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LYDIA FULTON portfolio


2-3 | Professional Work 2 | Governmental Civic 3 | Residential 4-5 | Schematic Design Professional Work 4 | Haus der Weimarer Republik 5 | Erfurter StraĂ&#x;e 6-20 | Architecture Studio Projects 6-9 | A Riparian Retreat 10-12 | A Ballard Interior 13-16 | Disintegrating Industrialism 17-20 | Umbrella Houses 21-23 | Analog Work 21 | Sketching 22 | Models 23 | Table 24 | Experiment

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BUILT WORK | Design-Build WJA Design Collaborative; Seattle, WA 2014-2015

BACKGROUND. WJA Design Collaborative’s projects were design-build contracts, meaning we worked closely with numerous other disciplines and had several drawing and design submittals per project at significant benchmarks in the design process.

ROLE. Much of my work was coordinating architecture with other disciplines. For example, the detail at the left is an expansion joint flashing detail I drew which coordinated architectural, structural, and building envelope considerations. The perspectives below are among a long series of renders I did for the clients to visualize materials and interior architecture. On this project, I participated in the design development phase.

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BUILT WORK | Residential Zeroplus; Seattle, WA 2016

BACKGROUND. At this small firm, which does mostly residential and small civic or commercial projects, design down to the smallest details was always important. The client’s desires changed quickly, so drafting was accompanied with design. Because there were only a few other disciplines involved in the projects, my tasks sometimes involved work normally in the realm of structural, mechanical, interior design, etc.

ROLE. I worked on several residential projects, all at various stages of development. I was the main draftsperson for each project. Anything I drew had to be feasible and complement the design concept of the project. Also, I had to understand how to detail and fabricate each design. To the left, window jamb details and picture of a window I designed that had a very small, light profile. Below, the drawing I made of cast concrete with a snap-tie pattern and a photo of the actual result.

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HAUS DER WEIMARER REPUBLIK Professional Work; Hartung und Ludwig; Weimar, Germany; 2017

BACKGROUND. While working at a firm in Weimar, Germany, I and two others designed a competition entry for a museum that commemorates the 100th anniversary of the creation of the Weimar Republic, which was negotiated close to our site in Weimar. The design had to incorporate an addition, an existing building, and the crumbling remains of an armory. We also provided siteplanning recommendations.

DESIGN. My main contribution to the project was in creating the images, helping with the site plan, and working on how to resolve the approach to the building, which was a major design challenge as no new construction could be built along the most frequented path. I helped design a side entrance (elevation shown) that would stitch together the east and west public squares as well as the new and old construction.

Site Plan: 1. New building 2. New Public square

Plan: 3. Entrance/Ticketing 4. Exhibition 5. Shop/Cafe

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ERFURTER STRAĂ&#x;E

Professional Work; Architektur Kontor; Weimar, Germany; 2017

BACKGROUND. This firm was expanding rapidly and had put in an offer on a piece of property where they could build their own office. The office would also have a small residential unit for the principal architect’s parents, a small kindergarten and, since the area was very urban, there was potential for leasing the bottom floor out as a store or bakery. This is a schematic design I did for them.

DESIGN. One major design problem was to transition smoothly from the classical apartment buildings on either side of the site to the new design. Another problem was with privacy on this busy site. I was intrigued by the fences, and how they create rhythm, partition, and transition. 1. Bakery/Store 2. Office space 3. Meeting 4. Kitchen 5. Patio 6. Private Office 7. Library/Archive 8. Roof Deck 9. Residential Unit 10. Kindergarten

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A RIPARIAN RETREAT

An Environmental Center and Field Lab for Edge Conditions

University of Washington Core Studio I Autumn 2012 Professors: Penelope West, Rob Corser, Robert PeĂąa

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OBJECTIVE. An interactive environmental field lab that spans two biomes: bluff and beach. At their intersection is a large area of hillside actively eroding into the water. The site is unstable: structurally unstable because of erosion; environmentally unstable because invasive species are usually the first plants to repopulate the eroded cliffs.

RESEARCH. I studied erosion - its manifestations, its patterns and its history in the area - and used this information as a basis for an exploration of form. This form would maintain its shape and function even as the landscape around the building eroded. In the early stages of design, my explorations were with many iterations of models, experimenting how channels made by or for the erosion could create form, space, and rhythm. Diagrams (L-R): circulation, sunlight, erosion.

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Circulation runs through spaces where the channels have created different amounts of enclosure: to the left is a covered but unenclosed space, the outdoor lab; in the middle, the semi-enclosed indoor lab; and the last space is the fullyenclosed sleeping area, where the main circulation path is fully outside of the structure.

The perspective to the left shows the view along the main circulation path and illustrates how the channels dictate architectural rhythm with sunlight and structure.

1.Site plan (North is up) 2.Outdoor Lab 3.Indoor Lab 4.Sleeping Area

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Both perspectives show circulation over the structure’s channels and depict how they would look after the channels had filled in with earth and plant life.

The dynamic, transient, and busy nature of the bluff gives this site section a unique quality: the line between earth and air is not explicit. The messy nature of erosion and fast-growing plants give the section a fuzzy quality.


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A BALLARD INTERIOR

An Artist’s Collective for Ballard, WA

University of Washington Core Studio II Winter 2013 Professors: Jennifer Dee, Kim Pham

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OBJECTIVE. The project was to conceptualize an artists’ collective and then design a building for them that would include both civic and private spaces: a exhibition space, a cafe, a theater, studio space, and a library with an archive. Pictures (L-R): Hopper, Hopper, Akerman.

RESEARCH. The analysis began with two artists: the painter Edward Hopper and the filmmaker Chantal Akerman. Their works, despite using divergent mediums, represent very similar ideas. Both artists depict loneliness and simple, everyday struggles in public and private settings. This is extremely relevant to the city setting, where often people feel lonely despite close proximity to one another. Using one main gesture that exploited this idea, a translucent screen called the “lantern,” the project made every occupant of the building, whether visitor or employee, a part of this milieu created by Hopper and Akerman in their works.

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The lantern is created by a tectonic screen that encloses the public spaces (theater and lobby/cafe) from the private or non-social spaces (studios, library, exhibition). This tectonic screen is the edge, on either side of which the play between void and mass, expansion and compression, and tectonic and carved structure are explored.

The tension between the two spheres is inspired by Hopper and Akerman and their depictions of personal, everyday struggles in public and private. Through the screen, people can be a witness to the actions of the lonely individual, whether they are in the public lobby and cafe or in the privacy of the upper halls.

1.Theater 2.Storage 3.Office 4.Exhibit 5.Lobby/Cafe 6.Ticketing/Theater Foyer 7.Library/Archive 8.Studios

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DISINTEGRATING INDUSTRIALISM Recycling Center and Park for Via Ostiense, Rome

University of Washington Core Studio IV Fall 2013 Professors: Brian McLaren, Louisa Iarocci, Frank Ching

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OBJECTIVE. For this unusual project, the program was to design a modern industrial site - a recycling plant that included areas for receiving the recycled materials, processing the materials into new products, and then displaying the products - on the site of an old industrial plant, an operation that had polluted the site and taken many lives. Most strange about this project was that we were not allowed to enter the site because it was still too toxic from its former use as a gasification plant. 1.Human movement 2.Material movement

RESEARCH. My exploration began by observing and strategizing using the conditions at the edges of the site. My experiments were done mostly with models, with which I could explore texture, scale, and composition of architectural and site responses. My design was based on the idea of moving from the regularity of city blocks, through the industrial ruins in the center of the site, to the soft natural bank of the Tiber River. Circulation followed this fan-shaped pattern: restricted near the city blocks, it became looser and freer as the visitor moved through the industrial ruins towards the nature of the Tiber River.

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Circulation is constricted along a city grid at the entrance to the site (processing building) but begins to fan out and become looser at the center of the site (production building) and especially at the river (exhibition building). The movement of materials is direct and efficient but crosses the paths of visitors as much as possible to allow the viewing of and transparency in the manufacturing process. 1.Processing 2. Material pipeline 3.Production 4. Industrial ruins 5.Exhibition 6. Riverside park


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The materials and the visitors go through three different buildings: a processing building at the beginning of the site, where the materials are received and prepared for a new use; the production building where they are made into something new; and the exhibition building where they are displayed and information about the site is presented.

Top perspective is of the exhibition building and the bottom perspective is of the production building. The perspective on the first page of this project is of the processing building.


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UMBRELLA HOUSES

A Habitat for Humanity Community for Forks, WA

University of Washington Core Studio VI Spring 2014 Professor: Rob Corser

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1. Place wet core

3. Erect open web trusses on top of the post and beam

2. Erect post and beam

4. Place structurally insulated roof panels (SIP)


OBJECTIVE. In a community as rural as Forks, WA, a sense of ownership and pride in the community can be very powerful. The design and building process can encourage this sense of pride and ownership if it frequently involves the community. In this studio we were tasked with proposing individual house designs and an overall site design for a new Habitat for Humanity community that would have approximately eight single-family houses.

RESEARCH. I was inspired by the idea of a barn-raising. A barn-raising has two highly important functions: first, it is a reason for the community to get together and create something; second, it brings the community together to create something in one day. In short, they are a spectacle. While it would be difficult for Habitat for Humanity volunteers to create a house in one day, I designed a solution that would take only one day for the distinct shape of the house to materialize: a barn-raising of the structure that would be a spectacle for the community. Below: Steps of the “barn-raising� fot the sturcture of the houses

5. Build from inside during rainy season

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COMMUNITY SITE PLANNING. Because the proposed Habitat for Humanity project would involve multiple lots and a preexisting street, we also provided neighborhood site planning suggestions. The far left diagram depicts the site plan, which creates different hierarchies of community space, encouraging people to be active in their community. Each house shares a small community space, large enough for a patio and some planters, with a few other houses. There is a large park at the center of site for the entire neighborhood.

LOT PLANNING. Each individual lot has a hierarchy of spaces as well. These spaces are defined by differing levels of privacy. The side yards have limited visibility and are thus more private because of the screening nature of the trusses. The back yard is more private because it has room for vegetation while the front yard has limited privacy because it is open to the street.

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As described in a previous diagram, trusses that create a roof and two walls are raised first, creating a superstructure. It allows for the rest of the house to be built from the inside, protecting volunteers from the imminent Forks rain. This quick structure can then be used as a warehouse, workspace, and maybe even an overnight shelter for visiting volunteers.

This superstructure creates many good spatial qualities inside the house, as well. First of all, it creates covered and screened areas that can be used as a carport or a private porch. Inside the house, the post and beams create an axis for a hallway, which separates the public from the private spheres of the house. Also, the thickness of the walls create good opportunities for built-in storage, which must be as efficient as possible in a house of this small size. 1. House option 1 2. House option 2

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SKETCHES

Various Locations, 2013-2017

I developed most of my sketching skills while in the University of Washington’s Architecture in Rome program in 2013. We were fortunate to have Frank Ching as one of our instructors, so two of these drawings (the two on the left) were done in 2013. He emphasized quick ink drawings, a style I still frequently use.

I tend to sketch the most while I travel. From 2016 to 2017 I lived and worked in Germany and traveled often. The sketch below is from that time period.

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MODELS

Left: ZGF, 2013. Below: WJA DC, 2015.

The model to the left is of a multi-use high-rise project and was a presentation model for the client. As such, it was made with pristine, clean materials (laser-cut plexiglass and painted wood). Spatially, the model highlighted the roof-deck and the terraces that were at multiple levels of the high-rise.

The model below is a project I worked on at a firm that did many design-build projects where we would work closely with the general contractor and other disciplines. Thus, this model included details such as footings, intricate representations of structure, and multi-layered depictions of the walls. This model was made with two of my coworkers. I contributed to every step of the process, from planning to material choice to building. Photo credit: Ryan White

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TABLE

Summer 2016

OBJECTIVE. The partners at one of the architecture firms I worked at wanted a side table for their cabin. One partner had found four old table legs at an antique store and wanted those to be the basis of the table design.

PROCESS. To contrast with the ornate, antique legs, the tabletop was made of simple, sanded pieces of cherry. The shelf, a piece of fabricated bent steel, was another simple, yet disparate element that tied the two wood elements together and hid the few fasteners. Contribution: designed the table, ordered the bent steel, made the wood tabletop, did entire assembly

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AIR CIRCULATION EXPERIMENT Winter 2014

OBJECTIVE. For one studio project, I did a study of natural ventilation. The project was a mixed-use high-rise along the waterfront. A prevailing wind hit the side of the building that had a cafe, so I was interested in exploring how wind moves through buildings. The objective was to diffuse the wind so it would flow evenly and lightly throughout the cafe space to create natural air circulation.

FINDINGS. I concluded that many small partitions better diffused the wind, creating an even and light air circulation throughout the cafe. This can be seen in the iterations at left where the dyed water has spread evenly and has a low contrast. There were, of course, limitations to this process, including the fact that the hair dryer was probably not a perfect depiction of wind.

PROCESS. To test different arrangements of partition walls that would diffuse and direct the prevailing wind, I created an experiment. I made multiple floorplans with water color paper, each having a different arrangements of partition walls. I used a leaf-blower to imitate the wind and dyed water to record the movements of the wind around the partition walls.

FUTURE. This extremely fun experiment helped supplement my design and understanding of space. I did this experiment after being discouraged by inconsistent results from computer modelling programs. I learned a lot from this analog alternative. I hope to always find nuanced, fun approaches to design problems such as this one.

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1. leaf blower (represents prevailing wind) 2. Dyed water (records wind movement)

3.Water color paper (partition wall) 4. Gap in water color paper (doorway/operable window)

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Thank you for your time and consideration.

Lydia Fulton Portfolio  
Lydia Fulton Portfolio  
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