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Lynnasha Galbreath Type 2

Of Mice and Men

Hertowski


Synopsis

Two migrant field workers in California on their plantation during the Great Depression— George Milton, an intelligent but uneducated man, and Lennie Small, a man of large stature and great strength but limited mental abilities—are on their way to another part of California in Soledad. They hope to one day attain their shared dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Lennie’s part of the dream is merely to tend to (and touch) soft rabbits on the farm. This dream is one of Lennie’s favorite stories, which George constantly retells. They are fleeing from their previous employment in Weed, California, where they were run out of town after Lennie’s love of stroking soft things resulted in an accusation of attempted rape when he touched a young woman’s dress, and would not let go. It soon becomes clear that the two are close friends and George is Lennie’s protector. The theme of friendship is constant throughout the story.

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Illu stration

Photography

Typography

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Reserach of Book

George Milton: A quick-witted man who is Lennie’s guardian and best friend. His friendship with Lennie helps sustain his dream of a better future. Lennie Small: A mentally disabled, but physically strong man who travels with George and is his constant companion.[4] He dreams of “living off the fatta’ the lan’” and being able to tend to rabbits. His love for soft things conspires against him, mostly because he doesn’t know his own strength, and eventually becomes his undoing. Candy: An aging ranch handyman, Candy lost his hand in an accident and worries about his future on the ranch. Fearing that his age is making him useless, he seizes on George’s description of the farm he and Lennie will have, offering his life’s savings if he can join George and Lennie in owning the land. The fate of Candy’s ancient dog, which Carlson shoots in the back of the head in an alleged act of mercy, foreshadows the manner of Lennie’s death. Curley’s wife: A young, pretty woman, who is mistrusted by her husband. The other characters refer to her only as “Curley’s wife”. This lack of personal definition underscores this character’s purpose in the story: Steinbeck explained that she is “not a person, she’s a symbol. She has no function, except to be a foil – and a danger to Lennie.”[4] Curley’s wife’s preoccupation with her own beauty eventually helps precipitate her death: She allows Lennie to stroke her hair as an apparently harmless indulgence, only for her to upset Lennie when she yells at him to stop him ‘mussing it’. Lennie tries to stop her yelling and eventually kills her by recklessly breaking her neck.

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Author

John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American writer. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939) and East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). As the author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories, Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962. Wrod List: douse appraise dabble bemused wiggle whinny cringe stilted snivel rectangle fawning crestfallen derogatory pugnacious disengage recumbent writhe fascinate reprehensible lightweight maul mottled mollify receptive welter scuttle amaze subside brittle sniff

accumulate cower reassure derision mimic rustle apprehensive discourage juncture subdue scourge precede tangle unaware ripple invade console adjusted contemplate imitate stump deliberate shallow elaborate

Quotes: “Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place....With us it ain’t like that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us.” “He don’t give nobody else a chance to win--” “Well, you ain’t bein’ kind to him keepin’ him alive.” “I ought to of shot that dog myself, George. I shouldn’t ought to of let no stranger shoot my dog.” “Nobody never gets to heaven, and nobody gets no land.”

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MoodBoard Research Character: Lennie Blurb: In order to represent ignorance of Lennie, the design is simplified through shapes.

Object: Rabbit/Gun Blurb: In order to represent the setting, the design is shown through a dream like imagery.

Place: Farm Blurb: In order to symbolize the rabbit, the design is represented through the imagery of color and form.

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Type Study

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A water snake glided smoothly up the pool, twisting its periscope head from side to side; and it swam the length of the pool and came to

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the legs of a motionless heron that stood in the shallows. A silent head and beak lanced down and plucked it out by the head, and the

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Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place. . . . With us it ain’t like that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us. We don’t have to sit in no bar room blowin’ in our jack jus’ because we got no place else to go. If them other guys gets in jail they can rot for all anybody gives a damn. But not us. Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place. . . . With us it ain’t like that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us. We don’t have to sit in no bar room blowin’ in our jack jus’ because we got no place else to go. If them other guys gets in jail they can rot for all anybody gives a damn. But not us. Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place. . . . With us it ain’t like that. We got a

John Steinbeck

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John Steinbeck

Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place. . . . With us it ain’t like that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us. We don’t have to sit in no bar room blowin’ in our jack jus’ because we got no place else to go. If them other guys gets in jail they can rot for all anybody gives a damn. But not us.

Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place. . . . With us it ain’t like that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us. We don’t have to sit in no bar room blowin’ in our jack jus’ because we got no place else to go. If them other guys gets in jail they can rot for all anybody gives a damn. But not us.

"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages....The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom." Chicago Tribune

Of Mice and Men

....In sure, raucous, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has touched the quick in his little story." The New York Times

Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place. . . . With us it ain’t like that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us. We don’t have to sit in no bar room blowin’ in our jack jus’ because we got no place else to go. If them other guys gets in jail they can rot for all anybody gives a damn. But not us.

....In sure, raucous, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has touched the quick in his little story." The New York Times

"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages....The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom." Chicago Tribune

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Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place. . . . With us it ain’t like that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us. We don’t have to sit in no bar room blowin’ in our jack jus’ because we got no place else to go. If them other guys gets in jail they can rot for all anybody gives a damn. But not us.

Of Mice and Men

....In sure, raucous, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has touched the quick in his little story." The New York Times

"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages....The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom." Chicago Tribune

"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages....The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom." Chicago Tribune

....In sure, raucous, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has touched the quick in his little story." The New York Times

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"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages....The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom." Chicago Tribune

Guys like us, that work on ranches, are the loneliest guys in the world. They got no family. They don’t belong no place. . . . With us it ain’t like that. We got a future. We got somebody to talk to that gives a damn about us. We don’t have to sit in no bar room blowin’ in our jack jus’ because we got no place else to go. If them other guys gets in jail they can rot for all anybody gives a damn. But not us.

....In sure, raucous, vulgar Americanism, Steinbeck has touched the quick in his little story." The New York Times

"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages....The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom." Chicago Tribune

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John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American writer. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939) and East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). As the author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories, Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962.


Two migrant field workers in California on their plantation during the Great Depression—George Milton, an intelligent but uneducated man, and Lennie Small, a man of large stature and great strength but limited mental abilities—are on their way to another part of California in Soledad. They hope to one day attain their shared dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Lennie's part of the dream is merely to tend to (and touch) soft rabbits on the farm, but all that leads into some trouble.

John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American writer. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939) and East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). As the author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories, Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962.

"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages....The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom." Chicago Tribune

Two migrant field workers in California on their plantation during the Great Depression—George Milton, an intelligent but uneducated man, and Lennie Small, a man of large stature and great strength but limited mental abilities—are on their way to another part of California in Soledad. They hope to one day attain their shared dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Lennie's part of the dream is merely to tend to (and touch) soft rabbits on the farm, but all that leads into some trouble.

John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American writer. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939) and East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). As the author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories, Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962.

"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages....The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom." Chicago Tribune

Two migrant field workers in California on their plantation during the Great Depression—George Milton, an intelligent but uneducated man, and Lennie Small, a man of large stature and great strength but limited mental abilities—are on their way to another part of California in Soledad. They hope to one day attain their shared dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Lennie's part of the dream is merely to tend to (and touch) soft rabbits on the farm, but all that leads into some trouble.

John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American writer. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939) and East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). As the author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories, Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962.

"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages....The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom." Chicago Tribune

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"Brutality and tenderness mingle in these strangely moving pages....The reader is fascinated by a certainty of approaching doom." Chicago Tribune

Two migrant field workers in California on their plantation during the Great Depression—George Milton, an intelligent but uneducated man, and Lennie Small, a man of large stature and great strength but limited mental abilities—are on their way to another part of California in Soledad. They hope to one day attain their shared dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Lennie's part of the dream is merely to tend to (and touch) soft rabbits on the farm, but all that leads into some trouble.

John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American writer. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939) and East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). As the author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories, Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962.

John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American writer. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939) and East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). As the author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories, Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962.

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John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) was an American writer. He is widely known for the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Grapes of Wrath (1939) and East of Eden (1952) and the novella Of Mice and Men (1937). As the author of twenty-seven books, including sixteen novels, six non-fiction books, and five collections of short stories, Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962.

Two migrant field workers in California on their plantation during the Great Depression—George Milton, an intelligent but uneducated man, and Lennie Small, a man of large stature and great strength but limited mental abilities—are on their way to another part of California in Soledad. They hope to one day attain their shared dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Lennie's part of the dream is merely to tend to (and touch) soft rabbits on the farm, but all that leads into some trouble.

Two migrant field workers in California on their plantation during the Great Depression—George Milton, an intelligent but uneducated man, and Lennie Small, a man of large stature and great strength but limited mental abilities—are on their way to another part of California in Soledad. They hope to one day attain their shared dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Lennie's part of the dream is merely to tend to (and touch) soft rabbits on the farm, but all that leads into some trouble.


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John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968)

Chapter 1 John Steinbeck

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dream of settling down on their own piece of land. Lennie's part of the dream is merely to tend to (and touch) soft rabbits on the farm, but all that leads into some trouble.

Page 3

John Steinbeck

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Mice

&

Men

Two migrant field workers in California on their plantation during the Great Depression—George Milton, an intelligent but uneducated man, and Lennie Small, a man of large stature and great strength but limited mental abilities—are on their way to another part of California in Soledad. They on their own piece of land. Lennie's part of the dream is merely to tend to (and touch) soft rabbits on the farm, but

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hope to one day attain their shared dream of settling down

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all that leads into some trouble.

Chapter 1 Page 3

John Steinbeck

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Mice & Men


Book Cover Project: Of Mice and Men  

This is process of redesigning a book jacket for the novel: Of Mice and Men