Issuu on Google+

JANUARY 2013

d r l an nte a r e

te l C n u n l Ce dica

nedicdao Me

Aee Mlora

Northern Colorado ww w . m eMedical d i c a l&aWellness n d w e l2013 lness.com www.stylemagazinecolorado.com

cK Co d i M th e or M N

c

a

l

D

ir

e

1

c

to

r

y


Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

5


6

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

7


The Voice of Northern Colorado for

29 Years.

s t y le me d ia a n d d e s i g n , i n c .

| 970.226.6400 |

w w w. s t y l e m a g a z i n e c o l o r a d o . c o m w w w. m e d i c a l a n d w e l l n e s s . c o m

LawyersWest Wills, Trusts, Asset Protection, Litigation Guardianships/Conservatorships, Business Law

Publisher Lydia Dody | lydia@stylemedia.com Managing Editor Angeline Grenz angie@stylemedia.com creative director Scott Prosser Senior Designer Lisa Gould digital director Austin Lamb | austin@stylemedia.com Advertising Sales EXECUTIVES Jon Ainslie (970) 219-9226 Lydia Dody (970) 227-6400 David Knight (970) 619-9846 Saundra Skrove (970) 217-9932 Office Manager/About Town Editor Ina Szwec | ina@stylemedia.com Accounting Manager Karla Vigil Circulation manager Trisha Milton Copy Editor Corey Radman Contributing Writers Heidi Kerr-Schlaefer, Marty Metzger, Corey Radman, Kay Rios, Laura Sebastian, Carl Simmons, Tracee Sioux, Elissa J. Tivona, Michelle Venus PhotographerS Marcus Edwards, Don Hajicek Affiliations Fort Collins Area Chamber of Commerce Greeley Chamber of Commerce

Marrying a local presence with the experience of a regional law firm allows LawyersWest to meet the high demands of its clientele. Licensed in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah and Nevada Located in Front Range Village (Harmony & Ziegler), Fort Collins For over 20 years, LawyersWest has represented high net worth clients We’re ready to work for you, so call us for a confidential, no-charge consultation

970-797-4966 | LawyersWest.com Colorado Licensed Attorneys: Rikke Liska & Kate Smith. Wyoming Attorney: Rikke Liska. Utah Attorney: Michele Chambers. Nevada Licensed Attorneys: Robert C. Graham, Linda M. Graham, Delwyn Webber & Jerimy Kirschner.

8

2013 Style Magazines January-Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness Magazine and McKee Medical Center & North Colorado Medical Center Medical Directory February-Style March-Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness April-Style May-Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness June-Style July-Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness Magazine and Poudre Valley Health System Physician Directory August-Style September-Women’s Health & Breast Cancer October-Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness November/December-Holiday Style Style Media and Design, Inc. magazines are free monthly publications direct-mailed to homes and businesses in Northern Colorado. Elsewhere, a one year subscription is $25/year and a two year subscription is $45/year. Free magazines are available at more than 235 locations throughout Northern Colorado. For ad rates, subscription information, change of address, or correspondence, contact: Style Media and Design Inc., 211 W. Myrtle St., Suite 200, Fort Collins, Colorado 80521. Phone (970) 2266400, ext. 208. Fax (970) 226-6427. E-Mail: ina@StyleMedia.com ©2013 Style Media and Design Inc. All rights reserved. The entire contents of Style Magazine are copyrighted and may not be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. Style Media and Design Inc. is not responsible for unsolicited material. All manuscripts, artwork, and photography must be accompanied by a SASE. The views and opinions of any contributing writers are not necessarily those of Style Media & Design Inc.

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

9


CONTENTS

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness

JANUARY 2013

page 12

Publisher’s Letter

page 14

Introduction Letter: Rick Sutton, Chief Executive Officer at NCMC, and Marilyn Schock, Chief Executive Officer at McKee

on the cover

NCMC’s Fixed Wing Flight Program sends medical specialists to underserved rural areas via a four passenger Piper Cheyenne I twin turbo prop plane. Find out how this special program is saving lives. Cover photography by Marcus Edwards.

page 16

Banner Health in Northern Colorado

page 20

Taking to the Skies to Save Lives

page 24

Palliative Care: Intensive Comfort Treatment

26

44

page 26

page 58

Banner’s Regional Cancer Network

page 60

The Concierge Will See You Now

page 67 wellness section page 70

Kaiser Supports Community Health

page 72

Who is Kaiser Permanente?

page 74

Paying it Forward: Family Recognized for Legacy of Donation

page 31 medical directory

page 76

Collaboration Means Healthier, Happier Seniors

page 51

70

McKee Adds Pulmonary Clinic

Telestroke Robots: Neurologists on Wheels

page 44

54

page 56

Heart Help Through Electrophysiology

page 54

Nurse Examiner Team Helps Victims of Sexual Assault

Philanthropy Key to Hospital Growth

page 80

Get Fit, Give Back Calendar

page 82

Greeley Patrol Cars Now Carry Lifesaving Equipment

The enclosed articles in this issue of Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness Magazine/ Directory are for your general knowledge and not to be used as a substitute for medical advice or treatment. If you have any questions or concerns about your health please contact your doctor or healthcare provider.

82

74 10

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


publisher’sletter

Excellence In Healthcare Welcome to our 8th annual edition of the Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness Magazine and Medical Directory. We are honored to collaborate with McKee Medical Center and North Colorado Medical Center (NCMC), which are part of the Banner Health Western Region, to bring our Northern Colorado readers this timely and informative magazine and medical reference directory. This year the medical directory is even more

12

comprehensive. Not only is it a very user-friendly reference and guide to physicians serving McKee and NCMC, organized by specialty and physician name, we have added over 100 other healthcare support professionals with privileges at Banner Health. Look for listings by specialty of Certified Physician Assistant (PA-C), Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM), Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP), Nurse Practitioner (NP) and Neonatal Nurse Practitioner (NNP). Because many Physician Assistants and Nurse Practitioners are responsible for the primary care of many patients, we collectively thought it very important to include them in the Medical Directory. In the face of ever-changing healthcare reform, one thing is certain: Marilyn Schock, CEO of McKee, is committed to continuing to strive for excellence in hospital care in her community. As she says, “Our goal is to be the best hospital in the United States.” It is this patient care focus that has led to the completion of the McKee Cancer Center expansion and super linear accelerator addition, the expansion of the robotics program and remodeling of the Breast Center. Continuing this focus, McKee plans to add a full-time palliative care doctor in 2013 to help people with serious illness. Preparing for a challenging future in healthcare, Rick Sutton, CEO of NCMC, says, “We’re focused on limiting the variation of care and we’re standardizing equipment. We believe this leads to better outcomes, and better outcomes and quality care reduces cost.” NCMC and McKee have been recognized with

numerous Healthgrades awards for 2013 and NCMC was also designated as one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals in the country according to Healthgrades. One innovative, patient care oriented program NCMC has established is the alliance with Good Samaritan’s Bonell Community longterm care facility. The program has significantly decreased readmission to the hospital by assisting these senior patients with their recovery and medication management. The cover for this issue is a tribute to NCMC’s Fixed Wing Flight Program, which began in 1989 and flies medical personnel to 18 areas in eastern Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska and Kansas to provide medical care not available in these rural areas. These traveling physicians bring specialty expertise and extend the hospital’s community healthcare outreach on a consistent and reliable basis, often saving lives. We are very fortunate to live in Northern Colorado where we have such exceptional healthcare provided by these two excellent hospital facilities. Even though the future of healthcare may look rocky, we can be assured that Banner Health has plans in place to continue to provide top quality care to its patients. We hope you find this issue interesting and informative and use the Directory throughout the year as a reference. We appreciate partnering with Banner Health and thank the management team, physicians and staff for their contributions. Wishing each of you good health, Lydia@stylemedia.com

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


ear NortherN Dear Northern CD olorado ReaderC,oloraDo reaDer,

Rick Sutton

Chief Executive Officer

As aI approach as Chief Officer at It is our pleasure to be part of my thisfirst 8thanniversary annual issue of Executive the January McKee Medical Center, a Banner Health facility, I am honored to be Northern Colorado associated Medicalwith & Wellness Magazine and Medical such an outstanding medical team, and to lead this Directory. This is anorganization excellentinto source to learn about the innovation, the future. patient care, and technology of front-range Banner serviceswe live in We all are very aware that the health Health care environment and facilities including McKee Medical Center (Loveland) and North is about to change dramatically. I assure you that the McKee team will meet that(Greeley). change, and continue to deliver high-quality, compassionate Colorado Medical Center health care to the people of Loveland and surrounding communities. There are informational articles and stories about pulmonary care, McKee has been providing the Loveland community with health care minimally invasive surgery services, stroke care and our physician the past 30 years. Many of you were born at McKee, and probably outreach program toforname just a few. We also provide you with the latest more of you have received health care at McKee over the past three update on developments and the the hospitals along with decades. Weprogress have alwaysinbeen community hospital forsome Loveland, thoughts on what toand expect in 2013. have established vital relationships with this community. Even though the mostYet,recent election is overchanges, and debate we recognize that‘season’ as the landscape so mustover McKee. the Affordable Care We Acthave hasa world receded, is clear thatand in we thearecoming class it team at McKee, preparedyear to move forward. Be assured your team provides excellent care in all responsible healthcare organizations willhospital be engaging in pro-active aspects of the health care a continuum. have made, and continue analysis of patient care processes with focus onWe controlling or will reducing to make,affecting strategic decisions move us into the future, and put operational costs without qualitythat orwill patient satisfaction. your hometown hospital in a position of continued strength. Healthcare reform is the subject of extensive discussion and continues to We have compiled five priorities that everyone at McKee has evolve. committed to work toward, with the outcome of increased quality Ultimately, true reform about a transformation of our care andisareally wonderful hospital experience at the core. The five areas system that consistently enables us to provide the right care, at theOutcomes, right are: Employee Engagement, Patient Satisfaction, Quality Physician Friendly Financial Strength. time, in the right place, at the mostand appropriate cost – one patient or are committed to ensuring staff at McKee are highly plan member at a time.We A prime location where that this all transformation engaged, determined andfar committed to givehome you the– best care possible. is anticipated to occur is probably not from your in your We believe that having highly engaged staff results in the ability to primary care physician’s office. provide higher quality care, lower turnover, increased productivity and We are proud thatain late fall 2012, 14 primary more effective organization overall. care practices in Northern Colorado, including nine Banner weresatisfaction among 500 We also are concentratingpractices, on our patient to make such practices acrossyour theexperience nation selected for participation in the Centers at McKee one of the best in the country. At McKee for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) Comprehensive we are compared nationally to other hospitals in the Primary country, and are in the top one-third of all implemented hospitals participating Care Initiative. The consistently intent of placing this initiative, which was Nov.in the patient satisfaction survey. access to quality healthcare 1, is to test a clinic-based model of improved Of utmost importance iswith our ability to deliver quality health care, at lower costs for Medicare beneficiaries, a focus on enhanced, and according to our metrics, you can be assured that quality health coordinated services. care is something that you will receive at our hospital. This is just one example of ensure how our of employed We also that network our staff members are highlyphysicians trained and that and our two hospitals lead innovative efforts throughout our local we provide state-of-the-art technology so you receive the best health communities. It is certainly be recognized as a leading care in thegratifying market. Youto deserve that, and at McKee Medical Center, is what through you will experience. national healthcare that provider selection for these types of Wequality also continue to work hand-in-hand with our physicians to initiatives as well as high rankings from independent rating ensure they are pleased with the care their patients are receiving. We are organizations. making sure that all necessary equipment and supplies are available to Even more gratifying is the quality of people – employees, physicians, them as they provide health care to this community. volunteers – who are part of our healthcare team. These are your McKee continues to be financially strong due to the support of the community members, your neighbors, friends, perhaps eventofamily community, physicians, your and staff, and we’re well prepared grow with members who work this to provide you the highest quality care. community in the future. We are proud of our Itlong support, boilshistory, down toour this:community Your community hospitaland is a our physician friendly facility, highly engaged staff members that healthcare professionals who areemploying your local healthcare providers. Weprovide the highestto level of quality health carethe to you andcare, your family. look forward to continuing provide you with right at the We will always strive to ensure you will not have a betterto health right time, in the right place, with all the right that information for years care experience than the one you will have at McKee. Quality health come.

Rick Sutton, MS, FACHE Chief Executive Officer McKee Medical Center

Marilyn Schock Chief Executive Officer

care at your hometown hospital – that’s what we’re all about.

Sincerely, Rick Sutton

Chief Executive OfficerSchock, Rick Sutton, Marilyn Center Chief Executive Officer McKee Medical Chief Executive Officer North Colorado Medical Center McKee Medical Center

14 1

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


medical

LEADERSHIP

banner health

CEOs Marilyn Schock and Rick Sutton are leading healthcare into the future at Banner Health’s McKee Medical Center in Loveland and North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley.

in northern colorado By Heidi Kerr-Schlaefer

Healthcare is an issue that touches all of us at some point in our lives, and the subject is not free of politics or emotions. In the face of ever-changing healthcare reform, Style sat down with the CEOs of McKee Medical Center in Loveland and North Colorado Medical Center (NCMC) in Greeley to learn what these two Banner Health facilities have been doing in the past year to prepare for a challenging future.

16

We learned that Banner Health in Northern Colorado is rich with healthcare options, from first-rate cancer centers to minimally invasive surgery programs. Residents can rest assured that healthcare in this region continues to thrive in all areas.

McKee Medical Center In 2012, McKee Medical Center received several big acknowledgements from the community it serves, including the Loveland Chamber of Commerce’s award for business of the year and top hospital in Loveland as selected by the readers of the Loveland Reporter-Herald. While accolades are nice, McKee’s successes go beyond trophies. “We view ourselves as a community hospital,” says Marilyn D. Schock, chief executive officer at

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Maximizing Care Through Accurate Diagnosis Serving patients in northern Colorado for more than 35 years Providing unrivaled comprehensive diagnostic services to our community

Christopher Bee, MD

Cory Dunn, MD

Richard Halbert, MD

Arlene Libby, MD

Wentzell Hamner, MD Thomas Neuhauser, MD

Carrie Pizzi, MD

Michael Walts, MD

Heath Worcester, MD

www.summitpathology.com

Loveland Greeley Medical Magazine & Directory 2013

17


McKee. “It’s not just about a healthcare building, it’s about our employees partnering and working with community members. I like to think we are the community. People who work here are proud of this city and proud to be part of the community.” As part of McKee’s focus on connecting with the community, the hospital introduced Spirit of Women, a new healthcare management resource for women. The program has been in Greeley for six years, where it has a healthy roster of 2,200 individual members, along with 150 business members. Spirit of Women provides education and support through activities such as Girls Night Out at the Promenade Shops at Centerra. The reason it appeals to the community? “Spirit of Women puts healthcare in the context of having fun,” says Schock. McKee’s campus also expanded in 2012. Perhaps the most significant upgrade was the $10 million, 6,000-square-foot expansion of the McKee Cancer Center that added a new super linear accelerator, a device used to administer radiation treatments to cancer patients. McKee also expanded its internationally recognized robotics program in 2012. The hospital added a second robotics console, which resulted in an expansion of certain support services. One of the areas of construction was in the sterile processing area to support the increased volume. Another construction project took place on the second floor of McKee, turning three wings into one unit with a central hub. The McKee Breast Center, in a building attached to the main hospital, also underwent a remodel in order to install two new direct digital mammography units and to add dressing rooms. While the enhanced mammography was the main focus, the dressing rooms are what the patients have noticed; having a dedicated space adds a level of comfort and respect to the process of breast care. This past year, 21 of the 23 Banner Health facilities achieved stage 7, the final adoption of the electrical medical record, and McKee was one of those facilities. Only 1.7 percent of hospitals nationwide have achieved this stage. “This is confirmation of what we know we are doing well,” says Schock. “Our goal is to be the best hospital in the United States. I think from a patient care perspective that’s really what we are about – striving to be the best.” During the summer of 2012, a state-of-the-art primary care clinic was opened on Southwest 14th Street in Loveland, and is home to five family practice physicians. During the past year, Banner Medical Group added a total of 21 physicians in a variety of specialties in Northern Colorado. Looking forward, McKee plans to add a fulltime palliative care doctor at the hospital in 2013. This specialty focuses on helping people with a life-limiting serious illness address pain, stress and symptoms. “We will have a physician who will be here to help patients through those processes. I think it can be confusing because people don’t understand the breadth of what their decisions can be and I believe palliative care comforts and educates,” says Schock. “We’re very excited about the program.” McKee is currently in the process of a Master

18

Campus Plan, and preparing for the future of healthcare in this country is part of the puzzle they are working out during this project. “We know the healthcare system is unsustainable. Economically, the U.S. can’t support it, so we have to change,” says Schock. “Personally, I believe if we stay focused on the patient and the quality of care we are providing, we are going to succeed.” She continues, “Banner Health is focused on being an industry leader in the provision of healthcare and we’re going to continue to focus on how patient care is being delivered in its best form. I’ve been with Banner Health for 26 years and the focus never waivers from patient care.”

North Colorado Medical Center At NCMC, 2012 represented a culmination of projects the hospital had been working on for the past four years. The hospital won a laundry list of awards in 2012, including nine five-star ratings and nine quality awards from Healthgrades. Founded in 1998, Healthgrades helps consumers make informed choices by measuring healthcare quality. NCMC was designated as one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals in the country according to Healthgrades, and only two Colorado hospitals made the list. Physician satisfaction continues to go up, as well as employee engagement, and NCMC is in the 92nd percentile when it comes to patient satisfaction. “Our market share continues to grow, our surgical volume continues to grow and our infection rate is one of the lowest in the country. When you look at our publicly reported benchmarks, they are all going in the direction we want them to go,” says Rick Sutton, chief executive officer at NCMC. This past year, NCMC acquired Weld County Paramedic Services, and also opened the new Banner North Colorado Emergency Care adjacent to the Summit View Urgent Care at 2001 70th Ave. in west Greeley. By having an emergency department and urgent care sharing the same driveway, Sutton hopes to educate people about what is a real emergency situation and what types of issues are more appropriate for urgent care. Perhaps the biggest accomplishment of 2012 was the extension of the operating agreement between Banner Health and NCMC, Inc. In the early 2000s, NCMC, Inc. contracted with Banner to operate the hospital, and the agreement was to run through 2017. After completing a Master Campus Plan in 2012, it became apparent that the facility’s infrastructure was aging. It is going to take around $60 million to position the facility for another 30 to 40 years; a new lab, new pharmacy and renovated food nutrition is planned, but most of the $60 million will be applied to renovating basic building infrastructure. The results of the Master Campus Plan prompted NCMC, Inc., to renegotiate and extend the operating agreement with Banner early. “The operating agreement has been extended to 2027,” says Sutton. “This ties the community of Greeley and Banner together for the next 15 years and that’s a great accomplishment.” Many specialties at the hospital continue to grow, and this past year saw the addition of a minimally-invasive surgery program headed by

Susan Carter, M.D. NCMC is adding a new da Vinci surgical robot in early 2013, and plans to continue this program. Minimally-invasive surgery has proven quicker recovery times that can lead to shorter hospital stays. “More and more doctors are getting trained on the robot,” says Sutton. “And that program continues to gain momentum.” NCMC has been on the cutting edge of population health management, a comprehensive strategy for improving systems and policies that affect healthcare quality, access and outcomes, and ultimately improving the health of an entire population. The forward-thinking arrangement with Good Samaritan’s Bonell Community is just one example. In a desire to lower readmission rates from this long-term facility to NCMC, a family nurse practitioner and employee of Banner Health has been working with Bonell since June. This arrangement helps improve patient care by making sure posthospitalization medication is taken according to prescribed orders, for example. Since then, readmission rates have been greatly reduced. In planning for the future of healthcare, Sutton says NCMC is leading the way as a good steward of healthcare dollars. With reimbursements going down, he believes costs have to be reduced without affecting quality or patient satisfaction. “We are very process driven and process oriented. We’ve focused on limiting the variation of care and we’re standardizing equipment. We believe this leads to better outcomes, and better outcomes and quality care reduces cost,” says Sutton. He adds, “What we are undertaking here at NCMC is an optimization process. Healthcare is not going to go away, but we have to figure out how to do it in a more cost-effective manner and we’re in that process right now.” NCMC is also taking a proactive approach to education and recruitment. They have formed relationships with high schools, junior colleges, universities and medical schools. NCMC donated funds to create a health sciences academy at Greeley Central High School. It’s a career pathway for students who want to go into the healthcare field. “This helps us prime the pump of staff that we’ll be working with in years to come,” says Sutton. While there are still many unanswered questions about the future of healthcare in this country, Northern Colorado’s medical community is on the cutting edge of technology, and remains dedicated to partnerships and community. Through teamwork and continued focus on putting patients first, McKee and NCMC look to the future with optimism. “There is rough water out there. We have a sound plan and we’re in a strong ship,” says Sutton. “There will be a few systems in this country that figure it out and I think Banner is one of those systems.”

Heidi Kerr-Schlaefer is a freelance writer & journalist. She is also the Mayor of HeidiTown. com, the place for Colorado festival, event & travel information.

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Proud to work with Banner Health!

1357 Water Valley Parkway Suite 500 Windsor, CO 80550 970.674.0933

1109 8th Avenue Greeley, CO 80631 970.353.5031

Carpet | Tile | Granite | Hardwood & More | On-Site Interior Design

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

19


medical

RURAL OUTREACH

taking to the skies

to save lives

One of NCMC’s two Piper Cheyenne I twin turbo prop planes that deliver Northern Colorado physicians to outlying rural communities to provide ongoing specialty care.

By Michelle Venus

It’s 6:30 a.m. at the Greeley airport. A pearly glow is just tipping over the horizon, shining on a four passenger Piper Cheyenne I twin turbo prop. Banner Health pilot Scott Bell is conducting his pre-flight routine and preparing the plane before his passengers’ arrival. As the sun rises higher in the sky, the passengers make their way to the small plane. They are doctors affiliated with Banner Health. And this is no junket to a resort area for a round or two of golf. It’s business as usual for these docs. 20

They are on their way to provide medical care to patients in rural areas. In 1990, North Colorado Medical Center (Banner’s Greeley facility) launched its outreach program to provide underserved rural communities with specialized healthcare. Known as the Fixed Wing Flight Program, it flies medical specialists to 18 locales in eastern Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska and Kansas. The program actually began in 1989 with one physician in a rented plane. Today, more than 100 clinics and hospitals are augmented with over 1,200 specialty clinics in 18 communities. Dr. J. Matt Byrd, a family physician in Ogallala, Neb., believes Fixed Wing is an invaluable service for his patients. The physicians fly in and perform more comprehensive procedures and screenings on the complex cases that extend beyond Dr. Byrd’s area of expertise. “On any given day, I’ll see a gastroenterologist, a cardiologist or an ophthamologist in the clinic,” he says. “We frequently see farm accidents at our clinic and these physicians provide that specialized care that patients need to get well. For instance, sometimes anhydrous ammonia (used as a nitrogen-rich fertilizer) will splash into a farmer’s eyes. The visiting ophthalmologist has the training and experience to deal with the corneal burns that could potentially cause blindness.”

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Other specialty areas are represented, as well. Dr. Byrd points to several occasions when lives were saved because one of these flying docs was present. A perfect example: an 87 year old woman suffered a heart attack while in the clinic. The visiting cardiologist was able to turn a life-threatening emergency into a story with a happy ending. He stabilized the woman, and coordinated her transport via medical helicopter to NCMC. “Today this patient is doing very well,” says Dr. Byrd. “She lost no heart muscle; there’s been no heart failure. She’s a very independent woman and lives by herself in her own home. She’s back home now, and she’s fine.” Dr. Paul Hurst is a cardiologist who has been flying out for Banner since he came to Greeley. “I got here 20 years ago when the hospital was just a small community hospital,” he explains.

“I was a bit surprised when I arrived; I thought folks from the eastern plains would want to go to Denver for specialized care. But they don’t. Denver is too big... and they don’t like that. Other than going to the Western Stock Show, they much prefer coming to Greeley for routine things like shopping and healthcare.” But for people who aren’t well, even the trip to Greeley, which can be up to five hours in a car each way, is still too much. It’s far more efficient for the doctors to spend 45 minutes flying out to them. On an average day, Dr. Hurst sees upwards of 22 patients. Calculate an average round trip of 150 miles to get to the Banner facility in Greeley by that many patients and you can see how much travel time the outreach program eliminates. Dr. Hurst was asked to participate in the

Communities served by NCMC Outreach Services: Sterling, Wray, Holyoke, Fort Morgan, Julesburg, Yuma, Brush, Haxtun, Windsor, Loveland and Lafayette, Colo.; Sidney, Bridgeport and Ogallala, Neb.; St Francis, Kans.; and numerous communities in WY for ABLS classes [advanced burn life support]. Outreach services provided by NCMC offers outlying communities access to: Code STEMI – Code STEMI is a highly coordinated process for outlying hospitals and physicians to better care for their patients having a heart attack. The Code STEMI program provides education to the healthcare providers on best care of the heart attack patient, ensures rapid Med Evac transport to NCMC, and enables an automatic acceptance to the Cardiovascular Care Unit and/or the cath lab depending on the status of the patient while in route to NCMC. It is all about efficiency and high quality care. PADnet – The PADnet program offers a unique solution to the need for early detection of peripheral arterial disease (PAD). It is a diagnostic tool that gives physicians the opportunity to test patients in their clinic while allowing a CardioVascular Institute (CVI) specialist from NCMC to read the study.

Dr. James Wolach has been participating in NCMC’s flight program since 1995.

outreach program from the onset and initially travelled to Yuma and Wray, two towns he still serves 20 years later. Initially he drove. Not only was the drive time consuming, it was downright dangerous at certain times of the year. Dr. Hurst found himself in a roadside ditch more than once after spinning out on icy roads. Flying is a much safer mode of travel. “...especially with our pilots,” says Hurst. “They’re very skilled and experienced; I trust them implicitly.” For Dr. Hurst, this is a way to give back. He grew up in a small town in rural Kentucky. He understands how difficult it can be to access specialized care when the patient is a few hundred miles from a major hospital. He relates his own experience of sitting in the back seat of the family car traveling to and from doctors’ offices to deal with a brother’s medical condition. He knows firsthand the toll it takes on the patient as well as the time it takes from a family. The patients in these communities are highly

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

appreciative. For Dr. Hurst, that’s where the rewards lie. “Every time I’m out in one of these communities, someone says ‘thank you.’ Not just thank you for seeing me, but thank you for coming out.” “This whole institution [Banner Health] is committed to serving patients. But really, not just the institution, it’s our community as well,” adds Dr. Hurst. He goes on to tell the story of a man from St. Francis, Kan., who suffered a heart attack. Once the heart attack was diagnosed, the man was flown to the hospital in Greeley for treatment. His family followed in the car. While the patient was recovering in Greeley, the family stayed in town to be with him. During that time, the car had a flat tire out on the east side of town. A stranger stopped to help change the tire and realized that the spare wasn’t in very good shape either. The stranger got the spare on the car, and told the patient’s wife that he would follow her to the tire store. Once there, it was

Mobile Echo – The mobile echo program allows CVI to send out a mobile echo van and registered technician to all the outlying communities to perform echocardiogram, ultrasound of the heart, and vascular studies. This service allows patients to be tested in their own community and home facility. HROB Transfer Program – This is a North Colorado Med Evac program to safely transport high-risk obstetric patients to facilities providing specialty care for the pregnant patient. Burn Education – Advanced Burn Life Support [ABLS] education is provided to regional healthcare facilities on an ongoing basis. NCMC Transfer Center – The NCMC Transfer Center is located at NCMC and is staffed in conjunction with the dispatch center for North Colorado Med Evac, allowing for smooth coordination of the patient’s transfer regardless of whether the transfer is by ground or air.

21


Dr. Wolach disembarks from the plane after a day spent visiting patients in northeastern Colorado.

discovered that all four tires were bald. The wife, already overwhelmed with her husband’s medical issues and the costs associated with them, did not know how she would pay for the tires. The stranger then instructed the fellows at the tire store to replace them at his cost. “She came back to the hospital with tears in her eyes,” states Dr. Hurst. “And that’s the kind of community that Greeley is, it’s the kind of hospital that Banner is, which is exhibited in the outreach program. That’s why I’m proud to practice here.” Dr. James Wolach is a second-generation urologist in Greeley. He started participating in the outreach program in 1995 when he joined his father’s practice. As a teenager, he saw his father flying out. Every two weeks, Dr. Wolach boards one of the planes and heads to either Yuma or Holyoke. Over the 17 years he’s been actively involved with the Fixed Wing program, he’s gotten to know his rural patients well. “They’re really a neat group of people,” he says. “We talk about their farms or their animals, or most recently the drought.” He, too, hears from his patients and the small hospitals how appreciative they are that he devotes his time and efforts towards their care and well being. “I enjoy working with them. They are very good people. The practice here [in Greeley] has gotten so busy that it would be easy not to go out. But I’ve been doing this for so long, and I enjoy it so much that I can’t see not doing it,” he explains. It’s not unusual for Dr. Wolach to head back to Greeley with homegrown vegetables, farm fresh eggs or baked goods that a patient gives to him. “This is not something that a doctor in a big city gets to experience. It opens up opportunities

22

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Dr. Paul Hurst, who has been participating in the program for 20 years, says this is his way of giving back to the community.

PROSPECT RD

E

AV RE

CE

NT

COLLEGE AVE

SHIELDS ST

for more personal discussions and that’s nice,” he explains. “It’s a very pleasant part of my job. In these small communities, everyone knows everyone. It’s like homecoming every week. It’s a much more personal relationship than you get in a larger town or city.” None of this can be done without the pilots. Scott Bell has been flying for the Fixed Wing program for 20 years and oversees a team of Banner-employed pilots and copilots. “Our job is to get the doctors out and back safely,” he says. He’s been flying Drs. Hurst and Wolach to their destinations the entire time. Bell started out as a contract pilot flying one doc out to Holyoke and worked in that capacity for eight years as the program grew. Then the NCMC Foundation embarked on a capital campaign to buy planes for the program and Bell became a full timer. In addition to managing his flight team, he oversees scheduling and maintenance. He flies out five days a week; only severe fog conditions out east keep his planes grounded. Sylvia Stager, Outreach Program Manager for Banner explains, “Our safety record, which we take very seriously, is excellent.” The NCMC Outreach Services’ Fixed Wing Flight Program does more than extend access to medical care for rural patients. It creates a medical community beyond the walls of Greeley’s hospital that saves lives.

DRAKE RD

Michelle Venus is a freelance writer from Fort Collins. She is currently working on an art book entitled And Tomorrow Comes Again, which features the creative expression of suicide survivors. See more at www.michellevenus.com.

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

LocationFollow us on social media! Find us at the northeast corner of Centre and Shields. 1024 Centre Ave., Bldg E, Suite 100 Fort Collins, Colorado 80526

Contact Information Give us a call today to schedule an appointment or to visit the facility. Phone: (970) 797-2431 Fax: (970) 797-2509

Physical Therapy focused on helping individuals with orthopedic and neurological problems reach their optimal potential. Find us at the northeast corner of Centre and Shields.

1024 Centre Ave., Bldg E, Suite 100 Fort Collins, Colorado 80526 (970) 797-2431 | www.berkanarehab.com

23

Achieve.


medical

Palliative care

palliative care:

Dr. Robert Fried (center), with social worker Lisa Lahrs and nurse practitioner Linda Theuerkorn, is leading NCMC’s palliative care department, a growing segment of medicine that provides support and comfort to seriously ill patients.

intensive comfort treatment By Carl Simmons

Serious, debilitating illness doesn’t just affect patients. It affects families and everyone who cares about the person is suffering. Often, both patients and caregivers feel like they’re walking through a tunnel with only one possible set of options. The palliative care team at North Colorado Medical Center, however, suggests that a better way is possible – or rather, a variety of better ways. 24

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


“One of the things we do that’s most helpful is to enable families to see the road ahead, and to see the implications of the decisions they’re trying to make,” says Robert Fried, M.D., medical director of the program. “They may say, ‘I want everything done.’ But what’s ‘everything’? What are the results of that? Patients think they have two choices: Do everything the doctor has outlined or stop treatment and go it alone. We offer a third approach: intensive comfort treatment.” The goal is to reduce the symptoms, pain and stress of a serious illness – whatever the diagnosis – for any patient, of any age, with any diagnosis, at any stage, Dr. Fried says. “If either the patient or the family is experiencing pain, stress or symptoms from a serious illness, palliative care should be a part of that. In fact, this should be normal practice for every hospital.” The palliative care program at NCMC started just over a year ago, and may be the only program of its kind in Northern Colorado. Since then, Dr. Fried, nurse practitioner Linda Theuerkorn, M.S.N., F.N.P., and social worker Lisa Lahrs, L.P.C., have worked together to provide care that’s not just medical but holistic. In other words, the team not only manages physical symptoms, but emotional and spiritual ones as well. “We want it to be a natural process that if someone comes in with a serious illness, they don’t feel they have to ask, ‘Can I have palliative care?’” says Theuerkorn. “It should be an expected part of the process. What we try to do is let them know they have options.” “People are sometimes nervous about asking about the kind of treatment they’re receiving – even some doctors get nervous,” Lahrs adds. “I watch families respond when we present them with options; they feel a sense of release and rest. They know there’s a path to take. It’s hopeful.” Suffice to say, palliative care covers a wide variety of treatments, and thus is a bit hard to define on the surface. The closest parallel for those unfamiliar would be hospice care, but hospice is just one subset of palliative care. Palliative care represents the skills developed in hospice, but is provided to patients earlier in the course of their illness. “Thus, all hospice care is palliative, for example intensive comfort treatment focusing on relief of suffering, but not all palliative care is hospice care.” “We’re also careful to say that we’re not painmanagement specialists,” he continues. Palliative care is for people who have pain, symptoms and stress arising from a serious illness. He adds, “Let’s say you’ve received a diagnosis of cancer, and your doctors have prepared a course of treatment. Even at the beginning of treatment, you might have physical symptoms such as nausea. You might also have spiritual needs. We help, while the other treatment is still going on. It’s a team effort. Over the course of your illness, if a cure becomes less likely, the role of palliative care becomes greater.” To illustrate, Dr. Fried describes a patient who – through the course of treatment – underwent surgeries that affected his mobility. As the condition worsened, he required further surgery and eventually wasn’t able to heal well due to poor circulation. “In this situation, the legitimate question we asked the patient was: What is the goal?

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

What’s achievable? What’s the compassionate approach, given what we’re facing?” “Sometimes people think that palliative care means doing nothing; in fact, it’s the opposite. A patient like this might benefit from intensive comfort treatment,” says Dr. Fried. That intensive comfort treatment breaks down into three major parts: managing symptoms, which again could be physical, emotional or spiritual; a patient-centered focus that helps people define the care they want moving forward; and coordinating the care of patients after they leave the hospital. “Comfort isn’t just managing symptoms,” Theuerkorn says. “We try to find a way to connect with patients; sometimes it’s just listening to them. When we’ve done that, the things they really need just come out. They’re more comfortable talking about their own goals for care at that point.” Each team member handles a different area of this intensive comfort treatment. “I handle the psychiatric stuff,” Lahrs says. “So if there’s an issue that comes up I can deal with it. Another big issue is care coordination; I try to make sure people have the resources they need, no matter what care options they choose. This is an emerging area. We connect the family to rehab, or to hospice; we also help them navigate the intricacies of Medicare and Medicaid.” “She speaks for the patients when they can’t speak for themselves,” Dr. Fried adds. Theuerkorn explains her role: “I see the patients; we have family meetings, and try to figure out how best to treat the patients.” Dr. Fried further clarifies, “Linda operates in a manner similar to a doctor, but she also brings a nursing heart to the work.” “I focus on the physical side of things,” Dr. Fried adds. “I also have administrative responsibility for the growth of the program. My job as director is to articulate the broad vision and to keep us on task. And I see lots of patients as well.” The future includes growth, says Dr. Fried. “Right now we’re strictly an inpatient program; we hope that will change early in 2013. We hope there will be an office where people can come in, and know that the palliative process is still working. We have a system now that allows us to see when patients have come in and been treated before, so there’s continuity. We’ve only been in business one year, so we’re still building those other pieces – not only the widespread understanding and use of palliative care in Greeley and Weld County, but everywhere. Wherever Banner (Health) doctors and patients meet, they should be able to get palliative care.” “We see ourselves as educating people, both formally and informally. Our focus isn’t limited to four walls. We are one of the only hospitals in the region doing this. We’ve brought stateof-the-art palliative care to an area that’s been underserved,” Dr. Fried says. “The message we want to give patients is: We only come by invitation. So ask your doctor – because you can ask,” he concludes.

Carl Simmons is a freelance writer living in Loveland.

25


medical

stroke care

The telestroke robot is enabling emergency room physicians to connect with Denver-based stroke specialists to determine the best treatment as quickly as possible for victims of stroke.

telestroke robots:

neurologists on wheels By Elissa J. Tivona

“Every minute can make a difference,” says Dr. Matt Ledges, medical director of the Emergency Department of North Colorado Medical Center (NCMC). “Time is brain.”

26

This simple truth, summarized by Dr. Ledges, guides the treatment for stroke, defined broadly as “death of brain cells in a localized area of the brain due to inadequate blood flow.” Celeste Rhys, nurse manager in the Emergency Department at McKee Medical Center, goes on from there. She adds, “The sooner you can restore blood flow to that section of the brain… it decreases your chances of health complications that go along with stroke.” Both emergency care professionals stress the ultimate goal:

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


determining precise interventions that lead to successfully restoring blood flow to the brain. And both point to the Telestroke robot at their respective facilities as the latest and most indispensable tool for making time-critical diagnoses and determining best treatment options. All strokes are considered high-risk time-sensitive situations, explains Dr. Ledges. However, only certain strokes will benefit from the timely administration of drugs known as thrombolytics, which dissolve blood clots in vessels. These drugs are very effective at restoring blood flow but only in patients meeting specific criteria. For instance, thrombolytic therapy is reserved for the treatment of ischemic strokes only, those caused by blood clots. Although 87 percent of strokes are ischemic, 13 percent are hemorrhagic, meaning strokes that are caused by bleeding into the brain. In hemorrhagic strokes and in cases where ischemic strokes are complicated by other factors in the patient’s history (like major trauma, intestinal or other recent surgery, use of medications like Coumadin, bleeding ulcers or others), administering IV thrombolytics can actually result in greater harm to the patient. Thrombolytic therapy in hemorrhagic strokes can prolong bleeding into the brain and cause more extensive damage. In these cases, surgery may be advised. “We have to be absolutely certain we are giving the right medicine to the right person,” says Dr. Ledges. “Through the Telestroke program, we have expert stroke neurologists available 24/7 to give us added expertise in real time to help us make the diagnosis.” According to InTouch Health, developer of Telestroke’s combination of products and protocols, Telestroke creates a “spoke and hub” network, where outlying hospitals are directly connected to comprehensive stroke centers through the use of remote presence devices (also called Telestroke robots). By placing a phone call through the robot’s secure WiFi connection, emergency personnel at distant hospitals link directly to stroke specialists day or night for consults on acute stroke patients. In Northern Colorado, the Telestroke program connects NCMC and McKee Medical Center with Swedish Medical Center in Denver, a Level 1 Trauma Center that “serves as the region’s referral center for neurotrauma and is a recognized leader in the treatment of stroke.” Rhys describes the Telestroke program in action. At a moment’s notice the Telestroke robot can be wheeled into any examination room. “We call a number that directly connects us to Swedish. They contact the stroke neurologist on call, and usually within five minutes we have them on the screen.” The camera allows for two-way communication. The neurologist at Swedish can talk to and see the patient at McKee (or NCMC) as if patient and physician were in the same room. “We explain to patients that it’s basically a doctor on wheels,” continues Rhys. “You’re going to be talking in real time with this physician from Swedish who is a specialist in strokes. That usually puts the patient and

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

27


Celeste Rhys, nurse manager, Emergency Department at McKee Medical Center

family at ease.” Typically the nurse stays in the room to assist the remote physician with further assessment of the patient. Using this technology, the stroke neurologist can zoom the camera in or out to see patient reactions and can interact with the patient through the audio channel. “It’s like having that doctor in the room,” says Rhys. At both McKee and NCMC, all emergency department personnel understand that whenever a patient presents with stroke-like symptoms, time is of the essence. Dr. Ledges says, “Most stroke patients are transported to emergency rooms by ambulance. If a stroke is suspected, paramedics will issue a stroke alert.” The alert is made based on specific assessments performed en route, such as difficulty speaking, facial droop and arm or leg weakness on one side. Also, paramedics and triage staff at emergency rooms must try to determine the time of symptom onset. There is a critical window of 4.5 hours where thrombolytic therapy can significantly reduce the effects of blood clots. However, giving thrombolytics beyond that time frame can result in more harm because as brain tissue dies the likelihood for bleeding increases. “It’s a moving target. We have to know when symptoms first started,” explains Dr. Ledges. Hence, the need for speed. “If the patient is seen within the 4.5 hour window, the sooner you give the drug, the better the outcome. Every effort is made to expedite

patients in this situation. At hour one you can have a better outcome than at hour four. However if you don’t know when symptoms started, you can’t give the medicine.” Consequently, a stroke alert by paramedics or any hospital staff triggers a cascade of immediate responses. Doctors and nurses at the emergency service stand by to meet the ambulance, the imaging facility is cleared to receive the patient, and the Telestroke robot is at hand. The patient is taken immediately for a CT scan, an imaging test in which the brain is X-rayed from different angles. “CT scans are a primary method of determining whether a stroke is ischemic or hemorrhagic,” states the Internet Stroke Center website. Dr. Ledges continues, “If a CT scan doesn’t show bleeding, we immediately activate the Telestroke service; the nurse rolls in the Telestroke camera (robot) and a neurologist from Swedish Medical Center in Denver will be on hand to conduct an examination remotely.” The remote neurologist also reviews the CT scan and confirms the results. In the rare instance of a hemorrhagic stroke, the patient may be recommended for immediate air transport to Swedish. Rhys notes, “Brain bleeds require highly specialized neurosurgical techniques, many of which can be performed at Swedish. Again, time is an essential factor. And if transfer is required it must be done before too much of the brain tissue is damaged. The sooner they can get it diagnosed, and if need be, the sooner we get them shipped, that’s time in their favor.” More commonly, the stroke patient is admitted to the intensive care unit, and, if thrombolytics are indicated, local physicians administer them and the patient will be cared for by the neurologist in their own community. Banner Health has neurologists on staff at both hospitals to provide continuing care for the patients in the hospital and after they are discharged. Dr. Ledges concludes, “The big advantage of Telestroke is having two physicians in different specialties (ER and neurology) evaluating the patient in real time, weighing in on the decision to include or exclude for thrombolytics… coming together to determine the best care for this person.” For Celeste Rhys, enthusiasm for the Telestroke program is more than professional; it’s personal. Her mother suffered a stroke seven years ago. Rhys says, “I truly believe that had this technology been available, she would still be with us. That’s why it’s so dear to me. I’m not bitter, I’m just excited that we’re going to be able to give this to other people so that they don’t have to go through what my family went through.”

Elissa J. Tivona is a writer and international educator living in Fort Collins. She resides as the Peace Correspondent at www.thepeacecorrespondent.com

28

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


In June Eaton, Colo., was pounded by a severe storm that produced silver dollar-size hailstones. One of the many victims from the onslaught was Eaton Evangelical Free Church. After being approached and working with several other roofers the church was unhappy with how things were going. They had a large complex project that required a very experienced team. After hearing from several of the church members about the quality of work and service from Affordable Roofing, Pastor Craig Fitzpatrick made his decision to give them a try.

“Choosing the right contractor for the restoration of our facility was not just an issue of getting our ‘home’ back to its pre-storm condition. It was a matter of restoring and reaffirming our investment in our community… In the midst of a very complex and difficult restoration, Jim and those at Affordable Roofing worked diligently to meet or exceed each and every promise and expectation.” -Pastor Craig Fitzpatrick

Affordable Roofing & Restoration offers free roof evaluations and estimates on insurance claims. They have over 40 years experience and specialize in the following: • WIND AND HAIL DAMAGE • WINTER WATER MITIGATION • INSURANCE CLAIMS • NEW CONSTRUCTION • RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL ROOFING • GUTTER REPLACEMENT • WATER & FIRE DAMAGE • SMOKE AND ODOR REMEDIATION • MOLD MITIGATION

Affordable roofing replaced 200 squares with Hail Impact Roofing Shingles and 220 squares of membrane. Jim had wonderful things to say about their community.

970.207.0000

NorthernWWW.AFFORDABLEROOFINGINC.COM Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

29


banner health mckee medical center north colorado medical center

medical

directory

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

31


32

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

33


mckee medical center north colorado medical center & banner health

The medical health professional list has been provided by McKee Medical Center and North Colorado Medical Center. This Medical Directory is current as of 12/14/2012. * These health professionals belong to the medical staffs at both McKee Medical Center in Loveland and North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley.

medical

Allergy-Immunology Clement, Loran, MD 2121 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 350 Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-221-2370 Culver, William G., MD 2923 Ginnala Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6660 George, Anna, MD 608 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 101 Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-498-9226 2923 Ginnala Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6660 James, John M., MD* 1136 E. Stuart St., Bldg. 3, Ste. 3200 Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-221-1681 Kailasam, Velusamy, MD 1130 38th Ave., Ste. 2 Greeley, CO 80634.........970-330-5391 Lanting, William A., MD 8223 W. 20th St., Ste. B Greeley, CO 80634....................970-978-4114 Murthy, Krishna C., MD 2121 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 350 Fort Collins, CO 80528....970-221-2370 Pace, R. Scott, MD 6801 W. 20th St., Ste. 206 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-353-0155

directory 2013

Hamner, H. Wentzell, MD* 5802 Wright Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-212-0530

Gaca, Julie A., MD* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819

Traynor, Robert M., EDD* 4675 W. 20th Street Rd. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-2881

Libby, Arlene L., MD* 5802 Wright Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-212-0530

Gengler, Jeffrey W., MD* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819

Burn Medicine

Neuhauser, Thomas S., MD* 5802 Wright Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-212-0530

Hagebak, Robert W., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819

Pizzi, Catherine C., MD* 5802 Wright Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-212-0530

Lloyd, Alan, MD 2000 Boise Ave Loveland, CO 80538.................970-350-6399

Walts, Michael J., MD* 5802 Wright Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-212-0530

McFarland, David K., MD* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819

Wilkerson, James, MD PO Box 419 Loveland, CO 80539..................970-635-4163

Michael, Christopher S., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819

Worcester, Heath D., MD* 5802 Wright Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-212-0530

Nesbit, Michael T., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819

Anesthesiology Abston, Phillip A., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. G10 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-396-6994 Balestrieri, Frank J., MD 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-350-6399

Rose, Erin C., MD* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819 Song, Yo-Jun, MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819 Weitenberner, Nicholas A., MD* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819

Cockrell, Gail Y., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-6301 Garber, Rebecca, FNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6301 Goodwin, Cleon W., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6301

Cardiology Beckmann, James, MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-392-0900 Chapel, Harold, MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-392-0900 Dearmont-Olson, Jodi, FNP* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-392-0900 Dong, Lin-Wang, MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-392-0900

Anatomic & Clinical Pathology

Callahan, Vicki Lynn, MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819

Allen, Patrick, MD PO Box 419 Loveland, CO 80539..................970-635-4163

Carmosino, Mario J., MD* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819

Bee, Christopher S., MD* 5802 Wright Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-212-0530

Elliott, Keith L. MD* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819

Audiology

Burson, Michael, MD PO Box 419 Loveland, CO 80539..................970-635-4163

Faszholz, Mark S., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4819

Dice, Noel C., AuD 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-313-2740

Hinze, Brenda, PA-C* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-392-0900

Dunn, Cory D., MD* 5802 Wright Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-212-0530

Filby, Paul, MD 2000 Boise Ave Loveland, CO 80538..................970-350-6399

Skordas, James D., AuD 6500 29th St., Ste. 106 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-330-5555

Hirsch, Cecilia, MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-392-0900

Halbert, Richard E., MD* 5802 Wright Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-212-0530

Foley, Kevin, MD 2000 Boise Ave Loveland, CO 80538.................970-350-6399

Swope, Karen S., AuD 2528 W. 16th St., Ste. 100 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-2881

Hurst, Paul, MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-392-0900

34

Anticoagulation Clinic Duncan, Jane (Mitzi), FNP* 2001 70th Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-350-6437

Drury, John, MD* 1405 S. 8th Ave., Ste. 104 Sterling, CO 80751........970-526-8175 Giansiracusa, Richard, MD 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 100 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-613-1745 Gryboski, Cynthia, MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-392-0900

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Jensen, Ruth, FNP* 1800 15th St., Ste. 320 Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-6953

Zumbrun, Stephen, MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-392-0900

Bruce, Aaron, DO 776 W. Eisenhower Blvd. Loveland, CO 80537..................970-667-3116

Gill, Sarvjit S., MD 3820 N. Grant Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-593-1177

Lyle, Brian, MD* 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 200 Loveland, CO 80538.......970-203-2400

CardiologyElectrophysiology

Castle, Stephen P., DO 7251 W. 20th St., Bldg. E Greeley, CO 80634....................970-330-6075

Gupta, Sanjay K., MD 6500 29th St., Ste. 106 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-330-5555

Pfahnl, Arnold E., MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-392-0900

Hoover, Aaron, MD* 6500 29th St., Ste. 106 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-556-9319

Peterson, Keith E., MD 2528 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-4646

Rowan, Shane B., MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631....................970-392-0900

Lillis, Patrick, MD 776 W. Eisenhower Blvd. Loveland, CO 80537..................970-667-3116

Peterson, Thomas T., MD 2528 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-4646

Marinello, Laura, PA-C* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-392-0900 Marsh, Randall, MD* 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 200 Loveland, CO 80538.......970-203-2400 Quillen, James, MD* 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 200 Loveland, CO 80538.......970-203-2400 Rath, Gary, MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-392-0900

Critical Care Medicine Ear, Nose & Throat (Otolaryngology) Groves, Robert H., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-392-2026

Ricci, Megan, PA-C 3820 N. Grant Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-593-1177

Bieganski, Andrea, PA-C 1120 E. Elizabeth St., Bldg. F-101 Fort Collins, CO 80524....970-221-1177

Robertson, Matthew, MD 1120 E. Elizabeth St., Bldg. F-101 Fort Collins, CO 80524....970-221-1177

Bundy, Jeffrey, PA-C 1120 E. Elizabeth St., Bldg. F-101 Fort Collins, CO 80524....970-221-1177

Sabour, Sarmad, MD 6500 29th St., Ste.106 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-330-5555

Baird, Kristin, MD 1551 Professional Ln., Ste. 135 Longmont, CO 80501................303-532-2810

Chen, Arthur F., MD 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-313-2740

Wold, Stephen, MD 1120 E. Elizabeth St., Bldg. F-101 Fort Collins, CO 80524....970-221-1177

Blattner, Mary A., MD 5881 W. 16th St., Ste. E Greeley, CO 80634....................970-313-2734

Eriksen, Christopher, MD 1120 E. Elizabeth St., Bldg. F-101 Fort Collins, CO 80524....970-221-1177

Zacheis, David, MD 3820 N. Grant Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-593-1177

Shihabi, Ahmad, MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-392-0900

Dermatology

Shults, Christopher, PA-C* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-392-0900

Bair, Sarah, MD 776 W. Eisenhower Blvd. Loveland, CO 80537..................970-667-3116

Webb, Peter, PA-C* 1800 15th St., Ste. 310 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-392-0900 Wilson, Emily, PA-C 1800 15th St., Ste. 320 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6953

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

35


Emergency Medicine Albert, Nils P., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Allison, Erik M., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Arguello, Daniel MD 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071 Baker, Jeffrey T., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Bassett, Kenneth W., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Emme, Siegfried, FNP 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071

Peacock, Seth R., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Fallon, Michael P., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-6244

Pedigo, Thomas F., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Fuhrmann, Eric, MD 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071

Price, T. Chris, MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Geohring, Jerold D., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Ranniger, Stacie L., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Green, Andrea L., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-6244 Grossman, Lauren S., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-6244

Beasley, Benjamin E., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Hanck, Jill L., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Bogart, Trina, MD 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538..................970-635-4071

Huntington, Michael, MD 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071

Brant, Dennis P., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Johar, Jasjot S., MD* 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Breyer, Klementyna, MD 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071 Busch, Benjamin A., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Cooper, Brian E., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Corson, Thomas, DO 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071 Dannemiller, Elisa M., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Ledges, Matthew G., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Lee, Jennifer, PA-C 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071 Maldonado, Ryan B., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 McNally, Thomas, PA-C 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538..................970-635-4071

Richter, David M., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Ross, Heather, MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Saint, Elva, FNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Schwartz, Jeffrey C., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Sovndal, Shannon S., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Sundheim, Scott, MD 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071 Tabaka, Marta, PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Todaro, Matthew A., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244 Vanetti, Carol S., MD* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-346-1567

Endocrinology Hegert, Teresa, FNP 1800 15th St., Ste. 210 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4676 Izon, Meriam, MD 2121 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 300 Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-295-0010 Kumar, Nirmala S., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. 210 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4676 Lease, Anne Marie, FNP 1800 15th St., Ste. 210 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4676 Sadler, Corinn M., MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 210 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4676

Family Medicine Allen, Thomas, MD 295 E. 29th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6000 Bakanauskas, Egle, MD 1455 Main St., Ste. 100 Windsor, CO 80550....................970-686-3950 Bearden, Jacqueline S., MD 5623 W. 19th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80634....................970-353-9011 Bender, John L., MD 4674 Snow Mesa Dr., Ste. 140 Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-482-0213 Bradley, Robert Claud, MD 1455 Main St., Ste. 100 Windsor, CO 80550...................970-686-3950 Branum, Joanna H., MD 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-2520 Brockmann, Robert A., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Melton, Natasha L., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Wageman, David D., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Brooks, Lesley C., MD 2930 11th Ave. Evans, CO 80620......................970-353-9403

Mendenhall, Matthew L., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Walters, Jeannine T., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Brown, Cara E., MD 222 Johnstown Center Dr. Johnstown, CO 80534................970-587-4974

Moore, Maureen, NP 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071

Watson, Susan S., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-6244

Brown, John M., MD 222 Johnstown Center Dr. Johnstown, CO 80534................970-587-4974

Dixon, Mark, MD 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071

Morrow, Gregory, PA-C 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071

Whaley, Jason W., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Budensiek, Richard L., DO 5623 W. 19th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-353-9011

Dugan, Lauren G., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Nemejc, Charles J., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Wolf, Ryan D., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Cabrera, Anthony, MD 3880 N. Grant Ave., Ste. 140 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-0047

Eliopoulos, Vassily T., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Paules, Melissa M., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Yerton, Jeremiah E., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

Campbell, Richard M., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Deason, Janna, FNP 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4071 Demers, Nicholas G., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6244

36

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Garber, Stacey L., MD 2420 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-353-7668

Leonard, Brian A., DO 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2424

Orozco-Peterson, Marilu, MD* 811 E. Elizabeth St. Fort Collins, CO 80524..............970-224-1596

Grauerholz, Brent D., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2454

Ley, James W., MD 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-313-2700

Paczosa, Michelle K., DO 6801 W. 20th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-378-8000

Gregory, Joseph E., MD 222 Johnstown Center Dr. Johnstown, CO 80534................970-587-4974

Lobitz, Paul Daniel, MD 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2520

Pflieger, Daniel P., MD 2420 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-353-7668

Hailey, Mark, MD 1230 SW 14th St. Loveland, CO 80537...................970-619-3999

Lyons, Marianne V., DO 100 S. Cherry Ave., Unit 1 Eaton, CO 80615......................970-454-3838

Powell, Patricia K., MD 2930 11th Avenue Evans, CO 80620......................970-353-9403

Haskins, Robert Scott, MD 6801 W. 20th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-378-8000

Magnuson, Douglas A., MD 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2520

Puls, David C., DO 5623 W. 19th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80634....................970-353-9011

Hoffmann, Julie, MD 3880 N. Grant Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-0047

Mallory, Patrick, DO 1548 N. Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-9245

Racine, Kimberly Ann, PA-C 1900 19th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2438

Hollos, Lori, MD 2701 Madison Square Dr. Loveland, CO 80538..................970-663-0722

Manter, Charles D., DO 2627 W. 10th St., Ste. 3 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-3274

Rangel, Keith A., MD 1455 Main St., Ste. 100 Windsor, CO 80550...................970-686-3950

Hotz, Issac Moses, MD 2930 11th Ave. Evans, CO 80620......................970-353-9403

Martinez, Matthew L., MD 6801 W. 20th St., Ste.101 Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-378-8000

Reents, William, MD 1230 SW 14th St. Loveland, CO 80537..................970-619-3999

Hyndman, Jamie L., PA-C 1900 19th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2438

Mattox, Amy E., MD 2420 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-353-7668

Ripley, Lori A., MD 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2520

Isley, Courtney B., MD 222 Johnstown Center Dr. Johnstown, CO 80534................970-587-4974

McCabe-Lentz, Jennifer, MD 1230 SW 14th St. Loveland, CO 80537..................970-619-3999

Risenhoover, Edwin, MD 295 E. 29th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6000

Jacob, Prema, MD 1230 SW 14th St. Loveland, CO 80537...................970-619-3999

McCall, Janis R., MD 5623 W. 19th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80634....................970-353-9011

Rommereim-Madden, Daphne, MD 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-2424

Jeffers, Wayne S., MD 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-2424

McGarr, Mitzi A., FNP 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2424

Schaffer, Scott, MD* 303 Colland Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-461-8031

Kary, Jonathan Alex, MD 1300 Main St. Windsor, CO 80550....................970-686-5646

Mills, Angela Lee, MD 5623 W. 19th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80634....................970-353-9011

Schmalhorst, Brian K., MD 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-313-2700

Kasenberg, Thomas, DO 295 E. 29th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6000

Morgan, Frank D., MD 5623 W. 19th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-353-9011

Schulte, Dorothy M., FNP 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-2424

Kenigsberg, Thomas A., MD 222 Johnstown Center Dr. Johnstown, CO 80534................970-587-4974

Noordewier, Edwin R., MD 1900 19th St. Greeley, CO 80631......................970-350-2454

Sheppard-Madden, Dena, MD 295 E. 29th St. Loveland, CO 80538..................970-669-6000

Fahrenholtz, Herbert D., MD 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2424

Kennedy, Christopher T., MD 2420 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-353-7668

Nwizu, Chima C., MD 6801 W. 20th St., Ste.101 Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-378-8000

Smith, David B., MD 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-2424

Finnoff, Gregory J., DO 2930 11th Ave. Evans, CO 80620......................970-353-9403

Kessinger, Trina A., MD 1300 Main St. Windsor, CO 80550....................970-686-5646

Nystrom, Robert R., DO 1900 19th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2454

Snodgrass, David, MD 2701 Madison Square Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-663-0722

Flake, Zachary, MD 2701 Madison Square Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-663-0722

Kirker, Mary, MD 630 15th Ave., Ste. 103 Longmont, CO 80501................303-776-0600

Ogden, Samuel, MD 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-2424

Squires, Rhonda D., FNP 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-2424

Frickman, C. Elmo, MD 3320 W. Eisenhower Blvd. Loveland, CO 80537..................970-669-2849

Kurth, Jay, DO 608 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 101 Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-204-9069

Oligmueller, William J., MD 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-313-2700

Stoddard, Andrew P., MD 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-2520

Caragol, Jennifer A., MD* 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 110 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-461-6140 2930 11th Ave. Evans, CO 80620......................970-353-9403 Carey, Michael V., MD 1455 Main St., Ste. 100 Windsor, CO 80550....................970-686-3950 Clang, Daniel R., DO 6801 W. 20th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-378-8000 Clang, Tamara S., DO 6801 W. 20th Street, Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-378-8000 Clemens, Orrie, MD 2001 S. Shields St., Bldg. L Fort Collins, CO 80526..............970-221-0565 Colgan, Ann T., MD 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2520 Cook, Jeffrey S., MD 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2424 Coonrod, Rita A., MD 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2424 Corona, Joseph A., MD 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-313-2700 Dallow, Kurt T., MD 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-2424 Dawson, Judd W., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529 Dawson, Jennifer D., DO 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2520 DeMoor, Sarah F., MD 2930 11th Ave. Evans, CO 80620.......................970-353-9403 Doft, Anthony, MD 1300 Main St. Windsor, CO 80550....................970-686-5646 Dubin, Jeremy, DO 3320 W. Eisenhower Blvd. Loveland, CO 80537...................970-669-2849

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

37


Taylor, Grant, DO 608 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 101 Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-204-9069

North, Crystal, DO 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 220 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-669-5432

Englert, Thomas, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 410 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-667-2009

Bagci, Shawn E., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Trevino, Julia B., MD 2930 11th Ave. Evans, CO 80620......................970-353-9403

Reynolds, Kara L., PA-C 2010 16th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631....................970-378-4475

Nelson, Brian, MD 1925 W. Mountain View Ave. Longmont, CO 80501................720-494-3130

Barzdukas, Sherri A., FNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Unrein, Tanya S., FNP 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2424

Rosenblatt, Mark L., MD 2010 16th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4475

Hematology-Oncology

Boyce, Lynn, FNP 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538..................970-203-6770

Volk, John W., MD 2930 11th Avenue Evans, CO 80620......................970-353-9403

Sears, Stephen, MD 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 220 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-669-5432

Walker, Justin J., MD 2930 11th Ave. Evans, CO 80620.......................970-353-9403 Wallace, Mark E., MD 2930 11th Ave. Evans, CO 80620......................970-350-4674

Sherif, Ahmed M., MD 2010 16th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631....................970-378-4475 Strong, Lewis, MD 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 220 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-669-5432

Waugh, Kyle B., MD 6801 W. 20th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-378-8000

General Dentistry

Wilson, D. Craig, MD 2520 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-356-2520

Edgren, Bradford N., DDS 3400 16th St., Bldg. 4-V Greeley, CO 80634.........970-356-5900

Young, Mark D., MD 2420 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-353-7668

Ferrara, Nicole, DDS 2975 Ginnala Dr., Ste. 100 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-663-1000

Zucker, Charles I., MD 6801 W. 20th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-378-8000

Gerken, Louis R., DDS 2800 Madison Square Dr., Ste. 1 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-7711

Gastroenterology

McIntyre, Peter A., DDS 595 Chapel Hills Dr., Ste. 105 Colorado Springs, CO 80920....719-475-2511

Abu Qwaider, Yazan A., MD 2010 16th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4475 Ciarvella, Amber S., PA-C 2010 16th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4475 Compton, Rand, MD 3702 Timberline Rd., Bldg. A Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-207-9773 Dunphy, Rebecca, MD 3702 Timberline Rd., Bldg. A Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-207-9773

Mioduski Jr., Ted, DDS 2975 Ginnala Dr., Ste. 100 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-663-1000 Mioduski III, Theodore, DDS 2975 Ginnala Dr., Ste. 100 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-663-1000

Geriatric Medicine Al-Adsani, Wasl, DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

DeWall, Debra A., PA-C 1675 18th Ave., Ste. 3 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-347-5780

Brower, Tina C., FNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Kemme, Douglas J., MD 1675 18th Ave., Ste. 3 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-347-5780

Chen, Edward, DO* 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-6770

Lininger, Thomas R., MD 1675 18th Ave., Ste. 3 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-347-5780

Cramer, Shane E., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

McFarland, Ross W., MD 2315 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 110 Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-212-7600

Demeke, Tesfaye, MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Medgyesy, Diana C., MD 2315 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 110 Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-212-7600

Emerson, Barbara L., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Moore, James C., MD 2315 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 110 Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-212-7600

Floyd, Chelsea L., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-378-4529

Shelanski, Samuel A., MD* 2050 N. Boise Ave., Ste. A Loveland, CO 80538..................970-679-8941 1800 15th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-3894 Soriano, Ariel, MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-3894 2050 N. Boise Ave., Ste. A Loveland, CO 80538..................970-679-8941 Stone, Michael D., MD 1675 18th Ave., Ste. 3 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-347-5780 Stroh, Ann L., DO 2500 Rocky Mtn Ave., N MOB Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-7080 Williams-Wuch, Kerry, MD* 2050 N. Boise Ave., Ste. A Loveland, CO 80538.................970-679-8941 1800 15th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-3894

Fuller, Alexander J., FNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529 Harris, Marciann, FNP 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-6770 Hastings, Deborah L., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80620....................970-378-4529 Hipp, Naomi, MD* 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-6770 1627 E. 18th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-6770 Huang, Christine Y., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80620....................970-378-4529 Kalfon, Barry L., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80620....................970-378-4529

Durkan, Mark, MD 3702 Timberline Rd., Bldg. A Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-207-9773

Gynecology

Holland, Rodney, MD 3702 Timberline Rd., Bldg. A Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-207-9773

Burke, Robert, MD 2500 Rocky Mtn Ave., Ste. 150 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-493-7442

Kading, Steven O., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2470

Burket, Charles R., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2403

Knuthson, Amber S., PA-C 2010 16th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4475

Carter, Susan D., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. 220 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-353-1335

Hospitalist

Marino, Edward L., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Langer, Daniel, MD 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 220 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-669-5432

Crane, John, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 410 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-667-2009

Asadi, Shahram, DO 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538..................970-203-6770

Matarrese McGibbon, Lia, DO 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-6770

38

Hospice & Palliative Care Allen, David, MD 305 Carpenter Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525....970-663-3500

Loecke, Steven W., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529 Loftin, Andrew A., PA-C 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Mills, Angela Marie, MD* 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-6770 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529 Norman, Edward A., MD* 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-6770 1627 E. 18th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-613-4755

Barker, Lance E., DO 100 S. Cherry Ave. Unit 1 Eaton, CO 80615.......................970-454-3838

Weissmann, Colleen, MD 2923 Ginnala Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6660

Valasek, Patti, CNM 1647 18th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-663-9523

Berntsen, Mark F., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2438

Zenk, Daniel R., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2438

Von Nieda, Heidi, CNM 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 300 & 410 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-667-2009

Cash, Robert L., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2438

Licensed Professional Neonatal Medicine Counselor Barrett, Wendelyn M., NNP

Pearson, Antony C., MD* 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-6770

Christiansen, Dana L., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2438

Powell, Mary E., FNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Corcoran-Kelly, Susan M., MD 2001 70th Ave. Ste. 110 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4155

O’Shea, Linda M., MA 8213 W. 20th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-346-9057

Reinhardt, Marcus R., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Cuervo, Julia, MD 2923 Ginnala Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6660

Medical Oncology

Tallman, Marsha H., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Doro, Danielle L., MD 2010 16th St., Ste. C Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-5660

Theuerkorn, Linda S., FNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Ebens, John B., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2438

Tucker, Douglas A., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Garcia, Giovanna M., MD 2010 16th St., Ste. C Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-5660

Valin, James P., MD* 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-6770

Honea, Bertrand, MD 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-593-6099

Waddell, Martha M., MD* 2000 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-6770 1627 E. 18th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-613-4755

Kalt, Steven M., MD 222 Johnstown Center Dr. Johnstown, CO 80631................970-587-4974

Zhang, Shu, MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529

Infectious Diseases Breen, John F., MD* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6360 Cobb, David, MD 2121 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 380 Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-224-0429 Liao Ong, Jacob, MD 2121 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 380 Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-224-0429 Peskind, Robert, MD 2121 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 380 Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-224-0429

Internal Medicine Asadi, Shahram D., DO 4401A Union St. Johnstown, CO 80534...............970-619-3400

Keefe, Kevin, DO 2923 Ginnala Dr. Loveland, CO 80538..................970-669-6660 Khera, Sukhjinder K., MD 1107 S. Lemay Ave., Ste. 202 Fort Collins, CO 80524..............970-495-7410 Lopez Jr., William W., MD 2500 Rocky Mtn Ave. N MOB Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-7050

Carver, Laura J., LPC 1019 39th Ave. Ste. D Greeley, CO 80634....................970-624-0420

Cipperly, Vaughan R., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-3894 Garrison, Mitzi A., FNP 1800 15th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-3894 Sabol, Phyllis J., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-3894 Shelanski, Samuel A., MD* 2050 N. Boise Ave., Ste. A Loveland, CO 80538..................970-679-8941 1800 15th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-3894 Soriano, Ariel F., MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631....................970-378-3894 2050 N. Boise Ave., Ste. A Loveland, CO 80538.................970-679-8941 Williams-Wuch, Kerry Jean, MD* 2050 N. Boise Ave., Ste. A Loveland, CO 80538..................970-679-8941 1800 15th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-3894

1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6585 Benjamin, Kathleen M., NNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6585 Box, Judith A., NNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6585 Evans, Ruth Ann, NNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-4659 Gibbs, Michelle D., NNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6585 Gills, Mary B., NNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-6585 Harris, Stacy R., NNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6585 Howald, Kimberly Anne, NNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6585 McCarney, Linda D., NNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6585 Musick, Melda Beth, NNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6585

Nephrology

Midwife

Ahuja, Nilesh H. MD* 1600 Specht Point Rd., Ste. 127 Fort Collins, CO 80525....970-493-7733

Randle, Michael T., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2438

Davidson, Linda, CNM 1647 18th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-663-9523

Holler, Pamela, NP 1600 Specht Point Rd., Ste. 127 Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-7733

Smith, Peter, MD 2923 Ginnala Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6660

Dean, Cynthia, CNM 1647 18th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-663-9523

Merritt, Jason Lee, MD* 1600 Specht Point Rd., Ste. 127 Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-7733

Stadnyk, Sheldon G., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6639

Foose, Keiko Marie, CNM 1715 61st Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-336-1500

Muelken, Kevin D., MD* 1600 Specht Point Rd., Ste. 127 Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-7733

Tello, Robert, MD 2923 Ginnala Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6660

Komorowski, Janelle, CNM 1647 18th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-663-9523

Rademacher, Donald R., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2438

Webster, Douglas, MD 2923 Ginnala Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6660

O’Leary, Krista N., CNM 1715 61st Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-336-1500

Simmons, Richard E., MD* 1600 Specht Point Rd., Ste. 127 Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-7733

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

39


Singer, James R., MD* 1600 Specht Point Rd., Ste. 127 Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-7733

Howell, Elizabeth, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 300 & 410 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-667-2009

Teruel, Mark A., MD* 1600 Specht Point Rd., Ste. 127 Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-7733

Kiser, Rick E., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2403

Neurology Bandi, Srinivas, MD* 2923 Ginnala Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6660 Ewing, David L., MD* 7251 W. 20th St., Bldg. C Greeley, CO 80634....................970-356-3876 Hayes, Todd A., DO* 1800 15th St., Ste. 100B Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-5612 Schmitt, Joseph W., MD* 295 E. 29th St., Ste. 240 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-2668 Shaffer, William R., MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 100B Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-5612 Siegel, Jeffrey, MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 100B Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-5612 Young, Christy L., MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 100B Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-5612

Obstetrics/Gynecology (OB/GYN) Abbott, Stewart M., MD 1715 61st Ave. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-336-1500 Allen, Neil H., MD 2410 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-6353 Berdahl, Laurie D., MD 2410 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-6353

O’Neal, Jean-Pierre, MD 2410 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-6353 Plotnick, Michael I., MD 1715 61st Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-336-1500 Revoal, Alana M., DO 2410 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-6353 Saenz, Suzanne, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 300 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-667-2009 Slack, Kenneth, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 300 & 410 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-667-2009 Sokolowski, Irene, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 300 & 410 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-667-2009 Stoltz, Michelle C., MD 2410 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-6353

Ophthalmology Adams, John C., MD 1701 61st Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-351-6216 Carter II, Douglas B., MD 1931 65th Ave., Ste. C Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-1877 Cecil, Jennifer, MD 2902 Ginnala Dr., Ste. 1 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-8998 Crews, Kent R., MD 1725 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-221-2222

Tucker, Cynthia, MD 9351 Grant St., Ste. 560 Thorton, CO 80229...................303-586-5001

Crews, Michael J., MD 1701 61st Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-351-6216

Occupational Medicine

Foe, Elaine V., MD 1931 65th Ave., Ste. C Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-1877

Brogmus, Donna, MD, MPH 1703 E. 18th St., Ste. 4 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-278-4580 Chimonas, Marc-Andre, MD 1600 Specht Point Rd., Ste. 115 Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-672-5100

Jeng, Samuel M., MD 1616 15th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-352-6688 Kirk, John D., MD 3650 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-1107

Beard, David, MD 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-663-3975 Benz, Robert, MD 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-663-3975 Biggs, William, MD 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-663-3975 Browne, Deborah (DJ), PA-C 5285 McWhinney Blvd., Ste. 145 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-8881 Bussey, Randy M., MD 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-348-0020 Chamberlain, Satoru, MD 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525....970-493-0112 Clark, C. Dana, MD 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-663-3975 Crawford, Matthew, PA-C 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-493-0112 Dhupar, Scott K., MD 6200 W. 9th St., Ste. 1-B Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-353-5959

Cook, Guy L., DO 1517 16th Avenue Ct. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-6810

Prochoda, Michael, MD 555 Prospect Rd. Estes Park, CO 80517...............970-577-4408

Frisbie, Ken, PA-C* 1517 16th Avenue Ct. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6810

Uyemura, Matthew J., MD 1616 15th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-352-6688

Garza, Phillip G., MD 2410 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-352-6353

Hebard, James, MD, MPH* 1703 E. 18th St., Ste. 4 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-278-4580 1517 16th Avenue Ct. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6810

Weeks, Jeffrey B., MD 1931 65th Ave., Ste. C Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-1877

Hiratzka, Paul S., MD 2410 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-6353

Smith, Cathy D., MD 1517 16th Avenue Ct. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-6810

Astley, Scott M., PA-C 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-348-0020

Grant, Michael, MD 4795 Larimer Pkwy. Johnstown, CO 80534...............970-669-8881

Hofmeister, Jennifer, PA-C 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 300 & 410 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-667-2009

White, Jr., Robert W., MD 1517 16th Avenue Ct. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6810

Baer, Robert, MD 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-0112

Grey, Sean, MD 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-0112

Elkington, Kenneth, MD 1600 23rd Ave. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-356-2424 Franco, Jonathan, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 300 & 410 Loveland, CO 80538..................970-667-2009

40

Orthopedics

Donner, Edward, MD 5285 McWhinney Blvd., Ste. 145 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-8881 Driscoll, Kathryn, PA-C 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538..................970-663-3975 Durbin, Mark, MD 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525....970-493-0112

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Palliative Care

Grossnickle, Mark D., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2427

Pettine, Kenneth, MD 4795 Larimer Pkwy. Johnstown, CO 80534.....970-669-8881

Hale, Riley W., MD 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-348-0020

Remley, Michelle L., PA-C 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-348-0020

Hartman, Ryan, MD 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-663-3975

Rusnak, Michael, MD 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-0112

Heaston, Daniel R., MD 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-348-0020

Sanderford, Kelly R., MD 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-348-0020

Hoffman, Brian, PA-C 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-493-0112

Seiler, Steven J., MD 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-663-3975

Houghton, Michael, MD 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-0112

Sides, Steven D., MD 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-348-0020

Hunter, Brett P., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2427

Synder, Joshua T., MD 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2427

Jackson, Wesley, MD 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-663-3975

Tartaglia Jr., Louis, MD 1708 N. Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6880

Javernick, Matthew, MD 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-493-0112

Townsend, Kimberly J., PA-C 6200 W. 9th St., Ste. 1-B Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-353-5959

DeLeon, Hector, MD 2950 E. Harmony Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-207-7171

Trumper, Rocci, MD 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525....970-493-0112

Driscoll, Amy B., MD 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-313-2700

Veronie, Daniel A., PA-C 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-348-0020

Dubynsky, Orest G., MD 1601 25th Ave. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-356-2600

Wolf, Troy, PA-C 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-663-3975

Frazee, Lari L., DO 6801 W. 20th St., Ste. 201 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-350-5828

Young, Eric, MD 3830 N. Grant Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-776-3222

Harding, Amanda L., MD 6801 W. 20th St., Ste. 201 Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-350-5828

Jacob, Joseph P., MD* 1437 N. Denver Ave. Loveland, CO 80537..................970-290-7992 4401A Union St. Johnstown, CO 80534....970-619-3400

Zabler, Lance R., FNP 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-348-0020

Kolanz, M. Meshelle, MD 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-313-2700

Lanig, Indira S., MD 4401A Union St. Johnstown, CO 80534....970-619-3400

Martin, Dale, MD 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-663-3975

Pain Management

Konda-Sundheim, Rachel, MD 2021 N. Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538..................970-669-3298

Lockwood, Bruce A., MD* 1300 Oakridge Dr., Ste. 130 Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-377-9555

McFerran, Mark, MD 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-663-3975

Hompland, Scott, DO 1300 Oakridge Dr., Ste. 130 Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-377-9555

Marler, McKay, MD 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 130 Loveland, CO 80537...................970-663-5437

Nieves, Ricardo, MD 1437 Riverside Ave. Fort Collins, CO 80524..............970-692-5550

McRae, Nancy, PA-C 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-493-0112

Morrow, Kenyon S., MD 1023 39th Ave., Ste. L Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-7366

Mead, Andrea, MD 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 130 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-663-5437

Pouliot, Matthew, DO 3810 N. Grant Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-8881

Nettles, Ryan J., PA-C 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-348-0020

Sigler, James D., MD 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 114 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-392-5455

Moore, Christopher P., MD 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-313-2700

Reichhardt, Gregory, MD* 2001 70th Ave., Ste. 205 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-392-2490

Pazik, Thomas J., MD 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-348-0020

Wagner, Jan Gillepie, MD 1175 58th Ave., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-495-0444

Norman, Jennifer, MD 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 130 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-663-5437

van den Hoven, Raymond, MD* 2500 E. Prospect Rd Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-493-0112

Kennedy, Amy, PA-C 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-493-0112 Kieger, Arthur, MD 2318 S. County Rd. 9 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-667-2901 Kindsfater, Kirk, MD 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525....970-493-0112 Kraemer, Jason, PA-C 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-493-0112 Lehman, Dale, PA-C 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-663-3975

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

Fried, Robert A., MD* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4529 Mayer, Patricia Ann, MD 2726 W. 11th Street Rd., Greeley, CO 80634....................970-475-0040 Ringel, Marc A., MD 2400 W. Edison Brush, CO 80723......................970-842-6262 Theuerkorn, Linda, FNP* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-378-4529

Pediatrics Brown, Bridget, MD 2555 E. 13th Street, Ste. 130 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-663-5437 Bruce, Robert, MD 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 130 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-663-5437 Deen, L. Thomas, PA-C 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-313-2700

Patrick, Jenny, MD 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 130 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-663-5437 Pedersen, Robert L., MD 5881 W. 18th St., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80634....................970-313-2700 Quintana, Michael, MD 2021 N. Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-3298 Rosckowff, Carol M., MD 1601 25th Ave. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-356-2600 Ryan, Joseph P., MD 5881 W. 16th St. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-313-2700 Sando, James M., MD 6801 W. 20th St., Ste. 201 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-350-5828 Teruel, Katherine, MD 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 130 Loveland, CO 80537..................970-663-5437 Ward, Michelle, MD 4901 Thompson Pkwy. Loveland, CO 80534.................970-207-7171

Pediatric-Allergy Murthy, Krishna C., MD 1130 38th Ave., Ste. 2 Greeley, CO 80634.........970-221-2370

Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Bender, John D., DO* 1300 Oakridge Dr., Ste. 130 Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-377-9555

41


Podiatric Medicine & Surgery Atherton, Stacy M., DPM* 1305 Sumner St., Ste. 200 Longmont, CO 80501................303-772-3232 1931 65th Ave., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80634....................970-351-0900 Atwood, Thomas C., DPM 2122 9th St., Ste. 3 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-353-5800 Burns, Michael, DPM 2001 S. Shields St., Bldg. F Fort Collins, CO 80526..............970-493-4660 Hatch, Daniel J., DPM 1931 65th Ave., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80634....................970-351-0900 Hecker, Thomas, DPM 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-0112 Hunt, Nathan, DPM 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-663-3975 Knutsen, Chad M., DPM 3850 N. Grant Ave., Ste. 130 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-667-0769 Schulte, Robert, DPM 3850 N. Grant Ave., Ste. 130 Loveland, CO 80538..................970-667-0769 Schultz, Peter D., DPM 1440 Boise Ave. Loveland, CO 80538..................970-278-1440 Vaardahl, Michael D., DPM* 1931 65th Ave., Ste. A Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-351-0900 Webb, Emily H., DPM 1927 Wilmington Dr., Ste. 102 Fort Collins, CO 80528...970-416-9009

Psychiatry-Child Al-Adsani, Patricia M., MD 1300 Main St. Windsor, CO 80550....................970-336-4925

Psychology Barr, Thomas J., PhD 1800 15th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4433 Bromley, Susan P., PSYD 1750 25th Ave., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-353-3373 Bruns, Daniel L., PSYD 1610 29th Avenue Pl., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-352-8311 Derk, Jane E., PhD 3400 16th St., Ste. 5 YY Greeley, CO 80526....................970-351-6406

42

Norton, Carol C., EDD 1750 25th Ave., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-351-6688

Garrison, Mitzi, NP 1801 16th Street Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6650

Jess, Sarah Jane, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Smith, Marilee A., PSYD 1750 25th Ave., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-351-6688

Radiology

Johnson, Paul, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Thwaites, Gregory A., PhD* 2001 70th Ave., Ste. 205 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-392-2190

Pulmonary Disease

Bauerle, Gary W., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6860 Berkowitz, Bruce, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Dial, Danielle M., ACNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-392-2026

Bodenhamer, John, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Fitzgerald, David J., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-392-2026

Contreras, Jaime, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Janata, Kelli R., DO 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-392-2026

Cook, Philip S., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6860

Janata, Robert J., DO* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-392-2026

Craven, Winfield, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Kukafka, David S., MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 220 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-2120 Nallamothu, Ravindra, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 220 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-203-2120 Shedd, Michael W., MD* 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-392-2026

Desruisseau, Richard, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Dunphy, Thomas, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Esola, Christine, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Radiation Oncology

Fleener, Christopher, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Bertone-Kellogg, Kathleen, FNP 1801 16th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4433

Florant, Tracy, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Ceilley, Elizabeth A., MD* 2050 N. Boise Ave., Ste. B Loveland, CO 80538.................970-679-8900 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6680

Fuller, Samuel, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Ehrman, Sheryl L., FNP* 2050 N. Boise Ave., Ste. B Loveland, CO 80538..................970-679-8900 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6680 Fuller, Brian G., MD* 2050 N. Boise Ave., Ste. B Loveland, CO 80538.................970-679-8900 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-679-8900 Gale, Pamola, S., FNP* 2050 N. Boise Ave., Ste. B Loveland, CO 80538.................970-679-8900 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6680

Geis, John, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Geraghty, Michael, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Koplyay, Peter, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Kreider, Dan F., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6860 Markel, Curtis, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Mills, Andrew, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Pacini, Richard, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Paquelet, Jean, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Peck, Steven, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Peet, Gary, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Quickert, Timo M., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6860 Reese, Mark, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Ruderman, Richard, MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-6860 Weinstein, Stanley, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Weissmann, Jeffrey, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757 Wiedeman, Marjorie M., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631....................970-350-6860

Gunderson, Deborah, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Sports Medicine

Harris, John P., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6860

Anderson, Thomas, DO 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538......970-663-3975

Hayes, Amy, MD 2008 Caribou Dr. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-484-4757

Ross, Vincent, MD 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-0112

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Sachtleben, Thomas, MD 3470 E. 15th St. Loveland, CO 80538.......970-663-3975

Collins, Jerome, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 420 Loveland, CO 80538..................970-669-3212

Wirt, Timothy C., MD* 1313 Riverside Ave. Fort Collins, CO 80524....970-493-1292

Schenkenberg, Amy E., MD 2001 70th Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-378-4155

Yemm, Stephen, MD 2500 E. Prospect Rd. Fort Collins, CO 80525...970-493-0112

Ehrman, Donovan V., FNP 1800 15th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-352-8216

Surgery-Oral & Maxillofacial

Young, Linda, MD 2001 70th Ave. Greeley, CO 80634....................970-378-4155

Young, Linda E., MD 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 101 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-348-0020

Garber, Rebecca, FNP 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6301

Bley, Justin C., DMD 1707 61st Ave., Ste. 102 Greeley, CO 80634.....................970-506-0350

Urology

Surgery-Assistant

Goodwin, Cleon W., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6301

Coburn, Thomas, MD 3810 N. Grant Ave. Loveland, CO 80538..................970-669-8881 Finnegan, Patrick, MD 1925 W. Mountain View Rd. Longmont, CO 80525................970-776-1234

Surgery-Bariatric Johnell, Michael W., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631....................970-378-4433 Martinkus, Karolyn R., PA-C 1800 15th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4433 Toth Stephen W., PA-C 1800 15th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4433

Surgery-Cardiothoracic & Vascular Bruce, Todd, PA-C* 1800 15th St., Ste. 340 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4593 Jensen, Keith C., PA-C* 1800 15th St., Ste. 340 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4593 Lyons, Jr., Maurice I., DO* 1800 15th St., Ste. 340 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-378-4593

Harkabus, Michael A., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-352-8216 Keeler, Bradford, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 420 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-3212 Ogren, Jason W., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631....................970-352-8216

Mellin, Richard W., MD 3400 16th St., Bldg.1S, Ste. A Greeley, CO 80634....................970-353-5826 Nicholas, Kenton C., DDS 1900 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-2458 Owen, Zachary, DDS 2998 Ginnala Dr. Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-4802 Zulian, Michael, DDS 2800 Madison Square Dr., Ste. 2 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-6850

Manion, Sean, MD 1925 W. Mountain View Ave. Longmont, CO 80501................303-776-1234 Ripoll, Emilia A., MD* 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 106 Greeley, CO 80634....................970-378-1000

Surgery-Plastic

Saltz, Samuel L., DO 1800 15th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-352-8216

Boustred, Allister, MD 2315 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 160 Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-493-8800

Schmidovรก, Karin, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 420 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-3212

Brewster, Amy, MD 2020 Lowe St., Ste. 202 Fort Collins, CO 80525..............970-266-0456

Wolach, James W., MD* 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 106 Greeley, CO 80634.........970-378-1000 1813 Cheyenne Ave Loveland, CO 80538.......970-378-1000

Tyburczy, Joseph A., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631....................970-352-8216

Chapman, Jeffrey, MD 2315 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 160 Fort Collins, CO 80528 ...............970-493-8800

Wound Care Services

Vickerman, Robert P., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-352-8216

Gonyon, Jr., Denis L., MD* 4450 Union St., Ste. 100 Johnstown, CO 80534................970-624-7979

Surgery-Neuro

Schutte, Warren P., MD* 2500 Rocky Mtn Ave., Ste. 2130 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-372-2310

Beltz, Janet M., FNP* 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 210 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-635-4059 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6071

Blatt, David R., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. 130 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-5996

Tsoi, Christopher, MD 2315 E. Harmony Rd., Ste. 160 Fort Collins, CO 80528..............970-493-8800

Urgent Care

Nedom, Jessica S., FNP 1313 Riverside Ave. Fort Collins, CO 80524..............970-493-1292

Beck, Susan, MD 2555 E. 13th St., Ste. 110 Loveland, CO 80538..................970-461-6140

Surgery-General

Stobbe, Kai F., PA-C 1800 15th St., Ste. 130 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-5996

Harms, Thomas L., MD 2001 70th Ave. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-378-4155

Blomquist, Thomas, MD 1900 N. Boise Ave., Ste. 420 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-669-3212

Turner, Donn M., MD* 1313 Riverside Ave. Fort Collins, CO 80524...970-493-1292

Mercer, Jeannette 2555 E. 13th St., Ste.110 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-461-6140

Cockrell, Gail Y., MD 1801 16th St. Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-6301

Wieder, Brian, MD 1800 15th St., Ste. 130 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-350-5996

Milano, William 2555 E. 13th St., Ste.110 Loveland, CO 80538.................970-461-6140

Tullis, Gene E., MD* 1800 15th St., Ste. 340 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-378-4593

Malcom, Troy, DO 1925 W. Mountain View Ave. Longmont, CO 80501.................303-776-1234

Roeder, Tenley J., FNP 1800 15th St., Ste. 200 Greeley, CO 80631.....................970-352-8216

Coester, Hans C., MD 1107 S. Lemay, Ste. 240 Fort Collins, CO 80524..............970-495-7421

Richards, Kenneth M., MD 1800 15th St., Ste. 340 Greeley, CO 80631.........970-378-4593

Crylen, Curtis E., MD* 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 106 Greeley, CO 80634.........970-378-1000 1813 Cheyenne Ave Loveland, CO 80538.......970-378-1000

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

Ritsema, David F., MD* 5890 W. 13th St., Ste. 106 Greeley, CO 80634.........970-378-1000

The medical health professional list has been provided by McKee Medical Center and North Colorado Medical Center. This Medical Directory is current as of 12/14/2012. * These health professionals belong to the medical staffs at both McKee Medical Center in Loveland and North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley. Bold lettering indicates more information is available in ads.

43


medical

collaborative care

collaboration means

Sherrilyn Lorenz, nurse practitioner, examines one of the residents at Good Samaritan’s Bonell Community.

healthier, happier seniors By Heidi Kerr-Schlaefer

Sometimes providing the best possible healthcare means collaboration and cooperation, and that is exactly what is happening in Greeley.

44

The residents of Good Samaritan Society’s Bonell Community have a lot of people looking out for them, and now they have one more, thanks to a new relationship between Bonell and Banner Health. Sherrilyn Lorenz, a family nurse practitioner and employee of Banner Health Clinic specializing in Internal Medicine, has been working full time at Bonell since June. Several things prompted this unusual arrangement, but the most important was a desire to lower readmission rates from Bonell to North Colorado Medical Center. Traditionally, residents at Bonell were treated

by a few doctors locally, as well as doctors from the Denver area. The process lacked cohesiveness and there were communication difficulties. Often, if a resident experienced a medical problem and the doctor wasn’t available to perform an onsite evaluation, the doctor inevitably ordered the patient to be sent to the hospital. Even if the issue didn’t necessarily merit hospitalization, the doctor had no way of knowing this, so a trip to the emergency room seemed to be the safest solution. “This wasn’t cost effective and it’s just not good medical care, so Bonell approached North

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


I get to develop relationships with the nursing staff. They know me and what I’m able to do here. It’s that communication piece that’s so important. We can talk about what’s working for a patient and what’s not working. It’s about building trust between me and the staff and me and the patients. - Sherrilyn Lorenz, Nurse Practitioner, NCMC

Colorado Medical Center and asked how we could establish a better relationship and get better onsite care to prevent residents from being sent unnecessarily to the hospital,” says Steven Kalt, M.D. The result was an arrangement between NCMC, Bonell and Banner Health Clinic. Two managing physicians, Dr. Kalt and Dr. Giovanna Garcia, would coordinate the medical care at Bonell with Lorenz, and thereby help establish and maintain continuity and communication with the hospital. One of the two physicians visits Bonell every Wednesday to do patient care conferences and conduct patient reviews with Lorenz. The doctors remain in contact with Lorenz throughout the week, and are available to answer any questions or concerns that may arise. In addition to long-term care, this new arrangement also affects Bonell’s subacute care unit, Star Care. Subacute care is 24-hour nursing care for those individuals rehabilitating and recovering from hospitalization due to surgery, injury or illness. Today, if a person is ready to be discharged from NCMC, but they aren’t ready to return home, they often come to Star Care, where a stay can last from a few days to weeks. “We help with the transition piece from the

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

45


Lorenz consults with Dr. Steven Kalt regarding the care of one of Bonell’s residents.

hospital to Star Care. We continue whatever the plan of action was and we’re poised to handle things here because we have a practitioner onsite,” says Dr. Kalt. “We can do a lot of things onsite. We can order X-rays, do lab work – we can provide a lot of medical care without sending them back into the hospital.” In the past, residents of Bonell may have ended up in the hospital for a variety of reasons, but one common diagnosis was “altered mental state.” An altered mental state in an elderly person can be triggered by many different things, but is frequently caused by a urinary tract infection. “Having worked in the emergency room at McKee, I saw many elderly patients come in with an ‘altered mental state’ and often it was from a urinary tract infection,” affirms Lorenz. Today, Lorenz is able to test and treat urinary tract infections at Bonell, thereby preventing the patient from having to make a needless trip to the hospital because of symptoms caused by an undiagnosed infection. Lorenz gave another example of how this arrangement is keeping residents in their home at Bonell and out of the hospital. Recently, a resident exhibited coughing and shortness of breath. A chest X-ray showed pneumonia; however, the staff was able to treat her with antibiotics and cough medicine. “She’s improved greatly,” says Lorenz. “In the past, this patient probably would have been admitted to the hospital, but we were able to

46

keep her on campus, which is good because she has dementia and would not have done well in a hospital setting.” There are approximately 70 long-term care residents at Bonell and 12 to 18 patients in Star Care. On a typical day, Lorenz makes her rounds, reviews labs, keeps track of the residents due for their annual exam and coordinates care. “Being onsite, I get to develop relationships with the nursing staff. They know me and what I’m able to do here. It’s that communication piece that’s so important. We can talk about what’s working for a patient and what’s not working. It’s about building trust between me and the staff and me and the patients,” says Lorenz. This continuity of care also provides great comfort to the families of residents, and it can provide a feeling of security when it comes to end-of-life issues, a frequent subject in a longterm care facility. Dr. Kalt and Lorenz find it is much easier to discuss end-of-life issues, such as the wants and desires of the patient, at their Bonell home rather than at the hospital during an emergency situation. “With Lorenz here on a day-to-day basis, quality-of-life issues and end-of-life issues can be discussed and dealt with appropriately,” says Dr. Kalt. Lowering readmission rates to the hospital is important for two big reasons; first, it keeps costs down and second, from a medical standpoint, it is better for the patient. But these two things aren’t independent from one another. In

this case, better medical outcomes are keeping costs down. How is this possible? Under this arrangement there is faster initiation of care which decreases the severity of the medical problem resulting in cost savings. It’s a win/ win/win for the patient, long-term care facility and hospital. “If someone is hospitalized and 10 days later they need to be readmitted, it’s not being reimbursed by Medicare,” explains Dr. Kalt. “So there’s real incentive to take care of people outside of the hospital because if they get readmitted, the hospital is eating that cost.” Keeping Bonell residents or Star Care patients out of the hospital is also beneficial for their overall well-being. Many elderly patients become confused and agitated in a hospital setting. “They are much better off being able to stay here unless there’s an extreme situation,” says Lorenz. This collaboration between Banner Health and Good Samaritan is unusual, but the numbers don’t lie. Since the arrangement began, readmission rates have plummeted. However, it is not only lowering readmission rates, it is providing more efficient and effective medical care for seniors in Northern Colorado. Heidi Kerr-Schlaefer is a freelance writer & journalist. She is also the Mayor of HeidiTown.com, the place for Colorado festival, event & travel information.

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

47


48

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

49


50

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


MEDICAL

cardiac care

heart help

Drs. Shane Rowan and Arnold Pfahnl, cardiac electrophysiologists at the CardioVascular Institute of North Colorado, treat patients with heart arrhythmias with state-ofthe-art procedures.

through electrophysiology By Kay Rios

While a broken heart may take a long time to heal, a malfunctioning one can most likely be addressed in much less time thanks to the work of electrophysiologists.

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

“This is one of the few areas in medicine where we can cure a problem and not just treat it,” says Shane Rowan, M.D., electrophysiologist at the CardioVascular Institute of North Colorado. Cardiac electrophysiologists evaluate and manage patients who have a malfunctioning electrical system in their heart, including both slow rhythms (bradycardias) and fast rhythms (tachycardias). In this subspecialty of cardiology, electrophysiologists are trained in the mechanisms, functions and performance of the heart’s electrical activities. They offer medications, catheter-based procedures (ablation) and surgery to treat cardiac arrhythmias including atrial fibrillation (AF). The patients these doctors see can suffer from a range of concerns. “We deal with all sorts of situations from nuisance disorders to life-threatening ones,” says Arnold E. Pfahnl, M.D., Ph.D., and electrophysiologist at the North Colorado

Medical Center-based CardioVascular Institute. “Our patients range from young, healthy kids to the sickest of patients.” The heart’s internal electrical system controls the rate and rhythm of a heartbeat. With each beat, an electrical signal moves from the top of the heart to the bottom, causing the heart to contract and pump blood. The signal coordinates the timing of heart cell activity. The heart’s atria, the two upper chambers, contract and pump blood into the ventricles, the two lower chambers, which then contract and pump blood to the rest of the body. The heartbeat is created by a complex electrical system that synchronizes the contraction of the atria and ventricles. A problem with any part of this system can cause an arrhythmia. While most arrhythmias are harmless, some can be serious. “Think of it like a house with four rooms and

51


new EP lab at the CardioVascular Institute By Kay Rios

Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators can help regulate irregular heartbeats by delivering low energy pulses to return the heart to normal function.

a wiring system,” says Dr. Rowan. “Some people have a short circuit.” There are different ways of dealing with arrhythmias, Dr. Pfahnl adds. “We may use medications, ablation, pacemakers or implantable cardioverterdefibrillators (ICD).” “Each is a solution to a different problem,” Dr. Rowan explains. With cardiac ablation, catheters are typically used and inserted through a vein that is threaded from the groin to the heart. “It’s like looking for that short circuit in the house,” he says. “We find it and then cut off the short circuit. Ablation prevents abnormal electrical signals from traveling through your heart.” As in the house, the wiring system might be frayed. This becomes more common as people age, and a replacement part might be required. ICDs use electrical pulses or shocks to treat lifethreatening arrhythmias that occur in the ventricles. In this case, the arrhythmia is addressed with an electric shock to the heart (defibrillation). Although the idea of defibrillation in the public’s eye may be of those large paddles with electrical currents and the doctor calling “clear” as he prepares to zap the patient’s chest, newer technology is much smaller. The ICD is a small surgically-implanted device with wires and electrodes that connect to the heart chambers. The ICD monitors the heart’s rhythm and, if it detects an abnormally fast rhythm, a shock is delivered to restore a normal heart rhythm. The ICD can also be programmed to deliver rapid low energy pulses prior to a shock to treat a rapid heart rhythm painlessly. The pacemaker is similar to the ICD in shape

52

and is placed in a similar position in the chest but there are differences. It’s much smaller and uses electrical pulses that prompt the heart to beat at a normal rate. It can relieve the symptoms of slow heart rates such as fatigue or fainting, and can help the patient return to a more active lifestyle. Pacemakers only give off only low-energy electrical pulses and are used to treat less dangerous heart rhythms, such as those that occur in the upper chambers of your heart. All new ICDs act as both pacemakers and defibrillators. Electrophysiologists like Dr. Rowan and Dr. Pfahnl are trained to look at all the options. In fact, training to become an electrophysiologist requires seven to eight years of specialty training after medical school. “What we do is a young field,” Dr. Rowan says. “Ten years ago, they weren’t doing what we do now. Atrial fibrillation was thought to be impossible to address. That’s not the case anymore.” Improved technology has helped make the treatment more effective, Dr. Pfahnl says. “There was basic mapping of the heart for years but it was one-dimensional. It is now a very sophisticated system where we are plotting the picture and doing real time measurements.” He adds that cryoablation is a newer development. “It freezes tissue rather than using heat technology. We’re about to get that system here. It’s just one more way we can serve our patients more effectively.” Kay Rios, Ph.D., is a freelance writer from Fort Collins.

Located within North Colorado Medical Center (NCMC), the CardioVascular Institute of North Colorado already offers diagnosis and treatment of arrhythmias but with a newly reconfigured lab, scheduled to open in February 2013, that’s about to take a giant step forward. The lab has been reconfigured for efficiency: walls have been removed and much of the equipment will be off the floor or in the ceiling where it is more easily accessed. “We’ll have more options than we’ve had before in terms of looking at the heart and doing the work we currently do,” says Arnold E. Pfahnl, M.D., Ph.D., eletrophysiologist at the Institute. “One new tool we’ll get is a three-dimensional catheter guidance system. Ablation catheters are standard tools for what we do and this helps with the placement of those catheters. It creates a three-dimensional, real time picture of the chambers of the heart.” “This allows us to create a more precise map that will help guide us to more difficult spots,” adds Shane Rowan, M.D., electrophysiologist at the Institute. “We can address rhythm issues very specifically.” Another introduction to the lab is that of cyroablation, which is a therapy using the removal of heat from tissue to treat arrhythmias rather than introducing heat. Normal electrical conduction is restored through freezing the cardiac tissue or pathways interfering with the heart’s normal electrical impulses. That will be added to the new lab by the end of 2012. The new lab will include a “biplane” system with two X-ray sources. Biplane labs provide two separate planes of view with the same injection, saving time and limiting the contrast dye, so that the potential for kidney damage in susceptible patients is minimized. The new system will also allow physicians to obtain three-dimensional X-ray images of specific chambers in the heart, similar to a cat-scan. “It uses a very low dose of radiation, so it’s safer for us and for the patient,” Dr. Rowan says. Dr. Pfahnl says that the new set-up will feature a 56-inch monitor that will allow for better physician viewing. “We look at a lot of information at the same time. There are currently six computers and nine monitors we look at but with the new set up, we’ll have everything integrated on one big screen and we can divide it into sections, for example, we can see the three-dimensional mapping on one portion and ultrasound on another.” “It’s all the different ways of looking at the heart at the same time,” Dr. Rowan explains. It is definitely a move forward, Dr. Pfahnl says. “We currently spend a lot of time servicing the technology. This allows us to go from servicing the technology to servicing the patient.”

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

53


medical

emergency care

Marilyn Fain, RN and director of Emergency Services, and Ani Matt, RN and SANE program coordinator, have received specialized training to help treat victims of sexual assault at NCMC.

nurse examiner team helps

victims of sexual assault By Laura Sebastian

Every 152 seconds a sexual assault crime occurs in the United States. Historically, medical personnel in the local emergency room attended the victims of these crimes, personnel who weren’t specifically trained to handle the unique emotional and physical trauma faced by victims. Now, by implementing the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) program at North Colorado Medical Center (NCMC), a forensic nursing team is improving care for these patients.

Today there are 730 SANE teams in the United States, 55 in Canada and, with the addition of the new team at NCMC, 18 in Colorado. But the spread of SANE began slowly. The first team was organized in 1976 in Memphis, Tenn., by a group of nurses who saw the inadequate and often poor treatment victims of sexual assault received in the busy emergency room environment, an environment where nurses would have to stop and read the instructions on how to administer a rape kit while the victim waited, often for such long periods that they would simply leave before getting help. The Memphis nurses recognized that a sexual assault victim presents with far more complex issues than those of the average emergency room patient, issues not only physical, but also emotional, as well as those needing prompt care due to long-term health risks when considerations of sexually transmitted disease and potential pregnancy were thrown into the mix. With the advent of SANE teams, victims began receiving immediate treatment in the ER, expert administering of rape kits and collection of evidence, and, perhaps most importantly, compassionate care geared to their particular trauma. The staff at NCMC had long wanted to bring this same expert care to their facility, and was able to implement the SANE program

Continued to page 64

54

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


ACTIVE SENIORS • HEALTH • ACTIVITIES • RECREATION • WELLNESS • SERVICES

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

55


medical

PULMONARY CARE

mckee adds

McKee Medical Center’s newly minted pulmonary care team: Dr. Ravi Nallamothu, Dr. David Kukafka and nurse practitioner Mike Fitzgerald.

pulmonary clinic By Angeline Grenz

McKee Medical Center is enhancing its awardwinning critical care program and state of the art Sleep Center with a new pulmonology and sleep medicine clinic on campus. Pulmonary doctors primarily focus on the care of patients with any disease or ailment of the lungs and respiratory tract. They also specialize in sleep disorders and critical care patients. At McKee’s new Banner Health Clinic, specializing in Pulmonary and Sleep Medicine, doctors treat asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancers, pulmonary hypertension, sleep disorders and more. Pulmonary doctors are also certified in critical care, and these doctors oversee the care of every patient in the Intensive Care Unit, regardless of whether they have a respiratory issue. “Anyone who gets very sick in the hospital, we

56

are involved with,” says David Kukafka, M.D. This involvement offers pulmonary doctors a wide knowledge base of other illnesses that lead to intensive care stays such as cardiac and diabetic patients. The new clinic at McKee opened its doors in September when Dr. Kukafka joined Banner Medical Group after working in the hospital for years as a physician from an independent pulmonary practice. Dr. Kukafka leads the clinic and is director of McKee’s Sleep Lab. He works closely with fellow pulmonary doctor, Ravi Nallamothu, M.D., who arrived at McKee from a Florida practice at the end of October and will serve as the medical director of McKee’s Intensive Care Unit. Dr. Nallamothu specializes in pulmonary and critical care. The two physicians are joined by nurse practitioner, Mike Fitzgerald. For the past seven years with his former practice, Dr. Kukafka had been covering patients at McKee, so he is familiar with the landscape. “I am excited to be growing the clinic here,” he says. “Banner is very progressive; they really look ahead toward how to make medicine more cost efficient yet provide quality. I am happy with what they offer as far as potential growth and support for the clinic.” In fact, Dr.

Kukafka says, plans are to expand the clinic next summer with the addition of a third doctor and more space. The new clinic has full pulmonary consultative services, sleep medicine consultative services and the accredited 19-year-old Sleep Center. The clinic also runs critical care service at McKee. Already, McKee is a top 100 critical care hospital in the U.S., according to a Healthgrades report released in October. Although McKee has full-time local critical care specialists, the care is supplemented by 24 hour eICU, where patients benefit from the added care of being monitored remotely, in addition to the care provided at the bedside. Dr Nallamothu will work to integrate evidence-based medicine and established care guidelines with new technology to keep McKee a leader in critical care medicine. While Dr. Kukafka enjoys the changing landscape of pulmonary care, he is especially drawn to sleep medicine. “I think it is the next big frontier in medicine,” he says. “People are realizing the importance of sleep and getting quality sleep. And the satisfaction that people get when they sleep better is huge.” Dr. Kukafka adds that sleep is closely tied to “cardiovascular issues, longevity, as well as

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Treatment of sleep disorders is a growing part of pulmonary medicine. Above is a variety of CPAP mask styles used to treat sleep apnea.

diabetes. And I think we are going to continue to find how important sleep really is [to our health].” Beyond sleep apnea, Dr. Kukafka treats patients with insomnia, narcolepsy, cataplexy (a condition in which intense emotions cause a sudden loss of muscle tone) and other sleep problems. He also works with pediatric sleep problems, though he will often consult with a pediatrician for care of children under the age of 12. A link between children who snore and attention deficit disorders is currently being explored by a number of sleep medicine professionals. Fitzgerald worked with Kukafka previously and says following him to McKee was an easy choice. “We have an experienced staff that has made for a very smooth transition,” says Fitzgerald. He has been a nurse practitioner in the field of pulmonary and sleep medicine for more than eight years. He works strictly within the clinic, managing the continuity of care for their patients and is particularly skilled at troubleshooting problems that patients may have with their CPAP machines, devices that help patients with sleep apnea sleep more soundly. He also helps patients with insomnia to sleep better using cognitive behavioral therapy. As science continues to explore pulmonary and sleep health challenges, Drs. Kukafka and Nallamothu look forward to advances in several areas. Within the realm of sleep medicine, Dr. Kukafka says home sleep studies will increase. Currently, about 80 percent of sleep studies are done in the lab. He predicts that that number will drop to 50 percent, with the other half of studies performed within the individual’s home. Dr. Kukafka and his team are also working to bring more lung cancer surgeries to McKee. It is an exciting time for Drs. Kukafka and Nallamothu as they lead McKee’s new pulmonary clinic. “We have great support from Banner and McKee is a gem – I am so happy to be leading the pulmonary clinic here. This is a very personable place and we are small enough that we can really provide personal care,” says Dr. Kukafka. Angeline Grenz is managing editor for Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness magazine.

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

57


medical

cancer treatment

banner’s

Medical oncologists Kerry Williams-Wuch and Samuel Shelanski are key members of the McKee Cancer Center team and round out the comprehensive Banner Health cancer treatment network in Northern Colorado.

regional cancer network By Tracee Sioux

For several years, Banner Health has been gathering forces, establishing itself as Northern Colorado’s most comprehensive, consolidated regional cancer treatment network. The health system recently hired two medical oncologists to its regional staff in order to further ensure continuity, proximity and rapidity of care for its cancer patients. 58

“Excellent cancer care requires a comprehensive team approach, and Banner is committed to building a high-quality, compassionate care team to meet the needs of our patients,” says J.P. Valin, M.D., chief medical officer for Banner Medical Group, Western Region. “In the Front Range we currently have talented and compassionate physicians specializing in radiation oncology, general surgery and palliative care that are Banner-employed. The addition of medical oncologists completes the team and allows effective collaboration for the best patient experience and outcome.” Previously, Banner Health’s medical oncologists came from private practices in the community or were employed by Banner to serve its three regional cancer centers: McKee Cancer Center at McKee Medical Center in Loveland, Cancer Institute at North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley and the David Walsh Cancer Center at Sterling Regional MedCenter in Sterling. Medical oncologist Samuel Shelanski has worked in Loveland since 2005, enjoying

privileges at McKee Medical Center. Dr. Shelanski graduated from Columbia University. For many years, he worked in private practice. Dr. Shelanski chose to accept a staff position at McKee Cancer Center because he felt too restricted by private practice. “In private practice there is a limit to what we can do,” admits Dr. Shelanski. “Banner has been willing to open their pockets to build a really top-notch cancer network. Buying a new linear accelerator is not something any private practice can pursue. A hospital system can provide much greater service to patients. Medical teams can communicate better, we can employ the same computer systems and patients can get everything they need by just going across the lobby.” Banner’s second staff oncologist, Dr. Kerry Williams-Wuch, is originally from South Africa. She earned her medical degree at the University of Witwatersrand, completed her training and went into private practice in St. Louis, Missouri. Dr. Williams-Wuch was the Medical Director of the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers Breast Cancer Center of Excellence

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


in 2011. Dr. William-Wuch left her Missouri private practice for the opportunity to build a consolidated cancer program from the ground up. “Banner’s vision is to provide consolidated cancer care with a committed, stable group of providers to the whole of Northern Colorado,” says Dr. William-Wuch. “It’s a multi-disciplined field; it’s not about the individuals, it’s about teamwork. We have all the integral parts in place to provide the best care. We have oncologists working on cutting-edge trials, down the hallway we have TrueBeam (advanced linear accelerator) technology, we have excellent radiology oncologists and incredible surgeons. We all work together on bi-weekly tumor boards. It’s essential to have the whole cancer team in one place.” Patients benefit from open communication about their treatment options between all of their care providers. In a consolidated system, the cancer team constructs a cancer treatment plan together. Each patient also has easy access to financial counselors, social workers, surgeons, nurse practitioners, radiologists, support groups, nutrition counseling, educational resources and the latest advances in technology. “It becomes like a family,” says Dr. WilliamWuch. “That’s important for patients who are going through this journey. It’s scary, frightening. They don’t know what to expect. It’s comforting to know that your cancer team is on the same page. The nurses know their names and we know their families. They walk in and the staff knows who they are. That’s what you get when you’ve got a smaller comprehensive program. Everyone – dietitians, support groups, social workers, physicians, chemo and radiation – it’s all here, in one place.” Dr. Shelanski agrees that the regional consolidated cancer care approach works best for patients, “It’s not uncommon for patients to go elsewhere for an opinion and then come back to tell us, ‘They recommended the same thing and I felt like a number.’ Our biggest advantage is that we treat people, not diseases. We know who people are, we know what is important to them and we give them care with compassion and humanity.” Dr. Shelanski is especially struck by the rapidity of treatment that Banner’s regional cancer network has been able to establish. “I trained at Columbia University; there were 1,300 beds,” notes Dr. Shelanski. “Someone would roll in the door and we thought it was fast if we got them diagnosed, biopsied and imaged within seven to 10 days. Here, I’ve seen patients come into the ER and be biopsied, imaged, diagnosed and started on treatment within 24 to 48 hours. It’s the flexibility and rapidity of having everyone here that allows us to provide far better care than people receive at name-brand institutions.” Tracee Sioux is a Northern Colorado writer and author of Love Distortion: Belle, Battered Codependent and Other Love Stories. She can be found at www.twitter.com/traceesioux and www.thegirlrevolution.com. Contact her at traceesioux@gmail.com.

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

59


medical

minimally invasive surgery

the concierge

Dr. Susan Carter provides care at NCMC’s ambulatory minimally invasive and operative robotics clinic, where patients receive extra amenities to make their outpatient procedures more comfortable.

will see you now By Michelle Venus

Going to the hospital is never fun and few experiences cause the same level of anxiety, particularly for those who are scheduled for surgery. You have to arrive several hours ahead of your scheduled surgery and park the car at the end of the lot. Then sit in a draped-off room with little privacy, often wearing a not-so-comfortable-forget-aboutbeing-even-the-tiniest-bit-attractive gown. Your family is in the waiting room while you flip through old magazines. Just the way you wanted to spend your day, right?

60

Now picture this: you pull up to the front of North Colorado Medical Center (NCMC) and a waiting valet hops into the car and parks it for you. You walk the few steps to the ambulatory minimally invasive and operative robotics clinic, (staff informally refers to it as AMOR) where you are greeted by a concierge and handed a soft, comfy robe and warm fuzzy slipper-socks. Because you already completed the pre-operative procedure, all you have to do is change into the robe and wait a short time for your same-day surgical procedure to commence. Sounds like a dream, right? It is. Or at least it was when Susan Carter, M.D., conceived of it. Now it’s a program that has been in place since early 2012 at Banner Health’s facility in Greeley. And it is such stuff that dreams are made of – at least for patients. “I started thinking about the possibility of a streamlined, pleasant check-in and checkout process for major surgery when I had a hip

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


ACTIVE SENIORS • HEALTH • ACTIVITIES • RECREATION • WELLNESS • SERVICES

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

61


Dr. Warren Schutte, of Front Range Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, schedules cosmetic procedures to coincide with other outpatient medical procedures to save patients recovery time and hospital expense.

replacement done,” says Dr. Carter, who has been in practice since 1987 and who performs robotic gynecologic procedures at NCMC. “With high-tech robotics, surgeries are becoming less and less invasive. The surgery is done through a small port placed in the incision and we use robotic cameras to guide us through the procedure. I watch everything in 3D HD. It’s like having your head right inside the patient.” Patients leave after a few hours of observation to rest and heal in the comfort of their own homes. Now imagine having two or even three procedures done at the same time; all because the robotic technology offers such precise surgeries, with much smaller incision sites, that doing more is actually less. Less time in the hospital, less anesthesia medication, less post-operative pain and less downtime while healing. All of that adds up to less patient stress. When the patients are ready to leave, the friendly valet delivers their car to them (or their designated driver) and sends them on their way home. K.P., a 68-year-old female patient (who prefers not to have her name used), was just delighted with her AMOR experience. Several years ago, K.P. had a hysterectomy. “When the uterus is removed, other organs shift into the cavity that is left behind,” she explains. Dr. Carter performed a sacrocolpopexy, which repairs pelvic prolapse, and moved K.P.’s bowel and bladder back into their proper positions. “We [she and her husband] showed up at 6:15 in the morning, too early for the valet but parking was plentiful and easy.” She was then escorted to the suite and handed a white robe, similar to what you would wear in a spa. Shortly after that, K.P. was being administered IV fluids and walked down a short hallway to the operating room, where she met the da Vinci robot that Dr. Carter used for K.P.’s procedures. By 3:30 that afternoon,

62

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


she was home, safe and sound. “It was really just a breeze. I didn’t have the same anxious anticipation I did with my hysterectomy. This was so much easier,” she says. Several weeks out, she’s feeling just fine. Let’s take this one step further. What if you paired a tummy tuck or breast augmentation with another procedure like a hysterectomy? Loveland-based plastic surgeon Warren Schutte, M.D. with Front Range Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery, is seeing more and more of these pairings in his practice. “For patients who want those cosmetic reconstructive procedures, it makes sense to combine them with non-elective medical surgeries,” he explains. “The downtime is virtually the same. It’s safe. There’s a cost savings for the patient.” A cost savings? For plastic surgery? Yes. Elective cosmetic surgeries are not covered by insurance. For the patient, the fees associated with such procedures are out-of-pocket expenses; paid up front. But when the tummy is tucked at the same time as a gall bladder is removed, then certain fees can be covered by insurance. “The anesthesia costs are covered with the other procedure. So are facility charges, such as the operating room fees. It makes a lot of sense to schedule more than one procedure at a time,” states Dr. Schutte. He warns patients to be very careful about working with insurance companies when pairing elective and non-elective surgeries. “You want to make sure than none of the uncovered procedures are included in the claim,” he says. “You don’t want the entire claim to be denied because one uncovered line item is inadvertently sent to the insurance company.” He recommends working very closely with your physician’s billing department to prevent such mishaps. Dr. Schutte also recommends that a patient interested in tacking cosmetic surgery onto another procedure call for a consultation beforehand. “I frequently see patients for free consultations,” he says. “It’s important for them to be well informed before committing to any surgical procedure. Education is a huge part of our practice.” In today’s world, medical technology is moving forward at almost the speed of sound. While it makes for more efficient practices and procedures, that kind of fast forward momentum doesn’t always translate into a patient-centered approach. What matters to the patient is the total surgical experience; from making the decision to having the procedure done to the time spent recuperating. Sometimes that’s as simple as a partnership between two physicians – or a physician and a robot – to create an experience that not only promotes wellness and healing by pairing procedures into a single surgery, but takes into account the most important aspect of medicine: the patient. Michelle Venus is a freelance writer from Fort Collins. She is currently working on an art book entitled And Tomorrow Comes Again which features the creative expression of suicide survivors. See more at www.michellevenus.com.

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

63


Continued from page 54 in July 2012. The team consists of nine specially trained registered nurses who offer around-theclock care to adult, adolescent and pediatric patients impacted by sexual assault and abuse. In addition to the immediate care given at the hospital, SANE nurses also aid victims with follow-up care. “The team has worked closely with victim advocacy groups throughout Weld County to provide follow up counseling, victim assistance programs and support with navigating the legal process and trauma,” says Sara Quale, public relations specialist with Banner Health Public Relations. “The nurses work collaboratively with police, prosecutors, child protective services and others to provide the best and most appropriate care.” Yet, as horrific as sexual assault crimes are, they are the most under-reported of all crimes, with the U.S. Justice Department estimating that 60 percent of victims never report their rape to police. Victims are afraid and often ashamed, frightened of being further traumatized by the legal system and frightened that the perpetrator will not be brought to justice. According to the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network, victims have good reason to worry about the latter, as they estimate that 94 percent of men who rape will never spend a day in jail. But the NCMC SANE team has helped improve those odds. “This program enables us to be experts in what we’re doing,” says Ani Matt, RN and SANE program coordinator at NCMC. “SANE has absolutely given us more specific skills. We’re trained in what to look for and what to do when it comes to injuries, gathering the victim’s history and, importantly, doing an exceptional job at evidence collection, which helps law enforcement and attorneys have greater success in prosecuting perpetrators. Basically, a SANE has one eye on the patient and one eye on the courtroom.” The SANE team is indeed well trained, with RNs (you must be an RN to be a SANE) receiving certification by completing approximately 200 hours of clinical orientation in such areas as taking medical forensic histories, head-to-toe assessment of victims, forensic documentation, use of the sexual assault evidence collection kit, trauma identification, evidence collection, treatment, and courtroom preparation and testimony. “They’ve been able to show that prosecution rates are much higher than those cases where exams have been performed by nurses without SANE training,” says Marilyn Fain, RN and director of Emergency Services at NCMC. “Our team knows what certain injuries look like; they know how to collect evidence so it stays pure and is solid evidence. They can even serve as witnesses to give testimony regarding the evidence they found during an exam.” The SANE program has also benefited the local police force, giving them a valuable and reliable partner in helping victims and prosecuting crimes. “We’re very supportive of the SANE programs in this area and we’re certainly glad to have them as a resource,” says Susan West,

64

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


public information officer for the Greeley Police Department. “From the investigation side, it’s so helpful to have a protocol that’s followed each and every time to ensure consistency in the collection and processing of evidence. Because our officers know that the SANEs know what needs to be done, they are freed up to focus on pursuing investigative efforts for the case outside of the hospital. SANEs also free up fellow medical staff so they can attend to other patients. “When the SANE exam is completed,” West continues, “the officer returns to the hospital to collect the evidence and take the victim to the station to get their story on tape, or bring them home. It’s not mandatory for a victim to go to the police station after the SANE exam. If the victim is very emotional or injured we would not add to her or his stress. We do, however, tell them it’s important to get their story on tape as soon as possible, but medical and mental health issues are always put first.” The SANE program has also simplified the way a victim used to have to repeat her or his story, which was exhausting and further traumatizing. “Victims used to have to tell their story to multiple personnel,” says Matt. “Now, they speak to law enforcement and then a SANE would be called in. We’ve worked a lot with law enforcement, especially the Greeley Police Department, which is exceptional, and we’re glad to provide this service right here in Weld County where victims have the support of nearby friends and family. Of course, they always could get medical care here, but they used to have to go elsewhere, such as Denver or Loveland, to get a SANE exam. And anyone can come here for help, it’s not just for victims in Weld County.” “We advise all sexual assault victims to have the SANE exam, which does not carry a fee for patients,” Fain says. “We’ll provide them with prophylactic medications for sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy prevention. Even if someone chooses not to report the crime to police or go to court, they should still get an exam to make sure they’re OK. That way, if they do decide to pursue the case later, their evidence collection kit will be here.” More than anything, the SANE team at NCMC wants victims to know there is compassionate help available, that they do not have to go through their ordeal alone. “We want victims to know they’re safe here,” Matt says. “In my opinion, the most rewarding part about nursing is you get to have a positive impact on people at their most vulnerable time. Most people don’t have a true idea of how long lasting the effects of sexual assault are. It’s our job and our calling to help the healing start here.” For more information about the SANE program, call (970) 350-6945 or visit www.bannerhealth.com/NCMCSANE

Laura Sebastian lives in Fort Collins and has been a freelance writer since 1999.

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

65


Experienced Experienced cardiac cardiac care care that that keeps keeps you you healthy healthy so so you you can can follow follow your your heart. heart.

McKee Medical Center keeps your life in rhythm with state-of-the-art diagnostic and McKee Medical Center keeps your life in rhythm with state-of-the-art diagnostic and interventional heart procedures, as well as cardiac rehab services to get your heart back in interventional heart procedures, as well as cardiac rehab services to get your heart back in shape. When you need more advanced care, you can take comfort in knowing that McKee shape. When you need more advanced care, you can take comfort in knowing that McKee Medical Center is part of Banner Health, giving you access to an extraordinary network of Medical Center is part of Banner Health, giving you access to an extraordinary network of cardiac physicians experienced in providing comprehensive care for even the most serious cardiac physicians experienced in providing comprehensive care for even the most serious heart conditions. McKee Medical Center and Banner Health. Keeping you healthy so you heart conditions. McKee Medical Center and Banner Health. Keeping you healthy so you can follow your heart. can follow your heart.

Banner Health facilities include: Banner Health facilities include: North Colorado Medical Center North Colorado Medical Center McKee Medical Center Sterling Regional MedCenter McKee Medical Center Sterling Regional MedCenter East Morgan County Hospital East Morgan County Hospital

2000 N. Boise Ave. • Loveland 2000 N. (970) Boise 669-4640 Ave. • Loveland (970) 669-4640

66

For more information, visit www.BannerHealth.com or call 800-505-6877. information, www.BannerHealth.com or call 800-505-6877. For For job more opportunities, visitvisit www.BannerHealth.com or call 866-377-JOBS (5627). For job opportunities, visit www.BannerHealth.com or call 866-377-JOBS (5627). Banner Health is the leading provider of not-for-profit health care in northern Colorado. Banner Health is the leading provider of not-for-profit health care in northern Colorado.

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine

zzz. zzz.


wellness wellness zzz.indb 71 zzz.indb 71

1/26/06 5:59:51 pM 1/26/06 5:59:51 pM


68

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Wellness

community health

kaiser supports

A Kaiser-sponsored viewing of the HBO series “The Weight of the Nation” in Greeley encourages community health and wellness.

community health By Corey Radman

Kaiser Permanente is a nonprofit healthcare provider as well as an insurance plan. Part of its mission includes improving the health not just of its members, but of the community as a whole. Amy Whited, manager of Public Relations and Digital Media for the organization, says, “Kaiser Permanente is invested in giving back to the community and into programs that are going to improve community health.” 70

Case in point, Kaiser is a main sponsor of the HBO Documentary Film series, “The Weight of the Nation.” The films take a look at the obesity epidemic from every angle: agriculture, economics, evolutionary biology, food marketing, racial and socioeconomic disparities, physical inactivity, American food culture and the power of industry. It was created in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Institute of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health in an effort to educate the public about the American obesity epidemic. While Colorado has long enjoyed a high ranking in the “Fittest States in the Nation” lists,

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Kaiser’s programs bring awareness to the topic of childhood obesity and offers solutions to healthier living.

health officials are becoming alarmed as the obesity rates for Colorado’s residents, especially children, creep quickly upward. According to the National Survey of Children’s Health, Colorado’s childhood obesity rate is rising at the secondfastest rate in the country. Currently 23 percent of Colorado’s children are overweight or obese. Twenty-two percent of adults fall into the same category. At that rate of growth, only 33 percent of the state’s residents will be a healthy weight by 2020. To bring awareness to the issue and kick start discussions about solutions, Kaiser has recently organized community screening events

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

71


who is

Kaiser Permanente? By Corey Radman

Kaiser Permanente is the largest nonprofit health plan in Colorado. It has served communities for more than 40 years, mainly in metro-Denver, Colorado Springs and Boulder. In fall 2012, Kaiser expanded that service area to Northern Colorado, targeting Fort Collins, Greeley and Loveland. Kaiser’s new Fort Collins medical office is located at 2950 E. Harmony Road and the Loveland medical office at 4901 Thompson Parkway. Both medical offices offer primary care (family medicine, internal medicine and pediatrics), laboratory, pharmacy and routine radiology services. Saturday pharmacy hours are available at both medical offices and the Fort Collins office offers extended appointment hours until 7 p.m. Monday through Friday. Approximately 20 healthcare professionals are employed at each office, including four physicians in Fort Collins and four in Loveland. Employers are now able to purchase large and small group coverage for employees. Individual and family plans are also available and Medicare plans are available to qualified residents in Larimer County. In addition to the Fort Collins and Loveland medical offices, Kaiser is adding an office in Greeley in 2014 and has a partnership agreement with Banner Health hospitals and physicians. All Northern Colorado Kaiser Permanente members will have access to specialists from a preferred provider network made up of Banner physicians and other specialty providers in the community. Members may also choose to select or retain a primary care physician in the Banner Health network. Hospital care will be provided at Banner Health’s McKee Medical Center in Loveland and North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley.

72

As an HMO (health maintenance organization), Kaiser Permanente is slightly different from other regional providers who are mainly PPOs (preferred provider organizations). Kaiser Permanente and Banner Health are partnering to provide a new model of care in Northern Colorado, which includes linking each organization’s robust system of electronic medical records to better coordinate patient care. Patients who choose Kaiser Permanente as their healthcare provider will have access to a network of more than 400 physicians in Northern Colorado. According to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) Health Insurance Plan Rankings 2012-2013, Kaiser Permanente is the top rated health plan in Colorado and number six in the nation for quality and customer satisfaction. In addition, the health plan received the highest rating of “better than average” from the Colorado Business Group on Health. Kaiser’s Medicare plan has received five stars, the highest possible from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Kaiser Permanente members report they appreciate the all-in-one-building service model (meaning fewer cross-town drives). Another benefit: personal health records are secure and available to patients online. Through that system, patients can email their physicians and renew prescriptions online. There’s even an app for that.

of “The Weight of the Nation” in four Colorado communities: Denver, Fort Collins, Colorado Springs and Greeley. With post-film discussions led by local health experts, these forums were an opportunity to focus on overcoming obesity and developing healthy living habits at home, in school and in the workplace. A screening in Loveland is planned for early in 2013. Leading by example, refreshments at the meetings were required to be healthy. For instance, the November Greeley meeting was catered by the Weld County District 6 Nutrition Services and included fresh-made bean burritos, cucumber infused water, fresh veggies and black bean brownies. The post-film discussion, moderated by Dan Dennie, NCMC director of medical imaging, included opportunities for community members to share ideas that work and note the barriers to success. Whited explains Kaiser’s rationale behind sponsoring the films and these community events. “It’s not just a documentary series. It’s really a movement because it’s on such a large scale. This is the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... we’ve never seen all of these medical institutions and organizations come together for a common cause. This grassroots effort to create awareness to the problem is really extraordinary.” Whited relates that “Weight of the Nation” will be followed in spring 2013 by another set of films that are about children and directed at children. Plans are still coming together, but Kaiser anticipates being able to bring those to schools or community organizations in the spring of 2013.

Beyond the Films Kaiser Permanente’s community health initiatives serve the entire state and support more

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


In line with the evening’s theme, Kaiser offered healthy snacks to the attendees.

than 40 obesity prevention collaborations, which aspire to increase access to healthy food and opportunities for physical activity in schools, neighborhoods and workplaces. Kaiser indicates that in 2011 they invested more than $90 million dollars to improve the health of all Coloradans. Organizations and programs such as LiveWell Colorado and Weigh and Win are examples of Kaiser Permanente’s community benefit dollars at work. Weigh and Win is a free, publicly available program (for those ages 18 and up) that pays participants to lose weight. Individuals who sign up for the program participate in quarterly photographed weigh-ins at kiosks placed around the region. Participants have access to online coaching tools and receive cash incentives for positive results. Kiosks were recently added in Fort Collins, Loveland and Greeley. More information is available at www.weighandwin.com. LiveWell Colorado is an organization that serves Coloradans by focusing on policy, environmental and lifestyle changes that remove barriers and increase access to healthy behaviors. Working in partnership with obesity prevention initiatives across the state, LiveWell Colorado aims to provide access to healthy foods and opportunities for physical activity in the places Coloradans live, work, learn and play. Current initiatives include focus on food systems, built environments and worksite wellness. See more at www.livewellcolorado.org.

Corey Radman is a National Press Women award winner, and regular contributor to Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness. She can be reached at her website, www.fortcollinswriter.com.

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

73


Wellness

blood donor services

The Fagerberg family was recently recognized for their collective 1,000-unit donation to the Blood Donor Center in Greeley.

paying it forward: family recognized

for legacy of donation By Elissa Tivona

Author’s note: I arrived a half-hour early at the Blood Donor Center at North Colorado Medical Center, so I lingered in the hallway scanning the list of top donors displayed on an impressive wall plaque: Linda Fagerberg, 40-49 gallons; John Fagerberg, 15-19 gallons; Mary Fagerberg, 12-14 gallons; Chuck Fagerberg Jr., 11 gallons; Cheryl Fagerberg, 8 gallons; Chuck Fagerberg Sr., 7 gallons; Gretchen Fagerberg, 4 gallons. Who are these people? I was soon to find out, and it is my privilege to bring readers the story of this remarkable family. 74

“To be a Fagerberg is to be a blood donor,” says Andrea Hawkins, Outreach Coordinator for the Blood Donor Center, as she introduces Linda Fagerberg and her eldest son, John. The Fagerbergs may consider themselves an ordinary Greeley family, but to the North Colorado Medical Center, they’re heroes. For three generations, despite tragedies and triumphs, they have passed on the legacy of donating blood … pint-by-pint … and eventually gallon-by-gallon. Cyndi Mitchell, account executive at Fenwal, Inc., global supplier of blood collection products, was on hand at Greeley’s Blood Donor Center on Nov. 9 to induct the family into the Blood Donation Hall of Fame. This year, from 82 nominees, Fenwal selected 12 winners based on stories submitted by blood centers internationally. Andrea Hawkins offered the Fagerberg story. The tradition began with Chuck Fagerberg Sr.’s WWII tour-of-duty in Italy. Details of the anecdote have faded, but most family members recall Chuck

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Sr. losing a $5 bet in a casual card game. Problem? Chuck didn’t have the money to spare. To pay off his debt, he donated blood, which at the time went for a modest amount per pint. He continued to donate until the debt was fully paid off. Once he realized how easy and relatively painless donating was and how critically important blood products were to saving lives of fellow servicemen and women, Chuck just kept on giving, even after he returned stateside. Since then, the tradition of donating blood has passed from Chuck Sr. to children, to grandchildren, to spouses and to extended families of spouses. Today the Fagerberg family collectively has donated nearly 1,000 units (pints) to Greeley’s Blood Donor Center. At eight pints to a gallon, 1,000 units equal about 125 gallons from this one family alone. Since the human body requires eight weeks to recover an adequate supply of red blood cells, individuals are limited to donating about six units of whole blood annually. To donate gallons requires many years of commitment. At 84 years old, matriarch Mary Fagerberg is still donating, and according to the wall plaque outside the office she’s a proud 12-14 gallon donor. John reminisces about how he began participating in the family tradition. “[My parents] started taking us up to the blood donor room even before we were old enough to donate. We’d go up with them while they’d give. I don’t feel like it was something that was ever forced. Mom and Dad did it when we were coming up and it seemed like it was something that you just did. We’ve been regular donors since we were 17, my brother … and my sister was … and myself. Now, we bring our kids. My daughter’s 7 and my son’s 10, so they come up with us when we donate. When they turn 17, if they’d like to donate, they can carry on.” Andrea expresses deep regard for families like the Fagerbergs because she understands that regular donors ensure sufficient blood inventory at all times, not just during emergencies. “From the time a person donates it takes 24 hours to get all the testing back to make sure it’s safe to put it in the inventory,” says Hawkins. “We need 50 donors every day to keep up with the demand.” She relies on people like the Fagerbergs to donate whenever they become eligible to replenish available blood and platelet supplies. John, who worked as a phlebotomist while he was in school, points out, “When I worked here, we were just supplying our hospital in Greeley. Now, they’re supplying all the Banner hospitals around here – Loveland to Sterling. The need’s gotten a lot greater.” He explains, “The blood’s good for 42 days in the refrigerator. In the ideal world you’d throw away every unit of blood that was donated. But you don’t; all that blood is used. Sometimes it’s stuff you can plan for like an elective surgery. But a lot of it you can’t. If there’s an accident or a complicated surgery, the blood’s got to be there.” National research supports this concern. Studies show that nine out of 10 people will use a blood product at some point in their lifetime, and every 2 to 3 seconds, someone in the United States needs a blood transfusion. The staff at the Center shares dozens of stories highlighting the vital roles safe, available blood

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

become a local hero – donate blood at banner health’s north colorado medical center

Visit the Blood Donor Center at 1801 16th St., Greeley; call for an appointment at (970) 350-6100; or visit their website www.BannerHealth.com, keyword NCMC Blood. The Center has flexible hours to accommodate donor schedules: Mondays and Fridays – 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays – 11 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays – 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Fagerberg family was inducted into the 2012 Donation Hall of Fame.

products play in saving lives or sparing unnecessary suffering. Andrea shares one such emotional story. “A gentleman at 49 came in to have his mitral valve repaired. Fifteen days after his surgery he developed fluid build-up around his heart – so much there was no more room for it to beat. He coded. They rushed him down to the operating room… He required 14 units of blood and 3 units of platelets; he coded two more times on the operating room table. And it was because we had blood, ready to go – that’s the only reason he’s alive.” “That man just happens to be my husband.” Andrea adds, “I am forever grateful, every day, when I walk in these doors that there are people who give so graciously of themselves to help people that they don’t know and to save lives.” Other appreciative recipients attended the reception to thank the Fagerbergs personally. In July of 2010, Andrea Linn was diagnosed with a rare blood disorder known as hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS). “I had plasma exchanges every day for 50 days, requiring 80 gallons of blood.” She could not hold back tears when she told the family, “It took 642 donors to save my life!” Linda Fagerberg smiles warmly at Linn’s story. “Whenever [I] hear that helicopter go overhead, I’m so glad to know there’s blood there for that person.” John echoes his mother’s compassion. “A needle in the arm isn’t somebody’s favorite thing to do. But you’re on the giving end, and you’re able to do that if you’re healthy enough. But if you require the blood, you’re pretty sick or you’re pretty hurt. And to me, a little poke in the arm is nothing compared to what these people are going through. It’s the least I can do to come in here and go through a little discomfort to make them and their families better.” These words leave little doubt why the Fagerbergs enjoy the Donation Hall of Fame spotlight. Elissa J. Tivona is a writer and international educator living in Fort Collins.

Donating Blood is easy, safe, fast and critically needed. Only 5 percent of those eligible to give blood actually do. The number one reason given? “I never thought about it.” Please think about it today and become a local hero. Donor Eligibility: Forty-two percent of the U.S. population is eligible to give! Most people can give if they are: • 18 years old or 17 years old with parental consent • In general good health • Weigh at least 115 lbs. • And answer a brief health questionnaire prior to donation To protect Blood Bank Inventory some conditions may result in temporary or permanent ineligibility. Please inquire because all volunteers are evaluated individually and most qualify. Temporary ineligibility may result from: • Sore throat, cold or flu symptoms within last 3 days • Some medications (evaluated on an individual basis) • Antibiotic therapy (except acne) within last 3 days or symptoms of infection within last 14 days • Oral surgery in last 3 days • Recent immunizations (varies with type of vaccine) • Major illness or surgery (and not yet released from doctor’s care) • Cancer history (except basal cell skin or cervical insitu) within last year • Heart disease (donation may be possible, evaluated on individual basis) • Pregnancy within last 6 weeks • Tattoo or body piercing within last 12 months • Travel within the last 12 months to an area outside of the U.S. with high risk for malaria • Jail or prison time for more than 72 hours within the last 12 months Permanent Ineligibility: • Hepatitis of any type after age 11 • HIV/AIDS High Risk Category (symptoms or positive test for HIV, intravenous drug use, taken money or drugs for sex) • Visited or lived, for a total of 3 months, in the United Kingdom from 1980 to 1996

Please eat a meal before donating and bring a driver’s license.

75


Wellness

PHILANTHROPY

philanthropy key to

Julie Johnson-Haffner, executive director of the McKee Medical Center Foundation

hospital growth By Kay Rios

Hospital foundations have become an important part of many hospital and medical centers. Just as a physical foundation supports a house, hospital foundations support medical facilities through fundraising efforts and community education. Hospital foundations help healthcare providers keep in touch with the community’s needs just as they let communities know what their hospitals require to operate.

76

Foundations became more popular in the late 1960s as government funding for hospitals began to decline. Current-day hospitals are receiving less reimbursement from insurance companies and the government than it costs to provide services while at the same time, labor, medications and technology costs continue to increase. “Foundations have become part of the big picture in healthcare funding,” says Chris Kiser, president of North Colorado Medical Center (NCMC) Foundation. “I came from higher education where they’ve been fundraising for 300 years but it’s only been happening in healthcare for the last 30 to 40 years. Hospitals found they needed to look at different funding streams and philanthropy was one of them.” The American Hospital Association estimates that close to one-third of U.S. hospitals lose money every year. This has made foundations and additional fundraising even more important to hospital survival. And with the anticipated

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


impact of healthcare reform, that focus will become even sharper. “Budgets are tight,” says Julie Johnson Haffner, BS, CFRE, executive director of McKee Medical Center Foundation. “McKee pays competitive wages, and equipment is costly; add to that tens of millions of dollars being written off for bad debt or charity care. What other business is doing that and can keep its doors open? So the foundations step in and help fill the gap.” Kiser adds, “Discretionary dollars are tight in Greeley as well. We provide the ancillary support not included in the budget or cover those things that have been removed from the budget. We offset some of the reduction.” As an example of how the Foundation works, in 2005, over $3 million was raised for the “Second Century Campaign,” with gifts supporting the construction of a new 300,000 sq. ft. southwest building addition, community health programs, Will Rothman Family Chaplaincy, Indigent Care, and a major upgrade to the Western States Burn Center. There’s also additional competition for healthcare contributions and, with healthcare reforms, money will be tighter and tighter, Haffner says. “There are so many good causes in our communities: we really need to make a strong case for support. It comes down to the real essence of life. We are blessed to say we help change lives, and save lives. We help ensure that healthy babies are born into the community. We can show our successes and we demonstrate that we are good stewards of our donors’ money. We are very transparent with their gifts. We have a great story to tell and we can prove what we do makes a difference in Northern Colorado. It’s such a meaningful message.” McKee’s Foundation also pays close attention to what the community wants and needs, she adds. “We listen to what Loveland wants in healthcare and then we try to provide the extra dollars that aren’t in the hospital’s budget. For example, our Loveland community said, ‘We want local cancer care.’ That resulted in a campaign drawing $895,000 to build a cancer center that was opened in 2002.” Kiser says NCMC Foundation also has a good product to sell. “We get our story out there as much as possible to compel the donors to have a look at us. NCMC often works in life or death situations and the hospital results speak for themselves.” Giving has changed in a couple of ways, Kiser says. “Major gifts are on the slow side and we are seeing a lot of smaller gifts.” All of it helps, he says. “We’ve even reduced it down to every $1 that’s donated equals $22 in services. That’s very compelling. It says that even if you can’t do a major gift, every dollar makes a difference.” Another change is the emergence of planned giving, he says. Planned giving allows a donor to leave money or assets to a nonprofit at his or her death. “At NCMC, we have qualified $4 million in planned giving.” Haffner says McKee Foundation also counts on planned giving. “Our planned giving program sits at about $5.5 million. That’s important to have because these gifts address the future. We help people with their estate planning process;

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

77


Chris Kiser, president of the North Colorado Medical Center Foundation

we make sure the spouse and family are taken care of and we also make sure the government doesn’t get much. The community needs it more than Uncle Sam does.” Just as planned giving looks to the future, both Foundations are future-focused in their fundraising efforts. “We’re preparing for a capital campaign to be launched in the latter part of 2013 and we’re exploring additional funding to enhance our Cancer Institute,” Kiser says. The McKee Foundation will look at the gaps that may be created with healthcare reform, Haffner says. She also says that in the first six months of 2013 the focus will be a campaign aimed at supporting the Stepping Stones Adult Day Program. The Foundation has already raised $900,000 and has a goal of $2.1 million for remodeling and new equipment for the program that provides activities and daytime care for elderly adults in the community. Regardless of the priorities or focus, the key to maintaining the funding flow is to not only look to existing donors but also encourage new ones. “I think that McKee does a good job in working with both established donors and new donors,” Haffner says. “We provide engaging activities and donor education; we talk about excellence and successes.” Relationship building is important, she says. “We do friend raising first and then fundraising. We spend face-to-face time, put on events, and provide donor education. Then we go on to the

78

The Western States Burn Center at North Colorado Medical Center was one of the recipients of funds raised by the NCMC Foundation.

fundraising. I firmly believe my practice is to cultivate the friends first and the funds will follow.” Kiser agrees relationships are important. “We’re in a re-engagement mode with our donors, making contacts with people who already donate,” Kiser says. Their target markets are, however, different. “We are in the largest transference of wealth in history,” says Kiser. “Boomers are transferring wealth to the upcoming generation. And one thing all nonprofits are facing is replacing those donors at the top in age range. It’s a different approach. Younger generations want to make an impact. They want to be actively engaged so it needs to be more social and outcome driven. They have active lives and they have kids.” NCMC Foundation has created a 40 and Under Club aimed at filling the pipeline and promoting philanthropy to younger generations, he says. It’s the creation of a fun social club of young community leaders who also care about the NCMC Foundation’s mission, Kiser explains. Perks for the NCMC Foundation 40 and Under Club include exclusive tours, presentations by NCMC administrators and physicians, invitations to exclusive social events, and tax-deductible gifts directed to the NCMC department of their choice. The McKee Foundation effort is different in terms of target market, Haffner says. “We are focused on the profile of Loveland and that is an older generation. Loveland is one of the top five places in the country as far as attracting retirees.

Our activities and goals mirror the population’s profile and we recognize an older generation’s preferences in giving.” “It’s a unique challenge in Northern Colorado,” Kiser says. “Our foundation was founded in 1975 and has raised $45 million since then, demonstrating the unbelievable generosity of Weld County and our committed community. To have healthcare stand out like that is a real tribute to them.” Haffner says the McKee Foundation was founded in 1981 and has raised $25 million since then. “It speaks to how successful these two foundations have been,” she says. Kiser uses one his favorite sayings to demonstrate the success of both foundations: “The rising tide floats all boats. If it’s good for one, it’s good for all.” Haffner and Kiser remain energized by their responsibility to community and to their hospitals. “Both Chris and I have been in this business for a long time and it’s still fun. It’s very satisfying,” Haffner says. “It’s the goose bump effect,” Kiser says. “When you get a planned gift, you know people have a good many options and, yet, they choose our hospital. That’s exciting.”

Kay Rios, Ph.D., is a freelance writer living in Fort Collins.

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

79


Cold Weather Skincare

It’s cold and dry – the hallmark of Colorado winters. Between the wind outside and the dry heat indoors, our skin often takes the brunt of less than ideal winter temperatures. So how often should you hydrate and how? What are the best skin products for restoring the moisture that is squeezed out of our skin? Winter skin woes – dryness, eczema, psoriasis, chapped lips, etc. – require a special skincare regimen that is geared toward reducing dryness and restoring moisture. Some changes are easy enough: add a humidifier at night; limit long, hot showers; and decrease water temperature since hot water can strip more moisture out of your skin. Pat skin dry, don’t rub and apply your moisturizers and lotions to wet skin. But the type of skin care product and the frequency of application also need to be adjusted. “Moisturize often,” says Bobbie Marriott, medical esthetician at Allura Skin, Laser and Wellness Clinic in Fort Collins. She recommends moisturizers that are oil or fat based rather than water based during the winter season. Marriott also suggests adding hyaluronic acid to your moisture regimen. “Hyaluronic acid occurs naturally in people and animals, and is often found in young skin, tissue and joint

Vegetable of the Moment: Parsnips Winter is a great time to explore hearty root vegetables. One particularly healthy and delicious option is the parsnip. Looking much like a bleached carrot, indeed they are related, parsnips were popular with ancient Greeks and Romans and were said to be a favorite of Emperor Tiberius, according to Pliny. Parsnips are a hardy cold weather vegetable and are best harvested after a few frosts. Herbalists have used parsnips for centuries. The fruit’s essential oil is said to cure fevers, and a decoction of the root is said to be a good diuretic and a remedy for jaundice. Parsnips are sweeter than carrots and starchy enough to replace potatoes in meals. They are delicate in flavor and very tasty roasted. Parsnips are also often used in soups, can be mashed like potatoes, and have been used to make beers and wines. They can even be used fresh, peeled and grated into a salad. The vegetable is low in calories and contains no saturated fat or cholesterol. They are also high in fiber and contain folic acid, calcium, potassium and vitamins B1, B2, B3, C, iron and zinc. They also last for quite a while in the refrigerator.

80

fluid. The acid is part of the body’s connective tissues and is known to cushion and lubricate. Aging destroys hyaluronic acid.” High quality hydrating products that contain hyaluronic acid can be much more moisturizing to the skin, says Marriott. Exfoliation is important. “Dry skin collects dead skin more readily, so it is still important to exfoliate so moisturizing products can penetrate better,” she says, “but don’t over do it – try every other day or every third day instead – and make sure to use a more gentle exfoliator.” Marriott also recommends face peels during the winter months and she advocates the use of a Clarisonic sonic cleansing brush with a skin polisher every third day. For the body, choose soap, alcohol and formaldehyde free body washes. Switch from bar soap to body wash during the winter months as much as possible. Don’t forget protection from the intense winter sun. “Slather on sunscreens,” says Marriott, suggesting an SPF of 30 or higher. Another Colorado winter woe can be windburn. Marriott suggests a moisture protection ointment with vitamin E and C; but “avoid anything petroleum based.” A few final suggestions from Marriott: bundle up and protect skin, drink lots of water to remain hydrated, add in some essential fatty acid supplements, and protect your pout with some a hydrating lip gloss. This winter, don’t let the cold weather get the best of your skin. Fight back with some easy fixes and stay hydrated all winter long.

ROASTED PARSNIPS SimplyRecipes.com offers this recipe for Roasted Parsnips: •

1.5 pounds of parsnips, peeled and cut into 2.5 inch batons

4 tsps. extra virgin olive oil

Salt and freshly ground pepper

1/3 c. stock – chicken or vegetable

3 Tbsp. unsalted butter, softened

4 tsps. drained, bottled horseradish

½ Tbsp. finely chopped flat-leaf parsley

½ Tbsp. minced chives

½ small garlic clove, minced

Pre-heat the over to 400 degrees. In a large roasting pan, toss the parsnips with oil, salt and pepper. Add in the broth and cover with aluminum foil and roast, stirring once or twice, until the parsnips are tender and the stock been absorbed, 20 to 45 minutes. Combine the softened butter with the horseradish, parsley, chives and garlic. Toss the warm roasted parsnips with the horseradish-herb butter and serve. Yields 4 servings. Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Get Fit, Give Back Calendar Sign up now for the Colorado Marathon on May 5. This favorite race for marathoners and half-marathoners fills up fast. Register for your spot at www.ftcollinsmarathon.com.

january 27 – 34th Annual Frost Giant 5K & 10K, Estes Park, 11 a.m. Proceeds go to the Katherine Bricker Kent Memorial Fund and the Estes Valley Youth Activities Assistance Fund. www. evrpd.com FEBRUARY 16 – Loveland Sweetheart Classic 4-mile Race and Couples Race, Loveland High School, 10 a.m. Proceeds benefit the local high school track teams and The Baby Foundation. www. lovelandroadrunners.com 29 – Leap Day 5K, Runner’s Roost, Fort Collins, 5:15 p.m., www.runnersroostfortcollins.com MARCH 17 –Sharin’ O’ the Green 5K, Fort Collins, benefitting Partners Mentoring Youth, www. partnersmentoringyouth.org 25 – Fourth Annual JourneyQuest 5K Run/ Walk, Fort Collins, 10 a.m., benefitting the Shared Journeys Foundation, www.sharedjourneysfoundation.com APRIL 14 –Flying Pig 5K Charity Run/Walk, Spring Canyon Park in Fort Collins. Event includes “Pigs in a Blanket” pancake breakfast. Proceeds benefit families in the Family Support Services Program at Foothills Gateway. www. foothillsgateway.com 21 – 40th Annual Horsetooth Half Marathon, CSU Hughes Stadium in Fort Collins, 8:30 a.m., www.horsetoothhalfmarathon.com

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

81


Wellness

community health

greeley patrol cars now carry

lifesaving equipment By Marty Metzger

In September 2012 Greeley Fire Department EMS Coordinator Bill Diershow’s ongoing efforts to improve sudden cardiac arrest victims’ survival rates came to fruition. It was then that Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) were installed in 12 Greeley Police patrol cars. 82

Lieutenant Diershow had initiated the Heart Safe City Project in the 1990s (under a previous name). He has spent years dedicated to the project because cardiac arrest deaths in outlying areas, or deaths that occur in situations that otherwise delay ambulance and fire department intervention, often occur. The victims are generally children with hidden health issues or adults in their early 50s, says Diershow. Furthermore, after three minutes without CPR from the outset of a heart failure episode, people who do survive

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Officers Joe Timm, Doug Medhurst, Steve Brown and David Wiles received a Greeley Police department award for their CPR efforts that saved the lives of two people suffering from cardiac arrest.

often experience secondary problems such as oxygen deprivation-induced brain damage. Police are often first to arrive on the scene. Over the past 20 years, the Heart Safe City Project’s CPR initiatives have expanded. In 2011, Diershow acquired partners, including Banner Health, Banner NCMC Paramedics ambulance service, the Greeley Police Department and its Dispatch Center, Aims Community College and the Greeley City Council. He then applied for a state EMS grant to assist in purchasing the

Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

83


devices for placement in police patrol cars, citing in the application two instances in 2011 in which police officers performed early CPR. Both victims survived, one without any lingering effects. Since all officers have been trained in CPR since the early 2000s, it only made sense to provide them with AEDs to assure even greater probability of saving lives. Statistics show that this success occurs in more than 50 percent of certain types of cardiac arrest, says Diershow. “Having AEDs and the certified police officer available to respond is an important part of early CPR and shock provided to very savable cardiac arrest victims,” counsels Diershow. The grant application was approved and, at a cost of $1,640 per unit, the 12 AED units were installed in the patrol cars in September 2012. Although there is a big nationwide push for them, Diershow says only about 25 percent of police departments in the U.S. currently have the appliances. Diershow, an Advanced Cardiac Life Support Instructor for nearly 20 years, also credits a public CPR program in Greeley for additional rescues. The average U.S. rate for pre-EMS arrival bystander intervention is 38 percent. Cities with the highest rates are called Premier Cities and experience 60 percent survival rates. Greeley is the first city with a grant to offer citizens AED training. This free education includes basic CPR and usage of the AED equipment, which is automated and features user-friendly picture graphs. (Colorado has a Good Samaritan law that protects non-negligent private citizens who assist cardiac

84

AEDs in patrol cars, paired with CPR trained officers, have the potential to save lives as police officers are often the first emergency personnel on the scene.

arrest and other illness/injury victims.) Greeley citizens desiring training (or who wish to make financial donations) should call (970) 350-9508 for class dates and times. Diershow points out that approximately 20 incidents in Greeley occur annually that would benefit from the AEDs in patrol cars. Officer David Wiles, the Greeley Police Department AED Program Coordinator, says installation

of AEDs in patrol cars is a new concept regionally; Greeley is the first Northern Colorado department to implement them. Officer Wiles further advises that his city believes in the definite potential for quicker police intervention in cardiac arrest incidents through use of the devices. All officers complete an initial eight-hour training day, which includes first aid, CPR and use of the AEDs. Then, every other year, they must re-certify through a five-hour class. Officer Wiles describes an AED unit as handy, small and compact, about the size of a lunchbox. He adds that there are approximately 25 to 30 patrol cars on Greeley’s roads at any given time; those carrying the 12 units are strategically spread out so that at least one AED-equipped car is in each sector. The price for the life-saving devices includes purchase, operation, maintenance (batteries, pads, etc.) and eventual replacement, says Wiles. Each use costs approximately $50. Resource allocation is always a factor for city agencies, particularly in small, rural communities where ambulance and EMS services are distant or not readily available. AEDs in patrol cars are becoming important life-saving tools. That critical three-minute window of opportunity after sudden cardiac arrest is now open wider in Greeley since its well-trained officers have these vital medical devices with them at all times.

Marty Metzger of Fort Collins has been a freelance writer since 1987.

Lydia’s STYLE Magazine


Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness 2013

85


PRSRT STD U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

DENVER, CO PERMIT NO. 5377

www.stylemagazinecolorado.com 211 W. Myrtle St., Suite 200 Fort Collins, CO 80521

CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED


2013-01 Northern Colorado Medical & Wellness