Page 1

Supported by:


1.

FOREWORD

2.

FUNDRAISING

3.

ARRIVAL

4.

WORKSHOPS WITH 85 TANZANIAN YOUTH

5.

A COMMUNITY SUCCESS

6.

CONCLUSION

7.

A HUGE THANK YOU


KORI has been coming to Tanzania since 2008 when the Youth Empowering Youth Collective (‘YEYUK’) was born from the desire of the mentors (aged 16-25) to work with other young people in Africa. The first project set the standard when after fundraising together in London they achieved the sharing of drama, dance, singing and basketball skills with 120 young people in Debrabant Secondary School in Dar Es Salaam. This successful project was made into a film, which is still being used by the group to inspire young people in London and Africa. The second project to Tanzania by YEYUK was in 2010 and was focussed diferrently on developing the talents of young people from SOS Children’s Village, and Jang’ombe Secondary School Zanzibar, to enable them to perform at the Zanzibar International Film Festival (ZIFF). Again the group rose to the challenge of the project, successfully sharing skills so that the young students from both schools owned the stage confidently, delighting their parents, teachers and community with their achievements. This project was purposefully documented in such a way that it could be used as a manual to inspire other groups of young people in the UK to fundraise and engage in skill sharing youth exchanges in Africa. 2011 has indeed been a momentous year! KORI finally gained its own centre in which to develop its work in North London. The organisation also became a registered charity on the 25th of June 2011 under the leadership of a new proactive group of trustees with a clear eye on the future. This third trip to Tanzania benefited from the successful visit to London in March of six Tanzanian young people – (three from Jang’ombe Secondary School and three from SOS Childrens Village, Zanzibar) with two of their teachers. The visit was organized and paid for by dedicated fundraising from the KORI young people. The Tanzanians, hosted in London for a


month by parents of KORI young people, were enabled to enjoy intense exposure to the practice of arts and sports in education. Thus, their understanding of the role that these can have in educating children was strengthened: as was their understanding of KORI’s work. The trip also provided an opportunity for the YEYUK collective to plan with the young people from Tanzania and create ‘YEY’Tanzania’ (from the group that visited) who have now taken clear leadership roles in their schools in Tanzania. This supports good communication and facilitates the process of development during future projects. We also gladly made one of the visiting teachers, Robert Manondolo, a voluntary coordinator for KORI in Tanzania. On the return home of the group from Tanzania they shared the experiences they had in London with their schools and families. Robert then took on the responsibility of preparing the schools and community for this years youth exchange by KORI, opening the doors for new partnerships and friendships to blossom. This is a grave time for our Youth in London. Haringey, where KORI is based has had 75% of its youth service provision cut this year and the consequences may be dire. The positivity and inspiration from ‘Youth Empowering Youth’ Tanzania 2011 therefore, was a needed boost for both the young leaders from London and the young people in Tanzania– projects like this continue to affirm everyday that ‘Young people are truly amazing’!


gh of Haringey. med in 2002 in the Borou ity development. KORI Arts ‘KORI’ was for d on youth and commun use foc se pri ter en ial We are a not for profit soc artists and coaches g them with experienced gin ga en by le op pe g ntary education; We support youn mme of arts; suppleme gra pro e ers div a r live who train the youth to de they gain enrich on and sport. The skills ati uc ed ral ltu cu s; die environmental stu with real opportunities for ths and providing them pa r ree ca ing en op s, their live The vision of this trip became a reaIity when the much needed

£5,000 towards the £5,144 costs of tickets for the YEYUK, trip came from the Sir Halley Stewart Trust, giving the funding boost that was needed. This came within the short twelve-week window that the group had to raise all the funds for the journey! The rest of the funds were raised by the young people who were going on the trip in a number of ways: African Journeys’ in 2010 was an event that brought together African diaspora organisations to showcase their English and African projects and share good practice. Asheber, an east London based Band and community programme decided as a result of attending the event, to fundraise for one of their young leaders Zikko Archer to be part of the team going to Tanzania. Over the next few months they raised money from a number of performances. Yemmy Smithson, a 14 year old KORI senior and the daughter of an entrepreneur - blazed a new trail of fundraising success and set a standard to be followed in the future. This is what she did: She asked a diverse range of people and organisations for direct sponsorship. Collected donations in kind including a hamper basket from the chain store Budgens that she sold raffle tickets for. Supported a fundraising event put together by the two mentors that made up the music team for the trip, Zikko Archer and Onome Edgeworth in a venue that her mother managed ‘The Forge’ in Camden, North London.


The YEYUK team also worked together on fundraising walks, car washed, sold post cards, took part in club nights and ran a school disco in St Pauls Primary School, Wood Green. In addition to this they ran stalls and performances at the refugee festival in Bristol supported by the ‘Tribe of Doris’ team. In the short time of fundraising four thousand was raised to make the journey: amidst lots of hope that the support of the schools in Tanzania would make up for the shoe string budget. The team made the decision to go rather than disappoint the young people in Tanzania whose hopes regarding the visit were so high. The importance of the trips were reflected in some of the points raised in a report by SOS Children’s Village, Zanzibar, stating that: Students do not get exposure to vocational and technical skills at any level except in the few schools with a technical bias. There is a shortage of instructors, experts and facilities. Technical and vocational education does not cater for the needs of students with special educational needs. The following quote illustrates the level of their enthusiasm for the YEYUK Arts and Sports Programme 2011.

THE FOCUS FOR THIS YEAR’S TRIP WAS AS FOLLOWS: To further develop the YEYUK, skills and enable them to grow through the experience of delivering a challenging programme in Africa.


Building and helping the Tanzanian young people to develop skills in arts and sports, as well as enhancing the partnership with the two schools. For young people from both countries to positively deepen their understanding of each other’s cultures. Deepening the understanding of the educational value of arts and sports in Zanzibar through an inset for teachers in both schools. Building a vocal photography exhibition that would help expose and fund future trips. To develop the clarity and purpose of the ‘Youth Empowering Youth’ collective in the UK and Tanzania. To set up groups from this project of drama, basketball, football, music that have a structure for development over the coming year. To develop partnerships with organisations in Zanzibar that could build on the impact of the work and further develop and offer employment skills to young people in the area. Building the leadership skills of the young people from Tanzania that visited London.


After three months of intense fundraising and workshop preparation the Director, seven mentors, two seniors and two juniors that formed the YEYUK team, were met by KORI’s voluntary Tanzanian coordinator, teacher Robert Manondolo. They spent one night in a grim hotel in Dar Es Salaam and then made the three hour journey across to Zanzibar. At the port in Zanzibar they received a joyous welcome from a surprise welcome committee; Head teacher of Jang’ombe Secondary School Mr Sulieman and Chairman of the schools committee and the former Zanzibar International Film Director, Professor Martin Mhando. Robert had found a house for the group to rent and prepared it for their arrival. Waiting for them was a huge meal prepared by the young people who had visited London a few months before and some of the female teachers from the school! It was an overwhelming welcome and after a nights stay the team headed for a four day break in the tropical island of Pemba, where they recovered from three frantic months of fundraising and preparation. During the four days of swimming, eating and playing football and basketball with the locals, the team reflected on the last few months. They also got used to living together, finished their workshop planning and generally prepared themselves for the programmes beginning in the following week.


The trip had begun to show successful outcomes before the team had actually arrived. The schools had prepared together for the YEYUK 2011 Arts and Sports Programme. The students from both schools had been carefully selected. They were interviewed first by teachers and then individually by Robert Manandolo and accepted on the programme on the basis of their commitment, selfdiscipline and passion for the arts or sports. This represented a huge step forward, demonstrating that the work was both needed and wanted by the schools. In commitment to the programmes success the Jang’ombe Secondary School board provided a welcome meal and basic foodstuffs. SOS Children’s Village had agreed to provide transport to and from workshops and to host the programme on its grounds for its duration.

The project began with the team working with the teachers, introducing them to their individual disciplines demonstrating how they added value to an academic curriculum. Max Ribiero, a philosophy student at Bristol University delivered an eloquent opening on learning styles. His presentation was based on the premise that intelligence is not onedimensional and that there are Multiple Intelligences1. The teachers nodded as it was demonstrated that kinesthetic (or feeling and movement) intelligence was possible through analyzing the mathematics involved in a basketball shot.

1

Term coined by Prefessor Howard Gerdner in 1983.


The delivery of the workshop was a little daunting for the group but the comments from the teachers proved they found it both useful and inspiring.

Over the next few days the art forms of music, drama, playwriting, basketball and football were introduced to the eighty-five students by YEYUK in smoothly led rotations so that all the students experienced each discipline and met all of the team. For the last day of the rotation each group stayed in an art or sport discipline and prepared a presentation for the others to see. This allowed all that was on offer to be seen clearly and allowed the young people to make a clear choice of what they wished to learn over the next two weeks. At the end of this process the students deftly made their choices; Music had 27 students, Sport 24 and Drama and Scriptwriting had 34. The YEY UK team was happy with the final numbers, they felt that the groups were very focused and that the ratio enabled them to really get to know each other. This trip emphasized the importance of giving projects time to grow and develop. YEYUK has grown into a collective of young people that really understand how to share their skills and be culturally appropriate: at such a level that they were earning the respect of everyone they worked with. Lydia Newman at 24, a mentor at KORI since she was 16 was the only young person that had been part of all three projects in Tanzania. She took the plunge this year and agreed to manage the programme. This was brave indeed for it entailed, planning the programme, liaising with teachers, managing her team and directing everyone towards the final


performance by the students. All this whilst she also worked with Max on delivering the drama and scriptwriting! Whilst the programme progressed on the pleasant grounds of SOS Children’s Village, the Director of KORI, Odiri Ighamre, was able to meet with the board of Jang’ombe Secondary School to gain a deeper understanding of the education system and the outcomes for their students. The story was indeed bleak as they admitted that 75% failed the national exams in form two in secondary school, after which the governments duty to educate them was over and they were left in a situation with no qualifications and no employment. After this point only those with parents who could not afford the £345 annual school fees as well as books, school uniforms and equipment, could not afford to go any further in education. The majority were left with few choices and end up in early marriages, staying at home or finding some employment in the tourist trade. Many simply fall pray to un-planned pregnancy, drugs, alcoholism and prostitution exposing them to sexually transmitted diseases especially HIV/ AIDS, that has created many of the orphans in SOS Children’s Village, Zanzibar. The meeting helped to put the programmes focus into perspective. In Zanzibar the population is young and the employment possibilities are very low (as they are for the young across Africa) focused on poverty line jobs in the tourist trade. The conclusion was that our programme was developing potential and creating skills that opened selfemployment potential.


Over the next few days this meeting was followed by others with the Women’s NGO Zayedessa, - that focused on tackling unemployment, school dropping out, drug abuse and HIV/ AIDS, also supporting groups to develop for economic benefit and development. Save the Children, Programme Manager Mubarak Maman, Zanzibar also met with KORI, keen to support next year’s projects when they saw that the programme KORI had developed complimented their agenda to empower and support children and young people admirably. As with every project in Tanzania, the days moved far too quickly. Each day the amazing range of activity played out like a well-rehearsed play. The sports group squashed into the SOS vehicle and made their way to the local stadium where Josephine Maignomo, KORI’s sports coach, led them through a grueling but pleasurable four hours of basket ball and football skills on alternate days. Their activities drew the attention of the locals, both children and adults, who crowded around to watch and learn each day. A local coach joined this crowd and began supporting the training, which proved invaluable as he later brought his team to give the newly taught students a much needed practice basket ball game in which they did very well.

The playwriting and script writing had the students working together, developing lines and characters for three plays with such concentration that the expression of learning was a joy to behold.


The music and songwriting became fluid once Onome and Zikko had stopped the copycatting of popular songs by the students. They did this by getting the students to develop a timeline of their lives and use it as an inspiration for their writing. This worked beautifully and the task became one of making them focus on the craft of writing, before attempting to become prolific songwriters!

The two young seniors in the YEYUK team Christopher Nugent and Yemese Smithson had supportive roles. Christopher worked alongside Josephine on the sports programme, which meant early mornings and long hot afternoons, organising equipment and leading warm-ups. Yemese led her own project-teaching dance to a group of selected SOS primary aged children. She did this so successfully that the pieces she taught enabled the children to perform at the opening and closing of the show for the community.


The show of work for the community happened on a glorious day on the 28th of July. Ali Hamad Ali, Village Educator and Mr Salum A. Salum, Youth Leader of SOS, Zanzibar had worked with the KORI Director Odiri, Graphic Designer Dorette and KORI coordinator, Robert to achieve the timetable that was put together by Lydia. The aim of the event was to share the young peoples learning achievements with their parents, teachers, organisations and other students. SOS had created a well-decorated stage for the event. By 2pm a crowd of over 300 people had gathered to experience the sports and arts skills learnt over just three weeks. The YEYUK team hardly breathed as the students made them proud again and again performing and playing to the best of their ability to a jubilant crowd.

THAT SENSE OF NK ME FOR TEACHING THEM, YOU DON’T GET THA TO UP E CAM S KID’ ES ANC ORM PERF THE ‘AT THEIR EGOS TO THEMSELVES TO DEVELOP, THEY DON’T ALLOW ACHIEVEMENT IN LONDON. THE KIDS HERE ALLOW GET IN THE WAY.’ ZIKKO ARCHER - YEYUK - SONG WRITING LEADER A proud high table made up of the SOS Village Director Mr Sulieman Mahmoud Jabir, many of the schools teachers and the Head teacher of Jang’ombe Secondary School Mr Sulieman plus the schools committee and teachers as well as guests from Save the Children, Zaydessa and local journalists. Without a doubt the event exceeded all expectations and the students were brilliant. They were so high on their success that the YEY team struggled to get them not to pro- long their time on stage by confidently ad-libbing!


After the event the YEYUK team spent the next few days meeting with the students to execute their plans for enabling the continued development of the young Zanzibaris over the next year. Working with young people who had visited London earlier that year they met with the students to see who was interested in staying committed to developing their learning furtherover. Some students were elected leaders of their individual subject groups. These were to be supported by young people from YEYTZ and the coordinator Robert Manondolo: who agreed to use Facebook and email to receive the tasks sent to the groups by YEYUK. Both schools also committed to this process, agreeing to provide space and time for the programme to continue. Thus next year, with all being well, the programme will be continuing with students who will not be starting right at the beginning of a programme. SO WHAT HAS BEEN ACHIEVED IN REALITY FROM THIS YEARS EXCHANGE?

YEYUK concretized their team ethos by fundraising collectively YEYUK and YEYTZ had their first planning meetings in Tanzania and executed their first plans The two schools worked colaboratively in partnership New organisations that could offer further development services to the young people came on board The teachers were included in the training, visited the project while it was happening and came to the performance


Parents and local people watched the project as it developed and attended the performance so the programme became known to the wider community. An amazing exhibition of photographs are available for hire for schools and galleries demonstrating two themes: ‘Youth Empowering Youth’ and ‘Africa Now’ by KORI’s graphic designer Dorette Lewin.


The project as always was not without challenges; typically the most difficult one was insufficient funds. The need for extra transport stretched the budget to breaking point and meant that personal funds had to be used to support the project. Without funding support whilst they were away, the group faced financial stress when they returned to London. Sometimes inexperienced translators meant that delivering the programme was not without difficulty although; both sides remained respectful and patient with each other treating every situation with a large dose of humor enjoyed by all. It will be wonderful to achieve exchange with another group of young people from YEYUK. Lydia Newman rose to the challenge and successfully led this programme, fulfilling the KORI philosophy of passing on skills. Each trip has boosted self- belief, improved work prospects and enhanced their life experience. Building on this years work in complete harmony with the teachers and leaders of both schools, will advance the work immensely and provide a platform for more young people from London to join YEYUK and be a part of further exchanges. It is wonderful that now the school communities that we worked with in Tanzania are convinced of the place of sports and arts in supporting the growth of self confidence, skill and potential employment for their very deserving young people.


A BIG THANK YOU TO OUR FANTASTIC SUPPORT IN LONDON FROM: Lord Lesley Griffiths and the Sir Halley Stewart Trust | The Moravian Church, Hornsey | St Pauls RC Primary School, Wood Green | Earlham Primary School Wood Green | Haverstock secondary School | Nikki Haydon | South Bank University, Academy of Sport | Andy Powslin | The Forge | Budgens, Crouch End | Niles Hailstones and Asheber | 198 Gallery (Hustlebucks). We are grateful to the Director of SOS Zanzibar Mr Sulieman Mahmoud Jabir, Village Director, Ali Hamad Ali and Mr Salum Abrahamani Salum, Youth Coordinator, for hosting the programme and supporting some of the transport needs. We are grateful to the Headteacher of Jang’ombe Secondary School, Sulieman Amour Mtondoo and all the committee members and teachers who showed such commitment to their students development by focusing on the development of the programme and giving us every support during delivery. We thank Mr Mubarak Maman and Mr Hashim Pondzea from Save the Children for supporting the programme by providing tee shirts and banners for the young people taking part in the programme. We thank the Ministry of Education and Vocation Training, Zanzibar for supporting the programme.


We thank Zaydessa for opening the doors to partnership for future programmes. We thank ZIFF for continuing to work with the SOS Children’s Village, Zanzibar, and giving them further opportunities to share their talents and for sharing KORI’s work. We also thank Amos Wambugu for his comfortable house and his wonderful cook, Teresia Edward Kungbe. We thank our guide and Coordinator Robert Clement Manondolo for his steadfast commitment and tenacity through both exchanges in 2011. Thank you to Dorette Lewin for making the memorable learning from these exchanges so powerfully visual and accessible to all. Also thank you to the ground support from our other mentors, volunteers and managers especially, Centre Manager Ayse Oliver and Leadership Development Manager / report editor Olusola Adebiyi - who held the other projects together whilst we were in Tanzania. Most of all we thank the young people who delighted, educated and inspired us: We thank Hajrra Mndasha, Rhama Amour Yussuf, Hassan Ngwere and Amina Simba Shabani and their lovely families for hosting us. They are the pioneers of - YEY Tanzania; we applaud them for being brave, hard working young people and supporting YEYUK through the programme delivery in their schools.


NASSIR ABEID KHALID

RAMADHAN MUSSA DAUD

DHAN HAMAD JUMA

SHAABAN FIKIRIN SHAABAN

SULEIMAN OMAR

NURU MUSSA KURWA

MUSTAFA HAJJI KHAMIS

RAMADHAN HAMAD JUMA

ASHA KOMBO JUMA

ABDALLAH MAKAME ABDALLAH

NURU MUSSA KURWA

ARAFA ABDALLAH AHMEID

KASSIM KHAMIS MOH’D

ASHA KOMBO JUMA

SABAH MAULID KIBWANA

KASSIM ABDALLAH HAMAD

ARAFA ABDALLAH AHMEID

ELIZABET FOUM MOSSI

ZAMIR TALIB KHAMIS

SABAH MAULID KIBWANA

ZUHURA ABUBAKAR

MUNDHIR ZIADU SALUM

ELIZABET FOUM MOSSI

AIMAN ABDALLAH

ABDALLAH MOH’D KAMWENDO

ZUHURA ABUBAKAR

TALHA RAMADHAN MNYEJI

MUDRIK OMAR KHAMIS

AIMAN ABDALLAH

HAPPY MUSSA RAMADHAN

RAMADHAN HASSAN ISSA

TALHA RAMADHAN MNYEJI

YUMNA MAHMUD

HASHIM RASHID SHAABAN

HAPPY MUSSA RAMADHAN

MARIAM ABDULLHABIB

SHARIF ALAWI ISSA

YUMNA MAHMUD

ASHA MOH’D ABDALLAH

HAFIDHUU SAND OTHMAN

MARIAM ABDULLHABIB

RAHMA JUMA ABDALLA

SARA MOH’D OMAR

ASHA MOH’D ABDALLAH

NADHRA ALLI MASOUD

IL-HAM MWINYI AYOUB

RAHMA JUMA ABDALLA

MOH’D ABDALLAH

HAJRA AHMEID MUSSA

NADHRA ALLI MASOUD

ABUBAKAR ALI ZAM

MO’D ALIY RASHID

MOH’D ABDALLAH

AHMEID ABDALLA ALI

KAUTHAR MWALIM AHMEID

MAJID ISMAIL ALLY

MOH’D AHMEID SALEH

MASOUD RICHARD SHIJA

NASSIR ALLY MBARUKU

SALMA JADID OMAR

MAJID ISMAIL ALLY

ALLY MAKAME MSINA

FATMA IDDI OTHMAN

NASSIR ALLY MBARUKU

YASSIR OTHMAN ABDALLA

RAKIM ALLY YUSSUF

ALLY MAKAME MSINA

HAMID ABDULAZIZ

SUMMAIYA SULEIMAN HAMAD

YASSIR OTHMAN ABDALLA

SAID JUMA UNONO

FOUM JUMA ALI

HAMID ABDULAZIZ

ABDULLWAHID AHMEID

AMIR BAKAR KHAMIS

SAID JUMA UNONO

KHAMIS BAKARI KHAMIS

NAJJASH SULEIMAN ALLY

ABDULLWAHID AHMEID

CHARLES SAMSON WILLIAM

MARYAM HAJI MACHANO

KHAMIS BAKARI KHAMIS

SUBIRA MAKAME MASOUD

LAILAT JUMA SAID

CHARLES SAMSON WILLIAM

RAMADHAN MUSSA DAUD

SAIDA MOH’D JAFAR

SUBIRA MAKAME MASOUD

SULEIMAN OMARRAMA

JAMILA LAMECK MOLLO


ESTER LUCIAN

AISHA MBEGU OMAR

HAROUN KHALIFA

SALAMA MOH’D

ISHAKA KHERI VUAI

HAMAD ALI

YASSIR IBRAHIM MUSSA

ANTARY MOH’D NASSOR

MOH’D ALI

SITI ALLY ABDALLAH

SALAMA ABEID SALEH

ARKAM ABDALLA

WINIFRIDA CANADA MORRIS

PATIMA PANDU AMEIR

IDRISA ALI

REHEMA KHAMIS MBARUK

ALI SILIMA JUMA

KAUTHAR ABDALLA

RIZIK RAMADHANI HASSAN

HASSAN AME

TATU KHAMIS

MUZDAT SAID ALLY

HALID ALI JUMA

FATMA ALI

NUNUU JUMA KHAL-FAN

KHAMIS AME

MIZA ALI

SALIM NASSOR SALIM

OMAR ALI SEIF

ZAINAB ALI

FADHILA SHAARIFU OMARI

SEIF SAID

NASSRA ABDALLA

MARYAM ALI HAMAD

NASSRA ABDALLA

MOH’D KHALIFA

ASIA KHAMIS JUMA

MOH’D KHALIFA

KHAMIS KHALIFA

MSIM MOH’D SAID

KHAMIS KHALIFA

HAROUN KHALIFA


605 3 / 07979 611 321 / 07811 319 3DP. Contact us on: 020 8826 325 N15 n, Gree d Woo , Walk w Willo ity Centre, KORI HUB @ Milton Road Commun

info@kori.org.uk

kori.org.uk

KORI - Nurturing young people to develop community

Kori, Registered Charity in England and Wales (1142628). A Company limited by guarantee, registered in England and Wales. Company number 05250047.


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