Page 1

“ arch itec ture LAW

LINDSEY ADELE WAGENER’S CREATIVE EXPLORATION just the beginning


01.0 introduction 01.1 who am i? well you asked...

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02.0 clemson university | masters of architecture + health 02.1 [micro] hospital 02.2 stretch house 02.3 [urban] heterotopic vectors 02.4 sub hub charrette 02.5 examination of an urban fabric

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03.0 clemson university | bachelors of arts in architecture 03.1 dwelling | a place of shelter 03.2 airport hanger | structural cantilever 03.3 wall | contours of emotion 03.4 study abroad

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04.0 shards of architecture + 04.1 publication 04.2 experience 04.3 graphics 04.4 passion of LAW

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01.1

introduction

who am i? well you asked... lindsey wagener

I was born in Savannah, Georgia and at the age of three my family relocated to Englewood, Florida. My sister and I have since named our hometown “wrinklewood”, a sleepy beach town where I began my infinite passion for all things related to water. At the age of seven I learned to sail and at the ripe old age of eight I joined the local racing team and have never stopped. I was born from a carpenter, my father, and a graphic designer, my mother. In the second grade I won the local art competition at my elementary school, the award was publishing your artwork on a Christmas card to be sold in town that year. On the back of the Christmas 2

card was my biography proudly stating,

“When I grow up I want to be an architect”.

Architecture, the art of form, space, light and enclosure, has long been a representational manifestation of a particular human endeavor that combines the arts, science and human aspiration in a way that directly impacts the user’s emotional and spiritual wellbeing. I plan to use “design” in a broad sense, one that allows creating not only exciting objects and places but also influence the social as well as the political infrastructure of the built and natural world. lindsey wagener / introduction


I began my architectural career at the Clemson University where I received my Bachelors of Art in Architecture. It was there that I first learned that architecture involves examining historical, social, and cultural forces which shape buildings through the traditionally means available to the architect. While at Clemson University I had the privileged opportunity to study abroad in Genoa, Italy for a semester which provided an opportunity to explore an entirely different world of architecture. An occasion to challenge myself with new situations that tested my abilities to adapt and learn. Many of the studios I participated in at Clemson dealt with in-depth research and traditional means of exploration, such as sketching and building models. With these methods as a strong background I would like to further expand my knowledge through technologies, theory, and visual studies. I graduated from Clemson’s undergraduate architecture program in 06’. On graduation day I swore that I had no interest in pursuing a career in healthcare design and I was determined to leave the state of South Carolina, to broaden my horizons through unknown experiences. It is only now that I have learned “Never say never!” Upon graduating, I began looking for a job and decided to drive to Charleston for a few practice interviews before I hopped on a plane to travel for further interviews. I interviewed with LS3P ASSOCIATES, LTD. and fell in love with the people working there and their passion for their community and architecture. After interviewing at several other firms around the country I decided to intern at LS3P in Charleston, SC with one exception, that I would not be working in their healthcare studio. However, when I showed up on my first day you can guess where I was placed, in the healthcare studio. It was then that I began realizing that not only could I make a difference in someone’s life through architecture (isn’t that why we all pursue a degree in architecture), but also I could more importantly change the way a person felt in a space, how his or her well-being and health could improve solely through architecture. I want to take architecture to the next level. So, when It came time to return back to school to finish my degree I had to ask “Do I want to pursue a graduate degree in Architecture + Health?” The answer was easy. I want to not only be a great architect, I want to

create architecture that impacts human health and wellbeing above and beyond anything else. I want to change the

world not only through design but how people interpret design, how people think about design. I have since pursued a graduate degree in Architecture + Health at Clemson University and am looking forward to the future of healthcare design. I have not forgotten my other passions for life through this process; rather these passions have furthered my ideals and passion for architecture. I continue to race both large and small sailboats and travel around the world as much as I can. If you want to hear a few of these stories all you have to do is ask!

who am i? well you asked...

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02.0

clemson university | masters of architecture + health

02.4 examination of an urban fabric 02.1 stretch house 02.3 sub hub charrette 02.2 [urban] heterotopic vectors


Within the framework of the Master of Architecture degree, the Architecture + Health (A + H) Concentration includes seminar courses and studio work appropriate for both a general professional degree and a concentration in A + H. The intent of the A+H concentration, which is the most structured and established program of its type in the United States, is to develop the generalist-specialist graduate who can creatively work in both modes. The curriculum concentration includes both the study of health facility design and the study of relationships between architectural settings and their impact on human health and well-being. The primary purpose of the concentration is to study how architectural environments impact health and how to create architectural settings that support the health and wellbeing of individuals and larger populations. Studio design projects and seminar courses examine architecture-health relationships for settings and conditions ranging from entire communities to specific projects and individual spaces. The emphasis in the studio is on design excellence within the framework of the complex demands found in the practice of health-care architecture. Student work must stand up critically at all levels of architectural consideration.


02.1

micro hospital

project | critical access hospital location | edgefield, sc semester | spring 2011 6

lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


[micro]

hospital

a public celebration of rural america through the connection of health

2011 / [micro] hospital

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Located in rural South Carolina, Edgefield is the last place one would expect to find a state of the art healthcare facility. However, this new Critical Access Hospital will help accommodate the under served population of its community. The site is located just a block south of the community town center, optimizing a community integrated care environment. The openness and virginity of the site not only serves as an aesthetic backdrop, but it allows the users of the hospital as well as the community to be more interactive and connect with their surrounding landscapes. The building is integrated with the dramatically sloped landscape by tilting the roof forms up from the landscape itself, providing a courteous face to the surrounding residential neighborhoods. Hospitals tend to be not only the largest employer in a small town but the largest building as well. In order to bring the experience of scale to a more human proportion the building grew out of the sloping site creating landscaped roofs that merge the outdoors in and the hospital out towards the town creating a continuous experience throughout your visit to the Edgefield Critical Access Hospital. It is important in a small community to fit in with the surrounding context, however, it was also important to integrate a way to stand out so that the new critical access hospital would interact with the community as a whole. While the simple form of the hospital cladded in Cor-Ten AZP steel metal panel creates a sensible gesture, the public space must be something more. This public structure became an abstract pendant towards the center of town, a glass cladded system that hangs from organic interwoven steel tube shapes that begin to blend in with the landscape while also standing out as a beacon of public interaction. 8

lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


original 40,000 sf footprint block on site just south of the town center

divided 40,000 sf block into public, procedural, and inpatient. slide units apart to create courtyards, daylighting, and natural ventilation

tilt down the north end of building. the hospital then grows out of the existing south sloping site.

this allows for a non obtrusive face to the residential homes on the east of the site while still connecting the public from the town center through the hospital and onward towards the proposed nature trail

2011 / [micro] hospital

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SECOND LEVEL 37 community reading room 38 internet cafe/coffee bar 40 outpatient waiting 41 outpatient physicians office 42 outpatient exam room 43 community resource room 44 cooling tower

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[FLOOR PLAN KEY]

FIRST LEVEL 01 main entry vestibule 02 main public waiting 03 community convenience shop 04 rehab/wellness center 05 cafeteria 06 procedural waiting 07 nurse station 08 emergency room clean storage 09 10 soiled storage 11 ucu 12 public toilet 13 imaging room [rf] 14 imaging room [x-ray] 15 imaging room [ct] 16 imaging viewing station 17 operating room 01 18 scrub 19 level 1 recovery 20 storage 21 sterile processes 22 medication room 23 lab 24 pharmacy 25 cafeteria 26 staff lounge 27 women’s locker room 28 men’s locker room 29 house keeping 30 data processing administration office 31 32 nurse conference/lounge 33 family waiting 34 public porch 35 private porch 36 patient room

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floor plan 02 not to scale lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


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floor plan 01 not to scale 2011 / [micro] hospital

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[FLOOR PLAN KEY] PARKING LEVEL 45 mechanical room

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[PLANNING DIAGRAMS]

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With a complex program it was important to systematically blend the environment, community, and the programmatic elements while still ensuring a level of spontaneous interaction. This form of programmatic mixing provides a variety of spaces ranging from intimate to monumental and provides accessible roofscapes that carry and blend function to the outdoors while engaging the surrounding context. By breaking down the barriers formed by typical divisions of unit typologies [Diagnostic and Treatment, Surgery, Imaging, Inpatient, Outpatient] and creating a plan that allows for cross flow on both patient and staff throughout the facility there is an opportunity to create a minimal building area, minimal staff, and fewer steps . With the wide spanning steel structure in the procedural and inpatient buildings the facility is extremely adaptable and flexible, allowing for maximum facility changes over time.

floor plan 0P not to scale

lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


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[smoke] COMPARTMENTS 2011 / [micro] hospital

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


02 SUB STRUCTURE SKIN insulated butt glazed system

01 SUB STRUCTURE SKIN

mullion system welded to structural steel tubes

02 PRIMARY STRUCTURE

2’-0” deep welded structural steel tubes

outline of public zone

01 PRIMARY STRUCTURE

four triangles at edge of roof array triangle 360° from corner

extend triangulation to edge remove hot spots from trianof facade gulation

create a structural hierarchy

3’-0” deep welded structural steel tubes

2011 / [micro] hospital

primary structure: highlighted triangles

primary structure

secondary structure

create a mullion grid: 5’ x 5’

rotate mullion grid at random final structural skin

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[STRUCTURAL CONCEPT IMAGES] view from second floor outpatient clinic into public space

section 02 not to scale

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


view from main public entrance on ground floor

2011 / [micro] hospital

The tilted volumes allow for an opportunity to open up the large building footprint to green courtyards that provide natural ventilation, daylighting, and views to nature. The sloping green roofs also provide an opportunity for rain water collection and utilize heat island mitigation and evaporative cooling techniques. This provides a healthy and environmentally responsible care environment to the occupants of the facility and the community as a whole.

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UP

DN

floor plan 02 not to scale structural framing diagram

floor plan 01 not to scale structural framing diagram

section 01a

section 01 not to scale

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


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MECHANICAL DIAGRAM KEY return duct supply duct [25 sf - 2 sf]

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floor plan 02 not to scale mechanical diagram

floor plan 01 not to scale mechanical diagram

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STRUCTURAL FRAMING KEY 12” x 12” Steel Tube Column 16” Steel I Beam 72” Steel Open Web Girder Truss 16” Steel I Beam Joist

section 01b

2011 / [micro] hospital

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[PUBLIC ENTRANCE + COURTYARD GARDEN]

view from top of penn st. to public entrances 20

lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


3’-0” structural steel tube [01 primary structure] 2’-0” structural steel tube [02 primary structure]

rectangular butt glazed mullion [01 sub structure skin]

insulated butt glazed system [02 sub structure skin] 02 detail

growth media granular drainage media R-30 insulation concrete topping slab [3”] metal roof deck [2”] 16” steel I beam joist 72” steel open web girder 16” steel I beam girder 12” square steel tube column

01 detail

displacement ventilation supply duct 5/8” gypsum ceiling board

hardwood flooring concrete topping slab [3”] metal roof deck [2”] 16” steel I beam joist 16” steel I beam girder displacement ventilation return duct

4” on grade concrete slab

section 01b 1/2” = 1’- 0”

2011 / [micro] hospital

section 01a not to scale

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


2011 / [micro] hospital

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02.1

stretch house

project | assisted living facility + adult day center location | greenville, sc semester | fall 2010 24

lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


+

=

stretch house

The stretch house consists of 54 residences that curve and dovetail into Theanother stretch house 54 one in such a wayconsists as to takeofadvantage of the downtown Greenville view. With the private spaces above residences that curve and dovetail and the public spaces below the housing scheme allows for the city to conncet with the into oneprovides another such a way as residents, openingreen spaces, and democratically provides the same viewadvantage to all its inhabitants. The building can then provide an to take of the downtown integrated community and environment inluding both the young and the Greenville view. With theandprivate old. The building is manipulated the residents apartments are stretched site the towards downtown spaces across abovetheand public spacescreating a structure that makes use of the bar spine that connects the buildings. Every resident below the housing scheme allows for the south east direction, room is provided with sunshine as the rooms face maximizing and with fresh air minimizing energy consumption. the city todaylight connect thewhile residents,

provides open green spaces, and assisted living democratically provides the same view + adult to all its inhabitants. Theday building cancenter greenville, south then provide an integrated community carolina and environment including both the young and the old. The building is manipulated and the residents apartments are stretched across the site toward downtown creating a structure that makes use of the bar spine that connects the buildings. Every resident’s room is provided with sunshine as the rooms face the south east direction, maximizing daylight and fresh air while minimizing energy consumption.

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2010 / stretch house .125


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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


The [Stretch House] model aspires to give people sense of pride and belonging, to encourage community involvement and connecting them with their environment. This will ultimately create healthy and happy places to live.

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d businesses ps an sho onscaanl d businesseshops and businesses hoplo al s al s c c lo lo low nd boulevards euslea e r o v b t ards d d boulevards s aenet s an e e e e r tr tr et et re re

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rainwater collection

grey water used by building management

rainwater collection naturalwater ventilation grey used by building management rainwater collection

grey water used by building management

natural ventilation

parks

homes

solar strategies natural ventilation

parks

homes solar strategies

parks

recycled materials solar strategies

homes

recycled materials

recycled materials

cafe | local shops

local farmers market

cafe | local shops

local farmers market local farmers market shared knowledge and skill shared knowledge and skill shared knowledge and skill public gardens public gardens public gardens

produces produces produces

boulevard and street trees boulevard andboulevard street treesand street trees

secure an secure an d d sa secsuarfe an fe d sa fe w

2010 / stretch house

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By providing an infrastructure for sustained urban food production the associated green spaces, community composting and annual processes will create habitats that would otherwise be absent from grey urban living.

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tion uc

Urban food production is a balancing act between space availability, substrate provision and access to water and sunlight. Therefore the [stretch house] model encourages a philosophy of stacking, staggering and multitasking to balance and optimize all of these aspects.

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The “Urban Greening� lens places importance on the utilisation and enhancement of green space and water systems. By focusing all effort to enhance these two factors can be optimized, and habitats are integrated in the process.

ell know know ledg edg w s s e sknow e s el ink link ha led ha nl s on rin ge rin tio ink ti sh g g ta a n l rta r or i ng tio o ta o o p p e e n n spa spa ces ces oapen sp an s nc ace c en sa nc

The [Stretch House] model aspires to enhance the connection between people and nature, to connect the power and subtleties of the natural world with the way in which we live and the places we live in. The aspiration of connecting nature and people will by default integrate and embed habitats into the urban environment.

s en

ing en

d foo prod

Livability is all about perception and identity, making a house a home. By providing a green space network and social infrastructure the urban model encourages the residents to become a community and meets the needs of all ages. Clear boundaries are respected within the built form to provide people with the private space through to the semi private space they need for secure and comfortable modern living, along with public / communal areas that allow communities to interact.

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cafe | local shops value added products value added products value added products homes homes homes

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garden materials

recycled crushed conrete

recycled crushed glass

recycled crushed pavement

seating | chairs + tables

garden materials

kids educational garden

garden types

kids educational garden

butterfly garden

butterfly garden

comm. vegetable garden

comm. vegetable garden

flower garden

flower garden

recycled crushed concrete

recycled crushed conrete

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recycled crushed glass

recycled crushed glass

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recycled crushed pavement

recycled crushed pavement

seating

seating | chairs + tables

restaurant

garden types

kids educational garden

butterfly garden

11comm. vegetable garden 12 flower garden

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


2010 / stretch house

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30’-0” brick module that stretches and pulls across the site to keep with the vernacular of greenville

clear insulated glass

ceramic fritted glass for shading from the sun, printed in a brick pattern to keep with the vernacular of greenville

vertical shading louvers in various shades of green so the facade is ever changing

pop out box for shading and breaking up the facade, located at resident porches

vertical frosted glass at all public locations on the lower levels for semi privacy and night time glow

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


evation evation 2010 / stretch house

1/16”

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1/16”

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partial section 1/8” = 1’-0”

east e east e 1/16”

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1’-0”

sectio lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


2010 / stretch house

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a

b

arm rest to assist arm rest out to assist resident of resident out chair, area beneath of chair, seat area to place legs and beneath to assist outseat of chair.

place legs and assist out of chair.

anti-glare anti-glare easy on surfaces, the sensitive eyes surfaces, easy on of the elderly

the sensitive eyes of the elderly

c resident room section 1/4” = 1’-0”

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same floor floor same material material to continuos continue from throughout front porch, unit to make space seem through the unit, onto back largerthe when doors porch in order to are open andseem to make space larger doors reducewhen tripping are open and to hazards reduce tripping hazards

enhanced lighting lighting enhanced to to promote promote healthy activities healthy activities

e resident room section 1/4” = 1’-0”

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multi - height

multi - height surfaces to to assist assist surfaces all all resident resident types types with their daily with their daily needs

needs

all areas around

all areas should aroung furniture furniture should be wheelchair wheelchair be accessible accessible

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under counter

undercounter refrigerator refrigerator arm rest assist drawers for ease drawers for to ease out of chair, and convenience andresident convenience area beneath seat to place legs and assist out of chair.

open and airy

open and airy living space for living space for natural ventilation, natural ventilation, all all operable operable windows

windows

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anti-glare surfaces, easy on the sensitive eyes of the elderly open shelving, no

cabinet doors to open

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open shelving, no cabinet doors to same floor material open to continue from

front porch, through the unit, onto the

flexible and backand porch in order flexible open to make space seem open floorfor plan floor plan larger when doors furniture forare furniture open and to placement and reduce tripping placement and as rearrangement hazards rearrangement residents needsas change residents needs change

lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health

d


10:00

2010 / stretch house

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02.2

[urban] heterotopic vectors

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


project | transformation of dead malls into an urban wellness center location | gentilly, new orleans, la semester | spring 2010

2010 / [urban] heterotopic vectors

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[urban]

HETEROTOPIC VECTORS The randomness of the immediate site and the multifaceted cultural systems of New Orleans warrants a reinterpretation and transformation of Gentilly. The center of Gentilly cannot be resolved by reconstructing a lost past. It must be transformed through new ideas and vectors that create a heterotopic reality that doesn’t give priority to any one program, space or form but organizes “otherness”. Spaces become layered with meaning and have relationships to other places that aren’t immediately apparent, enabling the peoples of Gentilly to create discovery and an imaginative future. The complexity and potential density of a transfused, mixed use health program requires a design strategy that moves beyond the 2 dimensional plan of strip malls and box stores and treats the elevation and section as another urban plane, organizing and reinterpreting the analysis of urban vectors that govern the program and its connections/adjacencies across the entire space of the site.

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


.01 modified traffic corridors

.07 internal site connectivity

.02 historic connectivity

.08 public transport

.03 visual connectivity

.09 urban topography

.04 landscape

.10 reinvented parking

.05 urban view corridors

.11 intersecting vectors

.06 small business networking center

site

parameters

2010 / [urban] heterotopic vectors

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dematerialization process Vectors _ Mathematics: a quantity possessing both magnitude and direction, represented by an arrow, the direction of which indicates the direction of the quantity and the length of which is proportional to the magnitude. Computers: an array of data ordered such that individual items can be located with a single index or subscript.

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cut

stack

stretch

dematerialize

verticality

horizon

Heterotopia _ is a concept that describes places and spaces that function in non-hegemonic conditions. These are spaces of otherness, which are neither here nor there, that are simultaneously physical and mental.

Porosity _ is a measure of the void spaces in a material, and is a fraction of the volume of voids over the total volume.

lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


stretch

void

use

horizontality

mass/void

function

2010 / [urban] heterotopic vectors

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


educational kitchen + health cafe

2010 / [urban] heterotopic vectors

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+ sustainability health

fresh air + ventilation existing

new

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! daylight existing

flood drainage + visibility + permeability existing new

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new

module condition existing big box

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fat footprint 120’ deep

new small module 30’ x 90’ large module 45’ x 135’

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


daylight existing

new

module condition existing big box

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fat footprint 120’ deep

new small module 30’ x 90’ large module 45’ x 135’

!

2010 / [urban] heterotopic vectors

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transect model

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


gentilly site model

2010 / [urban] heterotopic vectors

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02.3

sub hub charrette project | transformation of dead malls into an urban wellness center [a two week charrette design studio] location | charleston, sc semester | spring 2010

The suburbs have failed to provide the same value to society they initially intended. In fact, we are now seeing that suburban sprawl is having adverse affects on the growth of our cities and towns. They are forcing dependence on cars and high-carbon emission energy sources, decreasing the ability for people to be apart of localized community, and even contributing to the country’s challenge of obesity. 48

lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


The SUB HUB initiative will “re-colonize� suburbs by adding localized and micro-versions of retail + healthcare, energy generation, water efficiency, food production, 15 minute car free lifestyle, and sense of place all through community organization, and economic development. Each SUB HUB will generate energy, water conservation, community and revenue as a sustainable micro-society. The SUB HUB initiative looks to retrofit existing suburbs, and set the tone for new developments that will generate the key factors for a healthy, sustainable, contributing and fulfilling residential life. As these SUB HUBs come to maturity, we will see them evolve to have different specialties in the goods and services they offer to neighboring communities. We will see them become a major contributor to the true implementation of a working energy micro-grid. Also, we will see the re-invigoration of sustainable communities in our country where people know one another; walk to where they shop, and contribute to their society and economy. 2010 / sub hub charrette

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health village

water conservation

substance crops

sustainable energy

existing site context | res. + comm. + shopping center + biking + walking radius

bldg form + s building form | connection to water

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building form | uplifting natural landscape

lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


site context center hub + sub hub diagram

site context | ventilation through site

2010 / sub hub charrette

site context | bldg orientation on site

center hub diagram

site context | connection to neighborhoods

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site plan nts

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


wind farm

roof solar panels farming storage farmers market

view from farm fields towards health village

vegetable garden

wheat | corn cotton

south perspective

roof garden return to natural environment sports fields

existing shopping center walls + green wall system

pervious paving

view from sports fields towards health village 2010 / sub hub charrette

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02.4

examination of an urban fabric

The analogy between the design of buildings and cities is one that architects have recognized throughout centuries of architectural history. In this project I examined the parallels between cities and large health facilities - between urban design, and the master planning and design of larger health facilities. I examined the physical artifact of the Philadelphia metropolitan region, the Borough of Norristown PA, two “tissue samples� in Norristown and several large medical centers. The point was to understand both the context for an urban medical campus master planning project, and what makes viable and healthy urban fabric. I made comparisons between urban fabric and hospital building/campus fabric and graphically documented and analyzed the physical, typological, functional, navigational, demographic and chronological patterns Norristown and the region.

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


project | urban mapping location | norristown, pa semester | fall 2009

2010 / examination of an urban fabric

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / masters of architecture + health


2010 / examination of an urban fabric

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03.0

clemson university | bachelors of arts in architecture

03.4 study abroad 03.1 dwelling 03.2 airport hanger 03.3 wall


Clemson’s undergraduate program allows students to tap into their creative talents, introduces them to the challenging world of building design and construction, and prepares them to pursue a master’s degree in architecture and other fields. Clemson students develop critical thinking, research and analysis skills, and an ability to engage theory and culture with an understanding of how these forces work together in the built environment. The first two years of the program prepare students for the Fluid Campus by training them in design, drawing and computer applications. Computer integration is emphasized in the second year design studio. First- and second-year students are trained in public speaking through a joint program with the Department of Communication Studies. Students have access to a full range of course offerings in each of the University’s five academic colleges. While developing skills in design, drawing, computer applications and construction, students also study history, theory, social science and humanities.


03.1

dwelling | a place of shelter

This simple dwelling space combines architecture and landscape to make large rooms out-of-doors. It is sited on the only flat area in a rolling 10acre hillside that overlooks the mountains. The house is only 15 feet wide and the layers stack and intertwine to maximize views. A 20 mile view to the north resulted in a north facade that is mostly glass. A skylight helps to take advantage of passive solar heating and to provide a bright, naturally lighted interior. The exterior colors mimic the natural surrounds of wood and stone.

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / bachelors of arts in architecture


project | dwelling unit location | denver, co semester | spring 2006 2006 / dwelling | a place of shelter

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welcome relax eat cook sleep bath reflecting pool park

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second floor plan  

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first floor plan

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / bachelors of arts in architecture


2006 / dwelling | a place of shelter

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All architecture is shelter, all great architecture is the design of space that contains, cuddles, exalts, or stimulates the persons in that space. - Philip Johnson

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / bachelors of arts in architecture


south elevation

north elevation

east elevation

west elevation 2006 / dwelling | a place of shelter

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03.2

airport hanger | structural cantilever

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / bachelors of arts in architecture


project | airport hanger location | greenville, sc semester | spring 2004

The airport hanger was a structural project, one that involved testing material and structural designs for the final output. I started with a simple X shape designed out of light weight concrete. It was angled to house the triangulated structural steel cantilever membrane. This structure failed many times before the exact placement within the X members cradle worked. The ceiling was then hung from the cantilever made from tinted glass and steel. This light system served two purposes: one to create a light enough structure so that the cantilever would not fail and two, that the air hanger would seem open and become a much larger space. The doors then attached to the roof and ground. They slid open to create another attachment onto the air hanger. The expansion allowed for additional working space when all the doors were open. The main focus, however, was primarily towards the cantilevered structure and the numerous structural tests it took to make the project stand. 2004 / airport hanger | structural cantilever

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / bachelors of arts in architecture


2004 / airport hanger | structural cantilever

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03.3

wall | contours of emotion

project | wall location | unknown semester | fall 2003 70

lindsey wagener / clemson university / bachelors of arts in architecture


The wall was a response to the following quote, “Design must seduce, shape and perhaps more importantly, evoke an emotional response.” Given the site conditions and its drastically changing contours the wall has carved itself a place. The jagged corners twist upwards and then back down poking or jabbing at the being or thing that walks along its tracks. It is made of thick concrete, a bold move in such a delicate scene. The structure is carved beneath the overhangs. The roof detail was attached to provoke someone to change paths. This interruption is to lead one from side to side, to experience both sides of the valley. The wall then becomes a description based on one of aristotles quotes, “The business of art is to bring something to life.”

2003 / the wall | contours of emotion

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / bachelors of arts in architecture


2003 / the wall | contours of emotion

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03.4

study abroad

I spent four months living and traveling in Italy. During this time the focus of my studies was directed toward researching and understanding the history of architectural theory. Italian Futurism and Rationalism became my primary interest. I studied many different architects of these movements such as Piacintini, Gruppo 7, Libera, Minnucci and many others. Many of the classical elements that I have studied and understood have been further developed in my later projects. This was a time of great development not only in my understanding of architecture but also of myself. The art of travel has now become a passion of mine that I will continue to pursue in the future. project | hand sketches and drawings location | genoa, italy semester | fall 2004 74

lindsey wagener / clemson university / bachelors of arts in architecture


2004 / study abroad

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lindsey wagener / clemson university / bachelors of arts in architecture


2004 / study abroad

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04.0

shards of architecture +

04.4 passion 04.2 experience 04.3 graphics 04.1 publication


Shards of architecture + is a portion of my life that expands beyond my formal education and into the depths of what I am made of. This is what I am comprised of so enjoy!


04.1

publication

DesignIntelligence published this article which I wrote for the December 2007 issue.

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lindsey wagener / shards of architecture +


THE FIRST STEP: AN INTERN ARCHITECT REFLECTIONS ON A JOURNEY OF DECISIONS August 24, 2005 - the starting point of the FINAL year! The fall began with famous Clemson tailgates and senior socials at the local establishments. I cheered, for the last time as a Clemson student, watching “the most exciting twenty-five seconds in college football” dash before my eyes. The beginning of the end was bitter sweet with the knowledge that life was moving drastically forward. Throughout the fall semester, graduation seemed so far away. I was ambivalent about attending graduate school or beginning an internship after earning my diploma. It was with the push of my parents that I took the GRE and decided to submit my portfolio to my four “dream” schools, knowing they may well have been way out of my league. With only one week before the applications were due, I sat down to make the first draft of my portfolio, a major mistake, as I soon learned that this is not a task to be rushed. I slipped the final packages in the mail using overnight delivery with only the smallest hope that I would even be considered for a fall slot in any of the four programs. Once the applications were mailed I had to endure the hardest part of all - the wait. I wouldn’t hear back from the master’s programs until early April, leaving me four months to think about which firms I might consider an internship with.

Where to even begin?

The question had been floating through the studio corridors for weeks. How do you decide where you want to be in a year when there are no restrictions binding you? I could move anywhere in the world, work for any number of types of firms, or just take some time off to travel. I was paralyzed by the myriad options available to me. So I made a few phone calls to chat with those who had been in this situation before and those who might offer advice on where to start. This led me to DesignIntelligence and The Greenway Group, Inc. They shared with me their thoughts on some top firms in the country, lending me valuable insight into each firm. After leaving their offices, feeling relieved and more directed, I decided to choose four locations where I most desired to live, work, and begin the next phase of my life - adulthood. My list included Chicago, my number one city, followed by Seattle, New York, and Charleston, SC. Making this list was not an easy task. I dwelled over these decisions for weeks. April arrived and letters began to appear in the mail. Because I spent little time on my application packages, I didn’t expect much. Looking back, I believe I only applied to please my parents, who had worried that I might never return to school once I began working and earning a living. The first letter began with “We are sorry to inform you…” and the following three letters were the same. For each rejection letter I received, I gave myself five minutes to wallow in my sorrow and disappointment and then I moved on to think about what other paths were open to me, excited by the potential career possibilities. Already having some experience with small firms through my summer internships, I set a new focus on larger firms where I might have more opportunities to learn. While in my senior studio I had become very interested in the connection between architecture and sustainability; in choosing a firm, therefore, I decided to give priority to firms sharing this focus. I refreshed my résumé and

december 2006 / publication

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cover letter and added a third element to my career package, a sample of work developed from my portfolio. When I began arranging interviews, the reality hit me: I was no longer going to be a studentI was going to be a working adult, responsible for my own livelihood. Terrified by this realization, I drilled myself with interview questions to prepare. My first interview was with LS3P Associates LTD, one of the firms recommended by my advisors. I drove four hours from school - the day before my final project was due - to meet with a Vice President/ Managing Principal from the firm. When the interview began, my tension abated and I was able to talk openly about what I wanted to do with my degree, my thoughts on the profession of architecture, and my personal and professional goals. The interview was typical, ending with a procession through the three-story, open office. On the drive home I began to reflect upon the interview with a feeling that I had done my best and would continue my search for the “perfect firm”. I received a few telephone interviews and met with one other firm in Charlotte, NC, before receiving an offer from LS3P. It was then that I finally felt some form of direction. Knowing that I wanted to work for LS3P, I played my cards after receipt of another contract from the Charlotte firm, and the salary considerations began. Although offered a somewhat smaller salary from LS3P, I knew that, in the long run, I would benefit more through the knowledge, location, and associates of the firm. I began my internship June 1, just a few weeks after graduation. In all honesty, being an intern is not glamorous and I won’t sugar coat it for anyone who asks. What I will say is, when given the right firm, the opportunity to learn is priceless. My second weekend in Charleston was spent in the studio, and with that I knew the exciting journey towards becoming an architect had begun. One key to this journey is finding a firm that will let you grow as a person and a professional. Coming out of school I was unsure of the type of firm I wanted to work for - healthcare-based, federal, commercial-based, etc. With LS3P I am able to get a taste of all I desire, which is one reason I choose such a respected and growing firm. The transition experience from Clemson University to LS3P has been amazing, both personally and professionally. Clemson’s Architecture program taught me that architecture is a collaborative art form. My educational learning experience was spent answering open questions and not finding definitive answers. It is in the academic setting that I learned how to take risks, to be bold, assertive. I found myself trying to change the world, trying to be innovative and unique. Architecture is so much more than a fantasy of shapes; it is ethical forms and construction. And, while my degree gave me a quick snap shot of the construction process, I feel I will only fully understand it through my internship. How well prepared was I to handle the transition from school to career? This answer, as with most, is far from black and white. In architecture you are never fully prepared; it is a field of continual change and my educational experience will never end. I continue to learn everyday, which is what makes my job so exciting. I wish I had taken more advantage of learning 3D computer programs, as this it seems, is where most firms are headed. This knowledge would have placed me another step higher in the field. Many interns complain that we are seldom properly taught structures or the components of putting a building together. I would argue that this is best taught in the field, all the more reason we spend three years as interns. In all, I feel I was prepared for the challenge of a new job. During “pin ups” in the office I can quickly analyze and critically justify my thoughts and opinions, a skill learned during numerous academic studio sessions and critiques. I plan to pursue this journey as an intern for a few more years before

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lindsey wagener / shards of architecture +


returning once again, to the academic world. With the knowledge I am gaining through my internship, such as structural components of a building, client relations, and costs that many times determine design, I can return to graduate school - after a much needed break from the grueling rigors of the academy and studio sessions - with a better direction of what I want to take away with me from my education. It is only now that I begin to understand the daily problems and functions of an architecture office. We are constantly seeking ways to produce quality work faster, under budget, and in the client’s time-frame. And it seems that in this profession we are, time and again, underpaid and overworked. With this practical knowledge I can again return to school with a renewed focus on how to solve these issues while creating meaningful solutions and unique designs. This is a time of transformation for me. And for those who choose to become architects, it is the beginning of a lifestyle of determination and discovery.

december 2006 / publication

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04.2

experience

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lindsey wagener / shards of architecture +


While working for LS3P ASSOCIATES, LTD., I created this presentation board and imagery using Revit and Photoshop. 2006 thru 2008 / experience

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lindsey wagener / shards of architecture +


2006 thru 2008 / experience

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04.3

graphics

y o u r. d a t a . w i t h i n . r e a c h

CHARLESTON records management

Charleston Records Management

7167-B Cross County Rd. North Charleston, SC 29418

T. 843 767 3277 www.charlestonrecords.com

y o u r . d a t a . w i t h i n . r e a c h

CHARLESTON records management

Charleston Records Management

7167-B Cross County Rd. North Charleston, SC 29418

y o u r. d a t a . w i t h i n . r e a c h

Jay Cook President

7167-B Cross County Rd. North Charleston, SC 29418

CHARLESTON records management

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T. 843 767 3277 E. jaycook@charlestonrecords.com www.charlestonrecords.com

One passion of mine is graphic design. The upper left logo was commissioned for a sailing team in Charleston SC to be for t-shirts and gear branding. The branding on the lower left was designed for a local charleston records management company. I designed the logo, letterhead, envelope, business card, and truck wrap. The design on the right was an AIA emerging professional’s Charleston event. I created a survey of questions which was later used to advise the local architectural community on what interns really think and need. For this event I wrote the survey, designed the posters (like the one on the right), hosted the event and published the results. lindsey wagener / shards of architecture +


B. getting hired Rate 1-8 the importance of each of these factors (1 being most important) in choosing an firm: a. Location b. Reputation of firm c. Compensation d. Practice emphasis/specialty

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e. Firm’s commitment to interns f. Size of firm g. Fringe benefits h. Bosses

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How many firms did you consider before choosing a firm to work for?

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How many firms gave you a job offer?

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What other locations did you consider taking a job?

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How long did it take you to find a job once you started seeking? 89


04.4

passion of LAW

These photos are only a snap shot of who I am and what I love. I am an architect, writer, photographer, graphic designer, sailor, traveler, back packer, camper, and have a significant love of the water. Given the opportunity, I know I am capable of doing something great for our world and the people that inhabit it. I am passionate about accomplishing my goals through continuing education, professional development and life experiences!

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lindsey wagener / shards of architecture +


time undefinable / passion of LAW

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just the end of the beginning

Lindsey Wagener's Portfolio  

"LAW" Architecture Porfolio

Lindsey Wagener's Portfolio  

"LAW" Architecture Porfolio

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