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The teaching approach caters to appropriate learning styles, she says. “People in this industry are visual so we have a lot of visuals in the books and we use videos. It’s very intense training.” Students are also trained in salon success, people skills and marketing. “They need to develop the skills that are the most important for survival. We added this part of the program about six years ago and it’s becoming the trend throughout the industry.” It goes beyond cutting hair or giving facials. “Just being the best stylist does not necessarily mean you will be successful. You also need life skills. When students walk out of here and I give them a diploma, I know they have everything they need to succeed.” Kay Rios is a freelance writer living in Fort Collins. The IBMC team: JoAnn Caddoo, Career Services Director; Steve Steele, President; Diana Gunderson, Vice President of Education; Kevin McNeil, Regional Director of Admissions; Colleen Laub, CMO/Owner; and Richard Laub, CEO/Owner

Hair Dynamics Education Center

Cosmetology/hairstyling ranked nationally as one of the highest for job satisfaction in 2009, and the good news is, there’s no chance of it being outsourced overseas. “Some salons were hurt by the recession but most made it through and are still hiring,” says Tina Matuska, owner/Director of Hair Dynamics Education Center. Matuska says she saw an increase in enrollment over last year. “We’re generally busy and our programs are full,” she says. “We start classes monthly and we always see an increase.” Matuska and husband Dave started the school in 1984. Within three years they bought the building south of Fort Collins on Hwy 287. They went from 400 square feet to 17,000 square feet and started a major remodel a year and a half ago to accommodate growth. The school currently has 180 students. Full time students attend during the day and put in 30 hours a week, working four to five days a week for 15 months to complete the full cosmetology program. Nighttime classes are available for part time students. The full program includes hair, skin and nails. Students can elect to take just the hair program, which takes 10 months for full time students, or the aesthetics program (skin) or manicure program, each of which take five months. Most students take the full program, Matuska says. “Not all states recognize just hair or just nails. Only in the last 10 years has hairstyling by itself been recognized and still only about five or six states offer licensing for just hair.” Students finish the program ready for licensure, she says. “We prepare them for the two part test, written and practical, and we have a pretty high pass rate the first time. We track pass, fail, graduation and placement.” Hair Dynamics, which is accredited by the National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences (NACCAS), has high outcomes, with 2008 figures showing completion rates at 78 percent, licensure at 94 percent and placement at 89 percent. “We hold a high standard for our training,” Matuska says. “The state requires 20 percent of training to be classroom time before they can work in the student salon but we require 36 percent classroom first. We know if we train them well before they go into the salon setting, they will do well.”

Style 2010

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2010-04 Lydia's Style Magazine  

April - Northern Colorado Economy A powerful issue with an article focus on Northern Colorado’s business, building, economy, lifestyle an...

2010-04 Lydia's Style Magazine  

April - Northern Colorado Economy A powerful issue with an article focus on Northern Colorado’s business, building, economy, lifestyle an...

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