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David Hockney The Complete Early Etchings 1961–1964


David Hockney The Complete Early Etchings 1961–1964


3 February – 10 March 2017 Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert 38 Bury Street St James’s London SW1Y 6BB +44 (0)20 7839 7600 www.hh-h.com in association with Lyndsey Ingram +44 (0)20 7581 8664 www.lyndseyingram.com

David Hockney The Complete Early Etchings 1961–1964


‘I started doing graphic work in 1961 because I’d run out of money and I couldn’t buy any paint, and in the graphic department they gave you the materials free. So I started etching…’ David Hockney, 1976


Introduction James Holland-Hibbert and Lyndsey Ingram

David Hockney continues to inspire us with

We are indebted to all those who have helped

his protean approach to creating images. He

with the exhibition, including Leslie and Johanna

constantly questions techniques, received wisdom

Garfield, Simon Aaron, Stefan Turnbull and John

and the way that we look at the world around us.

Kasmin. We also wish to thank Tate for the loan

Throughout his career he has been a committed

of Queen and the Royal College of Art who allowed

printmaker, complementing his work as a painter.

us to include Big Tyger, a painting from Hockney's

From etchings to iPads, Hockney has pushed

student days. We extend thanks also to Hockney

the practice of creating multiple images with

Pictures, Sarah Greenberg and Marco Livingstone

a relentless verve and curiosity.

for his thoughtful advice and catalogue essay.

This is the first comprehensive exhibition

The works in this exhibition form a portrait

of Hockney’s early etchings made between

of the artist as a young man and enhance

1961–1964. They are personal, filled with youthful

our understanding of Hockney’s artistic roots.

energy and rich with autobiographical content.

We are delighted to be collaborating on this

Perhaps most interestingly, they reveal his original

long overdue survey. It is a period of the artist’s

approach to printmaking – a medium he adopted

work for which we share a great enthusiasm.

as an impecunious student at the Royal College of Art. He continued etching after his graduation and it was the submission of the etching, Three Kings and a Queen, that won him the art prize enabling him to make his first trip to the United States. This visit inspired the groundbreaking series A Rake’s Progress.

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In the Beginning: David Hockney’s first etchings Marco Livingstone

As a naturally gifted draughtsman, David Hockney

themes that dominated the work with which he

immediately felt in his element when he decided to

first made his name. His heroes from literature

try his hand at etching in 1961 as a postgraduate

and politics, the great 19th-century American

student at the Royal College of Art. Having run out

poet Walt Whitman and the driving force of the

of money for painting materials, but in the full flow

Indian independence movement, Mahatma Gandhi,

of creating highly personal images in the faux-naive

celebrated as a civil rights leader for his ‘passive

style that marked his arrival as a mature artist, he

resistance’, are depicted as saintly figures with

wasted no time in visiting the print workshop when

haloes around their heads. The skinny young artist,

he discovered that students could avail themselves

paying his respects and humbly enumerating his

of all the materials and facilities there for free.1

own qualities with the laconic phrase ‘I am 23 years

Discovering a new tool or a new medium was for

old and wear glasses’, looks on deferentially. Behind

him then, as it has remained to this day, cause for

him a Valentine’s heart, with his own initials to one

celebration as an incentive for finding new ways of

side and those of these great mentors on the other,

creating images.

confirms the overriding aspiration of Hockney’s art: a desire to communicate love in all its forms.

Hockney had produced a few highly accomplished colour lithographs in the mid-1950s as a student

That Whitman wrote so naturally of his emotional

in his native Bradford, but had not had occasion

and physical bonds with other men, at a time when

to try etching before. His very first essay in this

Hockney himself was publicly proclaiming his own

previously untested medium, Myself and My Heroes,

homosexuality through his art, was a cause for

is far too accomplished to be labelled experimental.

celebration. Though other painters, notably Francis

Wisely confining himself to the basics of line

Bacon, had conveyed a strong homo-eroticism

and tone – using the etching needle to incise his

in their art, it was two poets, Whitman and the

images into the ground, and various densities of

Alexandrian Greek 20th-century poet C. P. Cavafy,

aquatint to create the dramatic backdrop to his

who provided specific inspiration for a number of

three delineated figures and to give a physical

Hockney’s early pictures, including etchings made

weight to their torsos and heads – he found himself

in this first great burst of graphic invention from

immediately in his comfort zone. Working on small

1961 through to 1964. From Cavafy’s poems he

plates comparable in size to the sheets of paper on

derived the motifs of Kaisarion with all his Beauty

which he was accustomed to drawing, and keeping

and Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, the lines 'proud to

the techniques simple enough for him to be able

have received upon itself this beauty for a few

to proceed on his own with limited assistance from

minutes’ coming from the poem ‘Mirror in the Hall’.

technicians, 2 he was able to devise images with

One of Michelangelo’s homo-erotic love sonnets

a spirited spontaneity and to endow them with the

is illustrated by an etching, In Memoriam Cecchino

same degree of personal touch as his paintings

Bracci, of which only a single impression appears

and unique works on paper. This initial foray into

to have been pulled; four lines from a translation

etching carries the force of a manifesto not just of

into English of this epigram, in a printed type that

his graphic aesthetic but also of the highly personal

contrasts with the characterful handwriting splayed

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around the boundaries of the coffin bearing the

of the threatening vagina dentata – labelled ‘snatch

young man, foreground the powerful expression of

(nasty)’ – from which the male lover is about to

grief and loss conveyed also by the large untouched

rescue him. Resolution arrives in the form of an

area of the plate expressed as an eloquent void. 3

image of embracing figures who ‘lived happily ever after’, depicted almost exactly like the couple locked

The title of The Fires of Furious Desire, attesting to

into each other’s arms in the Whitman-inspired

the volcanic surge of sexual attraction experienced

painting that was to follow quickly in the same year,

in puberty and young adulthood, was adapted from

the celebrated We Two Boys Together Clinging (1961).

another poem, ‘The Flames of Furious Desire’, this time by the visionary poet and artist William Blake,

Berger had a further cameo in a print made three

whose marriage of words and images nearly two

years later, Jungle Boy, shown in profile as a hairy

centuries earlier was another important source of

naked body greeting a phallic snake in an exotic

inspiration. With the zeal of the convert, or should

garden (with all the attendant Biblical overtones of

one say with the excitement of a young man in the

temptation).5 The last of the etchings made by Hockney

throes of testosterone-fuelled libido, Hockney’s

in 1964, before taking a two-year break from the

work through to 1966, when in his late twenties

medium, was fittingly a tribute to another idiosyncratic

he created a series of etchings illustrating the

poet and artist, Edward Lear, whose limericks and

erotic poems of Cavafy, remained so in thrall to the

‘nonsense poems’ provided a way for the imagination

pleasure principle that even the most innocent or

to take flight: he is depicted in fragments in the

heterosexual sources of inspiration became homo-

middle distance on this large plate, behind the poet’s

sexualised. An emphatic declaration of Hockney’s

name spelled out in large stencilled letters, half-

orientation, in his own mind deliberately and

hidden by an extravagantly stylised palm tree, the

doggedly imbued with a subversive propagandistic

entire scene theatrically revealed in the opening of

quality, courses through Queen and other early

a set of curtains suspended from a rail near the

prints, with their bold embrace of such terms as

plate’s upper edge.

‘queer’ and ‘queen’, often used as derogatory expressions but defiantly reclaimed as a declaration

Flying against the prejudices then current,

of a gay man’s knowing rejection of societal norms.

especially among abstract artists, against ‘literary’ qualities and narrative, Hockney went out of his

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Always an avid reader, Hockney responded

way to take these on board, as is evident from the

immediately and with great enthusiasm to the

two illustrations to the fairy tale ‘Rumpelstiltskin’

touching confessional homo-eroticism of Cavafy’s

essayed in 1961 and 1962, his first engagements

poetry, as to Whitman’s, to both of which he had

with the work of the Brothers Grimm which were

been introduced by a fellow student at the Royal

to culminate at the end of the decade in a magnum

College, Adrian Berg, whose open and confident

opus of thirty-nine etchings realised in a more sober

homosexuality helped him in accepting his own.4

and controlled linear language. The world of the

Another fellow student, the American Mark Berger,

imagination represented by story-telling and poetry

who was also bold for that time in openly embracing

was closely linked in Hockney’s mind to his own

his homosexuality – when sexual acts between men

experience, which in his prints, as in the equally

were still against the law in the UK – was the author

imaginative paintings of that period, contributes a

of an unpublished short story cum gay fairy tale,

diaristic autobiographical authenticity and intensity

‘Gretchen and the Snurl’ (the manuscript of which

to imagery that speaks vividly of formative episodes

is now in the New York Public Library), that Hockney

in his own life. The first trip he made to the USA in

illustrated in the episodic manner of a comic strip

the summer break in 1961, thanks to a monetary

through five separate plates printed on a single

prize he had been awarded for an earlier etching,6 is

sheet. Here a sentimental expression of romantic

commemorated in one of the most breezily engaging

attachment to another boy (‘io t’amo bambino’),

of his early prints, My Bonnie Lies over the Ocean.

camply identified as Gretchen, gives way, with a

Here the young artist represents himself as a stick

rather jarring element of misogyny, to a depiction

figure clinging on to the red, white and blue of the


American flag, a symbol for him of the liberation he found in New York City. Respectfully recording the date of the visit in words carved directly onto the plate, he also uses the lyrics of a popular song to lament the distance between him and a straight friend, Peter Crutch, with whom he was in love and whom he had left behind in London. Though Hockney had portrayed himself with his heroes in his very first etching and in the following year also produced an etched self-portrait of which he printed only a few impressions, he intuited that a more oblique representation of the circumstances and events of his life would be more effective than a straightforward rendering of his appearance. As in his paintings of the time, inspired in part by the example of Jean Dubuffet’s art brut, the expressive awkwardness of the language of child art serves in the etchings as a powerful signifier of vulnerability and a paradoxical stuttering eloquence. Downplaying and even suppressing his natural facility, by appropriating a deliberately clumsy style of depiction he invites the viewer to identify with his own frailties. There is at times, too, a witty illusion of self-mockery, for example in the way he represents himself in The Diploma being held aloft by the Royal College’s principal, Robin Darwin, who is himself about to be eaten alive by a hugejawed beast for having come to the defence of the gifted young artist. Having recently been told that he would not be awarded his diploma because of his failure to deliver the written essays demanded by the College for the General Studies course, Hockney with customary cheek had decided to award himself a replacement diploma of his own design. In the end, the college authorities relented, not only allowing him to graduate but awarding him the gold medal for his year. Hockney’s self-penned diploma vindicates his contrariness, confirming his belief that the only paper qualifications that should matter to a visual artist are those created through the work itself. A few of Hockney’s early etchings, including two of the most visually arresting – The Marriage and The Hypnotist – relate directly to paintings he had just made, reconfigured now in more starkly graphic terms. Three Kings and a Queen ties in with David Hockney in front of The Hypnotist, 1963

paintings he had been making based on playing

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David Hockney at the Editions Alecto print studios, working on A Rake’s Progress

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cards, bringing him into a tangential relationship to

After dalliances with politics and religion Hockney’s

the Pop Art then emerging as a major art movement.7

rake finds himself, as in the Hogarth series, in

The painting The Most Beautiful Boy in the World,

Bedlam, but of a specifically contemporary kind.

in which DB (Doll Boy, Hockney’s term for the

The featureless and personality-free zombies who

character he based on the pop star Cliff Richard) is

populate the final plate, each locked into his own

depicted wearing a provocatively see-through ‘baby

world as he listens to the local radio station through

doll’ nightie, was reconfigured as the etching Alka

earphones, provide a stark warning from the artist

Seltzer. Hockney’s passionate engagement with

to himself, an admonition not to float through life

the medium, however, led him to work on his metal

unthinkingly. The sixteen plates of the series, like

plates almost exclusively as surfaces onto which

all these etchings from one of the most productive

to create new images that were brought into being

and original periods of Hockney’s constantly self-

specifically as editioned prints. This is nowhere

regenerating career, provide the most persuasive and

more evident than in the magnum opus of this first,

telling evidence that there was little danger of him

and very thrilling, phase of his long and constantly

falling prey to such a disastrous fate. His conscious,

inventive career: the set of sixteen etchings, The

questioning attitude, his determination to discover

Rake’s Progress, inspired by his visit to New York

a craft unfamiliar to him and then to reshape it to his

in July 1961, initiated immediately on his return to

own ends, his self-evident delight in the possibilities

London and finally concluded two years later after

afforded by a particular medium, his ability to engage

his graduation from the Royal College. Modelled on

with tradition and then make it new, all contribute to

the narrative structure of William Hogarth’s eight

a body of work that remains among Hockney’s finest

engravings published under the same collective title,

contributions to the world of art.

which in turn were translations into black-and-white of his own set of paintings, Hockney’s prints were conceived as a cautionary tale inspired by his own recent experiences reimagined through a graphic shorthand representation of his alter-ego. Hockney depicts himself in the first Rake’s Progress plate, suitcase in hand, straight off his charter flight on Flying Tiger airline, a male ingénue heading determinedly towards the phallic allure of the city’s skyscrapers. He enjoys immediate success, selling two of his etchings to the city’s most powerful graphics curator, William S. Lieberman at the Museum of Modern Art, in an amusing twist on the financial windfall received by Hogarth’s ne’er-do-well anti-hero. On the way, he experiences the sights and sounds of American life, reinvents himself as a bottle blond in order to test the truth of Clairol’s ad campaign (‘Is it true blondes have more fun?’), looks longingly and with self-loathing at the desirable bodies of young athletes, explores the city’s dens of iniquity (gay bars being more overtly visible there than in early sixties’ London) and enters a marriage of convenience to a woman so fundamentally unconnected to him that her face is not even shown. (This particular episode in the story was not, needless to say, based on his own experience: fact and fiction intersect, collide and disperse once again throughout the series.)

1 See David Hockney by David Hockney (London: Thames & Hudson, 1976), p.64. 2 Hockney proofed many of these early etchings himself, but most were editioned by Ron Fuller and Peter Matthews at the Royal College. See David Hockney prints 1954–77 (exh. cat., The Midland Group and the Scottish Arts Council in association with Petersburg press, 1977), for full details of the production and publication of each print. 3 Bracci, from a wealthy Florentine family, is thought to have been Michelangelo’s lover. When he died aged sixteen in 1544, when the the Renaissance master was 69, Michelangelo created several dozen four-line epigrams in the boy’s memory and also designed his tomb, on which four of these lines were inscribed. In the same year as this uneditioned print, Hockney made a painting of the same title, on a coffin-shaped canvas measuring seven by three feet (now in the Thyssen-Bornemisza Collection, Madrid). 4 See Christopher Simon Sykes, Hockney: The Biography, volume I, 1937–1975, The Rake’s Progress (London: Century, 2011), pp.70–73. 5 Sykes, Ibid., p.141, records that Berger, by then back in New York, kept snakes as pets. 6 The prize, for Three Kings and a Queen, was awarded to him by the art dealer Robert Erskine, who also encouraged Hockney to visit the influential museum curator William S. Lieberman on that first visit to New York. See David Hockney by David Hockney, op. cit., p.65. 7 Other painters in Hockney’s year, notably Allen Jones, Peter Phillips and Derek Boshier, were to embrace Pop imagery, while Hockney and his closest friend, the American R. B. Kitaj, chose to keep their distance while still being credited as major forces in the evolution of Pop. An American proto-Pop painter known to and admired by all the British artists, Larry Rivers, had himself made paintings in the form of grossly enlarged playing cards; Hockney may well have been paying a knowing homage to these in his choice of motif.

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1 Myself and My Heroes 1961 Etching and aquatint 17¾ × 26 ½ inches; 45 × 67.5 cm

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‘T he Fires of Furious Desire is from William Blake – I think Blake’s title is ‘The Flames of Furious Desire’ – and it’s a little self-portrait. When I turned a bit against using literary sources for painting for a while, I never gave them up in the prints much. It seemed to me much easier to respond to them in a graphic way; it probably still is.’ David Hockney, 1976

2 Fires of Furious Desire 1961 Etching and aquatint 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm

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3 Alka Seltzer 1961 Etching and aquatint 15¾ × 11½ inches; 40 × 29 cm

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‘I won a prize of a hundred pounds for Three Kings and a Queen, from Robert Erskine who ran a print gallery. It was amazing! I just got the cheque through the post. I didn’t even know the exhibition was on. I’d just arranged, before that, to go to America in the summer, which was something very special to me. First of all, to be able to go away in the summer without taking a job was something. Somebody’d offered me this ticket for ten pounds, and I was to pay another thirty pounds later; I hadn’t got the thirty pounds, but I had the ten, and I thought, well, take it. And then I got this hundred pounds! I took with me a hundred and ten pounds to New York for three months. That was in summer 1961. Going was more of an accident, being offered the ticket. Before that I thought it cost a thousand pounds to cross the Atlantic, way beyond me.’ David Hockney, 1976

4 Three Kings and a Queen 1961 Etching and aquatint 22 ¼ × 31¼ inches; 56.5 × 79 cm

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‘B efore I left England, Robert Erskine had said to me Take some etchings and go and see William Lieberman at the Museum of Modern Art; I’m sure he’ll buy some off you. I thought, The Museum of Modern Art! I can’t do that. Anyway I took a bundle with me to New York, but I didn’t go to see him. I did meet him, however, later on, and he said Why haven’t you come to see me? Robert Erskine wrote me a letter about you. I didn’t think it would work like that. He did buy them; he took a copy of each of Kaisarion and Mirror, Mirror on the Wall for the Museum, and he sold all the other copies I’d taken. I got about two hundred dollars, which was a lot of money for me, and I bought a suit, an American suit, and bleached my hair.’ David Hockney, 1976

5 Kaisarion with all his Beauty 1961 Etching and aquatint printed black and red 22½ × 15¾ inches; 57 × 40 cm

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6 Gretchen and the Snurl 1961 Etching printed on five plates 11½ × 31¼ inches; 29 × 79 cm

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‘M irror, Mirror, on the Wall is from Snow White, and the other lines at the bottom, ‘proud to have received upon…’ are from ‘The Mirror in the Hall’, another Cavafy poem which I loved, because the idea of making a mirror have feelings is a wonderful poetic idea that strongly appeals to me.’ David Hockney, 1976

7 Mirror, Mirror on the Wall 1961 Etching and aquatint printed black and red 22 × 31¼ inches; 56 × 79 cm

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8 Study for Rumpelstiltskin 1961 Etching printed on four plates 9¾ × 22 inches; 25 × 56 cm

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10 The Diploma 1962 Etching and aquatint printed black and red 22¼ × 15 ½ inches; 56.5 × 39.5 cm

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11 My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean 1962 Etching and aquatint printed black, blue and red 22 × 22 ¼ inches; 56 × 56.5 cm

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‘I never seem to be able to go around a museum at the same pace as anybody else, and when I went to the Pergamon Museum with Jeff we got separated. Suddenly I caught sight of him standing next to an Egyptian sculptured figure, unconcerned about it because he was studying something on the wall. Both figures were looking the same way, and it amused me that in my first glimpse of them they looked united.’ David Hockney, 1976

12 The Marriage 1962 Etching and aquatint 20 ¼ × 25¼ inches; 51.5 × 64 cm

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13 Rumpelstiltskin 1962 Etching and aquatint 15¾ × 22 ½ inches; 40 × 57.5 cm

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14 Self Portrait 1962 Etching and aquatint 21¾ × 13 ½ inches; 55.5 × 34 cm

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16 Study for Seven Stone Weakling 1962 Etching and aquatint 11¾ × 15½ inches; 30 × 39.5 cm

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‘T hese etchings were begun in London in September 1961 after a visit to the United States. My intention was to make eight plates, keeping the original titles but moving the setting to New York. The Royal College, on seeing me start work, were anxious to extend the series with the idea of incorporating the plates in a book of reproductions to be printed by the Lion and Unicorn Press; accordingly I set out to make twenty-four plates, but later reduced the total to sixteen, retaining the numbering from one to eight and most of the titles in the original tale.’ David Hockney, December 1963

17 A Rakes Progress 1961–63 The complete portfolio of sixteen etching and aquatints printed in black and red 19 ¼ × 24 inches, 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 1) The Arrival 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 1A) Receiving the Inheritance 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 2) Meeting the Good People (Washington) 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 2A) The Gospel Singing (Good People) Madison Square Garden 1961– 63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 3) The Start of the Spending Spree and the Door Opening for a Blonde 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 3A) The Seven Stone Weakling 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 4) The Drinking Scene 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 4A) Marries An Old Maid 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 5) The Election Campaign (with Dark Message) 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 5A) Viewing a Prison Scene 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 6) Death in Harlem 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 6A) The Wallet Begins to Empty 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 7) Disintegration 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 7A) Cast Aside 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 8) Meeting the Other People 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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17 (Plate 8A) Bedlam 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm

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‘I was doing A Rake’s Progress, which I’d started in 1961; I didn’t finish it till 1963, because it was a long job. I didn’t have an assistant then. I started on it when I came back from New York. My original intention was to do eight etchings, to take Hogarth’s titles and somehow play with them and set it in New York in modern times. What I liked was telling a story just visually. Hogarth’s original story has no words, it’s a graphic tale. You have to interpret it all.’ David Hockney, 1976

18 Rake’s Poster 1963 Lithograph printed in black and red 31 × 22 inches; 79 × 56 cm

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‘M y version has a rather evil-looking hypnotist and an innocent helpless-looking boy (he has no viable arms). This is one of the few early paintings from which I made an etching. I drew the etching plate with the figures in the same positions as in the painting, but of course when it was printed it was reversed. Seeing both pictures together made me realize that even pictures read from left to right.’ David Hockney, 1976

19 The Hypnotist 1963 Etching and aquatint printed black and red 25½ × 22 ½ inches; 65 × 57 cm

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20 Jungle Boy 1964 Etching and aquatint printed black and red 20 × 24¼ inches; 50.5 × 61.5 cm

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21 Edward Lear 1964 Etching and aquatint 24 × 20 inches; 61 × 51 cm

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22 The Acrobat 1964 Etching and aquatint 22¾ × 31¼ inches; 57.5 × 79 cm

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List of works

1 [p.13] Myself and My Heroes 1961 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 17¾ × 26 ½ inches; 45 × 67.5 cm Plate size: 10 ¼ × 19¾ inches; 26 × 50 cm Signed in pencil Edition of Aproximately 50 Printed by Ron Fuller and Peter Mathews at the Royal College of Art, London English handmade paper Published by the artist 2 [p.15] Fires of Furious Desire 1961 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Plate size: 6 × 11 inches; 15 × 28 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 75 Printed by Maurice Payne, London Crisbrook handmade paper Published by Petersburg Press, London (1969) 3 [p.17] Alka Seltzer 1961 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 15¾ × 11½ inches; 40 × 29 cm Plate size: 11 × 5 inches; 28 × 13 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 15 Printed by Maurice Payne, London Crisbrook handmade paper Published by Petersburg Press, London (1969) 4 [p.19] Three Kings and a Queen 1961 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 22 ¼ × 31¼ inches; 56.5 × 79 cm Plate size: 9 × 25 ¾ inches; 23 × 65.5 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by Ron Fuller and Peter Mathews at the Royal College of Art, London English handmade paper Published by the artist

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5 [p.21] Kaisarion with all his Beauty 1961 Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 22 ½ × 15¾ inches; 57 × 40 cm Plate size: 19 ¼ × 10 ¾ inches; 49 × 27.5 cm Signed in pencil Edition of aproximately 50 Printed by Ron Fuller and Peter Mathews at the Royal College of Art, London English handmade paper Published by the artist 6 [p.23] Gretchen and the Snurl 1961 Etching printed on five plates Sheet size: 11½ × 31¼ inches; 29 × 79 cm Plate size: various Signed in pencil Edition of 75 Printed by Peter Mathews, London Crisbrook handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto (1963) 7 [p.25] Mirror, Mirror on the Wall 1961 Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 22 × 31¼ inches; 56 × 79 cm Plate size: 15¾ × 19¾ inches; 40 × 50 cm Signed in pencil Edition of Aproximately 50 Printed by Ron Fuller and Peter Mathews at the Royal College of Art, London English handmade paper Published by the artist 8 [p.27] Study For Rumpelstiltskin 1961 Etching printed on four plates Sheet size: 9¾ × 22 inches; 25 × 56 cm Plate size: various Signed in pencil Edition of 15 Printed by Maurice Payne, London Crisbrook handmade paper Published by Petersburg Press, London (1972)

9 [p.29] Queen 1961 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 17¾ × 11½ inches; 45 × 29 cm Plate size: 10 × 6 ¼ inches; 25.5 × 16 cm Signed in pencil Unknown edition. Possibly unique Printed by the artist Paper unknown Published by the artist Loaned by the Tate: Presented by Klaus Anschel in memory of his wife Gerty 1997 10 [p.31] The Diploma 1962 Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 22¼ × 15½ inches; 56.5 × 39.5 cm Plate size: 15¾ × 11 inches; 40 × 28 cm Signed in pencil Edition of aproximately 40 Printed by Ron Fuller and Peter Mathews at the Royal College of Art, London English handmade paper Published by the artist 11 [p.33] My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean 1962 Etching and aquatint printed black, blue, and red Sheet size: 22 × 22 ¼ inches; 56 × 56.5 cm Plate size: 17¾ × 17¾ inches; 45 × 45 cm Signed in pencil Edition of aproximately 50 Printed by Ron Fuller and Peter Mathews at the Royal College of Art, London English handmade paper Published by the artist 12 [p.35] The Marriage 1962 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 20 ¼ × 25¼ inches; 51.5 × 64 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 75 Printed by Birgit Skiold, London J Green mould-made Published by Petersburg Press, London (1968)


13 [p.37] Rumpelstiltskin 1962 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 15¾ × 22 ½ inches; 40 × 57.5 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of aproximately 10 Printed by Peter Mathews, London English handmade paper Published by the artist 14 [p.39] Self Portrait 1962 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 21¾ × 13½ inches; 55.5 × 34 cm Plate size: 19 × 10 ¼ inches; 48 × 26 cm Signed in pencil Edition of three Printed by the artist Paper unknown Published by the artist 15 [p.41] In Memoriam Cecchino Bracci 1962 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 17¾ × 19½ inches; 45 × 49.5 cm Plate size: 13 × 13¾ inches; 33 × 35 cm Signed in pencil Edition of one. Unique Printed by the artist Paper unknown Published by the artist Collection of Leslie and Johanna Garfield 16 [p.43] Study for Seven Stone Weakling 1962 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 11¾ × 15½ inches; 30 × 39.5 cm Plate size: 14 × 20 ¾ inches; 36 × 53 cm Signed in pencil Edition of one. Unique Printer unknown Paper unknown Published by the artist 17 [p.45] A Rakes Progress 1961–63 The complete portfolio of sixteen etching and aquatints printed in black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Each sheet signed in pencil Edition of 50 With the title page, justification and artists introductory text In the original red cloth wrappers Black slip case with title and editions Alecto imprint Printed by C. H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

17 (Plate 1) [p.46] The Arrival 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

17 (Plate 3A) [p.51] The Seven Stone Weakling 1961– 63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

17 (Plate 1A) [p.47] Receiving the Inheritance 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

17 (Plate 4) [p.52] The Drinking Scene 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

17 (Plate 2) [p.48] Meeting the Good People (Washington) 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

17 (Plate 4A) [p.53] Marries An Old Maid 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

17 (Plate 2A) [p.49] The Gospel Singing (Good People) Madison Square Garden 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto 17 (Plate 3) [p.50] The Start of the Spending Spree and the Door Opening for a Blonde 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

17 (Plate 5) [p.54] The Election Campaign (with Dark Message) 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto 17 (Plate 5A) [p.55] Viewing a Prison Scene 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

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17 (Plate 6) [p.56] Death in Harlem 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

17 (Plate 8A) [p.61] Bedlam 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

17 (Plate 6A) [p.57] The Wallet Begins to Empty 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

18 [p.63] Rake’s Poster 1963 Lithograph printed in black and red Sheet size: 31 × 22 inches; 79 × 56 cm Signed in pencil Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

17 (Plate 7) [p.58] Disintegration 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto 17 (Plate 7A) [p.59] Cast Aside 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto 17 (Plate 8) [p.60] Meeting the Other People 1961–63 From A Rake’s Progress Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 19¼ × 24 inches; 49 × 61 cm Plate size: 11¾ × 15¾ inches; 30 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by C.H. Welch, London Barcham Green handmade paper Published by Editions Alecto

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19 [p.65] The Hypnotist 1963 Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 25 ½ × 22 ½ inches; 65 × 57 cm Plate size: 19 ¾ × 19 ¾ inches; 50 × 50 cm Signed in pencil Edition of aproximately 50 Printed by Peter Mathews at the Royal Colege of Art, London English handmade paper Published by the artist 20 [p.67] Jungle Boy 1964 Etching and aquatint printed black and red Sheet size: 20 × 24 ¼ inches; 50.5 × 61.5 cm Plate size: 15 ¾ × 19 ½ inches; 40 × 49.5 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by Giulio Sorrini, New York Mould-made paper Published by Associated American Artists 21 [p.69] Edward Lear 1964 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 24 × 20 inches; 61 × 51 cm Plate size: 19 ¾ × 15 ¾ inches; 50 × 40 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 50 Printed by Giulio Sorrini, New York Mould-made paper Published by Associated American Artists 22 [p.71] The Acrobat 1964 Etching and aquatint Sheet size: 22 ¾ × 31¼ inches; 57.5 × 79 cm Plate size: 17¾ × 23¾ inches; 45 × 60.5 cm Signed in pencil Edition of 15 Printed by Maurice Payne, London Crisbrook handmade paper Published by Petersburg Press, London (1969)


Sources for quotations

Photo credits

[p.4] David Hockney by David Hockney, My Early Years, 1976, Thames and Hudson, p.64

[p.9] © Trunk archive Photo credit: Snowdon

[p.14] David Hockney by David Hockney, My Early Years, 1976, Thames and Hudson, p.64

[p.10] © Timelapse Library Ltd . Getty Images Photo credit: Tony Evans

[p.18] David Hockney by David Hockney, My Early Years, 1976, Thames and Hudson, p.65

[p.29] © David Hockney Photo credit: Richard Schmidt

[p.20] David Hockney by David Hockney, My Early Years, 1976, Thames and Hudson, p.65

[p.40] © David Hockney Photo credit: Noel Allum, New York

[p.24] David Hockney by David Hockney, My Early Years, 1976, Thames and Hudson, p.64 [p.34] David Hockney by David Hockney, My Early Years, 1976, Thames and Hudson, p.89 [p.44] Artist’s introductory text for A Rakes Progress, 1963 [p.62] David Hockney by David Hockney, My Early Years, 1976, Thames and Hudson, p.91 [p.64] David Hockney by David Hockney, My Early Years, 1976, Thames and Hudson, p.90

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Published by Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert and Lyndsey Ingram On the occasion of the exhibition David Hockney: The Complete Early Etchings 1961–1964 3 February – 10 March 2017 Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert 38 Bury Street St James’s London SW1Y 6BB Copyright © Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert / Lyndsey Ingram 2017 Copyright © Marco Livingstone 2017 All images copyright © David Hockney ISBN 978 0-9569128-5-5 All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior permission in writing from the publishers. Designed by Paul Arnot Printed by Dayfold Ltd Jacket: David Hockney, Jungle Boy 1964 (detail) p.2: David Hockney, The Hypnotist 1963 (detail) p.6: David Hockney, Myself and My Heroes 1961 (detail) opposite: David Hockney, Kaisarion and all his Beauty 1961 (detail)


Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert in association with Lyndsey Ingram

David Hockney: The Complete Early Etchings 1961-1964  
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