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Mangan ora mangan sing penting kumpul. Eat or not eat, as long as we are together.


Team Members

Chani Elmont Lydia McWherter Arturo Vargas Sarah Donohue Irene Ledesma Vega Vashtiary


Table of Contents I. Understanding The Problem Present Problem Cultural Research

1 2 4

II. Identity Development Mission Statement / Core Values Naming Process

7 8 10

Color Systems Final Palettes Color Combinations

12 14 15

Marks Typography Final

16 22 24

III. Space Design Schematics Floor Plan Renderings Models

31 32 34 38 46

IV. Specifics LEED Summary Code Summary

49 50 52

V. Brand Applications Posters Packaging Collateral Website

55 56 62 64 65

VI. Reflections

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Understanding The Problem


The Problem We were given a task to redesign a restaurant and retail space located in Denver, Colorado. Our assignment as a group was to begin by researching different cultures that we knew little or nothing about. We came across a list of cultures that were mainly from Europe. We decided that we wanted to do a culture from Asia, so we continued to do more research on this region. One of our group members, Vega Vashtiary, is from the island of Indonesia and mentioned that we should choose Java for our culture. Each of us researched different aspects of the culture. Our research included geography, religions, traditions, politics, food, clothing, and popular culture.

The community table outside of the restaurant.

Black Pearl sign outside of the front of the restaurant.

Table and lighting inside of the restaurant.

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Closer view of the community table outside of the restaurant.

View from inside the restaurant.

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Cultural Research Java is the most populated island of Indonesia. Approximately half of the island is cultivated, the rest being thickly forested. Java has a chain of mountains that cross the island from east to west. Of these mountains, 112 of them are volcanic, and thirty-five of them are active. Their major commercial crops include rubber, coffee, tea, sugar, tobacco, and cacao. Java is also home to the most expensive coffee in the work, Kopi Luwak. The population of Java is predominantly Muslim, and includes people of Javanese, Sundanese, and Madurese origin, each with their own differing languages.

Hills from Central Java.

Temples at Prambanan in Central Java.

The most expensive coffee from Java, Kopi Luwak.

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Cultural Research Foods are usually placed on a table, served at room temperature, and guests serve themselves in buffet style. Rice is a national staple in all of Indonesia, so it is placed in the center of the plate, with meats and other items around the edges. Food was eaten usually very fast and without speaking, with the fingertips or with a spoon and fork. During formal occasions, the people wear batik patterned clothing. Batik patterns are usually found on pieces of clothing that are dyed. The Javanese people are very inspired by the nature that surrounds them.

Food from a Javanese ceremony.

Batik patterns

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Identity Development


Core Values After we chose our culture and did our extensive research, we had to decide as a group a list of words that we felt would represent our restaurant and retail space the best. After we generated a big list of words, we narrowed the list down to five words. The five words are our core values, which are applied to every aspect of how we designed the applications for the project.

Javanese Communal Halal Nature Inspired Vivid Oasis

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Mission Statement

We strive to create a vivid Javanese experience by providing a communal oasis constantly evolving and inspired by nature.

We determined our mission statement after we finalized our core values. We integrated each of our core values into one sentence to represent our views on what we felt the restaurant and retail was all about.

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Naming Process When it came to start picking out a name for our restaurant and retail, we were not able to get all together at the same time. We took a different approach and decided to use Facebook as a way to make a list of names. This gave us a chance to look at all the different options and add ideas at our own pace. After reviewing our list of names, we met during our weekly Wednesday class and decided on the name Rumah for our restaurant and the name Kopi for our retail venue. We chose Rumah because it translates into "House", which went with our core values and mission statement because it is a communal space. We chose Kopi because it means coffee, which was the focus point of our retail. The coffee from Java is known as the most expensive coffee in the world.

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Color Process For our color palettes, we decided that the best direction for us to go in was to use colors directly from their traditional restaurants, palaces, and nature. The colors used in each of these were very warm and were all nature inspired.

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Final Color Palette We went through several steps of different color palettes to reach our final palette. We picked these colors because they are from Javanese buildings, and are the colors that the Javanese use in their everyday lives. Each color is warm and rich and reflects each of our core values. These colors are used throughout the identity and interior spaces of the restaurant and retail.

Pantone solid uncoated 1205 50% U Pantone solid uncoated 1807 U Pantone solid uncoated 497 U

Pantone solid uncoated 1116 U Pantone process black U Pantone solid uncoated 4645 U

Pantone solid uncoated 718 U Pantone solid uncoated 2965 U Pantone solid uncoated 5815 U

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Color Combinations We did a number of different color combinations to see how each color would work with each other. This is an important step because it helps us decide which colors to use with different applications later on.

Color wheel with all the colors in our palette.

Some of the color combinations done to see how each color looks with another.

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Batik Marks Chani Elmont When I began the process of creating a picture mark I decided to approach it from the artistic side of the Javanese culture. Java is really famous for the patterns they hand paint onto fabric, which is called Batik. I looked at as many different Batik pieces and this one in particular was the most inspirational one I found. I started sketching any little part of the pattern that might evolve into something highly interesting. After exploring every possibility I looked back at our core values and mission statement and decided to investigate the bird (seen in the bottom Batik) further.

The Batik piece that inspired my final mark.

Initial sketches of picture mark taken from Batik.

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Batik Marks Chani Elmont After a little while, I tried another approach of creating the entire shape with one line. Those seemed to fit the concept of the culture pretty well. It was one of these forms I ended up taking onto the computer to manipulate it more.

Combining the bird and a leaf form into one.

Abstracting the bird more.

My attempt to create the entire mark with one line.

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Language Marks Lydia McWherter For my marks, I decided to focus on the letter forms and language from Java. I chose to focus on the language and the letter forms from Java because I thought that they were beautiful and I knew that I would be able to make a mark that worked perfectly with the Javanese culture. I took some of the letters and worked to make them even more organic and natural than they already were. I also took certain parts of the letters and numbers to make my marks.

Beginning of my sketches.

The start of my refinements for one of my marks.

Refinements for my other mark.

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Final version of this mark. The bottom is a refinement of my other mark.

Continued refinements of this mark.

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Geographical/Batik Marks Arturo Vargas For my picture mark, I decided to take a geographical approach. I started to research different volcanos on the island of Java. I tried a couple different marks but none of them really seemed to work for me. I decided then that I would look into the designs of Batik. I found one that had many different shapes and one that looked like a house. I traced over this design and it was almost perfect. It was now time to take it to the computer and make it a vector. For the Kopi mark, all I really did was turn the house mark over and moved around some of the strokes.

A photo I used to trace the volcano. First mark ideas from the volcanos in Java.

Second mark ideas from Batik patterns.

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1. 1. 4.

2.

3.

2.

5.

4.

5.

6.

3.

6. Arturo Vargas

First vectored marks.

Using different brushes with the house mark.

First ideas for Kopi mark.

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Picking a Type Face Picking a type face was a fairly quick process for our group. We quickly decided that a serif typeface would fit our mission and core values the best. So, we went through many different typefaces and picking out any that we thought could possibly fit the look and feel of Rumah and Kopi. We ended up with twenty typefaces to pick from. We evaluated each typeface in terms of our core values and mission statement as well as how each one made us feel.

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Rumah Original Rumah Customized Rumah

Kopi Original Kopi Customized Kopi

Customizing Type Out of the list of typefaces that we chose, we chose Brioso for our official typeface. However, the original "i" in Brioso was weird and none of the group members liked it. From there, we took the "o" and and filled it in and made that our customized "i". We decided to enlarge both the R and K to give them an elongated, natural look. We tucked the rest of the word into the R and the K to tighten the word. In our Kopi mark, we also shortened the descender in the "p" so that our positioning statement would fit nicely underneath the word.

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Final Marks Chani Elmont After going over all my sketches I began tweaking the one line sketch of a bird. I got to the point seen besides this and started to work on the Kopi logo. For the Kopi logo, I pulled the bottom line out of the bird and twisted it around. I realized it kind of looked like a cup. I started playing with adding a saucer and doing other things that would enhance the cup like appearance. What I ended up with seems to me like this bird coffee cup that could be in Beauty and the Beast. After coming up with the Kopi logo the Rumah logo no longer pleased me so I revisited it. I came up with this simplified version that you see on the right.

First tweaked version with name and position statement added.

Updated version with simplifed Rumah.

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Chani Elmont Sarah Donohue Irene Ledesma Lydia McWherter Arturo Vargas Vega Vashtiary

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Final Marks Lydia McWherter For my final Rumah mark, I put it inside of a perfect circle. It represents each of our core values. For my final Kopi mark, I decided to flip my Rumah mark upside down to make my Kopi mark. The mark upside down reflects a coffee cup and also gives a sense of steam and motion. I combined the different colors of our color palette together to see which of the colors worked best with my marks. In the end, I decided to make my Rumah mark in the red from our color palette, and my Kopi mark in the lighter brown from our color palette. The positioning statements are also in the same colors as the marks.

R

K

R R

K K

R

K

R

K

R R

K K

R

K

Color combinations of my marks.

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Final Marks Arturo Vargas For my final marks, I went ahead and made all the strokes heavier. The first couple were way too thin and the whole mark disappeared as they got smaller. There are a couple of examples of what the different color combinations looked like. I went to the bright orange for Rumah as it went with the word vivid in our core values. The light brown goes perfectly with the picture mark for Kopi as it reminds me of coffee and since Kopi means coffee, it make sense.

Some of my color combinations of my picture marks.

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Space Design


Schematics

Sarah Donohue, Irene Ledesma, Vega Vashtiary We began with a process called adjacency matrices. This involves placing different bubbles next to each other to figure out the best possible floor plan. The bubbles do not represent square footage, they simply give us an idea of whether a particular layout will work. Next we moved to bubble diagrams, which involves taking our layout and applying real square footage to it. This gives us an idea of how our layout will work in a real space.

Bubble diagrams.

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Bubble diagrams.

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Floor Plan Interior Design After finalizing the functional layout, we develop a final floor plan design that will represent the finished space.

First floor, front.

First floor, back.

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Second floor.

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Rendered Floor Plan Interior Design After the final floor plans are printed, we take it one step further by adding the actual colors and finishes that is implemented in the design. This gives the client a better idea of what the space will look like, before they see the perspectives.

First floor, front.

First floor, back.

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Second floor.

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Renderings Interior Design The last thing we do is create a quality presentation for the client that really shows what the space would look like in reality. They should be realistic and represent the actual project specifications. This can also include creating a final set of boards that shows the renderings, samples of fabric and finishes, and products to be used.

First floor, bar.

First floor, lounge.

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First floor, main dining.

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First floor, entry.

Patio at night.

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Second floor.

Second floor.

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Second floor.

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Second floor, lounge.

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Rumah Wall Graphic

Chani Elmont and Lydia McWherter We had the idea of creating a cut out, back lit piece of wall art since the beginning of the semester. Once the decision was made to utilize Arturo's Rumah logo as the restaurant's logo we though we would use Chani's and Lydia's Rumah logos inside the restaurant. This would create a nice contrast between the organic flow the Chani and Lydia's logos and the sharp lines of Arturo's. For the wall graphic we sketched out a bunch of different ideas combining Chani and Lydia's logo into one elongated piece. Our final choice was the second sketch from the top, however, we had to tailor the design to fit the wall dimensions.

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Models

Graphic Design and Interior Design When creating models we were really excited about the front desk and the cut out accent wall, so we decided to make a model of both. The reception desk was created to mimic the shape of Arturo's Rumah logo from above. It would be build out of wood with glass covering the very back and very front. Here we will sell our coffee as well as take reservations. We picked the wall by the first floor bar to accent and cut out the wall graphic from the main wall. We then decided to reflect this image on the front glass window so that when you walk by the two images will line up at a specific point.

Retail space model.

Outside view of restaurant model.

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Inside view of restaurant model.

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Specifics


LEED Summary Irene Ledesma Utilizing products to make our designed restaurant and retail space as sustainable and eco-friendly as possible, we will reduce cost and waste by following LEED Existing building operations and maintenance checklist. LEED for Commercial Interiors v2.0 Registered Project Checklist Prerequisite 1 Erosion & Sedimentation Control Filtering all water waste into containers that will be removed form site by our recycling company. Credit 2 Development Density The location is in an urban community and is in an existing building thus compiling with the quid lines to prevent urban sprawl. Credit 4.1 Alternative Transportation: Public Transportation Access Public Transportation bussing is located two blocks east of the restaurant Credit 4.2 Alternative Transportation: Bicycle Storage & Changing Rooms Onsite bike rack and showers and changing rooms for employees. Credit 6.1 Stormwater Management: Rate & Quantity 21 We will be incorporating a green roof that will add to the environment and will allow to Catch and use rainwater. Credit 7.2 Heat Island Effect: Roof We will be incorporating a green roof plan. Water Efficiency Credit 1.1 Water Efficient Landscaping: 50% Reduction Our green roof will be designed with xeroscape plants Credit 1.2 No Potable Use or No Irrigation Roof will only use rain water as source for irrigation Credit 2 Innovative Wastewater Technologies By incorporating No-water urinals, Dualflush hands free toilets, tankless water heater, energy star broiler, energy star hands free facets, Aqualoc Tap Valves, Leak Detection Service, graywater tank. Credit 3 Water Use Reduction Incorporating a graywater tank to water the green wall and flower beds. Energy and Atmosphere Fundamental Commissioning, Required Contacting an independent Commissioning Service to work with client. 1. A commissioning agent (a LEED AP engineer) not directly be involved in the design or implementation of the project and must verify that all energy- related systems are installed, calibrated and performs as intended. (Fundamental Commissioning) Minimum Energy Performance, Required ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999, the building should start with a good envelope. This means complying with, or exceeding, building envelope requirements as found in Appendix B of the ASHRAE standard. 1. Double-pane low-E glazing 2. Well insulated walls 3. Green roof and insulated ceiling typically with continuous insulation for colder climates. 4. Mechanical equipment meets minimum ASHRAE requirements 5. Maximum lighting power densities are not exceeded. 6. Mandatory provisions will be met automatic lighting control. CFC Reduction in HVAC&R Equipment, Required 1. McQuay VAV rooftop systems that use HFC-410A (R-410A)--a non-ozone-depleting refrigerant with no phase-out concerns. All are available with efficiencies that exceed ASHRAE 90.1-2007 requirements for the year 2010. 2. Using Trane HAVC Optimize Energy Performance, Lighting Power 1. Reduce lighting power density to 15% below the standard by using LED lamp and fiberoptics Using Lutron Co controlled with remote system. Efficiency On-site Renewable Energy 1. Green roof with natural rain water 2. Interior green wall in stare case with slow drip system using gray water. Credit 1 Optimize Energy Performance 1. Equipment & Appliances by 2. Energy Star hand dryer throughout the facility 3. Energy star Broiler for 4. Energy Star hand dryer 5. Energy Star mini refrigerator 6. Energy Star hands free facets Credit 3 Additional Commissioning Contacting an independent Commissioning Service to work with client. A commissioning agent (a LEED AP engineer) not directly be involved in the design or implementation of the project and must verify that all energy- related systems are installed, calibrated and performs as intended. (Fundamental Commissioning) Credit 4 Ozone Protection 1. Using louver windows for natural ventilation will reduce the need for refrigeration equip ment. 2. The natural insulation of the green roof will reduce use for cooling and heating. Credit 5 Measurement & Verification 1. All systems need to be easily accessed for commissioning services 5. Materials and Resources Prerequisite 1 Storage and Collection of Recyclables 58 Internal Recycling Program - General Design Plan 2 Credits 1. Each office, employee break room, and other employee work areas will have desk-side collection bins, especially in the copy rooms (approximately 5-30-gallon capacity) 2. centralized collection areas will be located on each floor where suite/office bins are taken to be emptied; these areas will feature larger bins and "polycart" (wheeled) bins ranging from 30-95 gallon in size. 3. publicly accessible areas where the City is able to provide recycling for visitors will be designed to have restroom bins that are compatible with trash collection bins that are specified for the building. 4. loading docks and/or outdoor enclosures will be sited at the rear entry to each building, where transport trucks intersect the materials that have been collected within the build ing and haul them to recycling plants. Materials and Resource Prerequisite 1 Storage and Collection of Recyclables Credit 1 Building Reuse We will be using about 75% OF the existing facility in the expansion. The all existing exterior walls will be reused as will the stairs, brick, wood floors where applicable. Credit 2 Construction Waste Management 1. Help contractors develop a waste management plan early to ensure bestpractices from the initial phases of theproject. 2. Education of subcontractors on recycling practices and established penalties (such as fees) for not following these practices is key to achieving the highest percentage of construction waste diverted from the landfill. 3. Incentives, given by the general contractor or owner, to subcontractors for meeting tar geted recycling goals can both motivate and benefit all involved. 4. The owner may want to consider tying progress payments with the general contractor's progress submittal for tracking waste recycling percentages. 5. The general contractor should confirm the waste/recycling hauler is providing weights (in tons) for tracking hauls instead of the standard cubic yard totals. 6. Currently, gypsum wall board is the most difficult of all common construction materials to recycle in Colorado. Investigate local agricultural or site recycling opportunities, such as grinding the gypsum and using it as a soil amendment. We will be re-using as much of the wood and windows as possible most of the buildings brick will be reused in the infrastructure and the wood floors will be considered where possible. Credit 7 Certified Wood 1. Wood floors are reclaimed and are FSC certified. Indoor Environmental Quality Prerequisite 1 Minimum IAQ Performance Prerequisite 2 Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control 1. No smoking allowed Credit 1 Carbon Dioxide ( CO2 ) Monitoring Automated alarm system "Lutron" will be monitoring all carbons, fire, lights and shades. Credit 4 Recycled Content Using a Recycling Company to manage our waste during our building processes. Credit 5 Regional Materials We will be using about 60 % of local materials Credit 2 Ventilation Effectiveness 75 1. Will be determined after 24hours of installation of HVAC.

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Because of the use of natural air flow of louver windows we will have more then achieved the goal Credit 3.1 Construction IAQ Management Plan: During Construction 1. We will be documenting the whole project by taking pictures of air conditioning systems and how they were put together and we will write a report in consideration to the project following the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association specification standards where possible. Credit 3.2 Construction IAQ Management Plan: After Construction/Before Occupancy 79 Allowable work during the flush-out period: 1. Punch-list items are part of construction and must be completed prior to building flush out. 2. Commissioning is not part of construction and, as long as the process of commissioning does not introduce any additional contaminants into the building, commissioning activities may occur during flush out. 3. Moving items into the building such as furniture may add a chemicallsink to the interior of the building. 4. Occupant training and installation of security systems etc. is acceptable during flush-out. 5. "LEED-NC prefers, but does not require, the flush to occur before furniture instal lation." (CIR 3/17/05) 6. Owner move-in times and dates must take place after the flush-out. Credit 4 Low-Emitting Materials (General Overview) 1. Our General contractor will review all relevant product submittals and oversee all sub contractor activities on-site to avoid mistaken non-compliant product substitutions. This calculation procedure demonstrates the project's actual overall VOC level for paints or adhesives is less than the permissible total threshold for low-VOC products on the project. This may be necessary if the USGBC rules a paint or adhesive noncompliant during their preliminary review. Credit 4.1 Low-Emitting Materials: Adhesives & Sealants 81 1. One time use of sealant for concrete counters will be needed and applied by installers Credit 4.2 Low-Emitting Materials: Paints & Coatings 1. We will be using a natural ? interior paint and stains have

low VOC's and will be IAQ tested. Credit 4.4 Low-Emitting Materials: Composite Wood Composite wood will be used where applicable 1. Door cores 2. Telephone backerboard 3. Millwork 4. Backing on wall pads in gymnasiums 5. Plywood sections of I-beams Credit 5 Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control We will Identify possible pollution sources related to credits early in design. This will help to prevent expensive change orders for exhaust fans, pocket doors or other elements needed to revise the building design to meet the credit requirements. 1. By Call out walk-off mats and label relevant drains and deck-to-deck partitions on project drawings. Any door that is intended to be used regularly and frequently by building occupants will be considered a high volume and will be considered for LEED credits. A small low volume copier will be used to reduce pollutants. Credit 6.1 Controllability of Systems: Perimeter Spaces Operable windows and lighting controls will be used to and will be considered early on in the developmental stage. Credit 6.2 Controllability of Systems: Non-Perimeter Spaces temperature controls, airflow controls and lighting controls will be implemented and discussed in the developmental stage. Credit 7.1 Thermal Comfort: Compliance with ASHRAE-55 1992 optimal occupant comfort through temperature and humidity control will be highly considered and the mechanically ventilated space should meet the ASHRAE Standard 55-1992 for thermal comfort standards, and for naturally ventilated spaces and will comply with the 90 percent acceptability limits of the adaptive comfort temperature boundaries in the due to Colorado's dry climate. Credit 7.2 Thermal Comfort: Permanent Monitoring System A monitored and controlled monitoring system will be permanently installed. It will be design is largely left to the discretion of the mechanical engineer and commissioning agent. Evaluate early in the design process to establish credit viability.

1. In general, the project needs to demonstrate that humidity is controlled, or demonstrate through modeling/analysis that humidity control will not be necessary to maintain comfort. 2. Monitoring systems (thermostats and humidistats) are required regardless of whether humidification/dehumidification control systems are required. However, humidity sensors can be used in place of humidistats if humidification control systems are not provided. 3. Monitoring systems are required to be tested as part of the EAp1 Fundamental Building Systems Commissioning scope of work. Credit 8.1 Daylight & Views: Daylight 75% of Spaces Use of effective solar control strategies (overhangs) and high performance glazingsare will be implemented. Achieving the daylight contributes to increased energy sav ings in the Energy and Atmosphere credits. This is largely due to savings in the electri cal lighting that result from well daylit spaces. Credit 8.2 Daylight & Views: Views For 90% of Spaces Design decisions made early in the project have allowed us to consider the footprint shape and space layout. The design for this building provides sufficient views to the outside will maintain healthier and happier building occupants. 7. Innovation and Design Process We will effectively inform the public of the building's participation in the LEED program and provide specific and extensive educational procedures to be shared. For the Public Credit 1 Innovation in Design For an overview we will be making a complete list of all areas we are complying with LEED and offer the information to the public such as. 1. Green housekeeping 2. Low-emitting furniture systems 3. Environmentally preferable services 4. Sustainability education 5. Exemplary encouragement of alternative transportation 6. Radon mitigation 7. Donation and protection of open space 8. Alternative Transportation 9. Reduce Heat Islands, Non-Roof

10. Water Use Reduction 11. Recycled Content 12. Locally Manufactured 13. Regionally Extracted Credit 2 LEED Accredited Professional This design plan will be implemented with qualified LEED certified team. 1. By carefully selecting lighting that uses low energy light bulbs. Or florescent lamps with light sensors. 2. Incorporating Sky light where ever possible. 3. We will seek out any areas that need sealing and insulating. 4. Installing a hands free dual flush for toilet. 5. Low sound and high quality hand dryer. 6. Low sound HVAC. Such as Whisper Green ventilation fan which is energy Star rated. 7. Installing a energy Star Gas Furnace. 8. Installing a heat recovery system will keep air clean and healthy as well as save energy cost. 9. Green Roof. 10. Low-E Glass possibly dusts free shades. Or high performance glazing. 11. Computerized Heating/ alarm/ camera/ lighting/ system. 12. Energy Star equipment whenever and where ever possible. 13. Buying most of are product and material locally to save on shipping. Local stone, 14. Recycle plan. Where are the items we will not use go and if they are not recyclable how will we dispose of them? 15. Using only product that is reusable or biodegradable when applicable. 16. Researching benefits to wind powered energy. This list is research we have already completed and will seek to apply them where cost and supply are applicable.

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LEED Summary Nature is a large part of life in the Javanese culture. It is embedded in their lifestyle from birth. Being "Green" is not a fad, it is a way of life, something that came out of necessity in this developing country. Every design decision was based on whether or not it promoted a sustainable and healthy building. By utilizing the highest amount of energy efficiency, we created a foundation that we could build a naturally eco-friendly environment on. The reuse and proper selection of old and new materials provide another key element to the design. All of these choices have come together to create a LEED Platinum building.

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Code Summary Interior Design The Rumah and Kopi establishment is complying to the International Building Code 2006, as an A and M occupancy group. CHAPTER 3: Use and Occupancy Classification Section 303.1: Assembly group A Section 309.1: Mercantile group M 1003.3.4. Section 1003.4: Walking surfaces of the means of egress shall have a slip-resistant surface and be securely attached. Section 1003.6: The path of egress travel along a means of egress shall not be interrupted by any building element other than a means of egress component as specified this chapter. Only projections permitted by this chapter can be placed in the required width of a means of egress. The required capacity of a means of egress system shall not be diminished along the path of egress travel. Section 1003.7: Elevators shall not be used as a component of a required means of egress from any other part of the building. Section 1004.3: Every room or space that is an assembly occupancy shall have the designated occupant load posting in a conspicuous place, near the main exit or exit access doorway from the room or space. Posted signs shall be of an approved legible permanent design and shall be maintained by the owner or authorized agent. Section 1004.7: Occupant load for areas with fixed seating shall be determined by the number of fixed seats installed. Occupant load for areas without fixed seating shall be determined in accordance with Section 1004.1.1 and added to the number of fixed seats. not be less than the total occupant load served by the means of egress multiplied by the factors in Table 1005.1 and not less than specified elsewhere in this code. Section 1006.1: The means of egress, including the exit discharge, shall be illuminated at all times the space is occupied. Section 1006.2: The means of egress illumination level shall not be less than 1 foot-candle at the walking surface level. Section 1007.1: Accessible means of egress shall be provided with not less than one accessible means of egress. Section 1007.3: An exit stairway shall have a clear width of 48 inches minimum between handrails and shall either incorporate an area of refuge within an enlarged floor-level landing or shall be accessed from either an area of refuge or a horizontal exit. Section 1008.1: Means of egress doors shall not be concealed by curtains, drapes, decorations or similar materials. 1008.1.1: the minimum width of each door shall provide a clear width of not less than 32 inches. The maximum width of swinging door leaf shall be 48 inches nominal. 1008.1.2: Egress doors shall be side-hinged swinging. 1008.1.4: There shall be a floor or landing on each side of a door. 1008.1.6: thresholds at doorways shall not exceed 0.5 inch for doors serving other than dwelling units. Section 1009.1: The width of stairways shall not be less than 44 inches. Section 1009.2: Stairways shall have a minimum headroom clearance of 80 inches measured vertically from a line connecting the edge of the nosings. Section 1009.3: Stair riser heights shall be 7 inches maximum and 4 inches minimum. Stair tread depths shall be 11 inches minimum

CHAPTER 8: Interior Finishes

Section 803.2: Interior wall or ceiling finishes other than textiles shall be tested in accordance with the NFPA 286 and comply with Section 803.2.1. Section 803.5: Interior finish requirements based on group GROUP Exit enclosures and exit passageways B B SPRINKLERED Corridors Rooms and enclosed spaces C C

A-2 M

B C

Section 804.4: In all occupancies, interior floor finish and floor covering materials in exit enclosures, exit passageways, corridors and rooms or spaces not separated from corridors by full-height partitions extending from the floor to the underside of the ceiling shall withstand a minimum critical radiant flux as specified in Section 804.4.1. Section 806.1: Curtains, draperies, hangings and other decorative materials suspended from walls or ceilings shall meet the flame propagation performance criteria of NFPA 701 in accordance with Section 806.2 or be noncombustible. In addition, fabric partitions suspended from the ceiling and not supported by the floor shall meet the flame propagation performance criteria in accordance with Section 806.2 and NFPA 701 or shall be noncombustible.

CHAPTER 10: Means of Egress

Section 1003.2: The means of egress shall have a ceiling height of not less than 7 feet 6 inches (2286 mm). Section 1003.3: Protruding objects shall comply with the requirements of Sections 1003.3.1 through

Section 1004.8: Yards, patios, courts and similar outdoor areas accessible to and usable by the building occupants shall be provided with means of egress as required by this chapter. Section 1005.1: The total width of means of egress shall

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Section 1009.4: There shall be a floor of landing at the top and bottom of each stairway. The width of landings shall not be less than the width of stairways they serve. Section 1009.10: Stairways shall have handrails on each side and shall comply with Section 1012. Section 1012.2: Handrail height, measured above stair tread nosings, or finish surface of ramp slope shall be uniform, not less than 34 inches and not more than 38 inches. Section 1012.3: Handrails with a circular crosssection shall have an outside diameter of at least 1.25 inches and not greater than 2 inches or shall provide equivalent grasp ability. Section 1014.2: Egress through intervening space shall: Not pass through adjoining or intervening rooms or areas, except if the rooms or areas are accessory to the area served, are not a high-hazard occupancy and provide a discernible path of egress travel to an exit. Not pass through kitchens, storage rooms, closets or spaces used for similar purposes. Not pass through a room that can be locked to prevent egress. Section 1014.3: The common path of egress travel shall not exceed 75 feet. Section 1015.1: Two exits or exit access doorways from any space shall be provided where occupant load of the space exceeds 49 for group A and M. Section 1016.1: Exit access travel distance from the most remote point within a story to the entrance to an exit along the natural and unobstructed pat of egress travel shall not exceed 250 feet for group A and M. Section 1017.1: Corridors shall be fire-resistance rated. Section 1017.2: Corridor width shall not be less than 44 inches. Section 1021.1: An exit passageway shall not be used for any purposes other than as a means of egress.

Section 1021.2: The width of exit passageways shall not be less than 44 inches. Section 1024.1: Exit discharge shall be at grade or shall provide direct access to grade. Section 1025.2: The main exit shall be of sufficient width to accommodate not less than one-half of the occupant load and shall not be less than the total required width of all means of egress leading to the exit. Section 1025.3: In addition to having access to a main exit, each level shall be provided with additional means of egress that shall provide and egress capacity for at least one-half of the total occupant load served by that level and comply with Section 1015.2

CHAPTER 11: Accessibility

Section 1103.1: Sites, buildings, structures, facilities, elements and spaces, temporary or permanent, shall be accessible to persons with physical disabilities. Section 1104.1: Accessible routes within the site shall be provided from public transportation stops; accessible parking; accessible passenger loading zones; and public streets or sidewalks to the accessible building entrance served. Section 1104.2: At least one accessible route shall connect accessible buildings, accessible facilities, accessible elements and accessible space that are on the same site. Section 1104.3: When a building or portion of a building is required to be accessible, an accessible route shall be provided to each portion of the building, to accessible building entrances connecting accessible pedestrian walkways and the public ways. Section 1104.3.1: Common use circulation path within employee work areas shall be accessible route. Section 1104.4: At least one accessible route shall connect each accessible level, including mezzanines, in multilevel buildings and facilities. Section 1104.5: Accessible routes shall coincide with or

be located in the same area as a general circulation path. Where the circulation path is interior, the accessible route shall also be interior. Where only one accessible route is provided, the accessible route shall not pass through kitchens, storage rooms, rest rooms, closets or similar spaces. Section 1105.1: At leas 60 percent of all public entrances shall be accessible. Section 1108.2.8.1: Where dining surfaces for the consumption of food and drink are provided, at least 5 percent, but not less than one, of the seating and standing spaces at the dining surfaces shall be accessible and be distributed throughout the facility. Section 1109.2: Toilet rooms and bathing facilities shall be accessible. Section 1109.2.1: In assembly and mercantile occupancies, an accessible unisex toilet room shall be provided where an aggregate of six or more male and female water closets is required. Section 1109.2.1.2: Unisex toilet rooms shall include only one water closet and only one lavatory. Section 1109.2.1.3: Unisex-bathing rooms shall include only one shower or bathtub fixture. Section 1109.2.1.4: Unisex toilet and bathing rooms shall be located on an accessible route. Section 1109.2.1.6: A clear floor space not less than 30 inches by 48 inches shall be provided, within the room, beyond the area of the door swing, in a unisex toilet or bathing room. Section 1109.3: Where sinks are provided, at least 5 percent but not less than one provided in accessible spaces. Section 1109.11: Where seating or standing space at fixed or built-in tables, counters or work surfaces is provided in accessible space, at least 5 percent of the seating and standing spaces, but not less than one, shall be accessible.

CHAPTER 29: Plumbing Systems

Section [P] 2902.1: Plumbing fixtures shall be provided for the type of occupancy and in the minimum number shown in Table 2902.1

Section [P] 2902.3: The required water closets, lavatories and showers or bathtubs shall be distributed equally between the sexes based on the percentage of each sex anticipated in the occupant load. The occupant load shall be composed of 50 percent of each sex. Section [P] 2902.4: Customers, patrons and visitors shall be provided with public toilet facilities in structures and tenant spaces intended for public utilization. The accessible route to public facilities shall not pass through kitchens, storage rooms, closets or similar spaces. Employees shall be provided with toilet facilities in all occupancies. Employee toilet facilities shall be either separate or combined employee and public toilet facilities. Section [P] 2902.4.1: The required public and employee toilet facilities shall be located not more than one story above or below the space required to be provided with toilet facilities and the path of travel to such facilities shall not exceed a distance of 500 feet.

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Brand Applications


Poster Process Chani Elmont For the poster sets I wanted to create the group of images that were growing together and evolving. This concept is perfect for our core values and mission statement that calls for a continuously growing and evolving comunity inspired by nature. To complete this concept I drew from my rumah and kopi logos as well as the original Batik I was inspired by. The left poster is an enlargment of my Rumah logo while the right poster is an enlargment of my Kopi logo. Both are melding together to create this spiral plant element. I drew many different versions of this to get the right plant form in the middle so that it both fit the culture and appeared to be growing and evolving constently. The top one on this page won. On my final posters I got rid of excess and unneeded shapes so that each poster became strong on it's own as well as when they are put all together. I also added a very light pattern to the background that was, again, inspired by Batik. All Batik are completely covered in pattern so adding this light pattern to the background referenced Java even more. The goal was to make the posters appear like a modernized Javanese pattern or piece of art.

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1529 S. Pearl St. Denver CO 80214 303|777|0500 www.rumah.com

Designer: Chani Elmont

1529 S. Pearl St. Denver Co 80214 303|777|0500 www.rumah.com

Designer: Chani Elmont

1529 S. Pearl St. Denver Co 80214 303|777|0500 www.rumah.com

Designer: Chani Elmont

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Posters

Lydia McWherter For my posters, I really wanted to stick with doing very organic, natural batik patterns. I started by doing research and finding some images of batik on the internet. I took the images into Adobe Illustrator and used the pen tool to get the elegant and smooth curves that I have tried to focus on the entire semester. I wanted to try to be able to incorporate the mission statement and core values as well into my posters.

Batik Patterns that I used for my posters.

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javanese cuisine

javanese cuisine

javanese cuisine

1529 S. Pearl Street, Denver, CO 80210 303.777.0500 www.rumahandkopi.com

Designer: Lydia McWherter

1529 S. Pearl Street, Denver, CO 80210 303.777.0500 www.rumahandkopi.com

Designer: Lydia McWherter

1529 S. Pearl Street, Denver, CO 80210 303.777.0500 www.rumahandkopi.com

Designer: Lydia McWherter

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Posters

Arturo Vargas For my posters, I started by taking different parts of my final Rumah mark and seeing how they spread across three posters. I did many different tracings of different angles until I found something I could work with. I found one angle that was just enlarged my final Rumah mark and rotated to the side. This made the mark look like an entry way into a great structure. I kept the color of the mark throughout the three poster and changed the background of each poster.

Rough sketches of the final poster.

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Kopi Packaging We chose Lydia's logo because of the roundness of the logo. It is a perfect circle, so you can see it from all angles. We researched different types of coffee from Java, and decided to use the most popular types. We also wanted to inform people of the culture and language, so we added a description of where it is from. When you open the lid of the package, there is a quote on the inside of the lid that teaches you a Javanese word.

Luwak Luwak, a Javanese native animal, only eats the ripest co ee cherries. Unable to digest the co ee bean, the Luwak graciously deposits them on the jungle oor. e stomach acids and enzymatic action involved in this unique fermentation process produces Kopi Luwak, the world'srarest co ee bean.

Kaja Kaja co ee came from the Kalisat-Jampit Plantation, in East Java. It is about 4,000 hectares and located at the height of 900 meters above sea level. e high elevation and various temperatures that the beans received in this plantation resulted in a special tasted and nice fragranced co ee, called Kaja Co ee.

Luwak 4 2 0 0 0 0 6 2 0 0

Kaja Package design for Kopi Kaja product.

4 2 0 0 0 0 6 2 0 0

Package design for Kopi Luwak product.

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Final Kopi packaging.

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Collateral For the collateral, we also used Lydia's logos. We decided to stick with a very natural and warm feel. We used the two brown colors from our color palette throughout the entire collateral system.

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Website For our website, we decided to use the pattern from the menu and the coffee as the background for the website. The website is just a general image of what it would look like if there was an actual website for Rumah and Kopi.

General Information

Reservations

Restaurant

Kopi

Rumah Menu

Awards and Press

Event Hosting

We strive to create a vivid Javanese experience by providing a communal oasis constantly evolving and inspired by nature.

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Reflections


Reflections The Rumah and Kopi team were united, and got along very well the entire semester. Each person had the same ideas and same thoughts about the way things should be done and executed.The graphic designers and interior designers worked closely with each other the entire semester. We all became close, and formed and extended our friendships outside of the class. Many of us will use these friendships to benefit and help each other out throughout the years to come.

First few weeks of the semester

It's Javanese!

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Model making on the weekend!

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Working on our packaging.

12 hour day at school on the weekend.

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Another 12 hour day at school on the weekend.

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Final pieces.

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Our project hanging in the hallway of RMCAD.

An ecstatic Team Rumah and Kopi after a long day of presentations!

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Every goodbye is the birth of a memory.


Rumah & Kopi Process Book  

Process book from the classes Sign & Symbol and Restaurant & Retail during the Spring 2009 semester.

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