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390136_LYDIA GINN


DESIGN BREIFWestern Gateway Design Project Wyndham City

SYNOPSIS Design an exciting, eye catching installation at Wyndham’s Western Gateway. It will primarily be viewed by motorists travelling at high speed and provide the first indication of arrival into metropolitan Melbourne. The Western Gateway installation should provide an entry statement and arrival experience, and become a new identifier for the municipality. The installation should create a focal point of iconic scale and presence and encourage a sense of pride within the local community. The Western Gateway should propose new, inspiring and brave ideas, to generate a new discourse.

K Road Cliffs - Werribee

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ADVANCING ARCHITECTURAL DISCOURSE

CONTRIBUTING TO DISCOURSE Western Gateway Design Project

Wyndham City

When designing the Western Gateway project it is vital that we contribute to a discourse. Richard Williams in ‘Architecture and Visual Culture’ highlights that “architecture is as much a philosophical, social or professional realm as it is a material one, and it is through the consideration of architecture as a discourse than one can engage with it as visual culture.” In other words, a design must have more substance than just aesthetic qualities. In order for it to be fully appreciated a design needs to have some social, philosophical or professional significance. Once this is achieved, an audience can begin to think about it from the point of view of its consumption as much as its production. Williams proposes that there are three approaches to architecture that must be followed. ARCHITECTURE AS ART Architecture can only exist if there is a client and it is the client who determines the function of a project, its specification, its location and its cost. In terms of the Wyndham Gateway project our parameters have been set and it is essential that we fulfil the brief. ARCHTECTURE AS A SIGN Architecture is on display in the public realm and is therefore opened up to multiple readings by the non-specialised public. When designing the Western Gateway the perceptions of the public must be considered and an approach must be taken that appeals to a broad audience. ARCHITECTURE AS A SPATIAL EXPERIENCE Wyndham city council is very much after a project that considers the psychological effects the Gateway would have of viewers as it is their main goal to inspire and enrich the municipality of the city.

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ADVANCING ARCHITECTURAL DISCOURSE

BOATHOUSE personal project

Yarra Bend Park, Fairfeild

This design is a proposal for a new Yarra River Boathouse, in Fairfield. The project was inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright, who was an early pioneer of modern architecture and greatly changed the way designers thought about design. The development of the Prairie style in the early 1900’s is an example of how Wright advanced architectural discourse. Like Wright, I incorporated elongated, geometric forms, hugely cantilevered balcony and roof elements and monumentality through scale. The design is heavily integrated into the gently sloping hillside through the use of partial walls and far reaching eaves, stretching out into the surrounding landscape. This design can be described as contributing to architectural discourse in that it challenges conventional boathouse design. The elements, for instance (office, restaurant, café, boat hire and kiosk) are enormous and separate from each other, connected via grandiose staircases ascending the landscape. Rather than being located solely on the water’s edge the structure scales the landscape, far above the river. As well, the balconies and roofs cantilever up to 8 meters out over tree tops, requiring complex engineering. Wright was known to create innovative monuments that were heavily integrated within their surrounding contexts, yet stood out, creating a grand statement. I attempted to achieve this in my boathouse design and aim to emulate this legacy of Wright in a design for the Wyndham City Gateway - the gateway must create a focal point of iconic scale and presence and encourage a sense of pride within the local community - as outlined in the project brief.

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ADVANCING ARCHITECTURAL DISCOURSE

Abu Dhabi, UAE

YAS HOTEL by ASYMPTOTE

The Yas Hotel is awe inspiring and creates an experience of opulence that is rarely seen anywhere else in the world. Through the use of parametric design Asymptote Architects has created two twelve story towers linked by a 217-meter expanse of sweeping, curvilinear glass and steel, made up of 5,800 pivoting diamondshaped glass panels. The exterior surface is spectacularly innovative, designed as an environmentally responsive skin that by day reflects the sky and surroundings and by night is lit by a full colour changing LED lighting system that incorporates video feeds that are transmitted over the entire surface of the building.

Asymptote contributed to architectural discourse by creating a dazzling architectural landmark that utilizes cutting edge optical and technical systems in professional lighting. They have succeeded in producing a hotel that celebrates Abu Dhabi as a cultural and technological “tour de force” (Asymptote Architecture News, 2010), utilizing parametric design to combine aesthetics and forms associated with speed, movement and spectacle. Also incorporated is the artistry and geometries of basic ancient Islamic Art and craft traditions (Asymptote Architecture News, 2010).

“The search here was inspired by what

one could call the ‘art’ and poetics of motor racing, specifically Formula 1, coupled with the making of a place that celebrates Abu Dhabi as a cultural and technological

The Wyndham Gateway Project calls for innovation and the production of a landmark that celebrates the history and makes way for the future of the Wyndham city community. Like the Yas Hotel the gateway must be a spectacle that draws the attention of travelers on the motorway, paying special attention to speed and kinetics.

tour de force.” – Asymptote Architecture

Stephens, Suzanne. (2008). Architectural Record, March 2008 edn (The McGrawHill Companies)

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ADVANCING ARCHITECTURAL DISCOURSE

BWM WELT by COOP HIMMELB(L) AU

Munich, Germany

BMW Welt, a project by Architecture firm COOP HIMMELB(L)AU, is a prime example of parametric modelling, a method that allowed for a precise repetition of panelled glass shapes, abstract, fluid forms and a design that works to reduce overall environmental impact. BWM Welt was designed as a showroom for current BMW models, as well as an engaging space to hold events and forums. Architect Wolf Prix’ design intent was made clear when he announced at its opening that, “the building does not have the boredom of a hall, it is not only a temple, but also a market place and a communication center and meeting place for knowledge transfer”. BMW’s innovative discourse set a trend for German carmakers who began erecting a similar “string of lavish, architecturally distinct temples to showcase their wares” (Landler, 2007) including the Mercedes-Benz Museum and the Porsche Museum.

Landler, Mark. (2007). BMW’s Shrine to Horsepower. (New York: New York Times

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“Our dealers are like local churches,

while BMW Welt is St. Peter’s Cathedral” – Michael Ganal This complex twisted torque structure advances architectural discourse by redefining the notion of a car showroom and dealer, with all design concepts geared toward enhancing the experience of delivery. The conventional ideal suggesting that form will follow function is challenged by BMW Welt, since function has evolved out of form through the use of parametric design. Advancement in architectural discourse is made since this structure is a symbolic showcase of the innovation in computer modeling, a concept that is shared with BMW’s product. Through this cathedral-like showroom that dominates the surrounding streetscape, BMW have made buying their ‘luxury’ brand a luxurious experience, shedding a grand and sophisticated light on their product and evoking feelings of aristocracy and importance within the buyer.

“Our dealers are like local churches, while BMW Welt is St. Peter’s Cathedral”- This statement by Michael Ganal, BMW’s director of marketing highlights what the showroom achieved – affirmation of BMW’s high status amongst other car brands. Parallels can be drawn between the message behind BMW Welt and that intended in the Wyndham Gateway Project. Wyndham too hope to elevate their status within the broader context of Melbourne. Using parametric design we aim to design a Gateway that achieves just this.

Landler, Mark. (2007). BMW’s Shrine to Horsepower. (New York: New York Times

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PARAMETRICISM We have seen a growing interest in parametric design in recent avant-garde architecture as it presents a new approach to architecture based on advance computational design techniques. It is a new movement with radically new ambitions that, as more designers turn to parametricism, is defining the style of the new age. Parametric design uses a series of parameters to design rather than simply forming a shape. It is through assigning different values to these parameters that objects can be created. This approach allows designers to create a set of principles encoded as a sequence of parametric equations, rather than simply a shape, by which specific sections of the design can be generated and altered when necessary (Kolarevic, pp.18).

“The new primitives are animate,

dynamic, and interactive entities— splines, nurbs, and subdivs—that act as building blocks for dynamic systems.”

-Patrik Schumacher

Kolarevic, Branko, Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing (New York; London: Spon Press, 2003), pp.8

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COMPUTING IN ACHITECTURE

NORDPARK CABLE RAILWAY by ZAHA HADID

INNSBRUCK, AUSTRIA The use of digital modeling has opened up a universe of complex forms that, prior to modern computation programs such as CAD, would have been difficult to represent and develop. What is exciting about this new style is that parametricism offers a flexible set of components to manipulate. This leads to an infinite amount of variation in design. Computational design therefore advances architectural discourse in that it allows designers to move away from an allegiance to rigid geometrical figures as was the case in the past. Zaha Hadid’s Nordpark Cable Railway of this emerging style of digital design and construction. It is comprised of four new stations and a cable-stayed suspension bridge over the river Inn, taking passengers from the centre of Innsbruck to the top of the mountain. Hadid’s philosophy was that each station design was to be different and adapt specifically to the site conditions at various altitudes, yet all maintain the coherent overall architectural language of fluidity (arcspace, 2008).

The use of parametric design allows a high degree of flexibility within Hadid’s language of seamless fluidity that enables the shell structures to adjust to various site parameters, whilst maintaining a coherent formal logic. New production methods such as CNC milling and thermoforming ensured a precise automatic translation of the computer generate design into the built structure. Like Hadid’s philosophy, it is important that the gateway maintain an overall language in order to be percieved as a coherent whole. It is also necessary to adjust the design to suit various site parametres such as wind conditions. The Wyndham Gateway Project should propose new, inspiring and brave ideas, to generate a new discourse. To me this is precisely what computational design entails, creating exciting radical forms that evoke new perceptions of what design is. The gateway must inspire a fresh and modern outlook for Wyndham City, highlighting the community as an important sector in broader Melbourne’s Future.

“The railway reflects the city’s contin-

ued commitment to the highest standards of architecture and pushes the boundaries of design and construction technology.” -Zaha Hadid

Arcspace. 2008. Zaha Hadid’s Nordpark Cable Railway. Accessed online (21/4/12). < http://www.arcspace.com/architects/hadid/nordpark/nordpark.html>

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COMPUTING IN ACHITECTURE

META SERIES by SIMBIOTEK DESIGN LAB “Compared to this what are the cathedrals or palaces built by men! Mere models of playthings, as diminutive as his works will always be when compared with those of nature.”

– Joseph Banks

Designers look to nature for inspiration as it is in nature’s strategies where form generation is driven by maximal performance variation. Computational modelling and new technologies of fabrication have allowed us to more closely imitate the complexities of nature in our designs when compared with the past, making them inherently more efficient in their use of materials and energy. Simbiotek Design Lab (SDL) has focused on the creation of biomimetic products that edify their clientele on the importance of biodiversity in the natural world. Their products are based on researching highly evolved organisms utilizing design computation and advanced fabrication techniques. An example of their work is the Meta Series, which consist of both a jewelry and furniture line based on research into various organisms that display the voronoi subdivision logic, namely the giant Amazonian water-lily and dragonfly wings. The Meta occasional tables feature a subsurface produced by a CNC router which is a computer controlled machine for composites, aluminum, steel, plastics, wood and foams. The Meta bracelets are 3D printed from a soft yet durable ABS plastic that has a coral like texture.

Simbiotek Design Lab. (2012). Interation, Design Technology. Accessed Online 22/04/12 via < http://simbiotekdesignlab.com/>

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In both the past and the present of Wyndham City there is an intensive relationship between the natural environments and the activities of human settlement and associated industries. The city itself has undergone enormous expansion in recent years, experiencing the largest and fastest population and industry growth in all Victorian local government areas (Wyndham City Council, 2012). We aim to focus on this growth in the development of the Western Gateway. Like Simbiotek Design Lab, we will Look to biomimetic design and morphogenesis, the biological process causing an organism to develop its shape, for inspiration, we aim to convey Wyndham city as a growing organism in the broader fabric of Melbourne.

Wyndham City Council. (2012). Population and Demographics of Wyndham. Accessed Online 22/04/12 via < http://www.wyndham.vic.gov.au/aboutwyndham/ wyndhamcity/demographics>

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PARAMETRIC MODELLING

SEROUSSI PAVILLION by BIOTHING

Design team: Blasetti / Wang / Evers / Raingsan / Eun / Bearak Paris 2007

Biothing uses bottom up processing, an agent based design system utilizing digital technologies and parametric programming to realize their structures. This method of scripting is a ‘voyage of discovery’ (Burry, 2011), rather than a means to better a pre-conceived design idea. Biothing describe their process as one without having any clear goals, a method of ‘generative’ design where outcomes emerge from exploration. Seroussi Pavillion, as an example, was ‘grown’ out of self-modifying patterns of vectors based on electro-magnetic fields (EMF). The script allows for local adaption to the site and in short there are six geometrical systems used to design the pavilion, all stemming out of a primary trajectory.

Biothing. 2010. Serouissi Pavilio. Accessed 22/03/12. < http://www.biothing.org/?p=24>

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The project portrays the complexity and innovation of digital scripting and fabrication and demonstrates how computational design practices have been assimilated into contemporary design practices. I feel that scripting is a revolutionary paradigm that allows designers today to plan and fabricate forms that otherwise would have been immensely difficult, if not impossible. The idea surrounding mechanized design is intriguing. The act of designing is taken to a metalevel where, rather than identifying specific content, we identify frameworks and rules within which content happens. This notion epitomizes Burry’s concept, ‘scripting as a voyage of discovery,’ and is one which will be fully embraced whilst using Grasshopper to design the Wyndham Gateway.

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PARAMETRIC MODELLING

MORPHGENESIS

Generative Algorithms

Zubin Khabazi’s book ‘Generative Algorithms’ (2009), describes the “development of parametric objects in Grasshopper/Rhino Environment using algorithmic solutions through experiments rather than geometrical/algorithmic subjects.” Khabazi focusses on the formation process of the micro-organisms’ hard shells, utilising the methodology of form finding to mimic these structures in digital space and fabricate it with new machineries like Laser-cutters or CNC machines. Khabazi’s work inspired us to consider the augmentation of Wyndham as a generative function, something which evolves and expands over time like nature. The concept of morphogensesis previously raised is linked to the technique of form-finding. Scripting, such as in Grasshopper, to digitizing morphogenesis in nature is quite similar to the naturally occuring processes of morphogenisis. Wyndham City’s urban growth and its strong connection with the surrounding environment can be linked to mophology since they are both in a constant sate of flux.

MORPHGENESIS IN NATURE

“Branching Morphogenesis”

Epithelial cells

JENNY SABINE

Simulates the predicted network generated by human lung cells as they interact with an extracellular matrix in threedimensional space and time.

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PARAMETRIC MODELLING

GROWTH by MARK FORNES

The Very Many

Marc Fornes’ ‘The Very Many’ explores scripting as a method of design. ‘Growth’ a project conducted in 2009 uses Grasshopper to create a form based of growth formation of an object, focusing on randomness and non-linearity. Fornes applies probabilistic randomness, therefore forming structures that although similar cannot be produced twice. This concept of using Grasshopper to represent growth and the resulting morphology models provide a source of inspiration for our Wyndham Gateway design. A similar approach can be taken to allude to the natural growth of the city by comparing it to the morphologies of an organism.

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Extrusion

Extrusion

Shading

Rotation

Rotation

Shading

Shading

Rotation

Rotation

Multiple Functions

Extrusion

Component

Rotation

Curve Attracter

Using Surface Normals

Rotation

Shading

Rotation

ASSOCIATIVE TECHNIQUE Attractor Point Using Sets Explicit Grid

Extrusion

Shading

Extrusion

Shading

Extrusion

Maths Fuction

Image Sampler

CUT / DEVELOP RESEARCH PROJECT Matrix of Combinations

INPUT Curve Intersection


Shading

Extrusion

Shading

Component

Extrusion

Shading

Colour

Shading

Shading

Shading

Shading Pattern & Overlap

Shading Pattern & Overlap

Shading

Rotation

Extrusion

Arbitrary Points

Extrusion

Extrusion

Rotation

Shading

Rotation

Surface Grid Boolean Patterning

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CUT / DEVELOP

Morphogenesis

INPUT - Arbitrary Points ASSOCIATIVE TECHNIQUE - Image Sampler OUTPUT - Rotation

This initial exploration involved lofting a surface in Rhino and referencing it into the definition produced during grasshopper explorations. It resulted in an organic, contorted, flowing form .

Simlifying the initial curve and adjusting the parameters for the rotation and image sampler transformed the structure into what could be likened to the double helix form of DNA. This time the effect of the image sampler is less visible resulting in a more inform array of circluar forms

Adjusting the radias of the circles has produced an amorphous form, rather like the stalectites and stalecmites found in caves.

CONCEPT EXPLORED

Our group has placed a focus on morphogenesis, the biological process that causes an organism to develop its shape. Here i have explored the concept of evolution by using a generative design process to morph an organic form.

SEARCH PROCESS

Kalay informs us that design can be an open ended search for new possibilities, not only a problem solving mechanism. He proposes a two step process whereby we must ‘produce a set of candidate solutions for consideration,’ and then ‘choose the right solution for further consideration and development.’

EOI SIGNIFICANCE

Kalay highlights that computational design can produce many more possible ‘candidate solutions’ than other methods and therefore more avenues of possible designs must be explored. For the purpose of the Gateway Project it is essential that a comprehensive investigation of possible design solutions be undertaken in order to achieve optimal outcomes.

Here I have explored a candidate solution for the Western Gateway Project but not yet have i reached the ‘right’ solution as this can only be done through significant exploration. LYDIA GINN 390136

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CUT / DEVELOP

Speed/Movement

INPUT - Boolean Patterning ASSOCIATIVE TECHNIQUE -Multiple Functions OUTPUT - Data Driven Shading

This initial exploration involved lofting a surface in Rhino and referencing it into the definition produced during grasshopper explorations. The result represents speed and the blurring of focus when capturing an object at high speeds

Altering the number of rows and columns in the definition and changing the parameters of the domain and boolean pattering tool have produced a more define form that more strongly hints to movement through more closely spaced linear segments The function, initially sine, was changed to tan resulting in multiple layers. Enlarging the radias of the circles has enhanced the blurred effect, further emphasising motion and speed. This time the form resembles, quite literally a road.

CONCEPT EXPLORED

A requirement of the project brief is that the Western Gateway consider the high speed movement of traffic along the Princess Freeway. Also poigniant is the notion that Wyndham City is growing rapidly and moving forward in terms of its relationship with the City of Melbourne. Hence the concept of speed and motion is highly relevant to consider when designing the Gateway.

SEARCH PROCESS

This methodology is an example of a search process Kalay terms ‘depth’, which relates to the exploration of a candidate solution to it’s logical consulsion. This method ensures a comprehensive, logical and focussed investigation of each candidate solution.

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DE YOUNG MUSUEM by HERZOG & DE MEURON Reverse Engineered Case Study

The de Young Museum flaunts a dramatic copper facade that has been perforated and textured to replicate the impression made by light filtering through a tree canopy. To create the perforation design abstracted, digitized photographs of tree were superimposed onto each elevation. 7,600 unique exterior panels resulted and contained approximately 1.5 million bumps and 1.7 million perforations, all derived from the digital images. The material chosen for this project is one that dramatically impacts with the atmosphere. The untreated copper skin oxidises with the salt-laden winds over the course of seven to ten years producing a green patina that Herzog & de Meuron believe will â&#x20AC;&#x153;harmonize with the surrounding vegetation.â&#x20AC;? In relation to the Western Gateway Project we intend to focus on of metamorphosis, not only in terms or form as previously stated, but also in terms of dramatically varying materials. Copper is one example.

OXIDATION OF COPPER

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SPANISH PAVILION by FOREIGN OFFICE ARCHITECTS Reverse Engineered Case Study

GRASSHOPPER TOOLS Hexgrid Extude Trim Planar Surfaces

The Spanish Pavilion is composed entirely of of a 3dimensional hexgrid. Using the hexgrid component in Grasshopper we were able to create a set of hexigons that were then extruded in the z direction. To covert this arrangment into a surface the cap hole and trim planar surface tools were used.

The Spanish Pavilion incorporates an external skin that is composed of glazed ceramic hexagon forms. The material used in symbolic as it is a customary technique common of the Mediterranean Spanish coast and also in traditional Japanese ceramics. The concept of a ceramic lattice is derived from Mediterranean architecture in order to achieve traditional spaces and shadows in the building perimeter that help regulate the solar gains and spread of the thermal load over the space. In relation to the Gateway Project, the structure we design does not need to be an inhabitable space and therefore it is not essential that we consider its thermal properties. However what is relevant is the significance of the chosen material, in this case both cultural and historical. Wyndham wishes to portray their upgraded image as a clean and modern region and encourage further urban growth. I feel it is therefore vital that new, sophisticated and engaging materials be chosen to achieve this goal.

Foreign OďŹ&#x192;ce Architects. (2005). Spanish Pavilion Expo 2005.Accessed Online 24/4/12 via < http://www.cusa-dds.net/ARCH842SP2010/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/ForeignOďŹ&#x192;ce-Architects1.pdf >

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AIRSPACE TOKYO by FAULDERS STUDIO

Reverse Engineered Case Study

GRASSHOPPER TOOLS Voronoi patterning Offset

The Airspace Tokyo is composed of four overlapping 2dimensional voronoi patterned skins. Using the Voronoi patterning tool in grasshopper and extruding the edges we were able to create a 3dimensional pattern that we then layered to simulate the Airspace Tokyo Building.

Faulders Studio has invented an architectural system that performs with similar attributes to the dense vegetation that previously occupied the site and created “a new atmospheric space of protection.” AirSpace refracts sun along its metallic surfaces, channels rainwater away from the exterior walkways via capillary action and shields interior views behind its foliage like skin. The double layered skin has a 20 cm air gap and is derived from a compressed combination of unique patterns generated with parametric software. Composite lazer-cut aluminum panels compose the façade and are fixed to a matrix of thin stainless steel rods that are threaded from top to bottom, creating a visual floating effect. The external skin frames views, splays dynamic shadows and accentuates light according to different times of the day. Faulders Studio have followed a ‘performance’ based design’ method as opposed to a ‘process based design.’ This method ensures that the design outcome desirably achieves a “combination of form and function in a specific content.” Tools from outside disciplines are able to be integrated into designs through computational design, ensuring a more informed decision making process. Airspace Tokyo and its ‘green’ building skin performance based design is driven by the quest for more sustainable environments. This precedent shows how in future the parametric design techniques we are developing can be focused towards a sustainable living approach.

WEATHERING OF WESTERN RED CEDAR

Like Airspace it could be interesting to link the Western Gateway with its surrounding environment by exploring materials that react and change in the atmosphere. An example is Western Red Cedar, that if untreated weathers more rapidly than other timbers, transforming from a vibrant light brown to a rustic grey.

Faulder Studios. (n.d) AirSpace Tokyo. Accessed Online 24/4/12 via < http://faulders-studio.com/proj_airspace.html>

Lecture 05 Slides - Why Computing? Performance-Driven Design_JeromeFrumar.pdf Accessed online via < http://app.lms.unimelb.edu.au > Kalay, Yehuda, ‘Performance-based design,’ University of California, Berkley, 1999. LYDIA GINN 390136 pg. 20


RESTAURANT AOBA-TEI by HOTOSHI ABE Reverse Engineered Case Study GRASSHOPPER TOOLS Image Sampler

Restaurant Aoba-tei has created a steel surface that establishes a visual dialogue between the inside and the out. The surface takes the form of an organic membrane with an imprint of the regions characteristic landscape. I have taken this concept of imprinting an image of a tree and used an image sampler to convey the shading difference onto a surface of small, condensed circles.

RESTAURANT AOBA-TEI Restaurant Aoba-tei creates a dramatic lighting effect through a multitude of tiny lights that shine through a sophisticated S-shaped volume, defined by a continuous, curving sheet of perforated steel. The steel forms a skin that is entirely separate from the external shell of the building. The architect wished to relate the restaurant to the street that was shaded by Zelkova trees. This was achieved by distilling an image of the trees into an abstract pattern of dots. A CNC router punched these holes into a steel screen. Hitoshi Abe has proposed a ‘performance based design’ method, driven by a desire to build a form that creates a dramatic lighting experience for guests as well as conveying a sense of belonging within the street through the use of the Zelkova tree imprint. It is our hope to convey Wyndham’s complexity as a multifaceted municipality that is continually improving its image. The concept of a skin fragmenting and partially shielding something trying to break through, such as the light in Restaurant Aoba-tei, can be used to symbolize Wyndham emerging as a significant region in the broader fabric of Melbourne. It is for this reason that this case study is worthy of further exploration. It is important to understand different ways in which a single skin can be designed and manufactured to reflect this region. By exploring different facets, including texture, gradient, overlay, depth and speed we will be able to determine a larger set of potential solutions to the Western Gateway Project.

PERSONAL IMITATION

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CUT / DEVELOP MATERIALITY

Reverse Engineered Case Study

CASE STUDY - Restaurant Aoba-tei ARCHITECT - Hotoshi Abe ASSOCIATIVE TECHNIQUE -Image Sampler OUTPUT - Data Driven Rotation TEXTURE Continuing on from the previous case study experiementation I have began altering the textural patterns produce by the definition. By increasing and decreasing the radias of the circle component and changing the number of rows and columns very different textural forms are produced. The first hints to motion and speed, exhibited through strong horizontality. The second is more stagnant and abstract. OVERLAY/DEPTH The overlapping patterns input was added to create a layer of two distinct patterns. For the first example a maths funtion tool with larger circles overlay the image sampler creating the illusion of depth and of growths branching from the tree. The second substitutes lines for circles for the output of the overlaying definition hinting to depth. The tree appears as if approaching at a fast speed.

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CUT / DEVELOP MATERIALITY

Reverse Engineered Case Study

CASE STUDY - Restaurant Aoba-tei ARCHITECT - Hotoshi Abe ASSOCIATIVE TECHNIQUE -Image Sampler OUTPUT - Data Driven Rotation

TEXTURE Using the Restaurant Aoba-tei definition i substituted circles with spheres. This was intended to better symbolise growth of an organism. The texture change is dramatic, yet the form is still quite stagnant.

GRADIENT / GROWTH In this example the initial definition for the pattern seen in Restaurant Aoba-Tei was applyed to an amorphous lofted surface in Rhino. The Image Sampler tool produced a gradiet of circlular shapes and although the image of a tree is no longer evident the form ties in more closely with the theme of Wyndham as a rapidly growing organism, constantly evolving its image. This example also represents the notion of a continuous skin, morphing around an organic form.

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CUT / DEVELOP MATERIALITY

Physical Models

Moussavi and Kubo in their book, ‘The Function of Ornament’ describe the concept of ornament in design as “the figure that emerges from the material substrate, the expression of embedded forces through processes of construction, assembly and growth.” They feel that ornament is an “empty sign capable of generating an unlimited number of resonances.” This ties in with the ‘Western Gateway project’ as we aim to relate culture to our object by creating sensations and effects through ornamentation. In this example reflecting the voronoi pattern seen in Airspace Tokyo, the classification of depth, specifically form is what constitutes ornament as it is the entire model organisation that produces the resulting expression.

OVERLAY/LIGHT This model aims to investigate the concept of a skin through which an organic form can emerge. Two separate pieces are overlayed in an attempt to create a sense of depth and complexity integral to Wyndham’s new image. This model and those that follow have been explored in terms of different lighting affects and the shadows that are created. This was inspired by the dynamic shadows formed in Airspace Tokyo, accentuated by light according to different times of the day. Also considered was distortion as motorists travelling at high speeds will inevitable have a blurred perspective of the ‘Western Gateway.’

SHADOW The digital model was effectively translated into a physical patterned skin since the original contained no small perforations and was rather structurally sound. Although the material used, 1.8mm box board, isn’t able to be bent or contorted into abstract forms, which is what we hope to achieve. In fact, slight twisting caused the panel to fracture.

DISTORTION

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OVERLAY/LIGHT Here we have explored an alternate ‘skin,’ this time representing Wyndham’s integration into the broader context of Melbourne. The strict geomotrical composition aludes more literally to the city of Melbourne filled with buildings of all varieties. Like the previous trial, this model wasn’t able to be contorted, yet i feel that such a structured and geometric pattern would fit in more with a form of the same kind. For this reason i feel that such as skin wouldn’t be suitable for our current direction of thought.

SHADOW

DISTORTION LYDIA GINN 390136

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CUT / DEVELOP MATERIALITY

Physical Models

This model was inspired by Restaurant Aoba-Tei. The digital model had to be simlified drastically in order for the lazer cutter to produce it and therefore the intended image of a tree can no longer be identified. This however may not be a problem. I feel that in terms of the Wyndham Gateway Project, a skin featuring an imprint of a tree is too literal. The abstract arrangement of circles is interesting in its own right, in terms of the way shadows are cast on the ground and the rather etheral appearance of the panel under blue light, further reiterating the notion of an organism.

DISTORTION Patterns such as the three we have explored, will be applied to an external skin. The skin could be composed of some sort of a metal, which would produce a more permanant solution to the larger scale, Western Gateway. Copper is an enticing option, which would introduce an added facet of metamorphosis to our design. Copper, or other similar metals are also a maluable alternatives that could be contorted around an internal form.

SHADOW LYDIA GINN 390136

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This was our first attempt at fabrcating a digital model from grasshopper. The model was produced using a lazer cutter and each piece fit together like a puzzle. Through this trial we inteded to create the illusion of movement which i feel has been achieved. An organic wave can be seen which appears to grow out from the modelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s core.

Each view encompasses a hint of dynamism, an important concept that,as mentioned previously, must be focussed on in the Gateway Project,.

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MATERIAL EXPLORATIONS

Further Experimentation

Throughout the course of my EOI I have hinted to natural amorphous forms that can be achieved through parametric modeling. An example in nature of such forms are stalactites and stalagmites, organic ‘growths’ found in caves formed through the dripping of mineralized solutions and the deposition of calcium carbonate. These biomorphic structures have intrigued me and inspired me to try and recreate their ethereal qualities in a 3-dimensional model. The technique I’ve adopted was inspired the local artist, Kate Rohde. Polyurethane foam was sprayed into a chicken wire frame to create a rather uncontrolled growth-like form. A latex mould was then made and epoxy resin was poured. This produced a semi transparent amorphous form with a rough and unrefined texture. What was particularly exciting about the model was the way in which light splayed over the surface. This is an alternate technique to digital fabrication that could be used to construct a 3-dimensional biomorphic model. Although there is limited control in regards to how exactly the form will look this method is quite suited to the concept of morphogenesis since in nature, like cave formations, there is no set plan, only a series of unforeseeable circumstances that lead to the result. This can be likened to Wyndham’s future. We expect urban growth but it is unknown how exactly the city will flourish with increased public awareness.

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Metal has been raised previously as a possible medium for the Wyndham Gateway, for it durability and structural integrity. Here is an exploration of Aluminium as a potential material. I have pleated the metal sheeting to create a ripple affect. This investigation was mainly to determine the workability of soft metals into contorted forms and to see how easily textures can be produced by hand.

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EXPRESSION OF INTEREST

Summary

Already the city of Wyndham has been successful in improving its image through the significant work that has been done to upgrade the condition and aesthetics of its streetscapes, open spaces and parks. Yet we as designers have been called on to help Wyndham achieve more. Wyndham must be put on the map, and establish themselves as the integral, ever-growing part of Melbourne that they are. This can be achieved if we are given the opportunity to create a spectacle that like the Yas Hotel or BMW Welt, cannot be overlooked by travelers on the Princes Freeway. ‘The Western Gateway’ should be an icon that makes a statement about Wyndham’s continual evolution towards a greater, more vital sector of Melbourne. The notion of the city as an organism, focusing specifically on metamorphosis of organic forms and patterns, encompasses this philosophy. The concept of a skin fragmenting and partially shielding an organic growth within is one which we consider symbolizes Wyndham’s emerging higher contemporary status. Movement and dynamism will be addressed as the design must create a visual experience for motorists travelling at high speeds and from different angles. Our proposal will provoke new, inspiring and brave ideas to generate a new discourse as this is precisely what is achievable through the use of parametric design. We have linked urban growth to the growth of a generative form; one that can only be realized through computational processes. The form will be radical and exciting and evoke new ideas about design. Parametricism is the architectural style of the new age and the very act of designing parametrically has the potential to boost Wyndham’s desirability as a place to live and visit. We have the potential to inspire a fresh and contemporary outlook on Wyndham, elevating the city’s status as a prominent and sophisticated puzzle piece in Melbourne’s future.

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PERSONAL REFLECTION

Progress/Learning Objectives

Throughout the first eight weeks of this course I have attempted to familiarize myself with the emerging architectural style made possible by computational design programs. I have specifically explored grasshopper as a mode of designing. This process and the skills necessary to use the program effectively have been difficult to grasp and I am aware that there is much more I must learn before I can be entirely comfortable with this design approach. Unlike usual processes, I have explored mechanized design via grasshopper, which is the act of designing by identifying frameworks and rules within which content happens, as opposed to identifying specific content. I have effectively approached scripting as a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;voyage of discovery,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; as Mark Burry elegantly put it. In terms of developing my skills in 3-dimensional media, prior to this subject I had made all my models by hand and never relied heavily on technology to design or draft my concepts. Through fabricating our digital models via lazer cutting I was able to gain an understanding of the process and the limitations of such digital fabricating tools, for example, if the perforations are too small or too close together the machine is unable to replicate them. This of course meant that certain digital patterns and shapes had to be simplified in order to be fabricated. By researching precedents I have gained knowledge of how others have used parametric design techniques effectively to convey their concept. I have seen an array of applications, from simple jewelry design to complex twisted structures, all advancing architectural discourse in some way. The designers I have looked at use varying degrees of computation in their work, for instance biothing have created forms entirely using parametric techniques, whereas architects like Herzog & De Meuron or Hotoshi Abe have created only a skin. I feel that the latter option is more suited to my skills and a more realistic approach to the Wyndham Gateway project since I will be better able to realize a concept specific to Wyndham.

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