Page 9

1959

Now let’s look at an experiment using figures 13A, 13B and 13C. If we put two squares within a given rectangular surface they will neither change in themselves nor materially modify the surface on which they have been put (fig 13A). Place the squares and notice the effect. Now see what happens with figure 13B. If we put the small squares so that their edges are at the edges of the surface of the picture, we shall have a different kind of space, creating a new relationship between the two squares and the surface they are on. (Try it out)

In fact, we have created a new type of time-space relationship which I called “Upright Space”. Perhaps this becomes clearer if we imagine Fig 13B stood upright: it is as if we had two squares, one behind the other, sitting on a horizontal surface, and one of them has been raised until it has reached the position of the squares in the figure (13B). This movement is shown in Fig 13C. In Fig 13B the ‘Uprightness’ brings with it an organic time-existence of its own. In the case of Fig 13A, on the other hand, the time that we feel is not an integral part of the figure but is created by the movement of the eye from one square to the other. I called this extraneous time ‘mechanical time’. A structure in space with a time-existence of its own, is, in its creation, the making of a ‘time-space. In other words, the surfaces as a basis for showing off a composition is a convention, expressing nothing but an extraneous mechanical time-scheme as mechanical as the time between two objects in space proper.

COPYRIGHT ASSOCIAÇÃO CULTURAL «O MUNDO DE LYGIA CLARK»

1959  

Lygia Clark describes her two artwork series "Modulated Space" and "Unit".

1959  

Lygia Clark describes her two artwork series "Modulated Space" and "Unit".

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