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10 ICONIC YVES SAINT LAURENT LOOKS

June/July 2012

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Contents june/july 2012

ON THE COVER:

{ issue 329 / sewnews.com }

Mix & Match

features

Discover designer secrets for mixing prints and colors.

38

42

Get Packing

48

Batik Mystique

52

Picnic in the Park

56

42

Stitch a stylish set of quilted travel accessories. Create a flattering tiered batik skirt窶馬o pattern needed! Dine al fresco with a versatile portable picnic blanket.

Top it Off

Dress up a basic summer tunic with chic details.

60

Along the Lines

62

Bandanna BBQ

66

Just Be-Gauze

70

Sleeve it to Me

76

Stay Cool

Adorn a simple shift dress with eye-catching silk latticework. Celebrate the 4th of July with a patriotic table setting. Make a breezy gauze cover-up for a day at the beach. Learn five sleeve alterations to transform a basic dress pattern. Beat the heat with a quick and easy cooling neck scarf.

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+ DOWNLOAD

FREE PATTERNS

columns

16 20 22 26 30 32 36

from this issue at sewnews.com/web_extras.

22

Top 10: Iconic Yves Saint Laurent Looks Home-Dec Help: Mitered Trim Basic Skills: Grading, Clipping & Notching Footwork: Darning Foot Fitting FAQs: Pant Fitting Solutions

32

Pattern Play: Gathered Bodice Stash Buster: Picnic Weights

in every issue 6 8 9 10 11 12 14 80 82

Editor’s Letter Our Experts

12

Sew & Tell Reader Tips From You Cool Tools Sew Your Support Shopper’s Market

ENTER

Hide&

SEEK

(PAGE 10)

The Last Laugh

Find out how to join our 2012 charity-sewing effort on page 14.

36 SEWNEWS.COM

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Editor’s Letter

DEAR READERS, Summer has finally arrived! It’s time for dining al fresco, taking a dip in the pool and soaking up the sun. It’s also the time of year when sewing machine companies host conventions to unveil their latest and greatest machines, accessories, software and gadgets. Thankfully, I’m one of the lucky few invited to attend these events! Convention attendees are mostly sewing machine dealers—the wonderful people who sell us machines, maintain our machines and repair our machines. They come from all over the country to learn everything new and take classes to better educate their customers. Also in attendance is the press. If you’re lucky, there are some celebs to gawk at, too. On any given day you might rub elbows with Martha Stewart, Marie Osmond, Nancy Zieman or Eleanor Burns, to name a few. From the moment I step off of the airplane, I meet countless shop owners in the baggage claim area, on the shuttle and in line awaiting checkin at the hotel. Their enthusiasm is contagious. If you thought you were passionate about sewing, these people have you beat! Ask them one question about their store, the machine brands

they carry or how they started in this business and you’ll be overwhelmed by their passionate response. There’s always some kind of opening gala to begin the convention— not unlike a school pep rally. The machine company president or spokesperson revs up the crowd to prepare them for the weekend’s events. A slideshow or unveiling of products follows, and then one big party ensues. In the days that follow, all attendees are invited to try anything and everything new and improved on the convention floor. It’s a varitable theme park for sewing enthusiasts. I’m sure all you want to know now is: What’s your favorite machine coming out in 2012? What I’ll say is this: All the machines are absolutely fabulous and have slightly different features that appeal to different types of sewists. I highly suggest visiting a few different dealers to test drive several models and find the one that’s right for you. Plus, you’ll see many of the new machines, accessories, software and gadgets in upcoming Sew News issues. Keep your eyes peeled and find your favorites! Have a fun and relaxing summer,

Got a question about achieving the perfect fit? Send your question to our fit expert, Peggy Sagers, at sewnews@sewnews.com. Your question (and Peggy’s answer) could appear in the “Fitting FAQs” column—find this month’s installment on page 30.

Ellen March, Editor-in-Chief

Coming Up!

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We’re welcoming fall in the Aug/Sept Sew News, on newsstands July 17. Don’t miss fabulous fall fashions, designer décor made easy and quick fixes for sewing mistakes!

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Our Experts

1 2 Find out about our talented experts featured in this issue. Visit their websites for more information.

3 4 5

6

1. Susan Beck (“Basic Skills: Grading,

8. Sharon Madsen (“Batik Mystique”— page 48) is a Midwestern gal who loves dogs, shoes and chocolate. She began sewing when she was 8 years old and hasn’t stopped since. sharonsews.blogspot.com

2. Lucy Blaire (“Stash Buster: Picnic

9. Tara Miller (“Top it Off”—page 56) is a sewing, knitting and crochet blogger who balances her time between her 2-year-old daughter, dogs, motorcycleriding husband and mountain of fabric, yarn and ideas. gruenetree.com

Clipping and Notching”—page 22) has loved creating with fabric, a needle and thread for most of her life. Susan is an educator, writer and editor for Bernina of America. berninausa.com Weights”—page 36) owns Lucy Blaire hand*made for which she stitches her own designs. In addition to running her shop, she writes for magazines and books. She lives in Catskill, NY with her husband. lucyblairehandmade.com

3. Pam Damour (“Home Dec Help”—

7 8

page 20) is known as the “Decorating Diva,” offering professional home-décor training to the public. Pam lives on the shore of Lake Champlain in a log cabin, where she hosts sewing retreats. pamdamour.com

4. Andrea Dennis (“Sleeve it to

Me”—page 70) has been sewing all her life and studied fashion at Ryerson University’s School of Fashion in Toronto, Ontario.

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page 30) is the owner of Silhouette Patterns, specializing in B-, C- and D-cup sizing. She travels the U.S. and Canada teaching easy ready-to-wear techniques to home sewists. silhouettepatterns.com

11. Stacy Schlyer (“Picnic in the

Park”—page 52) is a self-taught seamstress and self-proclaimed fabric junkie whose goal is the reach SABLE (Stash Accumulation Beyond Life Expectancy). She lives in Kansas with her family and blogs daily about her sewing adventures. stacysews.com

page 38) is the founder and designer of the children’s pattern company, Oliver + S, and the author of Oliver + S Little Things to Sew: 20 Classic Accessories and Toys for Children. oliverands.com/blog

12. Cheryl Stranges (“Along the

6. Ana Jankovic (“Pattern Play:

13. Kate Van Fleet (“Bandanna BBQ”—page 62) began designing clothing at the age of 3 when her mother found her sitting underneath the sewing machine cutting a doll dress out of a sleeve. She’s the former owner of Kreations by Kate, a business supplying handmade pillows to nine stores in five states.

Gathered Bodice Dress”—page 32) is a computer programmer, who expresses her creativity by sewing in her free time. She is a self-taught sewist and designer who resides in Belgrade, Serbia. stepalica.blogspot.com

7. Debra Justice (“Footwork: Darning

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5. Liesl Gibson (“Mix & Match” —

10. Peggy Sagers (“Fitting FAQs”—

Foot”—page 26) is an internationally known speaker, author, video celebrity and proprietress of an online sewing boutique. laboursoflove.com

Lines”—page 60) is a freelance sewing educator, specializing in sergers, embroidery software, sewing notions and presser feet. seecherylsew.blogspot.com

14. Carol Zentgraf (“Get Packing”— page 42) is a designer and editor specializing in sewing, embroidery, textiles, painting and decorating. She’s written seven home-décor sewing books and designs for several magazines and fabric company websites.

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sewNEWS

sewnews.com email: sewnews@sewnews.com EDITORIAL Editor-in-Chief: Ellen March Managing Editor: Kim Saba Associate Editor: Beth Bradley Assistant Editor: Nicole Schnurer Editorial Assistant: Leah Rybak

SEW & TELL

Join the Sewing District Online Community. + It’s FREE.

ART Art Director: Ann Inez Hardell Illustrator: Melinda Bylow Photography: Brent Ward, Mellisa Karlin Mahoney Hair & Makeup: Angela Lewis CREATIVE CRAFTS GROUP, LLC President & CEO: Stephen J. Kent CFO: Mark F. Arnett VP/Group Publisher: Tina Battock VP/Publishing Director: Joel P. Toner VP/Production & Technology: Barbara Schmitz VP/Circulation: Nicole McGuire Corporate Controller: Jordan Bohrer OPERATIONS Associate Publisher: Wendy Thompson New Business Manager: Joseph Izzo Renewal and Billing Manager: Nekeya Dancy Online Subscription Manager: Jodi Lee Newsstand Consultant: TJ Montilli Sr. E-Commerce Marketing Manager: MaKenzie Dykstra Production Manger: Michael J. Rueckwald Advertising Coordinator: Madalene Becker Administrative Assistant: Jane Flynn Retail Sales: LaRita Godfrey: (800) 815-3538 ADVERTISING INQUIRIES Wendy Thompson: (910) 791-3832 wthompson@creativecraftsgroup.com Online Advertising: Andrea Abrahamson: (303) 215-5686 SUBSCRIPTIONS: To subscribe to Sew News magazine or change the address of your current subscription, visit Subscriber Services online at: sewnews.com. You may also call or write: Phone: (800) 289-6397, International: (386) 597-4387 E-mail: sewnews@emailcustomerservice.com Subscriber Services: Sew News, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235 Subscription rates for the United States and possessions: $23.98 for one year (six issues). Subscribers in Canada and Mexico, add $6.00 per year to your subscription cost (includes postage GST and HST). All other subscribers outside North America, add $12.00 postage per one-year subscription. International subscriptions must be prepaid. U.S. funds only. Major credit cards accepted. Some back issues of Sew News magazine are available for $5.99, payable in advance. TO ORDER BACK ISSUES: Call (800) 590-3465; or go to quiltandsewshop.com REPRINTS: Contact Wright’s Reprints to purchase quality custom reprints or e-prints of articles appearing in this publication at (877) 652-5295 or (281) 419-5725 outside the U.S. and Canada. Occasionally, our subscriber list is made available to reputable firms offering goods and services that we believe would be of interest to our readers. If you prefer to be excluded, please send your current address label and a note requesting to be excluded from these promotions to: CREATIVE CRAFTS GROUP, 741 Corporate Circle, Ste. A, Golden, CO, 80401, Attn.: Privacy Coordinator. Sew News June/July 2012 • No. 4 Copyright © 2012 by Creative Crafts Group. All rights reserved. Nothing may be printed in whole or in part without permission from the publisher. Single-copy rate U.S. $5.99; Canada $6.99. Subscriptions are $23.98 for 6 issues. All foreign subscriptions, add $12 in postage. Canadian subscriptions (including GST & postage) $37.98 payable in U.S. funds. For subscriptions, address changes or adjustments, write to SEW NEWS, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142. Eight weeks are required for a change of address. Please give both new and old addresses and, if possible, the mailing label of the old address. The information in this publication is presented in good faith, but no warranty is given nor results guaranteed. Since SEW NEWS has no control over your choice of materials or procedures, neither SEW NEWS nor the various manufacturers assume any responsibility for the use of this data.

PRINTED IN THE USA

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Sewing District is full of sewing tips, free patterns and a list of the best sewing-related websites and blogs. Plus, share your latest project images in the gallery and post questions and answers in the community forum. Join Sewing District today and connect with sewing enthusiasts around the country. If you’re already a Sewing District member, you’re already signed up. If not, quickly and easily register for FREE at sewingdistrict.com to be a part of the new and exciting Sewing District community today! Visit sewingdistrict.com/forum to join the discussion!

HOT TOPICS

Here are some of the most talked about topics in the forum: 7 What is Everyone Working On? 7 Fashion Video Games 7 Sewing Bloopers

FREE Sewing Patterns

Check out some of the hottest FREE sewing pattern downloads at sewingdistrict.com/ free-sewing-patterns.

FEATURED MEMBER

Enis B., Brownstown Twp, MI

I’m am a self-taught sewist who loves to make children’s clothing, home-dec items, purses, quilts and machine embroidery projects. I’m married to my wonderful husband Bill and have three sons.

FEATURED PROJECT:

The “Free to Dream” quilt was a Christmas gift to my oldest son, Jason. The quilt design is adapted from a 1800s quilt I found in a book. I individually pieced the flag stripes and used a print cotton fabric for the stars. The spacer blocks are machine embroidered with stars, and the border is freemotion stipple stitched. I also created a quilt label using my embroidery software. My son loved his gift! I hope that one day he’ll pass down the quilt to his children.

“Like” us at facebook.com/sewnews. Follow us at twitter.com/sewnews. Find us on Pinterest: pinterest.com/sewnews.

Enis won The Homemade Home by Snaia Pell from Cico Books for being the Apr/May ’12 Sewing District Featured Member!

Check out more projects and submit your own at sewingdistrict.com/project-gallery for your chance to win a fabulous prize. SEWNEWS.COM

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Reader Tips

Hide&

SEEK STICKY SOLUTION CLEAN & SIMPLE To safely dispose of machine needles, rinse out the complimentary shampoo bottles from hotels and place used needles inside. The lids keep needles from falling out for quick and safe disposal. Carolyn R., Chatsworth, IL

PRESSER TESTER Cut a small fabric piece to use as a tester before pressing your project. This ensures that the iron temperature is correct for the fabric type, if the fabric shrinks and whether steam should be used.

When stitching vinyl or plastic, place tape on the bottom of the presser foot to prevent it from sticking to the fabric. Austin B., email

PICTURE PERFECT ORGANIZER Instead of putting loose fabric swatches in your purse for reference when fabric shopping, purchase a small, inexpensive photo album to organize scraps. It’s easier to flip through the album than digging in your purse for small scraps, which could get lost. Linda O., email

Juanita D., Smyma, TN

SHARPEN UP Don’t postpone replacing dull rotary cutter blades. A sharp blade is safer and saves you time and frustration.

PLAY AND WIN! What is it? Pictured above is part of a photo from this issue. When you find it, enter online at sewnews.com or send a postcard with the page you found it on to Sew News, Hide & Seek, 741 Corporate Circle, Ste. A, Golden, CO 80401. Responses are due

June 30, 2012. From the correct responses, we’ll randomly draw five winners. One could be you! Jun/Jul ’12 winners will receive a book from Fox Chapel Publishing: foxchapelpublishing.com.

Cindy K., Facebook

CONGRATULATIONS to the Feb/Mar ‘12 Hide & Seek winners! We randomly selected five winners to receive a sewing book from St Martin’s Griffin: Marlene

Featured readers received a sewing machine light from Bendable Bright Light for submitting a published tip. + For more information or to purchase Bendable Bright Light products, visit bendablebrightlight.com.

Boni, Wintersville, OH; Zmira Charloff, Brooklyn, NY; Alice Dahl, Echo, MN; Maria Lee, San Francisco, CA; and Monica Tomka, Howells, NE.

Send your tips to sewnews@sewnews.com or post them at facebook.com/sewnews or sewingdistrict.com/sewing-how-to-and-tips.

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From You

facebook.com/sewnews SEW BE IT

Sew News invites you to join our online community.

We asked you on Facebook: How did you learn to sew?

53% 21.5%

Family member

High school homeeconomics class

.5%

College class

15%

Self-taught

10%

BEST IN SEW

“Some I learned on my own, some I learned in 4-H and some I learned in Junior High

Other

economics.” K. Ann S.

K. Ann won a rotary set from Havel’s Sewing for her great comment.

YOU SAID SEW “My good friend, Sandy. I’m still a work in progress.” Tracy U. “Haven’t yet! Hope to learn here!” Angela R. “My mom started teaching me when I was 8 years old, 51 years ago.” Debbie F. “At a fabric store that offered sewing lessons.” Needles and Notions “I learned how to sew in 5th grade when I took a Singer sewing machine class. I started making my own clothes then! Loved it!” Didi H. “My mom set up a table next to her sewing machine and that’s where I began the wonderful journey I’ve been on for approximately 45 years.” Liesa L.

SEW ON / Check out the latest reader comments on our Facebook fan page: “I’m learning to sew and love your site.” Evelyn M.

“I loved my last issue.” Melinda P. “Just discovered Sew News at my mother-inlaw’s house and I’m hooked!” Kim F.

r u a sew news fan?

“I so enjoy your magazine. I always learn something and find lots of ideas for my 12-year-old daughter to use in her 4-H sewing projects. Thanks for the information!”

+ For more information or to purchase Havel’s Sewing products, visit havelssewing.com.

Bursting at the seams?

Join the Conversation!

Kyla O.

“Enjoy all the articles. Wishing for more time to sew!” Dianna K.

Visit our Facebook fan page to take polls and post comments for a chance to receive a special sewing prize from Havel’s Sewing!

facebook.com/sewnews k com/se

twitter.com/sewnews com/sew SEWNEWS.COM

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Cool Tools Stock your sewing room for summer with the latest notions, tools, fabric, home-dec books and more.

Sewists of all levels will appreciate the precision and control the Pfaff ambition 1.5 brings at an affordable new price point. The computerized machine includes a large, high-resolution touch screen, a wide variety of stitches, built-in alphabets and an automatic bobbin thread sensor. Pfaff’s exclusive Integrated Dual Feed technology allows fabric to feed smoothly and evenly. pfaff.com

Create a summery bag, quilt or throw pillow using the fabrics from The Palmer Collection by Anna Griffin. The retroinspired prints feature palm fronds, flowers and pineapples in vibrant colors that bring to mind Bermuda’s idyllic beaches and historic cottages. annagriffin.com

Pilot FriXion Pens allow you to mark fabric and then erase without leaving a trace. The patented thermochromatic technology causes the ink to disappear entirely with the application of heat from an iron. frixioncity.com

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JUNE/JULY 2012

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Discover fun and easy ideas for updating your home décor Give quilted projects professional polish with

with three great new books:

American Spirit Batting from Fairfield, available

Sewing Home Décor by Shannon Dennis features a handy

exclusively from independent quilt shops and specialty retailers. The batting is available in cotton, polyester, cotton/polyester and a luxurious bamboo/cotton blend. Each batting package also includes a free landscape quilt pattern. fairfieldworld.com

overview of basic décor sewing techniques, more than 35 projects and a 45-minute how-to DVD. landauercorp.com Learn time- and money-saving home-dec sewing tips in Decorating Sewlutions: Learn to Sew as You Decorate Your Home by Donna Babylon. The book includes beginnerfriendly methods to make more than 100 simple and practical projects. moresplashthancash.com Sew up a Home Makeover by Lexie Barnes shows you how to take your surroundings from drab to fab using beautiful fabrics. Choose from 50 projects, including slipcovers, wall art, throw pillows and curtains, to quickly revamp any room of your home. storey.com

Favorite fabric designer Anna Maria Horner brings her eye for bold and brilliant color to embroidery floss and Perle cotton thread with Anna Maria Needleworks for Anchor. Use the lovely, lustrous floss or thread to embellish projects with crewel embroidery, cross-stitch or needlepoint designs. Choose from a variety of handpicked coordinating color collections. westminsterfibers.com

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Sew Your Support

Operation Comfort Doll THIS YEAR SEW NEWS BRINGS YOU “SEW YOUR SUPPORT: OPERATION COMFORT DOLL.” Use your sewing talents to help domestic abuse victims by participating in the Operation Comfort

Send completed comfort dolls to: Brenda Hutchings Sew News Operation Comfort Doll 303 McKinley St. Valparaiso, IN 46383

Doll project. To date, over 800 dolls have been received from Sew News readers, and we’d love to double that number by the end of the year. Find free instructions and templates to make a simple comfort doll at sewnews.com/web_extras. The featured dolls only take 20 minutes each to complete. Choose from several skin, dress and hair

Do you know a charity that could benefit from future installments of Sew Your Support? Please email your suggestions to sewnews@sewnews.com.

color variations to make a doll that’s truly unique. The more dolls the Comfort Doll Project receives, the more women they can help!

For more information, doll design inspiration and to view past donations, visit The Comfort Doll Project blog at comfortdollproject.blogspot.com.

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JUNE/JULY 2012

4/3/12 1:50 PM


Sewing Thread Has Met Its Match! Introducing Aerolock Premium Serger Thread from Madeira When you sew, you choose thread and fabric that pair well together. Now your serger thread can be part of that equation! Madeira’s NEW Aerolock Premium Serger Thread comes in 48 popular colors, specifically chosen to match the top colors of Madeira Aerofil Sewing and Quilting Thread. You’ll never have to settle for a “close enough” color again! Plus, this top quality, 100% core-spun polyester thread has been tested to ensure flawless stitches every time.

Find Madeira Premium Serger Thread at your local sewing machine retailer or at www.madeirathread.com

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Top 10

10 Iconic Yves Saint Laurent Looks / { by Beth Bradley } During his monumental 50-year career, Yves Saint Laurent introduced myriad innovative designs and silhouettes, making him one of the most influential fashion designers of the 20th century.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR:

The Denver Art Museum is featuring a retrospective of YSL’s amazing body of work, including garments, accessories, sketches and more until July 8, 2012. Take a sneak peek at the exhibition by learning about 10 of YSL’s most iconic looks. For more information on the exhibition, go to denverartmuseum.org.

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TRAPEZE DRESS

MONDRIAN DRESS

LE SMOKING JACKET

After winning the International Wool Secretariat contest for an original cocktail dress design, YSL began working for legendary couturier Christian Dior in 1954. When Dior died in 1957, YSL took the helm of the design house at the age of 21. For his debut Dior collection in 1958, YSL introduced the “trapeze” dress silhouette, which featured narrow shoulders and a gracefully flared hem. The trapeze silhouette took the emphasis away from the natural waistline and changed women’s fashion for decades to come.

YSL was one of the first designers to link fashion and fine art. The basic shift dress had become ubiquitous in the ’60s, so YSL took advantage of its simple lines by paying homage to the iconic modern artist, Piet Mondrian. This jersey dress from 1965 cleverly hides the necessary shaping within the fabric color block seams.

YSL introduced his famous and revolutionary “Le Smoking” tuxedo jacket for women in 1966. The women’s movement had gained momentum throughout the ’60s, and YSL’s tuxedo design introduced an empowered and androgynous look. Over the course of his career, he also made blazers, safari jackets, pantsuits and leather jackets mainstream in womenswear.

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Top 10

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BELLE DU JOUR DRESS In the mid-’60s, YSL expanded his career by designing costumes and décor for film and theater. He began a long-term collaboration with the glamorous French actress Catherine Deneuve when he dressed her for Luis Buñuel’s film Bell du Jour in 1967. Her costumes included a black shirtdress that epitomized French chic with its simple lines and contrasting satin cuffs and collar.

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“BAMBARA” COLLECTION LONG EVENING DRESS

RUSSIAN-INSPIRED EVENING ENSEMBLE

PABLO PICASSO EVENING DRESS

YSL was also one of the first designers to incorporate global influences into his designs. For Spring/Summer 1967, he introduced an Africaninspired collection, which included this long evening gown adorned with wooden beading and embroidery. Elements of this collection, including beading, tribal prints, wood, metal and raffia, still resurface in fashion almost every summer.

In his Fall/Winter 1976 collection, YSL eschewed the simple, practical sportswear looks that had become popular in the ’70s. Instead, he borrowed dramatic influences from the Ballets Russes’ costumes, including rich embroidery, saturated colors and opulent textiles, such as velvet, silk and fur. The extravagant combination renewed the desire for luxury and created a new “bohemianchic” trend that continues to reappear in present-day fashion.

YSL continued to bring fine art to life throughout his career. In addition to Mondrian, YSL designed ensembles in tribute to many artists, such as Henri Matisse, Georges Braque and Vincent Van Gogh. YSL’s 1979 Fall/Winter collection took inspiration from Pablo Picasso’s paintings, and included this vibrant silk evening dress featuring swirling patchwork appliqués.

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8 PARIS ROSE In Fall/Winter 1983, YSL updated the classic sheath silhouette with an exuberant touch by adding an oversized pink satin bow to an elegant black velvet evening gown. Also in 1983, the Metropolitan Museum of Art presented an exhibition of YSL’s work, marking the first time the museum featured a retrospective of a living artist.

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GOLD LAMÉ EVENING DRESS

YELLOW DRAPED EVENING DRESS

YSL was the first couturier to introduce a prêt-à-porter (ready-towear) line of clothing in addition to his couture collection. He created his Rive Gauche line with the goal of democratizing high fashion, and opened the first Rive Gauche store in 1966. His 1991 Fall/Winter collection included this draped gold evening gown inspired by his time living in Morocco.

YSL bid farewell to fashion in 2002, showing his final couture collection for Spring/Summer 2002 at the Pompidou Center in Paris. Among the 300 looks he presented was this chiffon evening gown and silk cape featuring a relaxed, draped silhouette as well as the bold use of color that had become one of YSL’s most recognizable signatures.

PHOTO CREDITS 1. Yves Saint Laurent for Dior, Short evening dress, “Trapeze” haute couture collection, Spring-Summer 1958, Valse (Waltz) design. White silver-sequined tulle. © Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, Paris / Photo A. Guirkinger. 2. Yves Saint Laurent, Short cocktail dress, tribute to Piet Mondrian, haute couture collection, Fall-Winter 1965. Ecru wool jersey, encrusted with black, red, yellow and blue. © Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, Paris / Photo A. Guirkinger. 3. Yves Saint Laurent, Tuxedo with pants, haute couture collection, Fall-Winter 1966. Black barathea and satin silk, white organdy blouse. © Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, Paris / Photo A. Guirkinger. 4. Yves Saint Laurent, Belle de Jour dress, haute couture collection, Spring-Summer 1967. Barathea, black-andwhite silk satin collar and cuffs. © Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, Paris / Photo A. Guirkinger. 5. Yves Saint Laurent, Long evening dress, Bambara haute couture collection, Spring-Summer 1967. Black Rhodoïd and wooden bead embroidery. © Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, Paris / Photo A. Guirkinger. 6. Yves Saint Laurent, Long evening ensemble, haute couture collection, Fall-Winter 1976. Emerald and sable velvet bolero; peacock blueand-gold chiffon; Prussian blue Ottoman skirt. © Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, Paris / Photo A. Guirkinger. 7. Yves Saint Laurent, Short evening dress, tribute to Pablo Picasso, haute couture collection, Fall-Winter 1979. Black velvet and orange moiré, multicolored appliqué patchwork. © Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, Paris / Photo A. Guirkinger. 8. (and lead image) Yves Saint Laurent, Long evening dress, “Paris” haute couture collection, Fall-Winter 1983. Black velvet sheath dress, “Paris rose” satin bow. © Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, Paris / Photo A. Guirkinger. 9. Yves Saint Laurent, Long evening dress, Rive Gauche collection, Fall-Winter 1991. Draped gold lamé. © Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, Paris / Photo A. Guirkinger. 10. Yves Saint Laurent, Long evening dress, haute couture collection, Spring-Summer 2002. Yellow draped chiffon; blue gazer cape lined with green silk. © Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent, Paris / Photo A. Guirkinger.

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Home-Dec Help

Pam Damour answers your mitering question.

What’s a simple home-dec project I can make to incorporate a clean, contemporary style to my living room? Add mitered banding or a border to throw pillows for an easy contemporary makeover.

Mitered Banding Supplies

7 181⁄2” square of home-décor fabric 7 181⁄2” square of coordinating homedécor fabric (plus 1⁄4 yard) 7 16”-long regular zipper 7 17” square pillow form 7 Removable fabric marker 7 Edge joining or stitch-in-the-ditch foot 7 Home-décor ruler or ruler with 45º angle line at the corner (See “Sources.”) 7 Rotary cutting system (optional)

Prepare

From the coordinating home-décor fabric, cut enough 4”-wide bias strips to create 68” of continuous binding. Piece together the strips using a 1⁄4” seam allowance. Fold the binding strip in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press, and then unfold. Fold each long edge toward the center foldline; press.

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Construct

With right sides together, fold the home-décor fabric square in half lengthwise and widthwise; fingerpress. Mark 1⁄2” seam allowances on the square right side, using a removable fabric marker or pencil. Mark the center on each square edge line. Connect the center marks to create a diamond shape (1). Designate one diamond corner as the upper corner. Install an edge joining or stitch-inthe-ditch foot onto the machine and position the needle to the left of the presser foot rudder. Position the binding long edge along the upper-right line, extending the binding short end 2” beyond the upper corner; pin. Topstitch along the binding outer edge, beginning 2” from the upper corner and ending 2” before the adjacent corner. Unfold the binding along the outer edge. Fold the binding strip back over

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itself with right sides together, aligning the short folded edge with the adjacent line; pin. Align the ruler long edge with the seam allowance line and the 45˚ angle line with the binding outeredge foldline; mark the binding (2). Stitch along the marked line. Trim the seam allowance to 1⁄2”, and then turn the binding toward the right side; press. Fold the binding outer edge toward the wrong side, aligning the outer edges with the lines (3). Continue topstitching the binding outer edge, mitering the next two corners. End the stitching 2” before the binding beginning. Trim the binding end 2” beyond the upper corner. Align the binding beginning and end with right sides together; pin. Align the ruler long edge with the seam allowance line and the ruler 45˚ angle line with the binding outer-edge foldline; mark the binding. Stitch along the marked line. Trim to a 1⁄2” seam allowance, and then

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turn the binding toward the right side; press. Fold the binding outer edge toward the wrong side. Continue topstitching the binding outer edge. Position the needle to the right of the presser foot rudder. Topstitch the binding inner edge (4). With right sides together, stitch the fabric and coordinating fabric perimeter, leaving one edge open for the zipper. Insert the zipper into the opening, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Turn the pillow right side out through the zipper opening; press. Insert a pillow form.

Mitered Border Supplies

7 181⁄2” square of home-décor fabric 7 181⁄2” square of coordinating homedécor fabric (plus 1⁄4 yard) 7 16”-long regular zipper 7 17” square pillow form 7 Removable fabric marker 7 Edge joining or stitch-in-the-ditch foot 7 Home-décor ruler or ruler with 45º angle line at the corner (See “Sources.”) 7 Rotary cutting system (optional)

Prepare

From the coordinating home-décor fabric, cut enough 4”-wide bias strips to create 86” of continuous binding. Piece together the strips using a 1⁄4” seam allowance. Fold the binding in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press.

Construct

Position the home-décor fabric square wrong side up on a flat work surface. Mark 1⁄2” seam allowances at each corner, using a removable fabric marker or pencil.

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Install an edge joining foot or stitchin-the-ditch foot onto the machine and position the needle to the right of the presser foot rudder. Position the fabric square right side up on a flat work surface. Position the binding strip end at one fabric square corner, aligning the raw edges; pin. Topstitch the binding inner edge, beginning 3” from the corner and ending 3” before the adjacent corner. From the fabric square wrong side, insert a pin at the seam allowance corner mark. From the fabric square right side, insert another pin at the pin-mark (5). Unfold the binding at the pin-marks, keeping one pin on each binding half. Align the ruler edges with the pin-marks and the 45˚ angle line with the binding foldline; mark the binding (6). With right sides together, fold the binding in half widthwise 1⁄4” from the binding markings. Stitch along the marked line. Trim the seam allowance to 1⁄2” and clip into the corner (7). Turn the binding to the right side; press. Fold the binding along the foldline with wrong sides together, aligning the outer edge with the square edge (8). Continue topstitching the binding inner edge, mitering the next two corners. End the stitching 3” before the binding beginning. Trim the binding at the fabric square corner. From the fabric square wrong side, insert a pin at the seam allowance corner mark. From the fabric square right side, insert another pin at the pin-mark. Unfold the binding at the pin-marks, keeping one pin on each binding half. Align the ruler edges with the pinmarks and the 45˚ angle line with

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the binding foldline; mark the binding. With right sides together, fold the binding in half widthwise 1⁄4” from the marking end points. Repeat to mark the opposite binding end. Align the binding beginning and end with right sides together, matching the marks; pin. Stitch along the marked line. Trim the seam allowance to 1⁄2” and clip into the corner. Turn the binding toward the right side; press. Fold the binding along the foldline with wrong sides together. Continue topstitching the binding inner edge. With right sides together, stitch the fabric and coordinating fabric square perimeter, leaving one edge open for the zipper. Insert the zipper into the opening, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Turn the pillow right side out through the zipper opening; press. Insert a pillow form. Z SOURCE The Decorating Diva carries a home-décor ruler: (518) 297-2699, pamdamour.com.

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Basic Skills

Grading, Clipping & Notching

{ by Susan Beck }

Professional-looking seams are flat and bulk-free. Straight seams should be perpendicular to the floor and curved seams should be smooth. Learn how to properly trim, grade, clip and notch seams after stitching and pressing for professional results every time.

Trim Seam Allowances Seam allowances are usually trimmed if they interfere with the garment fit, such as along an armseye or crotch seam. Trim straight seams that are pressed open in order to reduce bulk inside the garment. Trim both seam allow-

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ances together when working with lightweight fabric (1). Trim each seam allowance independently when working with heavyweight fabrics to ensure ease and accuracy. Trim seam allowances to 1⁄4” when working with tightly woven fabric and 3⁄8” when working with loosely woven fabric.

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Trim intersecting seam allowances. Trim each seam upper point to reduce bulk (2).

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Trim points, such as those on collars, to reduce bulk for a smooth and flat seam on the fabric right side. Trim points diagonally close to the stitching line and taper the sides downward from the point (3).

Grade Seams The term “grading” has a similar meaning to the word used in landscaping. If a hillside is graded, it’s smoothed out with a gradual slope so there aren’t any ridges or sharp drop-offs. The concept is the same for enclosed seams, such as those on collars, lapels, facings, armseyes and cuffs. For example, the seam allowance on a collar creates a sharp change in thickness, making the edges heavier than the collar itself and resulting in a visible ridge on the fabric right side, especially when working with thick and bulky fabrics. Trimming the seam allowances to different widths, known as “grading the seam,” slopes them toward the garment, reducing the bulk and creating a smooth, flat appearance on the garment right side. Trim both seam allowances to 3⁄8”. Trim the seam allowance closest to the body another 1⁄8”. For seams with more than two layers, such as interfacing, underlining or lining, slightly trim the seam allowance closest to the garment right side, and then trim each seam allowance slightly narrower than the previous (4).

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Clip Inner Curves Inner or concave curves, such as armseyes, necklines and curved pocket openings, must be clipped to produce a smooth curve on the fabric right side. Clipping into seam allowances allows the fabric to spread out and lay flat. Clip into the seam allowance up to, but not through, the stitching line. Repeat to clip the remaining seam allowance, spacing the clips 1⁄2” (5). Or space clips 1⁄4” apart for very tight curves. If the fabric ripples when turned right side out, there aren’t enough clips or the clips aren’t cut close enough to the stitching line. For more control when clipping, clip each seam allowance independently. Stagger the clips on each seam allowance to create a smooth appearance on the fabric right side.

Notch Outer Curves Outer or convex curves, such as rounded collars or curved hems, have too much seam allowance fabric for the curved area, resulting in a bunched and uneven edge. Notching the seam allowances removes some of the seam

allowance fabric, creating a smooth curve on the fabric right side. Cut small triangles, or notches, from the seam allowance up to, but not through, the stitching line, spacing each notch 1⁄2” apart (6). If the curve has sharp points when turned right side out, there aren’t enough notches or the notches aren’t cut close enough to the stitching line. Press open the seam and turn the fabric right side out, using a point turner to smooth the edge from the fabric wrong side.

Princess Seams A princess-style bodice has three pieces; a center panel and two side panels. The panel seams are called princess seams and each panel has either an outer or inner curve that

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Basic Skills

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shapes the fabric over the bust. Princess seams replace darts and require clipping and notching for a smooth seam on the fabric right side. Staystitch within the seam allowance on each panel edge. Clip the center-panel inner curve up to, but not through, the staystitching line. With right sides together, pin the center panel to one side panel, spreading the center-panel inner-curved edge to fit the side-panel outer-curved edge (7). Stitch using a 2mm to 2.5mm stitch length. Cut notches into the side-panel outercurve seam allowance up to, but not through, the staystitching line (8). Press open the seam using a pressing ham and the iron tip.

Tablet Sleeve

Cut

Protect your tablet with a cute quilted felt sleeve. The curved edge flap adds color and style to the useful case.

Download the pattern at sewnews. com/web_extras.

Supplies Finished Tablet Sleeve measures 10”x11”. • Two 11”x 18” rectangles of wool or wool felt • Fat quarter of print cotton fabric • 4” square of coordinating print fabric • 10” x 11” rectangle of low-loft batting • All-purpose thread • Temporary spray adhesive • 11⁄2”-diameter covered button kit • Elastic hair tie • Point turner (optional)

From the fat quarter, cut two flaps. From the batting, cut one flap. From the hair tie, cut one 3” length.

Construct Use 1⁄2” seam allowances unless otherwise noted. Position one flap wrong side up on a flat work surface. Position the batting over the flap and secure using temporary spray adhesive. Position the two flaps with right sides together; pin. Fold the hair tie in half widthwise. Position the hair tie in between the flaps, aligning the ends with

SCISSOR TIPS Scissors are the most important tool for trimming, grading, clipping or notching. Follow these guidelines for perfect results: 7 Use small 4”- to 5”-long trimming scissors with sharp points that are aligned to cut all the way to the tips for the most control and accuracy. 7 Prevent clipping through the stitching line by placing the scissor tips where you want the clip to end. 7 When clipping loosely woven fabric, end the clip 1⁄8” from the stitching line.

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Custom Sizing 10

Create a custom sleeve for any size tablet. Measure the tablet length and width; record. Add 2” to each measurement; record. Measure the tablet depth; add the measurement to the width measurement, and then record.

the flap edge at the pattern marking. Stitch the flap sides and curved edge. Trim the curved seam allowance to 1⁄ 4”. Grade the seam allowances and batting to reduce bulk, following the instructions on page 23.

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Turn the flap right side out; press, using a point turner to push out the curved edge if needed. Designate the open edge as the upper edge. Position the sleeves with wrong sides together; secure using temporary spray adhesive. Quilt the sleeve in a simple pattern, such as channel quilting (parallel stitching lines in one direction) (9), grid quilting (parallel stitching lines in two directions) (10), or windowpane quilting (grid quilting using double stitching lines) (11). The featured sleeve showcases windowpane quilting. Stitch 1⁄8” from each sleeve short end using a 3mm-wide and 3mm-long zigzag stitch. Edgestitch each sleeve long edge using a straight stitch. Designate one sleeve short edge as the upper edge. With right sides together, position the flap upper edge 1⁄2” from the

sleeve upper edge; stitch 1⁄4” from the flap upper edge. Fold the flap toward the right side; press. Stitch the flap close to the seamline, and then stitch 1⁄ 4” from the first stitching line. Fold the sleeve in half widthwise with wrong sides together, positioning the lower edge 11⁄2” from the upper edge. Edgestitch the sleeve sides along the previous stitching line. From the coordinating square, cut one 3”-diameter circle. Cover the button following the manufacturer’s instructions. Fold the flap over the sleeve. Mark the button placement. Handstitch the button onto the sleeve at the button placement marking. Z

From the wool, cut two sleeves measuring the new length and width measurements. Before cutting the flap, fold the sleeves in half widthwise with wrong sides together, positioning the lower edge 11⁄2” from the upper edge. Position the flap pattern along the sleeve upper edge. The button center placement should be 3” above the rectangle folded edge. If needed, adjust the flap pattern to fit the sleeve. From the cotton fabric, cut two flaps. Before attaching the flap to the sleeve, fold the sleeves in half widthwise with wrong sides together, positioning the lower edge 11⁄2” from the upper edge; pin. Insert the tablet into the sleeve to check the fit. If needed, trim the sleeve and flap sides to achieve a tighter fit. Construct the sleeve following the instructions at left.

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Footwork

DARNING FOOT { by Debra Justice }

Use a darning foot to mend small tears or holes in a variety of fabrics, such as denim and lace, or use the foot for stipple quilting.

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Darning Foot Anatomy

Repair a Tear

A darning foot is also referred to as a free-motion, free-motion embroidery or quilting foot depending on the sewing machine manufacturer. “Freemotion” means you manually move the fabric around under the presser foot without the feed dogs engaged. The foot is spring loaded and designed to float over the fabric while the toe prevents the fabric from sliding up the machine needle during stitching. Darning feet vary slightly by manufacturer, although the functionality is the same. Most darning feet are completely metal or a combination of metal and plastic, and screw onto the machine. A darning foot has an open or closed toe that’s either metal or plastic. Select an open or closed toe based on your personal preference and the project type. Consult your machine dealer for available darning feet. Generic darning feet are available, but might require an adaptor in order to use.

Install a darning foot onto the machine and disengage the feed dogs, referring to the machine manual if necessary. Select a needle and thread that matches the fabric type, weight and color. Thread the machine.

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Trim any frayed fabric or threads from the tear. Lightly spray starch on the fabric and align the torn edges as close as possible without distorting the fabric. For large tears where the edges don’t align, position a large piece of water-soluble stabilizer underneath the tear. Position the fabric right side up under the presser foot, aligning one tear end 1⁄4” from the needle. Lower the presser foot. Manually turn the hand wheel to bring up the bobbin thread through the fabric. Take three to four stitches in place to secure the thread (1). If available, engage the needle-down feature on the machine.

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Tip: For larger repairs, hoop the fabric in a spring tension hoop. The hoop holds the fabric taut for easy movement during stitching.

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Stitch 1⁄4” from the tear perimeter, creating an outline stitch that the subsequent stitches will anchor to (2).

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Stitch back and forth across the tear, beginning at one tear end and stitching just beyond the outline stitch (3). At the opposite tear end, stitch back over the tear between the previous stitching lines to reinforce the repair. Take three to four stitches in place to secure the thread (4).

spray starch on the lace and align the torn edges as close as possible without distorting the lace. Position a large piece of water-soluble stabilizer underneath the hole.

Trim the excess water-soluble stabilizer beyond the stitching. Rinse away the remaining stabilizer, following the manufacturer’s instructions.

Position the lace right side up under the presser foot, aligning the needle with the thickest lace area or a lace design area. Lower the presser foot. Manually turn the hand wheel to bring up the bobbin thread through the fabric.

Repair a Hole in Lace Install a darning foot onto the machine and disengage the feed dogs, referring to the machine manual if necessary. Select a needle and thread that matches the lace type, weight and color. Thread the machine. Trim any frayed threads from the hole; do not over trim (5). Lightly

Take three to four stitches in place to secure the thread (6). If available, engage the needle-down feature on the machine. Stitch back and forth across the hole in one direction, mimicking the lace pattern and ending the stitching in a

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lace design area. Stitch back and forth in the opposite direction to complete the lace pattern. Take three to four stitches in place to secure the thread. Carefully trim the threads and watersoluble stabilizer beyond the stitching. Rinse away the remaining stabilizer, following the manufacturer’s instructions (7).

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Footwork

Stippling Tips

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Stipple Quilting Stipple quilting is free-motion stitching using a darning foot that attaches three fabric layers together, such as for a quilt or wall hanging. The stipple pattern is one continuous stitching line that consists of irregular twists and turns without overlaps. Stipple stitching resembles puzzle pieces or coral. Manually turn the hand wheel to bring up the bobbin thread. Position the project right side up under the presser foot, aligning the needle with the project upper-left corner. Lower the presser foot. Take three to four stitches in place to secure the thread. If available, engage the needle-down feature on the machine. Select a medium speed on the machine. Stitch from the quilt left edge to the right edge, creating a wavy and irregular line. Repeat to

Use the following tips to stipple like a pro: 7 Practice on scrap fabric layers using contrasting thread to perfect your stitching. 7 To prevent puckers, use a lowloft batting. 7 Change the machine needle after stitching a large project as the needle dulls quickly. 7 Don’t be afraid to stop stitching and lift the presser foot to see where you’ve stitched and where to stitch next. 7 Lightly spray starch on the project right and wrong sides for easier movement during stitching. 7 Wind several extra bobbins before beginning. 7 Use textured gloves to help grip the fabric and allow for easier movement during the free-motion stitching, especially when working on large projects.

stitch back to the left edge from the right edge, spacing the stitching lines roughly a presser-foot width apart (8). Repeat to stitch the entire project. Once the stitching is complete, take three to four stitches in place to secure the thread. When stopping to refill a bobbin or fix a mistake, clip the threads close to the last stitch. To begin again, take three to four stitches in place to secure the thread, and then take two or three stitches along the previous stitching line end. Continue stitching. Z RESOURCE Learn to Sew With Your Feet, Debra Justice: 2009, Labours of Love; Abbotsford, BC, laboursoflove.com SOURCES Baby Lock provided a darning foot: babylock.com. Bernina USA provided a darning foot: berninausa.com. Husqvarna Viking provided a darning foot: (800) 446-2333, husqvarnaviking.com. Pfaff provided a darning foot: (800) 446-2333, pfaffusa.com.

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Fitting FAQs

Your frequently asked fitting questions answered by Peggy Sagers (courtesy of Silhouette Patterns)

[Q] [A]

When fitting pants, how can I eliminate wrinkles and “smile lines” in the front crotch area? How can you get rid of wrinkles below ‘ the derriere? The wrinkles indicate that the pant crotch curve isn’t aligned with the body’s curve. The wrinkles are a result of excess fabric. To create a shape that accurately aligns with the body, eliminate the excess fabric at the wrinkle location rather than at the waistline. When trying on the pant fitting sample, create a dart at the wrinkle location, beginning at the center-front seam and tapering to nothing at the side seam (pivot point). On the pant pattern, fold an identical horizontal dart at the wrinkle location; tape closed (1). Because the pivot point is on the side seam, the pattern will still lay flat. Recut the pants using the altered pattern. ‘ is The problem of wrinkles below the derriere common to many women. To understand the origin, think about bra cup sizing. If a woman with

1 Excess fabric

Front Pivot point

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Tip: Stitch fitting-sample seams using a 1” seam allowance and a basting stitch to enable easy adjustments.

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Excess fabric

Back

Pivot point/ Hip line

a B-cup size wears a D-cup blouse, the excess fabric falls to the waist because there’s too much depth with nothing to support it. If a pant crotch curve is too deep, the excess fabric falls ‘ below the derriere, creating wrinkles. Pant patterns are usually drafted from a skirt pattern and then split horizontally at the hip line to allow ‘ curve. Manufacturers often room for the derriere split the hip line more than needed because it’s more likely women will purchase the pants if there’s too much room instead of too little. To eliminate the wrinkles, create a dart along the fitting sample hip line to eliminate the excess at the back crotch depth. The excess fabric must be removed at the hip line rather than the waistline or crotch seam in order to create the correct crotch shape and maintain the straight grainline. Pinch a horizontal dart at the hip line, beginning at the center-back seam and tapering to nothing at the side seam (2). Transfer the alteration to the pant pattern; tape the dart closed. Recut the pants using the altered pattern. Once you’ve corrected the front and back crotch fit, use the altered patterns to fix the crotch length of future pairs of pants. Compare and trace the crotch shape onto the new patterns to save frustration and fitting time. Z

Need expert fitting advice? Send your sewing questions to sewnews@sewnews.com. * Published questions may be edited for clarity and brevity.

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Pattern Play

Gathered Bodice Dress { by Ana Jankovic }

Add feminine flair to a summer dress by drafting a pretty and flattering gathered bodice.

Look for a simple dress pattern, such as Simplicity 2404.

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Bust Panel

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Tip: Use an embroidered border-print fabric with factory-finished edges to eliminate the need to finish the skirt, sleeve and bust-panel edges. Supplies 7 Shift dress pattern with front, back and waist darts (such as Simplicity 2404) 7 Lightweight border-print fabric & lining (amount according to pattern envelope, plus 1⁄2 yard) 7 All-purpose thread & notions (according to pattern envelope) 7 19”-long invisible zipper 7 Tissue or pattern paper 7 Rulers: clear flexible & curved 7 Clear tape

Prepare Cut out the pattern pieces. Before beginning the alterations, pin-fit or make a muslin fitting sample of the selected pattern. Make any necessary fit adjustments to the pattern, and then trace a copy on paper, transferring all markings.

Alter Mark the waistline on the dress front and back; cut along the waistlines (1). Trace the front bodice onto new paper. Cut along the bust-dart lower leg and waist-dart inner leg (2). Rotate the bodice lower panel to close the bust dart; tape closed (3). Determine the desired distance from the bodice side seam to the gathered bust-panel side edge and from the bodice lower edge to the bust-panel lower edge. Using these measurements, draw a gently curved L-shaped line that begins at the innershoulder point and ends at the center front, 3” to 5” above the bodice lower edge. At the desired neckline depth, draw a slightly curved horizontal line connecting the L-shaped line to the center front (4).

Cut along the lines to create three bodice panels; discard the paper above the bust-panel upper edge (5). On new paper slightly larger than the bust panel, draw two lines at a right angle. Align the bust-panel upper corner with the angle. Trace the bust-panel side and lower edges, connecting the dart lower points to form a continuous line. Redraw the upper edge as a straight line (6). Don’t cut out the traced bust panel; set aside. On the bust-panel left side, draw four equally spaced vertical slash lines roughly 1½” from the left edge. Cut along each line from the lower edge to, but not through, the upper edge (7).

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Pattern Play

8

Position the slashed bust panel over the traced bust panel, spreading the pieces until the upper edge aligns with the drawn straight line; tape in place (8). Trace the slashed bust panel side and lower edges (9). To add a box pleat to the centerfront and center-back skirt patterns, use pattern paper to add 3” to the center-front and center-back edges. Mark the pleat stitching lines along the original center-front and center-back lines, 5” from the upper edges (10).

9

10 Pleat stitching lines

Cut From the lightweight border-print fabric, cut one bust panel on the fold, aligning the pattern upper edge with the border edge. Cut one bodice lower panel on the fold. Cut two bodice side panels. Cut one front and one back skirt on the fold, aligning the pattern lower edges with the fabric border edge. Cut two back bodices. Cut two sleeves, aligning the pattern lower edges with the fabric border edge. From the lining fabric, cut one bodice lower panel, one front skirt and one back skirt on the fold. Cut two sleeves, two bodice side panels and two back bodices.

Construct With right sides together, stitch the left bodice-panel inner lower edge to the front lower-panel left edge. Repeat to stitch the right bodice panel to the front lower-panel right edge. Press open the seams. Construct the lining bodice in the same manner, and then align the fabric and lining bodices with

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3”

Back

Front

3”

wrong side together. Treat the front fabric and lining bodices as one.

Stitch the sleeves to the bodice following the pattern instructions.

Stitch the bust-panel lower edge using a gathering stitch. Gather the lower edge until it matches the bodice inner edge. With right sides together, stitch the bust panel side and lower edges to the bodice inner edge. Serge- or zigzag-finish the seam, and then press it toward the bodice.

With right sides together, fold the front skirt in half lengthwise. Stitch along the pleat stitching line; unfold. Press open the pleat. Repeat to stitch the back skirt pleat and lining pleats. Treat the skirt and lining pieces as one.

Stitch the back bodice darts; press toward the center back. With right sides together, stitch the center-back seam. Repeat to construct the back bodice. Treat the fabric and back lining bodices as one. With right sides together, stitch the shoulder seams; serge-or zigzag finish. With right sides together, stitch the bodice right side seam. Stitch the left side seam, leaving the zipper opening as directed on the pattern instructions. Serge- or zigzag-finish.

With right sides together, stitch the skirt side seams, leaving the zipper opening as directed on the pattern instructions; serge- or zigzag-finish. With right sides together, stitch the bodice lower edge to the skirt lower edge; serge- or zigzag finish. Insert the zipper, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Z SOURCE Simplicity carries 2404: simplicity.com.

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Not your grandmother's sewing cabinet... where creativity meets color! Call 1-800-533-7347 or visit www.arrowcabinets.com to find a dealer near you Introducing

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Stash Buster

Use small fabric scraps to stitch a cute collection of picnic weights to prevent napkins and tablecloths from blowing away in the summer breeze.

PICNIC WEIGHTS

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{ by Lucy Blaire}

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Tip: Use a knitting needle or chopstick to push fiberfill into smaller areas. Supplies 7 Assorted fabric and lining scraps (at least 41⁄2” square) 7 All-purpose thread 7 Vinyl scraps (at least 3” square) 7 Polyester fiberfill 7 Embroidery floss 7 Hand embroidery needle 7 Removable fabric marker 7 Play sand (available at hardware stores) • Paper scrap • Tape • Spoon

Cut Download the Picnic Weight templates at sewnews.com/web_extras. For the cat, cut two cats from the fabric scraps. Transfer the face to one fabric cat, using a removable fabric marker. From the lining fabric, cut two weights. From the vinyl, cut one bottom.

Construct Use 1⁄4” seam allowances unless otherwise noted. With wrong sides together, stitch the two weights, leaving a 2” opening. Roll the paper scrap into a funnel shape; tape. Fill the weight opening with sand, using the funnel and a spoon. Install the machine zipper foot onto the machine, and then stitch the weight opening closed (1). Thread a hand embroidery needle with two strands of embroidery floss. Embroider the cat face using a split stitch (2). Install the standard machine foot onto the machine. With right sides to-

1

2

3

4

Op

en

Op

en

Tip: Be careful not to overfill the weight with sand.

5

gether, stitch the cat perimeter, leaving the lower edge unstitched and a 2” opening along one side edge for turning (3). With right sides together, pin the vinyl bottom perimeter to the cat lower edge; stitch (4). Turn the cat right side out through the side opening (5). Place the weight inside the cat bottom. Firmly stuff the cat with fiberfill.

6

Slipstitch the opening closed (6). Pinch the cat to evenly distribute the sand and fiberfill.

Finish Repeat to cut, embroider and construct the remaining picnic weights. When creating a chicken picnic weight, cut the beak from a small felt scrap, and then stitch it between the fabric layers according to the pattern marking. Z

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Mix&Match { by Liesl Gibson}

Color and prints are beginning to play a large role in fashion once again, in a

way we haven’t seen in a very long time. Learn how to fearlessly mix and match fabric prints for an effortless look.

Trend Spotting

On the runways during Fashion Week, a large number of spring ’12 shows emphasized color and print. Designers combined bold, bright colors that many of us were taught not to mix, such as pink and orange or red and violet, and mixed prints more ambitiously than ever. All the emphasis on print and color means that what appears in stores and what looks “fresh” in the coming seasons will drastically change. In New York City, the fashionable crowd will embrace color and print after years of black, neutrals and solids. Some of the color and print mixing shown on the runways was overwhelming, but that’s typical of runway shows. The designers overemphasize a concept for the runway, but tone it down for ready-made clothing.

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Mix it Up

One of the pleasures of sewing for yourself is choosing your own color and print combinations. There are a few basic principles about mixing prints in fashion and design. The following guidelines will help you successfully combine prints without feeling mismatched. Unified Color Palette: Don’t restrict yourself to a narrow color palette; instead match a few common colors and the opposing print colors will work together. Look for a single dominant color in the chosen prints to help unify the prints and create a coherent feeling between them. For example, select two prints with an overall blue tone or prints that emphasize both blue and green. By staying within one area of the color wheel, the prints work together rather than compete with each other. Try adding accessories to an outfit that enhance the print choices, such as yellow shoes or a winecolored belt, that balance your selections and highlight or contrast with the prints. The accessories give the eye someplace to rest and add interest to your outfit without feeling too “matchy-matchy.” Vary the Scale: The most successful print pairings often feature one large print and one small print. The smaller print supports and enhances the larger print. The difference in scale helps the two prints work together. Most fabric collections have a large and small scale print for this reason. Use this trick to combine all types of prints and you’ll be surprised by what works. Combine Floral and Geometric Prints: The angles and lines of a geometric print often work well with softer, rounder floral shapes. Try combining an angular print with dots or soft, loopy print. A geometric print works well with floral prints because they play off and enhance each other through their differences. It’s easy to combine two geometrics or a geometric and a floral instead of two florals.

Striped fabric matches most prints. Depending on the prints, combining stripes with dots can be a bold, playful combination or a more subtle pairing. Mixing stripes and florals almost always looks great together. Think about motif variety when combining prints. Look for “Un-Solid Solids” or “Solid Prints”: Textures, such as wooly tweeds, combined with rich, luxurious velvet, or fuzzy sweaters combined with shiny smooth silk, make an outfit more interesting. Apply the same concept to prints. Many small prints have a visual texture and sometimes even appear solid from a distance, instead of a flat solid fabric. From a few feet away small-scale prints, such as checks, resemble a texture rather than a print and add interest to any outfit.

Fabric Fancy

Always keep the fabric type in mind as you plan and combine prints and colors. It’s important to use fabric with the correct hand (how the fabric feels), drape (how a fabric hangs on the body) and weight (how heavy or thick the fabric is). Review the clothes in your closet before selecting project fabrics. Choose similar fabric weights and textures to those in your closet, and then start experimenting with other fabrics that you find interesting. Always check the pattern envelope to find fabric suggestions. Audition the chosen prints before cutting. Hold them up to a mirror to see how they look together. Or hold them in front of you and have a friend take a photograph. Discovering how a fabric photographs before using it helps you gain a different perspective on the best print combinations. Or ask a fashion-conscious friend what they think about your chosen print combinations.

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Creative COMBOS

Discover stylish print combinations to create a basic dress and jacket ensemble.

Simplicity 2209, Lisette Passport Dress and Jacket

Floral + Ikat

Choose a warm color palette for a stylish spring outfit. Select lightweight sateen with a large-scale watercolor floral print for the dress and a lightweight canvas with small ikat medallion print for the jacket. The large-scale floral looks great for a sleeveless dress, and layers nicely with a the small-scale ikat medallion print jacket. The medallion print has plenty of solid space around the print motifs, which creates a more subtle print that matches a busier print.

Paisley + Check

Choose a unified color palette in a cool shade, such as aqua, and use textured check canvas fabric as a “solid print” for a sophisticated and understated ensemble. The check print canvas creates a solid print, adding texture and visual interest to the jacket. The paisley floral print dress is the focus of the outfit, which has a loose, hand-drawn feel. Combining the textured effect of the subtle “solid” print with the paisley floral print prevents the dress from becoming lost and helps emphasize the hand-painted appearance of the print.

Kaleidoscope + Ikat

Go for a bold approach and select a large-scale print for the jacket and a smaller-scale geometric print for the dress. The print combination draws attention to the jacket. The two prints share the same color palette, despite the wide range of colors within each print. Selecting two busy prints works as long as they share a few matching colors. The scale of the two prints are quite different, which actually helps them coordinate. The ikat print has soft edges that contrast the hard edges of the kaleidoscope print.

Tip: Select lightweight sateen fabric for dresses, skirts and blouses. Canvas works well for bottoms and jackets or more structured dresses that don’t require a lot of drape. 40

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Dressed to THRILL

Combine different prints on a dress bodice and skirt to create “solid” print color blocking look or to mimic the look of separates.

Stripes + Dots

Select a geometric striped print for the dress bodice and a geometric dot print for the skirt. The print combination works well because the colors coordinate, the print scales differ and stripes easily match with other prints. In addition, the stripes are a “solid print” and add texture to the simple dress.

Geometric + Cloisonné

Choose a unified color palette, such as yellow with pops of pink, for a subtle sundress. Select a geometric pattern that draws attention to the interesting dart details on the dress bodice and a cloisonné-inspired print for the skirt.

Tip: Combine prints within a dress with a yoke, obi-style belt or trim.

Stripes + Geometric

Combine two geometric prints in a cool color palette, such as green, with slightly different scales. Choose a subtle stripe that works as an “un-solid solid” for the bodice and a bold smaller-scale geometric print for the skirt. Both prints have textural interest that unifies the outfit. Combine this print mix on a dress with a bold floral jacket for a wearable, but not too ovewhelming, ensemble. Z

SOURCES Jo-Ann Fabric and Craft Store carries the featured Lisette print cotton and canvas fabric: (888) 739-4120, joann.com. Simplicity carries the featured Lisette Passport Dress and Jacket pattern: simplicity.com. Common Era provided the Seychelles shoes ($86): mycommonera.com.

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Hit the road in style with everything you need for a weekend getaway stored in a three-piece travel set. The roomy tote has several pockets for storage, the foldup organizer holds jewelry, cosmetics or other small items and the curling iron cover is heat-resistant.

Get Packing { by Carol Zentgraf }

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Purch the Get ase Pac Tote kit king at quiltan dsews to have hop.com pre fabric re cut ady to sew!

Tote Supplies Supplies listed are enough to make one 5”x 15”x 19” tote with 11”-long handles. 7 21⁄4 yards of 44”-wide reversible quilted fabric 7 1⁄4 yard of 44”-wide coordinating cotton print fabric (A) 7 1⁄2 yard each of two 44”-wide coordinating cotton print fabrics (B & C) 7 1 yard of 20”-wide fusible interfacing 7 1⁄2”-wide double-sided fusible web tape 7 Thread: all-purpose & serger (optional) 7 Needles: hand sewing, size 80/12 universal & size 110/18 upholstery 7 Removable fabric or chalk marker 7 1⁄2”-wide bias tape maker (optional) 7 Serger (optional)

Cut

Designate the quilted fabric right and wrong side. From the quilted fabric, cut two 18½”x 20” rectangles for the bag, one 9”x 15” rectangle for the outer pocket and two 3½”x 63” strips for the handles. From fabric A, cut four 4”x 20” rectangles for the border. From fabric B, cut two 16”x 20” rectangles for the inner pockets. From fabric C, cut three 2”x 20” bias strips for the inner pockets and one 2”x 9” bias strip for the outer pocket. From the interfacing, cut two 16”x 20” rectangles.

Construct

Use ½” seam allowances unless otherwise noted. Fold each binding strip in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press, and then unfold. Fold each long edge toward the center foldline; press. Or use a bias tape maker to create ½”-wide doublefold binding following the manufacturer’s instructions.

Fuse each interfacing rectangle to the correspond-

ing inner-pocket rectangle. Fold each inner pocket in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press. Unfold one inner-pocket binding. Position the binding along the inner-pocket long raw edge, enclosing the raw edge within the fold; pin. Topstitch ⅛” from the binding lower edge. Repeat to bind the remaining inner-pocket long raw edge. Designate each inner-pocket folded edge as the lower edge. Adhere fusible web tape along each inner-pocket lower-edge wrong side; remove the paper backing. Position one bag rectangle wrong side up on a flat work surface. Designate one short edge as the lower edge. Center one inner pocket right side up over the bag, aligning the pocket lower edge 3” from the body lower edge; fuse. Install a size 80/12 universal needle onto the machine. Topstitch the pocket sides and lower edge. Repeat to stitch the remaining inner pocket to the remaining bag rectangle. Fold the outer-pocket rectangle in half widthwise with wrong sides together; press. Serge- or zigzagfinish the long raw edge.

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1

3”

5”

3”

5”

2

Unfold one outer-pocket binding. Position the binding along the outer-pocket long raw edge, enclosing the raw edge within the fold; pin. Topstitch ⅛” from the binding lower edge. Baste the outer-pocket sides. Designate each outer-pocket folded edge as the lower edge. Adhere fusible web tape along the outer-pocket sides and lower-edge wrong side; remove the paper backing. With right sides facing up, center the outer pocket over one bag rectangle, aligning the pocket lower edge 3” from the bag lower edge; fuse. Topstitch the pocket lower edge. Position one handle wrong side up on a flat work surface. Position fusible web tape on each handle long edge; fuse, and then remove the paper backing. Fold each handle long edge ½” toward the center; fuse. Repeat to fuse the remaining handle. Install a size 110/18 upholstery needle onto the machine. Fold the handle in half lengthwise; press, and then topstitch the long edges and center. Repeat to stitch the remaining handle. Center and adhere one 16”-long piece of fusible web tape to one handle end wrong side; remove the paper backing. With right sides facing up, position one handle long edge 5” from one bag side, aligning the handle short end with the bag lower edge; pin. Topstitch the handle perimeter, ending the stitching 3” below the bag upper edge. Repeat to stitch the remaining handle end 5” from the opposite bag side (1). Repeat to stitch the remaining handle to the remaining bag rectangle.

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With right sides together, stitch the bag lower edges.

Unfold the bag binding. Position the binding along the bag lower-edge seam allowance, enclosing the raw edge within the fold; pin. Topstitch ⅛” from the binding lower edge. With right sides together, serge the bag sides. Or stitch the sides, and then trim and zigzag-finish the seam allowances. To box the corners, align one bag side seam with the lower-edge seam. Mark a horizontal line just below the pocket lower edge using a removable fabric marker. Stitch along the line (2). Hand tack the corner to the bag lower-edge seam allowance. Repeat to box the opposite bag corner. With right sides together, stitch two band short edges together to create one continuous strip. Repeat to stitch the remaining two band rectangles. With right sides together, align the two band strips; stitch one long edge. Adhere fusible web tape to each long raw edge right side. Fold each long raw edge ½” toward the wrong side; press. Fold the strip in half lengthwise with wrong sides together along the seamline; press. Remove the fusible web tape paper backing. Position the band 3” over the bag upper edge, aligning the side seams and enclosing the bag upper edge; fuse. Topstitch the band upper and lower edges.

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e Purchas king Pac the Get er and Organiz Cover kit at Iron in rl Cu g dsewshop.com, n ta il fabric u q precut to have rs and vinyl zippe ady! at the re

Organizer Supplies Supplies listed are enough to make one 12”x 29” organizer. 7 1⁄2 yard of 44”-wide reversible quilted fabric 7 1⁄4 yard each of two 44”-wide coordinating cotton print fabrics (A & B) 7 1⁄2 yard of clear vinyl 7 Three 12”-long regular zippers 7 Thread: all-purpose & serger (optional) 7 Chalk marker 7 1⁄4”-wide double-sided fusible web tape 7 21⁄2”-diameter circle template 7 Serger (optional) 7 1⁄2”-wide double-fold bias tape maker (optional)

Prepare

From the quilted fabric, cut one 12”x 31” rectan-

gle. Designate the rectangle right and wrong side. From fabric A, cut four 1½”x 12” strips, one 2½”x 12” strip and one 5”x 12” rectangle. From fabric B, cut enough 2”-wide strips to create 31⁄3 yards of continuous binding. Piece together the strips using a ¼” seam allowance. From the vinyl, cut two 9”x 12” rectangles. Fold the bias binding in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press, and then unfold. Fold each long edge toward the center foldline; press. Or use a bias tape maker to create ½”-wide double-fold binding following the manufacturer’s instructions.

Tip: Hang the organizer in a bathroom for easy access to cosmetics or toiletries.

From the binding, cut one 1 yard length; set aside

for the tie. Stitch the long open edge.

Construct

Use ¼” seam allowances unless otherwise noted and sew with right sides together. Center one small strip over the left zipper tape, aligning the long edges; stitch. Press the seam allowance toward the fabric wrong side. Topstitch the strip ⅛” from the seamline. Repeat to stitch the medium strip to the right zipper tape; this is the upper edge. Designate the rectangle as the upper pocket; set aside. Center one small strip over the left zipper, aligning the long edges; stitch. Press the seam allowance

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3

Medium Strip Small Strip

Vinyl

Small Strip Small Strip

Vinyl

Small Strip Large Strip

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toward the fabric wrong side. Topstitch the strip ⅛” from the seamline. Repeat to stitch another small strip to the right zipper tape; this is the upper edge. Designate the rectangle as the middle pocket; set aside. Center the large strip over the left zipper tape, aligning the long edges; stitch. Press the seam allowance toward the fabric wrong side. Topstitch the strip ⅛” from the seamline. Repeat to stitch the remaining small strip to the right zipper tape; this is the upper edge. Designate the rectangle as the lower pocket; set aside. Align the upper-pocket lower edge with one vinyl rectangle long edge; stitch. Finger-press the seam allowance toward the zipper. Topstitch the strip ⅛” from the seamline. Repeat to stitch the opposite vinyl rectangle long edge to the middle-pocket upper edge, the middle-pocket lower edge to the remaining vinyl rectangle long edge and the opposite vinyl rectangle long edge to the lower-pocket upper edge (3). Position the quilted fabric rectangle wrong side up on a flat work surface. Center the pocket panel right side up over the quilted fabric rectangle; pin. Trim the quilted fabric rectangle to match the pocket panel, if necessary. Position a circle template on one rectangle corner; trace the edge. Cut along the marked line. Repeat to round the remaining three rectangle corners. Unfold one binding long edge. Position one binding strip end right side along the lower-pocket edge wrong side; aligning the raw edges. Pin the binding around the organizer. Stitch along the foldline, beginning 1” from the strip short end and ending the stitching 1” before the binding beginning. Fold the binding end ¼” toward the wrong side, and then insert the binding end into the binding beginning. Continue stitching. Adhere fusible web tape along the organizer perimeter right side; remove the paper backing. Fold the binding toward the organizer right side, aligning the folded edge just beyond the previous stitching line; fuse. Topstitch ⅛” from the binding lower edge. Position the tie on a flat work surface. Measure 8” from the right short end; mark. Center the tie on the organizer upper-edge right side, aligning the mark with the binding edge; stitch. Knot each tie end.

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Curling Iron Cover Supplies Supplies listed are enough to make one 5”x 12” cover. 7 10”x 12” rectangle of reversible quilted fabric 7 2”x 48” bias strip of coordinating cotton print fabric 7 All-purpose thread 7 Removable fabric marker 7 31⁄2”-diameter glass or circle template 7 1⁄2”-wide double-fold bias tape maker (optional)

Construct

Designate the quilted fabric rectangle right and

wrong side. Position the rectangle wrong side up on a flat work surface. Position a glass or circle template on one rectangle corner; trace the edge. Cut along the marked line. Repeat to round the remaining three rectangle corners. Fold the bias strip in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press, and then unfold. Fold each

long edge toward the center foldline; press. Or use a bias tape maker to create ½”-wide double-fold binding following the manufacturer’s instructions. Unfold the binding. Fold each short end ¼” toward the binding wrong side; press. Position the binding along the rectangle perimeter, enclosing the raw edge within the fold; pin. Topstitch ¼” from the binding lower edge. Fold the quilted fabric rectangle in half lengthwise; press. Designate one short edge as the upper edge. Stitch the cover perimeter ⅛” from the edge, beginning 3” from the upper edge. Z SOURCES Clover Needlecraft provided the bias tape maker: (800) 233-1703, clover-usa.com. Fabri-Quilt provided the reversible quilted fabric and cotton print fabric from the Radiance by Judy Hansen for Paintbrush Studios collection: (816) 421-2000, fabri-quilt.com. The Warm Company provided Steam-A-Seam fusible web tape: (425) 248-2424, warmcompany.com.

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Showcase colorful batik fabric by creating a pattern-free tiered maxi-skirt

Batik Mystique { by Sharon Madsen}

that will become

a chic and casual staple of your summer wardrobe.

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Batik Basics

Batik fabrics feature beautiful, unique designs that are created by resist dyeing. The exact origin of batik is unknown, but it’s one of the oldest forms of resist dyeing, dating back more than 2,000 years. The word “batik” may originate from the word “ambatik” which means “a cloth with little dots,” or from the Javanese word “tritik,” which is a dyeing process similar to tie dye. Many batik fabrics are produced in Indonesia, including the islands of Java and Bali. The batik process begins with a design painted or drawn on the fabric. Next, the artist applies melted wax to the design areas that won’t be dyed. The traditional batik method involves a canting, or tjanting, tool, which is a pen with a bamboo handle and a small pot on one end for holding wax. The artist carefully pours the wax out of the pen along the marked design lines. Another method utilizes a copper block, called a tjap, to stamp the wax onto the fabric. This method is faster and more helpful for creating more intricate designs. Next, the fabric is dipped in dye. Any area not covered by wax absorbs the dye color, while the wax resists the dye. After the fabric dries, the artist applies heat to remove the wax. This process is repeated for every color in the batik design, beginning with the lighter dye colors and ending with the darkest color. Occasionally dye seeps under the wax, creating interesting variations that contribute to the overall unique, organic look of the batik design.

Fiber Factors

Woven natural fibers, such as cotton and silk, absorb the melted wax most successfully, but synthetic fibers, such as rayon, are also suitable for batik dyeing. Intricate batik designs register more clearly on fabrics that have a high thread count.

Rayon drapes beautifully and is appropriate for making loose-fitting garments, such as sarongs or full skirts. Cotton batik fabrics are easy to find, but may have a stiffer hand as a result of the dyeing process. Cotton batiks are often used for quilting and craft projects, but some varieties are soft enough for creating garments. If using a cotton batik fabric for a garment, choose a pattern with simple design lines and minimal seams, keeping in mind that the fabric won’t drape as softly as rayon. If the batik fabric feels very stiff on the bolt, don’t assume that it’s the sizing on the fabric that can be removed in the wash. The stiffness might be a result of excess leftover wax which can’t be easily removed by washing.

Sewing Batiks

The dye in batiks often runs, especially the vivid colors. To prevent running, prewash the fabric with a commercial color fixative to set the color and remove excess dye. On some batiks, the right and wrong sides are almost identical. Determine the desired wrong side, and then mark it using chalk or a removable fabric marker. Before cutting out the pattern pieces from the fabric, examine the overall batik design. Some batik patterns are very random, while others have a one-way design that requires the pattern pieces to be placed in the same direction. Some batiks have a very prominent design that you can feature by placing the pattern pieces to display the design to its best advantage. When sewing batiks, use a new size 75/11 or 80/12 universal needle. When sewing a very dense cotton batik, use a size 80/12 denim needle to prevent skipped stitches.

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Tiered Skirt Supplies 7 23⁄4 to 4 yards of 42”-wide batik fabric (amount depends on desired skirt length) 7 All-purpose thread 7 1⁄2”-wide elastic (length according to waist measurement) 7 Removable fabric marker 7 Safety pin 7 Rotary cutting system (optional) 7 Serger (optional)

Prepare

To determine the tier widths,

measure your waist and hip circumference at the widest point; record.

Designate the larger measurement as “A.” Calculate the width of each tier using the following formula: Upper-tier width: A + 5” ease = U Middle-tier width: U x 1.5 = M Lower-tier width: M x 2 = L For example, a skirt for a 36” waist has a 41”-wide upper tier, 61½”-wide middle tier and 123”-wide lower tier. Record the tier-width measurements.

Cut

Place the fabric right side up in a

single layer on a flat cutting surface. Cut out the tiers according to the recorded measurements, placing the short-tier edges along the selvage or lengthwise grain. Cut as many rectangles as needed to obtain the tierwidth measurements, allowing for ½” seam allowances after piecing. Use the

Upper 41” x 14½” Middle 41” x 15” Middle 19½” x 15”

Selvage

long). To determine each finished tier length, divide the total length by three. Subtract 1” from the uppertier length, and then add 1” to the lower-tier length; record the three tier lengths. For example, for a 42”-long skirt, the upper tier is 13” long, the middle tier is 14” long and the lower tier is 15” long. Note: The tiers visually appear to be the same length, but gradually become deeper to create a more flattering silhouette. Add 1½” to the upper-tier length for the waist casing and seam allowance; record. Add 1” to the middle-tier length for seam allowance; record. Add 2½” to the lower-tier length for the hem and seam allowance; record.

1

Selvage

Determine the desired finished skirt length (the featured skirt is 42”

Lower 42” x 17½” Lower 42” x 17½” Lower 39” x 17 ½” 42”

cutting diagram for a 36”-waist skirt as a reference, cutting more or fewer tiers as needed (1). Use a removable fabric marker to label the tier pieces “U”, “M” or “L”.

Tip: Take measurements to determine the needed yardage before purchasing fabric. For a soft, flowing silhouette, use rayon batik fabric for the skirt. For a fuller effect, use cotton batik fabric. 50

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HAIR FLAIR Use leftover batik fabric to create a ruffle to adorn a ready-made headband.

Supplies 7 Batik fabric and felt scraps 7 Ready-made headband 7 All-purpose thread 7 Hot glue gun & glue sticks 7 Rhinestones (optional) From the fabric, cut one 5”x 12” fabric strip and one 1”x 3½” strip. Fold the large strip long edges 1½” toward the wrong side; lightly press.

Tip: For a very full gathered skirt, increase the amount of ease added to the upper tier as desired, and then multiply the middletier width by 2 and the lower-tier width by 2.5.

Construct

Use ½” seam allowances unless otherwise noted. With right sides together, piece the upper-tier rectangles along the short edges to create a continuous band; press open the seams. Repeat to construct the middle and lower tiers. Designate one seam of each tier as the right side seam. Use pins or a removable fabric marker to quartermark the upper tier along the lower edge, using the right side seam as the starting point. Designate the remaining marks as the left side, center front and center back. Repeat to quartermark the middle-tier upper and lower edges and the lower-tier upper edge. Using a ⅜” seam allowance and a long gathering stitch, stitch the middle-tier upper edge, leaving long thread tails. Repeat to stitch a second row of gathering stitches using a ¼” seam allowance. Repeat to stitch gathering stitches along the lower-tier upper edge. With right sides together, align the middle-tier upper edge with the upper-tier lower edge, matching the

Using a long gathering stitch, stitch down the strip lengthwise center, leaving long thread tails. Gently pull the bobbin threads to gather the strip until it’s 5½” long. Fold each ruffle short end ½” toward the wrong side; press. Cut one 1½”x 4½” felt strip. Center the ruffle right side up over the felt; stitch along the center. Position the ruffle where desired on the headband; hot glue in place. Position the remaining strip over the felt strip from the headband wrong side, sandwiching the headband; glue in place. If desired, hot glue rhinestones along the ruffle.

right side seam and quarter marks; pin (2). Gently pull the bobbin thread tails to gather the middle-tier upper edge until it matches the upper-tier lower edge. Evenly distribute the gathers between the quarter marks; pin, and then stitch. Press the seam upward. Repeat to gather and stitch the lowertier upper edge to the middle-tier lower edge. Serge- or zigzag-finish the seams. To create a waistband casing, fold the upper-tier upper edge ¼” and then ¾” toward the wrong side; press. Stitch close to the first fold, beginning and ending about ½” from the right side seam. Wrap a length of elastic around your waist so that it’s snug but comfortable; cut the elastic to the needed length. Attach a safety pin to one elastic end and pin the remaining end to the casing opening. Use the safety pin to guide the elastic through the casing; adjust the fullness evenly. Remove the safety pin. Overlap the elastic ends ½”; pin, and then stitch close to each end through both elastic layers. Position

2 Upper Tier

Gathering Stitches Middle Tier Right Side Seam

Tip: To control and flatten the gathered seam bulk, topstitch the upper- and middle-tier lower edges. the elastic ends within the casing, and then stitch the casing closed. To prevent the elastic from twisting, stitch in the ditch along the right side seam from the upper edge to the casing lower edge.

Finish

Fold the skirt lower edge ¼”, and

then fold it 2” toward the wrong side; press. Topstitch close to the first fold. Z

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Picnic in the Park { by Stacy Schlyer }

Oilcloth has been used throughout the decades for a variety of applications. Today, people use the decorative material for fun sewing projects, such as lunch bags and travel cases. Learn the interesting history of oilcloth, and then stitch a versatile picnic blanket bag to carry to your next outing.

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Oilcloth History

When you think of oilcloth, the image of a brightlycolored tablecloth gracing your grandmother’s kitchen table probably comes to mind. While oilcloth is typically associated with the ’50s, the fabric actually dates back much further. Oilcloth derives its name from the linseed oil that was applied to heavy stretched cotton fabric during the 18th century. After several coats of the thick, unpleasant smelling oil, the material became somewhat waterproof, making it an inexpensive roof covering and fabric for sailcloth, tents and raincoats. As oilcloth grew in popularity, artisans began drawing designs on the fabrics prior to oiling and sold them as floor cloths. The process of making oilcloth drastically changed with plastic manufacturing. In the ’50s, a thin coating of vinyl was applied to decorative flannels, making the material water repellant and more crack resistant. Consequently, oilcloth became extremely popular for protecting furniture, lining drawers and storing shoes and clothing. In fact, it became so popular that magazines of the day often included projects on how to use oilcloth around the home. Today’s oilcloth hasn’t changed much from its ’50s counterpart. However, instead of flannel, woven cotton mesh is used as the material base. It’s covered in a vinyl coating, making it not only easy to sew, but resistant to tearing, fading and yellowing.

Picnic Blanket Tote

On your next picnic, take along a durable oilcloth blanket that folds into a handy tote. Once it’s time to pack up, easily wipe away any spills on the oilcloth blanket. Supplies Supplies listed are enough to make one 42” square blanket that fits into a 14” square tote. 7 11⁄4 yards of oilcloth (at least 44” wide; see “Sources”) 7 13⁄4 yards of print cotton fabric (A; at least 44” wide) 7 3⁄4 yard of print cotton fabric (B; at least 45” wide) 7 All-purpose thread 7 4” length of hook-and-loop tape 7 Removable fabric marker or tailor’s chalk 7 Pencil 7 Rotary cutting system (optional)

Cut

From the oilcloth, cut one 43” square for the blanket. From fabric A, cut one 43” square for the blanket

and two 15” squares for the large pocket. Designate one pocket square as the lining pocket. From fabric B, cut one 15” square for the small pocket and two 3½”x 45” rectangles for the handles. Cut the hook-and-loop tape into four 1”-long pieces.

STITCHING TIPS Learn five essential oilcloth stitching tips for perfect project results: 1. Oilcloth is a heavy, canvas-like material with a stiff hand. Use a size 90/14 or 100/16 universal needle when stitching oilcloth to prevent ripping, tearing or excess perforations. 2. Always use a pencil to mark oilcloth. Pens and removable fabric markers bleed through the fabric. 3. Never use pins, as they leave permanent holes in oilcloth. If pinning is necessary, only pin within the seam allowance. Or use paper or binder clips to secure fabric layers. 4. Stitch oilcloth with the right side facing up because the wrong side feeds easily over the machine feed dogs. Or install a PTFE or roller foot onto the machine. 5. Never iron oilcloth because it can melt. Finger-press open seams. Lay oilcloth out in the sun for several hours or place heavy books on top of the fabric to remove wrinkles.

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1 Tip: Easily remove the straps before laying out the blanket to have a flat picnic surface.

14” 1”

14¼”

2

Construct

Use ½” seam allowances unless otherwise noted. Fold one handle in half lengthwise with right sides together; press. Stitch the open edges, leaving a 3” opening along the long edge for turning. Turn the handle right side out through the opening; press. Topstitch the perimeter, closing the opening with the stitches. Designate the strap right and wrong side. Position one looptape piece on one strap short end, aligning the loop-tape long edge with the strap short edge; stitch the perimeter. Repeat to stitch a loop-tape piece to the opposite strap short end. Repeat to create the remaining handle. Fold the small pocket in half with wrong sides together; press. Topstitch the folded edge. Designate the folded edge as the upper edge. Fold the small pocket in half widthwise to find the center; press, and then unfold. Position the large pocket right side up on a flat work surface. Designate one edge as the lower edge. Position the small pocket over the large pocket, aligning the side and lower edges; baste.

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Position the lining pocket over the large pocket with right sides together. Stitch the sides and upper edge, leaving the lower edge open for turning. Clip the corners and turn right side out; press. Topstitch the pocket upper edge

and along the small-pocket centerline to create two pockets. Position the pocket wrong side up on a flat work surface. Position

one hook-tape piece ⅝” from the side and ⅛” from the upper edge; stitch the perimeter. Repeat to stitch a hook-tape piece to the opposite pocket side. Position the fabric square right side up on a flat work surface. Designate one edge as the lower edge. Center the pocket square right side up over the fabric square, aligning the lower edges; pin. Topstitch ⅛” and ¼” from each pocket side. Position one hook-tape piece 1” from the fabric square left edge and 14¼” from the lower edge; stitch the perimeter. Repeat to stitch the remaining hook-tape piece 14” from the fabric square left edge and 14¼” from the lower edge (1). With right sides together, stitch the oilcloth and fabric squares, leaving a centered 8” opening for

turning. Trim the seam allowance and clip the corners. Turn the blanket right side out through the opening. Select a 4mm-long straight stitch. Topstitch the blanket perimeter, closing the opening with the stitches. Position the blanket with the oilcloth right side up on a flat work surface. Fold the blanket into thirds, using the pocket edges as a guide and making sure the hook-tape pieces are on top. Turn the pocket right side up and fold the blanket into thirds, insert the blanket into the pocket (2). Attach the straps to the bag. Z SOURCES Fabric.com carries oilcloth: fabric.com. Oilcloth Addict carries oilcloth: oilclothaddict.etsy.com. Oilcloth Alley carries oilcloth: (760) 214-6152, oilclothalley.com. Oilcloth by the Yard carries oilcloth: (610) 888-2037, oilclothbytheyard.com. Mendel’s carries oilcloth: (415) 621-1287, mendels.com.

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TOP IT OFF { by Tara Miller }

Stroll down the boardwalk in a flattering Empire-waist top accented with pretty details, such as ruffles, piping or braided straps.

Ruffle Tank

Highlight the neckline with wide topstitched shoulder straps and ruffled edging. Supplies 7 Sleeveless Empire-waist tunic or tank top pattern (See “Sources.”) 7 Lightweight fabric (amount according to pattern envelope plus 1⁄2 yard) 7 All-purpose thread & notions (according to pattern envelope) 7 9”-long contrasting all-purpose zipper 7 Ruffler foot (optional)

Prepare

Shorten the tunic front- and back-skirt patterns

to 20” long. From the fabric, cut out the pattern pieces

according to the pattern instructions. Cut four 3”x 19” straps and one ruffle strip measuring 2”x twice the bodice upper-edge length.

Construct

Use ⅝” seam allowances unless otherwise noted. Align two straps with right sides together; stitch the long edges. Trim the seam allowance. Turn the strap right side out; press. Repeat to construct the remaining strap. Stitch ¼” from one strap long edge, and then stitch three additional vertical lines spaced ½” apart (1). Repeat to topstitch the remaining strap. Fold the ruffle strip in half lengthwise with right sides together; press. Install the ruffler foot, if applicable. Adjust the stitch setting to 12. Feed the ruffle strip through the machine, following the manufacturer’s instructions.

If not using a ruffler foot, set the machine to a long stitch length. Stitch the ruffle strip long open edge, using a ½” seam allowance and leaving long thread tails. Repeat, using a ⅜” seam allowance. Gently pull the bobbin thread tails, evenly distributing the gathers. Gather the strip until it matches the bodice upper-edge measurement. Construct the bodice according to the pattern instructions. Before attaching the bodice lining or straps, position the ruffle strip along the bodice right-side upper edge, aligning the raw edges. Pin, and then baste the ruffle strip, using a ½” seam allowance. Position the strap ends over the ruffle strip according to the pattern markings. Continue constructing the bodice and attach the lining according to the pattern instructions. Install the zipper into the center-back seam according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Finish

Stitch a 2½” double-fold hem along the

tunic lower edge.

1

¼”

½”

½”

½”

¼”

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Vary the ruffletrim width for a different effect.

STYLE OPTIONS Follow these easy tips to customize the tunic: 7 Use contrasting fabric to create the neckline ruffle for a fun pop of color, or use a print cotton to create the flat piping. Add shine by using satin to create the ruffle or piping. 7 Add a second ruffle or piping to the tunic lower edge. 7 Make bolder braided straps by cutting wider fabric strips. 7 Select a variety of print and solid fabrics in the same color family to create a chic bohemian look. Use a different fabric for the bodice, skirt, straps and ruffle. 7 Stitch a dressier tunic for a night on the town. Use silk doupioni for the main tunic body and linen for the piping. Wear the top with skinny pants, a blazer and cute clutch. Butterick 5038, View A (modified)

Tip: Emphasize the strap topstitching or decorative hem stitching by using contrasting thread.

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Linen Tank

Dress up a simple linen tank with braided straps, flat silk piping and subtle decorative stitching. Supplies 7 Sleeveless Empire-waist tunic or tank top pattern (See “Sources.”) 7 Lightweight fabric (amount according to pattern envelope) 7 All-purpose thread & notions (according to pattern envelope) 7 2” x fabric width strip of silk doupioni 7 9”-long matching invisible zipper

The raw braided edges give the top a trendy accent.

Prepare

Shorten the tunic front- and back-skirt patterns

2

to 20” long. From the fabric, cut out the pattern pieces

according to the pattern instructions. Don’t cut out the straps. From the remaining fabric, cut strips measuring ½”x the fabric length. From the silk doupioni, cut a strip measuring 2” x bodice lower-edge circumference. Braid three fabric strips until the braid is 23” long. If needed, knot additional fabric strips together as you braid to obtain the measurement; evenly trim the ends. Repeat to create a second 23” long braid. Baste each strap end to secure the braid.

Construct

Use ⅝” seam allowances unless otherwise noted. To create the flat piping, fold the doupioni strip in half lengthwise with right sides together; press. Stitch the bodice darts and side seams according to the pattern instructions. Before attaching the skirt or lining, position the piping along the bodice lower edge, aligning the raw edges. Pin, and then baste the piping, using a ½” seam allowance. Continue constructing the tunic according to the pattern instructions. After stitching the Empire-

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waist seam, press the piping toward the tunic skirt and topstitch along the bodice lower edge (2). When attaching the straps, follow the pattern markings for the front bodice, and then crisscross the straps before aligning the remaining strap ends with the back pattern markings. Insert the invisible zipper into the center-back seam according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Finish

Stitch a 2½” double-fold hem along the tunic lower edge. If desired, select a decorative stitch, such as a serpentine stitch, to topstitch the hem. Z

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SOURCES Butterick provided 5038: butterick.com. Common Era provided the pants; Solemio ($38): mycommonera.com.

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{ by Cheryl Stranges }

Adorn a dress with striking silk latticework embellished with buttons, ribbon and sheer organza. Supplies

Kwik Sew 3598, View A (modified)

7 Dress pattern (See “Sources.”) 7 Light- to mediumweight fabric & notions (according to pattern envelope) 7 3⁄4 yard each of coordinating 60”-wide silk doupioni & 44”-wide lightweight organza 7 Thread: all-purpose & serger (optional) 7 Lightweight tear-away stabilizer 7 1 yard of 3⁄4”-wide silk ribbon 7 Invisible zipper 7 Three 13⁄4”-diameter decorative buttons 7 Hand sewing needle 7 Serger (optional) 7 Tube turner (optional)

Cut

Cut out the pattern pieces. To create the

latticework pattern piece, mark the front pattern center-front edge ¾” from the neckline. Mark the armseye 2½” from the shoulder line. Draw a gently curved line connecting the two marks. Repeat to draw a second line 2¼” below and parallel to the first line (1). Cut the pattern along the drawn lines, and then add a ⅝” seam allowance to each cut edge.

1

2¼”

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Tip: Cut the facings from organza to provide a background for the latticework. To preserve the sheerness, don’t interface the facings.

from the fabric. Don’t cut out the latticework pattern piece. Cut out the facing pieces from the organza.

stitching line (3). To prevent the latticework tubes from shifting, tear away the stabilizer after constructing the dress front.

Measure the dress lower-edge circumference; add 1”, and then

Construct

Cut out the dress pattern pieces

slightly larger than the latticework pattern piece. Trace the latticework pattern onto the stabilizer. Draw a diagonal grid design onto the stabilizer within the traced shape. Space the grid lines evenly or unevenly as desired. Position the tubes over the design lines, weaving them into a lattice pattern and making sure the ends extend beyond the traced pattern edge; pin to the stabilizer (2). Weave lengths of ribbon through the latticework as desired; pin.

To construct the dress front, stitch the latticework-panel lower edge to the front lower-panel upper edge. Trim the seam, and then press it downward. Stitch the upper-panel lower edge to the latticework-panel upper edge. Trim the seam, and then press it upward. Remove the tear-away stabilizer. Stitch the darts, and then construct the facing from the organza pieces. Continue constructing the dress following the pattern instructions. Set the serger to a 3-thread overlock stitch to finish the seams or zigzag-finish the seams. Insert the invisible zipper into the center-back seam, following the manufacturer’s instructions. For invisible zipper tips, go to sewnews. com/web_extras. Fold the hem band in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press. Stitch the short ends using a ½” seam allowance. Position the band along the dress lower edge, aligning the raw edges and matching the band seam with the dress centerback seam; pin. Stitch or serge, and then press the seam upward (4).

Stitch along the traced pattern line to secure the tube and ribbon

Finish

record. From the doupioni, cut one strip measuring 1½” x the recorded measurement for the hem band; set aside. From the remaining doupioni, cut 1½”-wide bias strips, being careful not to distort the grain.

Create the Latticework

Fold the bias strips in half lengthwise with right sides together; lightly press. Stitch the long edges using a ¼” seam allowance. Turn the strips right side out using a tube turner or another tube-turning method. Cut a piece of tear-away stabilizer

ends to the stabilizer. Cut the latticework panel just beyond the

Try on the dress to determine the placement for the decorative but-

2

3

4

tons on the latticework panel; pinmark each placement. If desired, thread doupioni strips

through the buttonholes, and then tie them in a knot. Hand stitch a button to the latticework at each pin mark. Z SOURCES Husqvarna Viking provided the Designer Diamond Deluxe sewing and embroidery machine, Sapphire sewing machine, Huskylock S25 serger, Inspira stabilizer and Inspira needles: (800) 446-2333; husqvarnaviking.com. Kwik Sew provided the dress pattern: (612) 521-7651, kwiksew.com.

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Bandanna BBQ { by Kate Van Fleet }

Decorate for Independence Day using red, white and blue bandannas to make a festive table runner and matching napkin rings. Supplies Supplies listed are enough to make one 14”x 44” table runner and four napkin rings. 7 3 standard red bandannas (22” square) 7 2 standard blue bandannas (22” square) 7 1⁄2 yard of 45”-wide fusible fleece 7 1⁄2 yard of white cotton broadcloth 7 Red all-purpose or quilting thread 7 Rotary cutting system 7 Hand sewing needle 7 Four 5mm elastic hair ties

Prepare

Using a rotary cutter, mat and clear ruler, fussy cut one 10” square from each bandanna center. Cut the blue bandannas in half diagonally. From the remaining red bandannas, cut six 2½”x 17” strips for the binding and two 1½”x 12” strips for the napkin rings. Piece together the binding strips to create one long strip. Press open the seams. Fold the strip in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press, and then unfold. Fold each long edge toward the center foldline; press. Refold the binding along the center, encasing the long raw edges; press, and then set aside. From the remaining blue bandannas, cut two 1½”x 12” strips for the napkin rings.

Table Runner

With right sides together, pin one blue triangle

short edge along one red square edge. Stitch, backstitching at the beginning and ending the seam ¼” from the corner (1).

1

¼”

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Tip: Prewash, dry and press the bandannas before cutting and sewing to account for shrinkage.

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Tip: Purchase four additional bandannas to use as napkins.

2

¼”

3

Pin another red square edge to the adjacent blue triangle short edge. Begin stitching ¼” from the corner, backstitching at the seam end (2). Repeat to stitch each blue triangle to the red squares (3). Press open the seams. Position the table runner top over the broadcloth with right sides together. Cut out the broadcloth for the table runner back, using the top as a guide. Repeat to cut out the fusible fleece. Position the back on a flat work surface with the wrong side facing up. Position the fleece over the back, and then the top right side up over the fleece. Align the edges and corners. Fuse the fleece to each table runner side, following the manufacturer’s instructions. Stitch in the ditch of each seam. Unfold the binding. Fold one binding end ¼” toward the wrong side; press. Pin the folded end along one table runner long edge with right sides together and raw edges aligned. Continue pinning the binding around the table runner, mitering the

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binding at each table runner corner. Extend the binding end 2” beyond the binding beginning; trim. Stitch the binding to the table runner, beginning and ending 2” from the binding beginning. Refold the binding lengthwise, following the previous foldlines and encasing the table runner edge in the process. Whipstitch or slipstitch the binding fold to the table runner back.

Napkin Rings

Fold each napkin-ring strip end ⅛” to the wrong

side; press. Fold each long edge ⅛” to the wrong side; press. Wrap one strip around one hair tie; place one pin to secure the folded long edges. Stitch the long edges, manipulating the excess out of the way of the machine and gathering the strip in the process. Slipstitch the ends together to secure. Repeat to make three additional napkin rings. Z

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get connected. Join Sewing District to connect with sewing fanatics around the country! Share your latest projects, discuss everything sewing, receive special offers, discover new sewing tips and download FREE patterns. Your sewing community is just a click away. sewingdistrict.com

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Amy Butler Design, Sun Surf Halter (modified)

JUST BE-GAUZE { by Ellen March }

Create a stylish swimsuit cover-up dress thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy and breezy. Use a textured gauzy fabric and embellish with a fun handembroidery design.

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1

Supplies 7 Halter top pattern (See “Sources.”) 7 Cotton gauze fabric & muslin lining (amount according to pattern envelope, plus 1⁄2 yard or more depending on desired finished length) 7 Notions (according to pattern envelope) 7 Pattern tracing cloth or butcher paper 7 Hand embroidery design (See “Design.”) 7 Embroidery floss (in desired colors) 7 Hand embroidery needle 7 Chalk, removable fabric marker or embroidery transfer paper 7 Hand embroidery hoop (optional) 7 Tear-away stabilizer (optional)

Prepare & Construct

Wash the gauze fabric in hot water

and dry on a medium heat setting. Cut out the pattern pieces for the desired size; press each piece flat on a low-heat setting. Position the front pattern over a piece of pattern tracing cloth or butcher paper on a flat work surface. Measure the pattern piece, or refer to the pattern instructions, to determine the top length. The featured top pattern is designed to hit just below the waist. Measure from your shoulder to the desired dress length. Subtract the desired length from the pattern length; add 1”, and then record. Extend the pattern piece onto the cloth or paper using the recorded measurement and following the pattern curve (1). Cut out the pattern extension piece; tape to the existing pattern lower edge. Or redraw the entire pattern

piece using new pattern tracing cloth or butcher paper. Repeat to lengthen the back pattern. Using the modified pattern pieces,

cut out the dress tie, front and back from the gauze, cutting through one layer only and avoiding stretching the fabric. Cut out the dress front and back from the lining. Follow the pattern instructions

2

to construct the dress. If the gauze texture becomes flattened by the presser foot during stitching, reduce the presser foot pressure. Or position lightweight tear-away stabilizer above and below the fabric along the seamlines. Gently tear away the stabilizer after the stitching is complete. Hem the gauze and lining separately using a ½” double-fold hem.

Backstitch

Embellish

Choose a hand embroidery design

from an online, book or clipart source; print the design to use as a template. Or free-hand draw a simple line-art design onto paper.

3

Determine which embroidery stitches

to use for each design element. The featured design showcases backstitches for the line-art elements (2). Choose satin stitches for the filled elements, if desired (3). Mark the template, denoting the stitches for each element. Download a hand-embroidery stitch guide at sewitallmag.com/articles/

Hand_Embroidery_Stitch_Guide, if desired. Cut out the design template, leaving 1” of paper extending beyond the design perimeter. Audition the

Satin Stitch

Tip: If the chosen fabric is very lightweight or light colored, use matching embroidery floss for a subtle tone-on-tone look.

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Tip: When embroidering, take long stitches and leave them loose to avoid unslightly holes in the fabric.

design on the dress right side where desired. Once the desired placement is achieved, pin the template in place. Hang the garment or place it on a dress form. Stand 5’ to 6’ from the garment and make sure the embroidery placement is satisfactory. If not, reposition the template and repin. Transfer the design to the fabric right side, using chalk, a removable fabric marker or embroidery transfer paper. Hoop the gauze fabric only using a hand embroidery hoop, centering the design in the hoop. If using a design that doesn’t fit in one hooping, center one end of the design (the upper, lower, left or right edge) in the hoop, and then rehoop as needed to finish the design. Make sure the fabric is taut but not overly tight in the hoop. Since gauze fabric has a crinkly texture, the

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fabric appears wrinkled in the hoop. Do not try to remove the wrinkles by hooping tighter or ironing the fabric. If using a lightweight gauze, as for the featured dress, don’t hoop the fabric as it will suffer hoop burn. Carefully hand embroider the fabric using long stitches, leaving them loose to avoid tearing or ripping the fabric.

DESIGN Mushrooms: Urban Threads, Tiny Mushrooms; urbanthreads.com SOURCES Amy Butler Design provided the top pattern: (740) 587-2841, amybutlerdesign.com. Fabric.com provided the Island Breeze Orange Gauze fabric: (888) 455-2940, fabric.com. Sublime Stitching carries Carbon Transfer Paper: sublimestitching.com.

Thread the hand embroidery needle

with three strands of embroidery floss (more or less as desired) and begin embroidering the design, leaving a long thread tail at the beginning and end on the fabric wrong side. After stitching, weave the thread tails through the stitches on the fabric wrong side to secure. Repeat to embroider each design element, switching floss colors as desired and rehooping the fabric as needed. Z

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Sleeve it to Me

{ by Andrea Dennis }

Butterick 5638, View D (modified)

Use one basic dress pattern to create a variety of looks by making simple sleeve alterations. Draft five

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Supplies 7 Basic short-sleeved top or dress pattern (such as Butterick 5638) 7 Fabric (amount according to pattern envelope plus extra if lengthening sleeves) 7 All-purpose thread & notions (according to pattern envelope) 7 Pattern tracing material or paper 7 Rulers (clear flexible & curved)

Prepare

Kwik Sew 2896

Select a simple top or dress pattern with a short sleeve that has little ease and no darts. To alter the sleeve pattern, first remove the wearing ease from the sleeve cap. When the pattern is originally drafted, ease is added by raising the sleeve cap to allow it to fit comfortably on the shoulder. The following sleeve alterations include ease, so no additional wearing ease is needed. Measure the sleeve cap; record. Measure the total armseye measurement of the front and back bodice pieces; record. Subtract the first measurement from the second measurement to decipher the amount of ease to remove; record. Trace the sleeve pattern onto new paper, transferring the markings. Cut the new sleeve pattern along the center and bicep line, leaving small hinges at the upper corners to use as pivot points. Pivot the sleeve cap downward according to the recorded measurement for ease to be removed;

different sleeve types to add fun fashions to your summer wardrobe.

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Ease removed.

1

Original sleeve cap lowered after ease removed.

Overlap

Overlap

2

Redrawn bicep line same distance as before.

tape in place. For example, if ½” of ease needs to be removed, lower the sleeve-cap upper center ½” lower than the original pattern. Redraw the bicep line (1). Retrace the pattern onto new paper. Use this pattern for the sleeve block. Cut out the dress body pieces from the fabric. Construct the body according to the pattern instructions, and then follow the instructions for the desired sleeve alteration.

Puff Sleeve

Create a feminine puff sleeve with fullness along the upper and lower edges and finished with a lower-edge band. Trace the sleeve block onto new paper, transferring the markings. Draw seven equally spaced vertical lines on the pattern, using the center grainline as the centerline (2). Cut out the new pattern. Trace the pattern onto new paper, extending the center grainline and bicep line 4” on each side. Cut the pattern along the vertical lines, creating eight equal sections. Spread the sections evenly, ½” to 1” depending on the desired fullness, over the traced pattern, using the drawn grainline and bicep line as a guide; tape (3). Raise the sleeve cap 1½” at the upper center, tapering to zero beyond the notches. Lengthen the sleeve lower edge 1½” at the center, tapering to zero at the sides. Use a curved ruler to true and redraw the sleeve cap and lower edge, making

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3

sure the underarm seam remains the same length. Re-mark the sleeve-cap notches at the original distance from the sides (the gathers will be stitched between the notches to create the upper-edge fullness). Cut out the new pattern. To create the lower-edge band,

4

Gathering Stitches

Puff Sleeve

measure the sleeve-block pattern lower edge, and then add ½” for ease; record. Draw a rectangle measuring 3”x the recorded measurement. Add a ⅝” seam allowance to the perimeter. Cut out the band pattern. Cut one sleeve pair and two bands from the fabric.

the armseye measurement, evenly distributing the gathers. Gather the sleeve lower edge until it matches the band length.

Stitch a row of gathering stitches

Fold the band in half lengthwise

along one sleeve cap between the notches, using a ½” seam allowance and leaving long thread tails. Repeat to stitch a second row of gathering stitches using a ⅜” seam allowance. Stitch two gathering stitching lines along the sleeve lower edge (4). Repeat to stitch the remaining sleeve. Gently pull the sleeve cap bobbin threads until the upper edge matches

with wrong sides together; press. With right sides together, position the band along the sleeve lower edge, matching the raw edges; stitch. Press the seam toward the sleeve. Stitch the sleeve underarm seam with right sides together. Repeat to stitch the remaining sleeve. Insert the sleeves into the dress armseyes following the pattern instructions.

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Tulip Sleeve

A tulip sleeve has two overlapping layers to create a charming “petal” effect. Trace the sleeve block onto new paper, transferring the markings. Mark the front and back sleeve cap 3” from the center. Mark the center grainline 4” below the sleeve cap to indicate the layer intersection. Use a curved ruler to draw a slightly curved diagonal line from the back sleeve-cap mark through the 4” mark to the opposite lower corner. Repeat to draw a line connecting the front sleeve-cap mark to the opposite lower corner (5). Trace the front and back sleeve

layers individually onto new paper, transferring the markings (6). Add a ⅝” seam allowance to the lower edges. If desired, slash and spread the sleeve cap to create fullness for gathering, as per the puff sleeve. Cut two front and two back sleeve pairs from the fabric. If you added fullness to the cap, stitch the gathering stitches as per the puff sleeve. To finish the tulip sleeve lower edges, stitch a narrow hem, or add flat piping as in the featured sample. To create flat piping, measure the sleeve lower edges; record. Using the recorded measurement, cut two bias strips of contrasting fabric twice as wide as the desired finished piping plus a ⅝” seam allowance. Fold the strips in half lengthwise with wrong sides together; press. Position one strip along one sleeve lower edge with right sides together, aligning the raw edges; stitch. Trim the seam, and then press it toward the sleeve. Repeat to stitch the remaining strip to the remaining sleeve. Position one back sleeve cap over the front sleeve cap, aligning the up-

5

3”

3” 4”

Back

Front

Pegged Sleeve

6 Front

Back

per edges; pin, and then baste. Repeat to baste the remaining sleeve. Stitch each sleeve underarm seam

with right sides together. Insert the sleeves into the dress arms-

eyes following the pattern instructions.

A pegged sleeve has a pleated upper edge to create dramatic fullness, similar to a puff sleeve. Trace the sleeve block onto new paper, transferring the markings. Draw seven equally spaced vertical lines on the pattern, using the center grainline as the centerline. Cut out the new pattern. Cut along each line from the sleeve cap to, but not through, the lower edge. Position the slashed pattern on new paper. Evenly spread the sections 2” apart; tape in place. Redraw the sleeve cap and lower edge using a curved ruler, and then mark three 1” wide pleats each along the front and back cap. Mark

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7

8

Facing 1½”

the pleat direction going toward each side (7). Cut out the new pattern. To create the lower-edge facing pattern, trace the new sleeve pattern sides and lower edge for 1½” (8). From the fabric, cut one sleeve pair and two facings. Serge- or zigzagfinish the facing upper edges. With right sides together, stitch one facing to one sleeve lower edge; trim the seam allowance. Fold the facing toward the sleeve wrong side; press. Repeat to stitch the remaining facing to the remaining sleeve. Fold the sleeve pleats according to the markings; press, and then baste in place. Stitch the underarm seams with right sides together. Insert the sleeves into the dress armseyes following the pattern instructions.

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Bell Sleeve

A bell sleeve has fullness only along the lower edge to create an easy, flowing shape. Trace the sleeve block onto new paper, transferring the markings. Draw seven equally spaced vertical lines on the pattern, using the center grainline as the centerline. Cut out the new pattern. Cut the pattern along the drawn lines from the lower edge to, but not through, the sleeve cap. Position the slashed pattern onto new paper. Evenly spread the center six sleeve-section lower edges 3” apart; tape in place. Lengthen the sleeve lower edge by approximately 8”. Use a curved ruler to

9

3”

3” 1½”

3”

3”

8”

redraw the sleeve sides with a slight inward curve to create a dramatic bell shape (9). Cut one sleeve pair from the fabric. Stitch the sleeve underarm seams with right sides together. Insert the sleeves into the dress armseyes following the pattern instructions. Finish the sleeve lower edges with a narrow or rolled hem.

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Shirt Sleeve

10

Create a classic shirt-style sleeve with a cuff for a tailored look. Measure your arm from the shoulder to the desired finished length above the cuff; record. Determine the desired cuff width; record. Measure your wrist circumference; record. Trace the sleeve block onto new paper, transferring the markings. Extend the armseye by ½” on each side. Lengthen the sleeve lower edge to the recorded length above the cuff. Mark the elbow location on the sleeve pattern.

Extend armhole by ½”

½”

Bicep Line

Elbow Line Pleat 2½”

Wristline

11

Subtract the wrist measurement

from the sleeve lower edge length to determine the sleeve pleat width. Along the lower edge, mark the halfway point between the back underarm seam and the sleeve center. Draw a 2½” line extending from the mark. This is the placket location. Mark notches for the pleat ½” from the placket line (10). To create the cuff pattern, add 1½” to the recorded wrist measurement. Draw a rectangle measuring 4”x the recorded measurement. Add ⅝” seam allowance to the perimeter. Cut out the cuff pattern. To create the placket pattern, draw a 1½” x 8”rectangle. From the fabric, cut one sleeve pair, two cuffs and two plackets on the bias. Cut the sleeves along the placket lines. Stitch the sleeve underarm seams with right sides together; press open the seams, and then turn the sleeves right side out. Fold and baste the loweredge pleats closed. Pin one placket along one sleeveplacket opening with right sides together; stitch using a ¼” seam allowance. Double-fold the placket

Sleeve Front

toward the wrong side, enclosing the raw edges; press, and then topstitch. Evenly trim the ends (11). Repeat to stitch the remaining placket. Position one cuff along one sleeve lower edge with right sides together, beginning and ending at the placket opening and allowing one cuff side to extend 1”; stitch. Fold the cuff downward; press (12). Fold the cuff long raw edge ⅝” toward the wrong side; press. Fold the cuff in half lengthwise with right sides together; stitch the sides. Turn the cuff right side out, enclosing the sleeve lower edge; press. Slipstitch the open edge closed. Overlap the cuff extension to determine the buttonhole and button placement directly below the placket opening. Stitch a button on the lower (extension) layer. Stitch a buttonhole on the upper cuff layer. Repeat to construct the remaining cuff. Z

Sewn Placket

12 Extension

Attach cuff to sleeve.

SOURCES The McCall Pattern Company provided the featured pattern: butterick.mccall.com. Common Era provided the shoes for the puff sleeve dress; BC ($48): mycommonera.com.

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Stay Cool

Down the full load sewing instruc list of tions, plus a tips cooling for selling sc sewnew arves at s.c web_ex om/ tras!

{ by Linda Vilhaber}

Chill out on hot days with a simple cooling neck scarf.

Summertime Scarf

Imagine chilling out on a sweltering summer day with a moist cloth on the back of your neck. You can feel cool and look great wearing an attractive neck scarf filled with hidden water-soaked polymer crystals. The scarf is an easy, fast project made from readily available materials. Whip up several for guests at your next barbeque, or join a charity project and sew some for U.S. troops. Nontoxic polyacrylamide granules, often called crystals, are concealed in the casing of a cotton neck scarf. When the scarf is soaked in water, the granules absorb the water, expand and turn into a crystalline gel. The cotton fabric absorbs the water from the gel, and then the water evaporates for a cooling effect. Scarves stay cool and moist for hours due to the polyacylamide’s water-retaining properties.

The Elements

Make a scarf with lightweight, single-face tie ends or heartier, double-face ties. Single-face ties require hemming, but minimal turning. Doubleface ties are narrower and require more turning but no hemming. Conceal the fabric wrong side and the back of any embellishments. Cut the tie ends into points or curves, or create a unique shape.

Choose tightly woven 100% cotton fabric for its water-absorbing and cooling properties. Avoid loosely woven fabrics—the gel could seep through the loose weave. Scarves are worn wet, so select colorfast fabrics that won’t bleed onto clothing or skin. Look for prints in popular motifs, such as red, white and blue for summer holidays, or sport themes for wearing to outdoor events. Polyacrylamide is a super-absorbent, nontoxic polymer that was developed in the ’60s to retain water in arid soil. Polyacrylamide holds up to 400 times its weight in water—one pound of polymer can hold up to 48 gallons of rainwater! Different forms of polymer are widely used in many industries and in numerous products, such as disposable diapers, hot and cold compresses, toothpaste, cosmetics and flower arrangements. The crystals are nontoxic, but they can create a fine dust. Wear a dust mask, gloves and safety glasses and remove contact lenses when handling the crystals. Wash hands after use. Choose medium-size crystals for best results. Granule size and water quality impact how well the crystals absorb water. Water with a high mineral content can impede water absorption. For a list of polyacrylamide sources, go to sewnews.com/ web_extras. Z

BLAST FROM THE PAST This cooling neck scarf is one of the most popular projects from the past 10 years of Sew News. First appearing in the July ‘04 issue, this project elicited an overwhelming response from readers who banded together to make them for various military and charity organizations. Let us know who you make these scarves for at sewnews@sewnews.com.

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SEW FOR THE TROOPS

Many charities accept donations of cooling scarves to send to U.S. troops stationed overseas. The scarves protect soldiers from the extreme heat and desert conditions of the Middle East. Visit the following organizationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; websites for exact specifications and shipping information: 7 The Hugs Project: thehugsproject.com 7 Operation Gratitude: operationgratitude.com 7 The Ships Project: theshipsproject.com 7 Soldiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Angels Scarves Team: soldiersangels.org/scarves.html

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Celebrate SUMMER with

Creative Machine Embroidery as your guide.

The July/August issue is full of garment, home-décor and accessory projects beautifully adorned with embroidery.

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Last Laugh

SLEEPY SEWING A couple months ago, I was sewing too late at night and somehow I stitched buttonholes on both garment-opening edges. Bobbi J., sewingdistrict.com

UN-FAIR I was rushing to complete a project to meet the shipping deadline for my entry into the L.A. County Fair, after having won ribbons for sewing projects the previous year. I hurriedly packed my three projects, including a gingham shirt dress, for which I’d carefully matched the plaids and added contrasting white cuffs. I didn’t go to the fair to see the results. When the package was returned to me afterward, I’d won two ribbons for my other projects, but there was a comment attached to my gingham dress. To my horror, I realized the dress cuffs were going in the same direction and the buttons were incorrectly placed on the right side, like men’s clothing, instead of on the left. Laneycath, sewingdistrict.com

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PERFECT PANTALOONS

My brother asked me to cut a pair of his old pants into shorts. I started to cut the pants, but the length seemed really short. I adjusted the measurement, cut the pants, hemmed them and gave them back to my brother. When he tried them on, he came back into the room with a swashbuckling flourish and announced “I love my pantaloons!” That was exactly what they looked like; they hung to about mid-calf, yet were wide at the hemline. He wouldn’t let me fix them and wore them for years, especially if he knew I was coming over. ~ Gavena D., Moweaqua, IL

CAN’T HANDLE IT I was making a handbag that required circular bamboo handles. I didn’t check to see what size I needed and got an extra large pair that I thought would work. I struggled, trying to fit the oversized handles on the bag and under the presser foot. Ultimately, I had to take apart the bag, insert the handles and hand stitch them. A project that should have taken 30 minutes took two days and a lot of frustration. GirlieGirlbySLS, sewingdistrict.com

{

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When I was 16 years old, my sister-in-law gave me a piece of red corduroy that I quickly cut out into a pair of bell-bottom pants. Only after I made them did I learn about cutting fabric with nap. I had one red leg and one pink leg because I cut one leg with the nap and the other against it.

I have a home sewing business and was in a hurry to finish sewing in a sleeve for a client. After I finished the sleeve, I realized I’d sewn it inside out. I had to rip it completely out and restitch it correctly. I should have known better! Ladymiller, sewingdistrict.com

Pam H., Decatur, IL

Send us your sewing bloopers! If your blooper is chosen as our “Last Laugh,” you’ll win a $25 gift card from Fabric.com. Write to sewnews@sewnews.com and include your name and mailing address with each email. Bloopers become the property of Sew News and may be edited for clarity and brevity.

Issue 329. Sew News (ISSN 0273-8120) is published 6 times a year in Feb/March, April/May, June/July, Aug/Sept, Oct/Nov, Dec/Jan by Creative Crafts Group, 741 Corporate Circle, Suite A, Golden, CO 80401. Periodicals postage paid at Golden, CO 80401 and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Sew News, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to Bluechip International, PO Box 25542 London, ON N6C 6B2 Canada.

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Sew News June-July 2012  

Sew News magazine