excluding the normal method of commission bids. (d) For the purposes of a private treaty sale, if a lot is sold in any other currency than Sterling, the exchange rate is to be taken on the date of sale. 15. THIRD PARTY LIABILITY All members of the public on our premises are there at their own risk and must note the lay-out of the accommodation, safety and security arrangements. Accordingly, neither the Auctioneer nor our employees or agents shall incur liability for death or personal injury or similarly for the safety of the property of persons visiting prior to, during or after a sale. 16. GENERAL (a) We shall have the right at our discretion, to refuse admission to our premises or attendance at our auctions by any person. (b) Any notice to any Buyer, Seller, bidder or viewer may be given by email if not available then first class mail in which case it shall be deemed to have been received by the addressee 48 hours after posting. (c) Notices to Lyon & Turnbull should be in writing and addressed to Nick Curnow at 33 Broughton Place, Edinburgh EH1 3RR, quoting the reference number specified at the beginning of the sale catalogue.

(6) Upholstered items: are sold as “works of art” only and if bought for use must be checked over for compliance with current safety regulation. Use of such goods is entirely at the risk of the Buyer and no warranties as to safety of the goods are given. Lyon & Turnbull provide no guarantee as to the originality of any wood/material contained within the item.

(d) Should any provision of these Conditions of Sale be held unenforceable for any reason, the remaining provisions shall remain in full force and effect.

(7) Special terms may be used in catalogue descriptions of particular classes of items (Books, Jewellery, Paintings, Guns, Firearms etc.) in which case the descriptions must be interpreted in accordance with any glossary appearing in the catalogue. These notices and terms will also form part of our terms and conditions of sales.

(f) The contract between the parties may be varied by the parties by agreement and in writing.

12. BOOKS, CLOCKS & WATCHES (1) Books-Collation: If on collation any NAMED item in the sale catalogue proves defective, in text or illustration the Buyer may reject the lot provided he returns it within 21 days of the sale stating the defect in writing. This, however, shall not apply in the case of unnamed items, periodicals, autographed letters, music M.M.S., maps, drawings NOR in respect of damage to bindings, stains, foxing, marginal worm holes or other defects not affecting the completeness of the text NOR in respect of Defects mentioned in the catalogue, or at the time of sale, NOR in respect of lots sold for less than £300. (2) Clocks & Watches: All lots are sold “as seen”, and the absence of any reference to the condition of a clock or watch does not imply the lot is in good condition and without defects, repairs or restorations. Most clocks and watches will have been repaired during their normal lifetime and may now incorporate additional/newer parts. Furthermore, Lyon & Turnbull makes no representation or warranty that any clock or watch is in working order. As clocks and watches often contain fine and complex mechanisms, Buyers should be aware that a general service, change of battery or further repair work, for which the Buyer is solely responsible, may be necessary. Buyers should also be aware that Lyon & Turnbull cannot guarantee a watch will remain waterproof if the back is removed. Buyers should be aware that the importing watches such as Rolex, Frank Muller and Corum into the United States is highly restricted. These watches cannot be shipped to the USA and only imported personally. 13. CITES Please be aware that all lots marked with the symbol Y are subject to CITES regulations when exporting these items outside the EU. These regulations may be found at http://www.defra.gov.uk/ahvla-en/ importsexports/cites/ Lyon & Turnbull accepts no liability for any lots which may be subject to CITES but have not be identified as such.

(e) These Conditions of Sale are not assignable by either party without the other's prior written consent. No act, omission or delay by Lyon & Turnbull shall be deemed a waiver or release of any of its rights.

17. DATA PROTECTION In connection with the management and operation of our business and the marketing and supply of Lyon & Turnbull's services, or as required by law, we may ask the Buyer to provide personal information about themselves or obtain information about the Buyer from third parties (e.g. credit information). Lyon & Turnbull will not give out personal information except as may be required by law. If you would like further information on Lyon & Turnbull policies on personal data, or to make corrections to your information, please contact us on +44 (0)131 557 8844.. The Buyer hereby agrees to the release by Lyon & Turnbull of the Buyer’s name and contact details to the seller or the seller’s solicitor in the event of any dispute between Lyon & Turnbull and the Buyer and/or Lyon & Turnbull and the Seller. Lyon & Turnbull will give prior written notice of the release of any such details to the Seller of the Seller’s solicitor. 18. FORCE MA JEURE Lyon & Turnbull shall be under no liability if they shall be unable to carry out any provision of the Contract of Sale for any reason beyond their control including (without limiting the foregoing) an act of God, legislation, war, fire, flood, drought, failure of power supply, lock-out, strike or other action taken by employees in contemplation or furtherance of a dispute or owing to any inability to procure materials required for the performance of the contract. 19. LAW AND JURISDICTION (a) Governing Law: These Conditions of Sale and all aspects of all matters, transactions or disputes to which they relate or apply shall be governed by, and interpreted in accordance with, Scots law (b) Jurisdiction: The Buyer agrees that the Courts of Scotland are to have exclusive jurisdiction to settle all disputes arising in connection with all aspects of all matters or transactions to which these Conditions of Sale relate or apply.


Guide to Bidding & Payment Payment

Registration All potential buyers must register prior to placing a bid. Registration information may be submitted in person at our registration desk, by email, by fax or on our website. Please note that all first time bidders at Lyon & Turnbull will be asked to supply the following documents in order to facilitate registration: 1 – Government issued photo ID (Passport/ Driving licence) 2 – Proof of address (utility bill/ bank statement). We may, at our option, also ask you to provide a bank reference and/ or deposit. By registering for the sale, the buyer acknowledges that he or she has read, understood and accepted our Conditions of Sale.

Bidding At the Sale Registered bidders will be assigned a bidder number and given a paddle for use at the sale. Once the first bid has been placed, the auctioneer asks for higher bids in increments determined by the auctioneer. To place your bid, simply raise your paddle until the auctioneer acknowledges you. Please ensure that the auctioneer repeats your bidder number correctly when confirming the sale. If there is any doubt at this stage as to the hammer price or buyer it must be brought to the auctioneer’s attention immediately. All lots will be invoiced to the name and address given on your registration form, which is non-transferable.

By phone A limited number of telephone lines are available for bidding by phone through a Lyon & Turnbull representative. Phone lines must be reserved in advance. All bid requests must be received an hour before the sale. All telephone bids must be confirmed in writing, listing the relevant lots and appropriate number to be called. We recommend that a covering bid is also left in the event that we are unable to make the call. We cannot guarantee that lines will be available, or that we will be able to call you on the day, but will endeavor to undertake such bids to the best of our abilities. This service is available entirely at our discretion and at the bidder’s risk. In writing Bid forms are available at the sale and/or the back of the catalogue. These should be submitted in person, by post, or by fax as soon as possible prior to the sale and we will bid on your behalf up to the limit indicated. In the event of receiving two identical bids the first one received will take precedence. All bids must be received an hour before the sale. This service is entirely at the bidder’s risk. On the internet A fully-illustrated catalogue is available on our website. Registered bidders may leave absentee bids through the website and will receive email confirmation of their bid. Live online bidding (powered by Invaluable) is also available, accessible either through our website or at www.invaluable.com. Please note that an additional 3% premium is charged by Invaluable for this live online service.

Payment is due within seven (7) days of the sale. Lots purchased will not be released until full payment has been received. Payment may be made by the following methods: Bank Transfer Account details are included on any invoices we issue or upon request from our accounts department. Credit or Debit Cards Payment can be made by Visa Debit, Maestro, Mastercard or Visa Credit cards. Please note there is a 2% surcharge on credit card payments and we do not accept Amex. Online Card Payments We no longer accept card payments by phone. Please use our online payment service (provided by Cardstream/Credorax. You will find a link to this service in any email invoice issued or you can visit the payments section of our website. Cheque Cheques should be made payable to Lyon and Turnbull Ltd. We reserve the right to wait until cheques have been cleared by our bankers before releasing bought goods. Cheques can be cleared prior to sale on request. Cheques drawn by third parties cannot be accepted. If paying by post please include the slip from your invoice. Cash Cash payments can be made at the accounts desk during or after a sale. Cash payments limited to €15,000 (euros).

© Lyon & Turnbull Ltd. 2016. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted by any form or by any means without the prior written permission of Lyon & Turnbull Ltd.


LYON & TURNBULL AUCTIONEERS EDINBURGH SCOTTISH PAINTINGS & SCULPTURE

182 Bath Street, Glasgow G2 4HG Tel. +44 (0)141 333 1992 Fax. +44 (0)141 332 8240

78 Pall Mall, London SW1Y 5ES Tel. +44 (0)20 7930 9115 Fax. +44 (0)141 7930 7274

9TH JUNE, 2016

33 Broughton Place, Edinburgh EH1 3RR Tel. +44 (0)131 557 8844 Fax. +44 (0)131 557 8668 Email. info@lyonandturnbull.com www.lyonandturnbull.com

Thursday 9th June, 2016 33 Broughton Place Edinburgh

Scottish Paintings & Sculpture

Profile for Lyon & Turnbull

Scottish Paintings & Sculpture | 9th June 2016 | 6pm  

Scottish Paintings & Sculpture | 9th June 2016 | 6pm