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JANE HAM MOND N AT U R A L S E L E C T I O N


JANE HAM MOND N AT U R A L S E L E C T I O N

10th May – 15th June 2018

Lyndsey Ingram 20 Bourdon Street London W1K 3PL T. +44

(0)20 7629 8849 E. info@lyndseyingram.com W. lyndseyingram.com


FOREWORD Lyndsey Ingram

We are delighted to greet the arrival of spring at the gallery with this show of new works by American artist, Jane Hammond. Vibrant, eclectic, and thoughtful – Hammond’s work defies easy categorisation. Her botanical collages are all built from disparate found imagery, ranging from photographs and academic illustrations to wallpaper and handmade drawings. They offer a wonderful example of how Hammond is so deftly able to bring together a myriad of unrelated and often unlikely elements into a single, harmonious, composition. This show is the culmination of a particularly intense period for Hammond, during which she worked specifically on the botanical collages with great enthusiasm and focus. The resulting exhibition is bold, vibrant, and alive – like the flowers themselves. There are several people without whom this show would not have been possible. We would like to thank Jenny Uglow for her considered and insightful essay on Jane's work. We are also very grateful to Galerie Lelong, and particularly Lindsay MacDonald Danckwerth, who have offered their continued support. And lastly, we owe an enormous debt of gratitude to Jane, for these extraordinary works and for her commitment to showing them in London.

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N AT U R A L S E L E C T I O N Jenny Uglow

Jane Hammond’s botanical collages are rhythmic, vibrant, strangely alive. They are utterly original, yet their spectacular arrangements of images of flowers, grasses, seeds, accompanied by insects and birds, are also curiously familiar. They offer a fresh take on a great tradition, and it feels splendidly apt that this exhibition should open in a London spring, at the time of the Chelsea Flower Show.

lets discrete, un-named images form random associations – their ‘meaning’ is in the eye of the beholder. Her Butterfly Maps, such as All Souls (Canterbury) and the gilded scraps in Loose Tapestry of Daily Life (Rotary Phone) (both 2014) convey both the fragility and continuity of human history. She is interested, too, in the diverse ways that images preserve and present information, and in the convention and context of display, as in the Scrapbook series of 2003-6, or Tabula Rosa, 2001, where the ground was her own body.

All Hammond’s work is a dialogue with the culture we inherit and inhabit, a re-shaping of the images that surround us. A supreme paper-artist, whose work can be found in major galleries and museums in the USA and abroad, Hammond is a painter, printmaker, photographer and sculptor as well as a collagist. In a short video for the Metropolitan Museum in New York, talking of her fascination with the way old photographs catch unscripted dramas, she describes herself as ‘having a diverse practice collecting found information and transforming it’. This transformation takes many forms: sometimes she plays with narrative; elsewhere she

The convention that she explores in the current exhibition looks back to to the first great age of Dutch flower painting. In Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder’s Still life of Flowers in a Wan-Li Vase on a Ledge with Further Flowers, Shells and a Butterfly, 1609-10, the fixed, monochrome form of the bird on the vase (like that in Hammond’s Chinese Bird Vase) contrasts with the radiant illusionism of the painting. The genre allowed artists to show their skill in mimicking textures and surfaces, light and sheen, yet the tangled stems, buds and

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blooms were never a reflection of reality. The paintings, intended to entertain botanists and rich collectors, depicted specimens from different countries and continents, plants that would never bloom in the same place and same time. Similarly Hammond brings together images from myriad places and times: old calendars, cards and prints, wrapping paper and cloth, lithography, linocuts, relief printing, digital printing, watercolour, gouache and more. This is a ‘found’, un-natural realm.

to make nearly 1000 ‘paper mosaicks’, astounding for their botanical accuracy, calling them her Herbal or Hortus Siccus, a collection of dried flowers. Some were made from hundreds of tiny pieces, carefully, layered and glued, becoming increasingly life-like, as in the Rosa Gallica with an insect bite in its leaf. Delany collected and treasured different kinds of paper – as Hammond does today – and her skill in cutting was supreme, another feature that Hammond shares: ‘ I have more pairs of scissors than anyone I know,’ she laughs.

Flower painting quickly became associated with women artists, like Rachel Ruysch, whose romantic, asymmetrical compositions, with jewel-like insects and glowing flowers against sombre backgrounds, burned with energy while implying the transience of this glory, the theme of ‘vanitas’. Women also depicted flowers in embroidery and domestic crafts; the great cut-paper artist Mary Delany was a skilled embroiderer before she told her niece, at the age of 73 in 1772: ‘I have invented a new way of imitating flowers’. She went on

Botany itself was considered a woman’s subject. Self-taught women naturalists collected butterflies, ferns, grasses, seaweed and shells and arranged their pressed plant specimens in albums and commonplace books. The delight was both scientific and sensual: Victorian women painted their finds in watercolours, made decorative arrangements in folded and cut paper, and created boxes and books. At the same time, natural images invaded textiles, wallpaper and printed china: the dresses women wore,

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Unlike her grandmother, Hammond has no garden. Instead, huge welded cantilevered ledges, full of plants, hang from the windows of her Manhattan flat. Defying a cold spring, hellebores and cyclamen flower among millet and boxwood. Her inner, artist’s garden is full too, of representations of plants: drawers, cupboards and boxes overflow with a huge stockpile of images, gathered over the years, ready for her to harvest at will.

the plates they ate off, the rooms they lived in, all abounded in flowers. In the twentieth century, flower-arranging itself became a recognised art. The long feminine legacy touches Hammond’s own life: these particular collages spring, she thinks, partly from her childhood, much of which she spent with her grandmother, an innocent and hugely ambitious gardener, who made her learn the Latin names of 100 plants when she was six – she can still remember some now. She has always been interested in taxonomy and natural forms. Her very titles have an evocative, taxonomic twang, while echoing the solemn precision of their early Dutch forebears, like Jan van Huysum’s Glass Vase with Flowers with a Poppy and a Finch Nest. They roll in the mouth with poetic resonance: Champagne Bucket with Black Fritillaria, Cockscomb, and Rafflesia; Chinese Bird Vase with Buttercup, Prairie Anemone; and Plumeria Italian Vase with Kangaroo Paw, Barbie Pagoda and Azure Kingfisher.

Part of the intensity and appeal of the botanical collages comes from the contrasting styles and divergent origins of the images: a tiny daisy from a wrapping paper design, an angular twig from a plantsman’s catalogue, a fly-catcher from an old print, a pale camellia from a floral handkerchief. Unlikely bedfellows meet in surprising sympathy, discords and clashes make a piece hum, and the intricate, bizarre natural forms attain an abstract quality. The three-dimensional effect makes the collages almost hyper-real, involving the viewer in a special way. The eye ricochets around, from detail to detail, and there is a

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intellectual. All the collages come from what she calls ‘a germ’ (a typically organic term). Sometimes this can be expressed verbally, as with Elephant Vase with Basket Stinkhorn, Heartbreak Grass and Strychnine, where the key word is ‘poison’. In this colourful arrangement everything can bring harm, not only the deadly nighshade and the little green leaves of the Florida Poisonwood tree, but the opium poppies, the stinking voodoo lily, the veined white leaves of Caladium that swell the throat, the mistletoe and mandrake. Dame Nature, the piece jests, can be a genuine femme fatale.

constant see-saw between tension and harmony as the varied media produce different effects, reflections and textures. Hammond’s collages look carefree and spontaneous, but they demand phenomenal care and application. The arrangement is everything. With collage you are not committed as you would be to a drawing, where a line on paper is final. Here you can pick and choose, select and discard, place and move. As she says ‘it’s a really vexatious problem for quite a long time – then suddenly, it’s a winner. Or you can feel it is ninety per cent done, but the final detail won’t come, and then you are utterly flummoxed and have to take the whole thing apart and start again.’ To glue, or not to glue? – that is the question. But then, miraculously, it feels right. Then comes a final stage, touching up with watercolour to bring out the green on a twig, the deeper blue of a flower’s centre.

While some ‘germs’ are nameable, others are aesthetic. Hammond found the idea for Korean Vase with Hyacinth Beans, Cotton, and Chrysanthemum, when she saw a hellebore with a bruise-like shadow. Inspired, she set to work with a “bruised palette”, its discomfort conveyed by the prickly cotton heads offset by highlights of various greens and purples, including the rich magenta hyacinth beans. For the extraordinary back-

Although Hammond’s sense of design feels intuitive, her work is in essence conceptual and

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atids speak to the brilliant Hanging Lobster Claw on the right, and the Fishbone Cactus on the left. This cactus rarely flowers, and when it does it blooms at night and lasts a day: the image is a photograph of one that burst unexpectedly into bloom when Hammond was visiting her sister. Serendipity is one of the joys of the found image – she cherishes printing mistakes and oddities – but so is meticulous craft.

ground, Hammond painted the mother-sheet grey and used Japanese papers with a script, working vertically – another tantalizing element, another implied story. The Korean vase, too is a dulled silver with bronze, not the “ingratiating shiny silver” one might expect. The vases play an important part, harking back, perhaps, to Hammond’s graduate work in ceramics. The intriguing urn in Spanish Vase with Thistle, Angelica and Lupine, was found by her husband, a digital image of a gouache painting from a library in Madrid. A slight line, showing where the page was folded, made Hammond think of tiles, which she then used for the background: their hard surface shows off the colours and texture of the plant-images, while their square shape also make the bifurcation of the vase an element of the whole design. There are many sets of reflections here: a tall thistle and strangely right-angled twig hint at the trident in the vase painting, the red flowers echo his scarlet cloak, the white lupin reflects the woman’s dress. Similarly the vase’s symmetrical cary-

The ground, like the vase, can dictate mood. At one point, hunting for an effect like the sixth-century gilt mosaics at San Vitale in Ravenna, Hammond cut and glued a thousand tiny pieces, only to find that the gold fought with all the flowers she tried. Finally, in French Glass with Emerald Cuckoo, Malachite Sunbird and Carmine Bee-eater she solved the problem by making a monochrome arrangement of flowers and foliage, using subtle tones of black and white. The only colour here comes from the flashes of the birds that hover and perch on the curling branches. Behind them the gold mosaic has become mobile, rippling with light.

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seen? But now I look at those photographs differently. I first think – melting, global warming!’ To find images of birds for the collages Hammond recalls ‘I used the internet like crazy’. When she looked up Indian kingfishers, she found hundreds of varieties; then came the Malaysian varieties, and the the Indonesian… thousands of glorious creatures. But, she asks, ‘in fifty years, where will all this plenitude be?’ The abundance of forms in paintings of nature has always conjured a kind of Eden. With a new urgency, her luminous collages return to the double theme of the earliest flower painting, the beauty and evanescence of nature and the power of art to preserve it, to hold its rich images through time.

The collages are sublimely artificial, a chorus of botanical impossibilities. Playing with digital images, Hammond can reconfigure plants, alter colour and distort scale. The small Rafflesia Arnoldii in the French champagne bucket is actually the largest, heaviest flower in nature, up to a metre across. But even in its artfully dwarfed form, this vile-smelling ‘corpse plant’ looks like a fleshy beast, a sinister stranger. Witty details like this alert us to the liberties Hammond takes as an artist, but also to the oddities of nature itself. Evolution, she notes, outdoes art in invention, as in the use of mimicry to ward off predators or invite pollinating insects: a plant like the Monkeyface Orchid ‘is almost a cartoon of itself’. Her new works are a celebration, both of the variety of nature, and of the diversity of images. But they provoke thought as well as delight. When Hammond first saw Lynn Davis’s stunning photographs of icebergs twenty years go, she says, ‘I thought, how wonderful – what must it have been like to be there? to be faced with these amazingly complex shapes that only she had

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Champagne Bucket with Black Fritillaria, Cockscomb and Raffelesia Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, hand cut and assembled on a collage of Thai sheet music papers with additional digital sheet music over cotton rag, 2017 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Chinese Vase with Chestnut, Flycatcher and Baby Blue Eyes Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, Japanese silver leaf, hand cut and assembled on collaged Japanese papers over painted cotton rag, 2016 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Korean Vase with Hellebores, Prairie Anemone and Elephant Hawk Moth Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, silver and gold leaf, hand cut and assembled on various watercoloured Japanese papers collaged over cotton rag, 2017 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Italian Vase with Kangaroo Paw, Barbie Pagoda and Azure Kingfisher Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, hand cut and assembled on collaged Japanese papers over painted cotton rag, 2017 Signed in pencil 96.5 × 127 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Japanese Vase with Borage, Moonwart and Monarchs Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, hand cut and assembled on a mosaic of various Japanese papers over painted cotton rag, 2017 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Korean Vase with Hyacinth Beans, Cotton and Chrysanthemum Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, silver and bronze leaf, hand cut and assembled on a collage of Japanese papers over painted cotton rag, 2016 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Piety Vase with Royal Flycatcher, Angelica and Sphinx Moth Caterpillar Stage Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, hand cut and assembled on collaged Japanese papers over painted cotton rag, 2017 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Spanish Vase with Thistle, Angelica and Lupine Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, gold leaf, hand cut and assembled on a mosaic of Japanese papers over painted cotton rag, 2016 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Hong Kong Vase with Weeping Gum, Persian Carpet Flower and Banded Broadbill Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, hand cut and assembled on collaged Japanese papers over painted cotton rag, 2017 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Islamic Glass with Pandorus Sphinx Moth, Adder’s Tongue and Fly Agaric Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, hand cut and assembled on collaged Japanese papers over painted cotton rag, 2018 Signed in pencil 96.5 × 127 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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French Glass with Emerald Cuckoo, Malachite Sunbird and Carmine Bee-eater Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, hand cut and assembled on a mosaic of various collaged gold papers over painted cotton rag, 2017 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Elephant Vase with Basket Stinkhorn, Heartbreak Grass and Strychnine Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, hand cut and assembled on collaged hand-painted Japanese papers over cotton rag, 2017 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Chinese Bird Vase with Buttercup, Prairie Anemone and Plumeria Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, hand cut and assembled on a mosaic of Japanese papers over painted cotton rag, 2018 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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Champagne Bucket with Silkmoth, Chanterelle and Gooseberries Unique botanical collage using lithography, linocut, relief printing, digital printing, coloured pencil, Sumi ink, watercolour and gouache, hand cut and assembled on collaged Japanese papers over painted cotton rag, 2016 Signed in pencil 127 × 96.5 cm £�,500 + �% import VAT

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BIOGRAPHY

Jane Hammond was born in 1950 in Connecticut and received her B.A. from Mount Holyoke College in 1972. She earned her M.F.A from the University of Wisconsin in Madison in 1977. Hammond moved to New York City in 1980 and had her first solo exhibition in 1989 at Exit Art, NYC. She’s had 18 solo exhibitions in New York City and additional solo exhibitions in Paris, London, Stockholm, Barcelona, Milan, Amsterdam, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Detroit among others. She’s had 29 solo museum exhibitions at such venues as: the de Young Museum in San Francisco; the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus; the Detroit Institute of the Arts, the MCA Denver and the Johnson Museum of Art at Cornell University, New York. Hammond’s work is included in over 70 public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Whitney Museum of American Art; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; MFA, Boston; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; the Art Institute of Chicago; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the J.Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven; the Biblioteque Nationale, Paris and the Albertina, Vienna. Hammond currently lives and works in New York City where she is represented by Galerie Lelong.

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SELECTED PUBLIC COLLECTIONS

Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, MA

The de Young Museum, San Francisco, CA

Albertina, Vienna, Austria

Flint Institute of Arts, Flint, MI

Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY

The Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, MA

Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art,

Fort Wayne Musuem of Art, Ft. Wayne, IN

Ridgefield, CT

Grand Valley State University, Grand Rapids, MI

Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort

Grunewald Center for Graphic Arts, Los Angeles, CA

Worth, TX

Hallie Ford Museum, Williamette University,

Arkansas Arts Center, Little Rock, AR

Salem, OR

Art, Design & Architecture Museum,

The Heckscher Museum of Art, Huntington, NY

University of California, Santa Barbara, CA

Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, WA

Art Institute of Chicago, IL

Herbert F. Johnson Museum, Cornell University,

Baltimore Museum of Art, MD

Ithaca, NY

Biblioteque Nationale, Paris, France

Honolulu Academy of Art, Honolulu, HI

Boise Art Museum, Boise, ID

Hood Museum of Art, Dartmouth College,

Brooklyn Museum of Art, NY

Hanover, NH

Chazen Museum of Art, University

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, University

of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

of Oregon, Eugene, OR

Cincinnati Art Museum, OH

Joslyn Art Museum, Omaha, NB

Cleveland Museum of Art, OH

J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, CA

The Colorado Collection, University of Colorado

The Library of Congress, Washington DC

at Boulder, CO

Maryland Institute College of Art, Baltimore, MD

The Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, MO

Madison Museum of Contemporary Art, Madison, WI

The Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

Mead Art Museum, Amherst College, Amherst, MA

Cranbrook Art Museum, Bloomfield Hills, MI

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY

Detroit Institute of Arts, MI

Milwaukee Art Museum, WI

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Mount Holyoke College Art Museum, MA

Lawrence, KS

Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, Mexico City

Toledo Museum of Art, OH

Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL

Tucson Museum of Art, AZ

Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego

The Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, MN

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA

Wayne State University Art Museum, Detroit MI

Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, FL

Weatherspoon Art Museum, The University

Museum of Modern Art, New York City, NY

of North Carolina, Greensboro, NC

National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC

Wellesley College Davis Museum and Cultural Center,

National Museum of Women in the Arts,

Wellesley, MA

Washington, DC

West Virginia University Art Museum,

Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art,

Morgantown, WV

Overland Park, KS

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City,

New York Public Library, New York City, NY

NY

Orlando Museum of Art, Orlando, FL

Williams College Museum of Art, Williamstown, MA

Palm Springs Art Museum, Palm Springs, CA

Yale University Art Museum, New Haven, CT

Portland Art Museum, Portland, OR Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, NJ Saint Louis Art Museum, MO San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, CA San Jose Museum of Art, CA Seattle Art Museum, Seattle, WA Smith College Museum of Art, Northampton, MA Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC Spencer Museum of Art, University of Kansas,

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SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS

2018

Natural Selection Lyndsey Ingram, London

2017

Search Light Galerie Lelong, New York

Contemporary Art, Denver Jane Hammond: Photographs Galeria Senda, Barcelona Fallen Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego

2015

Search Party Galerie Lelong, Paris

2008 Photographs Galerie Lelong, New York

In the Mind’s Eye Greg Kucera Gallery, Seattle

Jane Hammond: Paper Work Mt. Holyoke 2014

No Assembly Required Sims Reed Gallery,

College Museum of Art traveling to

London

Tucson Museum of Art; Chazen Musuem

Jane Hammond: Photographs Nina Freud-

of Art; Arkansas Arts Center; Herbert F.

enheim Gallery, Buffalo

Johnson Museum; the Achenbach Foundation at the DeYoung Museum;

2013

2011

2010

Jane Hammond: Collaged Monoprints Pace

and Detroit Institute of Arts

Prints, New York

Fallen Wexner Center for the Arts,

Columbus

Light Now: Dazzle Paintings and Photographs

Jane Hammond: Photographs Museum of

Galerie Lelong, New York

Contemporary Art, Denver

Jane Hammond: Fallen FLAG Art Found-

People, Places and Things Lemberg Gallery,

ation, New York

Detroit 2007

Cabinet de Curiosites Galerie Lelong, Paris Jane Hammond: New Collaged Monoprints

New Photography McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, Texas

Pace Prints, New York 2006 Jane Hammond: Monoprints Pace Prints, 2009 Jane Hammond: Photographs Museum of

New York

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Recent Photographs Jaffe-Friede and

1999

Galeria Senda, Barcelona

1998

David Beitzel Gallery, New York

Strauss Galleries, Dartmouth College 2005

Galerie Lelong, New York

Galerie Barbara Farber/Rob Jurka,

Amsterdam

2004 Greg Kucera Gallery, Seattle 2003

1997

Luhring Augustine, New York

1996

Galerie Barbara Farber, Amsterdam

1995

Jose Freire Fine Art, New York

1994

Orlando Museum of Art

Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro

Be Zany, Poised Harpists; Be Blue, Little Sparrows San Francisco Public Library 2002

Whitney Museum of American Art at Philip Morris, New York

The John Ashbery Collaboration Jose Freire

Galeria Senda, Barcelona

Fine Art, New York 2001

Jane Hammond: From Avatar to Zed Galerie Lelong, New York

1993

Cincinnati Museum of Art, Cincinnati

1992

Transepoca Gallery, Milan

1991

fiction/non-fiction, New York

1990

Honolulu Academy of Art, Honolulu

1989

Exit Art, New York

The John Ashbery Collaboration 1993 – 2001 Cleveland Center for Contemporary Art, traveling to The Contemporary Museum, Honolulu; Madison Art Center; and Blaffer Gallery, Houston 2000 Greg Kucera Gallery, Seattle

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‘I entered the art world in the heydey of Minimalism – the era when less was more and flowers were verboten. It has taken me a long time to embrace and include this life-long interest in my practice. Looking closely at plants and birds one gains an understanding of taxonomic relationships and of the incredible complexity and variety of nature. My work embraces the fact that more is more – the infinite complexity of nature and our ability to make distinctions and associations in its contemplation – is a cause for celebration and an important part of what makes us human.’ – Jane Hammond

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Published by Lyndsey Ingram Designed by Lucy Harbut Printed by Dayfold Cover image Champagne Bucket with Black Fritillaria, Cockscomb and Raffelesia, 2017 p.3 Chinese Vase with Chestnut, Flycatcher and Baby Blue Eyes, 2016 (detail) p.4 Elephant Vase with Basket Stinkhorn, Heartbreak Grass and Strychnine, 2017 (detail) p.11 Korean Vase with Hellebores, Prairie Anemone and Elephant Hawk Moth, 2017 (detail) p.47 Hong Kong Vase with Weeping Gum, Persian Carpet Flower and Banded Broadbill, 2017 (detail) All images Š 2018 Jane Hammond


LYNDSEY INGR AM

Jane Hammond | Natural Selection  

We are delighted to greet the arrival of spring at the gallery with this show of new works by American artist, Jane Hammond. Vibrant, eclect...

Jane Hammond | Natural Selection  

We are delighted to greet the arrival of spring at the gallery with this show of new works by American artist, Jane Hammond. Vibrant, eclect...