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SUMMER 2007

A I T I

L S O N H I S S S U E

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O N T H E C O V E R Renaissance man of the visual arts, Paul Pope, designed our Issue III MGZN cover. Inside Pope gives the LVHRD MGZN reader an exclusive look at the never-before-seen trailer for his comic book 100%

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P B L S H R . F N D R . D R CT R .

Beauregard H. Montgomery E D ITO R - I N - C H IE F

Doug Jaeger M a n a g i ng e d i t o r

Michael Garrido D ESI G N D I R ECTO R

Elizabeth Tan A R T D I R ECTO R

Mark Miller LINK editor

Pat Allard t e c hn i c a l d i r e c t o r

Erin Sparling P H OTO G R A P H Y

Karin Patrin Pedro Reis Peter Svarzbein Leo Zacharias The Squid video

Carlos Pavan

L V H R D M G Z N B s n s s M ngr

Matt Spangler writers/ contributors

Logan Antill Dorothy Ball Dave Franzese Matt Goldman Nicholas Hall Todd Jatras Randy Makiej Obreahny O’Brien Chris Roan Steve Roberts Production assist

Matthew Ell L V H R D M mbr s hp Srv c e s

Chantal Strauss P u bl i c R e l a t i o n s

thehappycorp global

a r t / i ll u s t r a t o r s

Daniel Arbello Dave Franzese Catalina Girón Marcelo Maziero Paul Pope

Onl i n e D i s t r i b u t i o n

Cliff Shelby Adv e r t i s i ng S a l e s

April Garrett Lauren Dapiaoen S P ECIA L T H A N K S

Ben Nabors Jennifer Daniel for their continued support

SOMETHING ON YOUR MIND?

Direct your thoughts, inquiries and comments to: MGZN@LVHRD.ORG

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TOC Catalina Girón

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Mark miller

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contributors

01 Peter Svarzbein

02 leo zacharias 03 catalina Giron 04 nicholas hall

05 matt ell 06 pedro reis 07 daniel arbello 08 erin sparling 09 jennifer daniel 10 karin patrin

11 marcelo maziero 12 dave franzese 13 paul pope

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PCTRS

MASTER-DISASTER MCFGHT II

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TUE, MAY 22ND, 2007 HIGH SCHOOL GYM NOLITA HOST KURT BRAUNOHLER “WEAR A DISGUISE. WE’LL PROVIDE THE MUSTACHE”

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1 wgraphic by Dave Franzese, AAARRR!!! 2 Competitor Matt Coats 3 Nicholas Hall & Randy Makiej 4 Winners Tara Salerno 5 Commandante of Events

Ben Nabors with Host Kurt Braunohler 6 Competitor Eric Gill 7 Judges Bill Sims, Heather Fink & Luca Venezia aka Drop the Lime 8 Cody Childers tries on a moustache 9 The excited crowd 10 DJ’s Snack & C’mish of Turntable Lab 11 Comedian Kristen Schaal. 1

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Photographs by Leo Zacharias and Erin Sparling.

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On May 22nd, 2007 LVHRD turned a high school gymnasium into the greatest karaoke arena in NYC. We speak of MCFGHT II. Mustaches were painted, voices were lost, and lives were changed. Over three rounds of single elimination our 6 contestants–Anthony Ellison, Eric Gill, Jahfurry, Laurel Wells, Matt Coats, Tara Salerno–vied for vocal dominance in front of three judges and host Kurt “The Ribbon Twirler” Braunohler. In round 1 the contestants performed songs they had prepared beforehand. Round 2 intensified with the audience choosing the songs for the remaining three singers by a show of shouts.In the final round–the Mic Fight– finalists Matt Coats and Tara Salerno dueled with a montage of viral video clips. When the dust settled from the Flea Market Montgomery and Asian workout video mashups it was up to our judges–Luca Venezia, Bill Sims, and Heather Fink–to decide who would leave the gym clutching the boxing glove trophy. Tara Salerno was crowned MCFGHT karaoke champions over falsetto singing, crowd favorite, Matt Coats. Many felt that Tara and Tyler’s fake bling blinded the judges’ decision, a ruling that to this day remains controversial.

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Elements for Creativity Type: Railroad Gothic 1 face Red Rooster $45 Images: To see a gallery of the images used, go to veer.com/worldsofimagination Š 2007 Veer Incorporated

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MT @ LVHRD

SUPERHEROES BALL DECEMBER 31, 2005

June 2007 may have seen the first ever joint LVHRD birthday party.  Heather Fink and Jeff Newelt aka Jahfurry, who met at the LVHRD Superhero Ball, took over Cake Shop on the LES for an all-star basement dance party featuring the legendary jazzmen Bill Sims and Cedric Brooks.     

JEFF NEWELT AKA JAHFURRY

MINISTER OF HYPE

Heather and Jeff’s birthday collaboration was born out of a shared lust for life.  Heather’s comedy writing is a tangle of limbs and suggestive verbs; Jeff is a jack of all trades, part comics editor, part reggae singer. Both have a tendency to start a dance routines midway through a conversation. Don’t take it personally. 

HEATHER FINK

COMEDIAN

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MMBR RCMMNDS

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We asked the MoMA’s Staff Liaison to the Board of Trustees, Ellen Haller, to shed some MIT-educated light on her favorite threedimensional spaces of NYC. Despite the fact that she is very tall, her perspective can be enjoyed by everyone. Her answers were submitted through this facsimile questionnaire.

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MMBR SRVY

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PPL

We love Desktopias. But lately they have been leaving us wanting more. For this edition we had our contributors pull back the camera and show us their workspace. One of these in particular will make you feel better about the empty water bottle you subconsciously refuse to move.

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A:MURRAY HILL Q:CHRIS ROAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY KARIN PARTIN

My approach to Murray Hill’s act has always been nice, simple, and ignorant. I like it because I agree to not ask too many questions. I have always simply decided to be entertained by the ideal of Murray, and to leave it at that. But that’s not to say that I haven’t been curious. I was honored to sit down with Murray to discuss his history, psyche, burgers, comedic lineage, politics, and things in threes.

What are your top three burger joints in NYC? Great Jones Café, Florent restaurant, and Dumont Burger. But Great Jones is my favorite place in New York. It’s not so fucking hip that you can’t stand it. It’s great. I always order the burger. I’m a real creature of habit in there. My dream is to go into any restaurant in New York and order “the usual” and have them whip it up. I’ve been going there for ten years. Order the usual there and I order the usual at Sal’s and Rosario’s Pizza. There are some pretty swanky burlesque lounges opening up these days, and I wondered if you thought it was a positive thing that people were paying $120 cover charges to get into the room. $600 for a fucking table! I’ve been performing in the East Village for about ten years. I started at this place called the 9999s. It’s closed now. Pretty much every venue I’ve ever played is now closed. It’s a joke, like “Hey, Murray’s playing the room, get ready to close the place down.” So gentrification has always been happening. When I first started, it was just the cool kids and the gay crowd in the audience. Now, everybody else comes to the show. So that’s good for me. But the problem is that some of the exclusive clubs aren’t hiring downtown talent, and I don’t think that’s cool, because

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these are the people that made this neighborhood cool in the first place. What are your favorite three venues to play? Mo Pitkins, Joe’s Pub, and Bowery Ballroom. You’ve been doing a lot of shows abroad, how does the act translate to a crowd that might not be familiar with the Borscht Belt nostalgia of your act? My response in London was amazing! They were screaming at me not to get off stage. We did two nights with 1,500 people each night. So oversees they love it. They love the characters and the drag and the camp. There’s nobody like me out there so they really go for it. I want to move out there. Can you name other performers that you think have been able to successfully adapt to the changing audiences? Not really. I can appeal to a lot of different people. And people get completely different stuff out of my act. I’m embracing it. It’s my career. When I first started I was running for mayor of New York.I was going to ask you about that next. I was on the street trying to hit all walks of life. I’ve never just wanted to play to the gay crowd or the downtown crowd. I hit the whole gamut. Mainstream, whoever. Who wants to preach just to the converted? How many votes did you get? I got 341 write-in votes just by hitting the street. Do you ever think about running again?

Well, I have a bit of a past between then and now. They have technology that would reveal things about me that are probably more suitable for an HBO special than a mayoral campaign. You are called things like “the reigning patriarch of downtown performance” by the New York Times. Do you feel a responsibility to help promote a new generation of downtown performers? I get that “elder statesmen” responsibility because I have been around for so long. I try and help younger acts get booked, and help them out with some of their promotional materials. You know, some of the stuff that you see is so bad you just want to cringe. So you help them with flyer designs? Yeah. A lot of my act that people never see is behind the scenes. It’s not just showing up to a gig. You’ve got the flyers, and the website, and the brand, and some of the younger kids have no idea what they are doing with that. You did your own website? It looks really great: Hey, that’s showbiz. Low overhead. You are an accomplished triangle player. Where did you pick up the art of triangulation? I’ve been playing since I was a kid. It’s a cheap instrument! Easy to pick up. What will a top shelf triangle run you? Fifteen bucks with a nameplate on it. You know, all those Borscht Belt guys had instruments. I happened to have one, and I played it with a fork. I blew a bunch of fifteenyear-old kid’s minds with a triangle solo at a Le Tigre show once. Have you ever had an interaction with an audience member that caused them to get offended? Oh yeah, there was this woman, I said she looked like “Blossom”. She took it as some knock against Judaism and thought I was calling her ugly and started crying. I love Blossom! That’s a huge compliment! I know! But I felt bad that she was crying, but you know, you’ve got to move on. Check your ego at the door at a Murray Hill show, I guess. Which brings to mind the framework of the id, ego, and superego, and I’d like to get into that for a moment if we may. It

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Murray Hill Mo Pitkins Hamburgers Mark Twain Borscht Belt The Triangle

murray hill show. Saturday nights at 10PM in September at Mo Pickin’s

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“In junior high I dressed as Mark Twain for a book report!” CONTINUED

CHRIS ROAN

When Chris Roan was 17, he was banned for life from a Perkins restaurant in his home town of Minneapolis for sneaking into the kitchen and trying to prepare his own food. As of March 2007, his photo still hangs by the host’s station. He is now 26 and resides in Brooklyn, New York, where he frequently masturbates.

RIGHT Backstage at Mo Pickin’s.

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seems to me that Murray Hill could be the manifestation of your id. Is that so, and in what ways have you seen Murray creep into other aspects of your life? By accident I called my shrink “kid” the other day, and it freaked us both out. I couldn’t believe I slipped into the voice! But in the old days, I used to be Murray all the time. Like 24/7. I had no down time. I was drinking like fifteen Budweisers a day. I had girlfriends that only knew me as Murray. It was crazy. So there were people that you were dating that were only dating Murray, not the comedian behind Murray? Yeah, only when I was out. I was stuck in the nightlife, and there was no downtime. Just partying. And I burnt out. But they only knew me in character. But it was fun for a while. In some of your current relationships, do you find it creeping in at times? My special lady friend always asks me “Am I going out with you or Murray tonight?” And I had asked who I would be sitting down with as well: Since I have a gig tonight, I am Murray. But it’s a tricky situation. When did you start dressing in drag? I started doing Murray in 1995, but without me really knowing I was doing drag, the earliest I started was pre-kindergarten! We had a little school play about Bingo the farmer, and I was cast to play one of the girls.  My mother told me that I threw a crying fit and hid in a cubbyhole

because I wanted to be the farmer. So, they cast me as the farmer and I wore overalls and a straw hat!  Then in third grade I wrote a skit for some class based on that show “One Day at a Time” and I dressed up as Schneider, the handyman, with a mustache, the cigarette pack rolled up on my sleeve, work boots--the whole nine yards. Then, in junior high I dressed as Mark Twain for a book report!  So, I guess I have been doing drag my whole life. I read that you came to NYC to study art at SVA. Were you dressing in drag then as well? I actually started performing as Murray my last year at SVA.  I was dangling in the middle of feeling pressure to fulfill my photo thesis requirements and performing. The pull of performance was very strong.  I had this amazing teacher who could tell I was struggling with a focused direction, and at one of our meetings she told me to “put down the camera, and put everything you’ve got into developing this character.”  And, that’s exactly what I did. When I ran for mayor of New York, I was actually still in grad school and it became my thesis project. And what were you called before you assumed the identity of Murray Hill? Agnes is my confirmation name. Where do you live? Williamsburg. I’ve lived there for ten years of my fucking life. Before anybody moved out there. How has the foreseeable end of Coney Island as we know it affected you personally and professionally? I just did a show there. It kills me. There really is so much changing, and so many… I just hope they don’t wreck the place. There’s such history there. Like 52nd street, and now there is one place left. And that’s where all the speakeasies used to be. New York is losing its memory and its history. It kills me but I do my part. I still perform down here. I’d make more money if I performed further uptown, but I still try to hold the torch. Whatever happens, I’m still going to do shows where you have to walk through the kitchen to get to the stage.

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Maura Rockcastle and Sierra Bainbridge are landscape architects at Field Operations and the winners of LVHRD’s ARCH DUEL III. From its inception, both worked on the High Line Park project that will create a native plant habitat three stories up with the first section to open this year. They sat down to talk with us about the impact of this environmental challenge and the use of cheese as a viable construction material.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY LEO ZACHARIAS LV H R D . O R G

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What was your approach to the outfits you wore at the ARCH DUEL III?

Maura: Well, we decided to make costumes that both we could use in the model and also were sort of a wonderful visual performance.

So actually, you preconceived the idea of using them in the models— because there were some who thought that was cheating.

Sierra: We were actually very concerned that maybe we weren’t following the rules. We had various discussions about whether or not it was within the rules. We decided that the whole point of the event was to break down boundaries between disciplines and between different types of work. So the idea of having a rule that governed that seemed silly in the end, so we decided to go for it! And our kind of compromise was that if we didn’t use the material in the model, we would use it as a tool to flatten cheese or we would use it to texturize cheese or whatever way we found to use it.

So you knew cheese was the material?

S: Yeah, they told us the night before. M: But then at the last minute too, we decided that if we feel uncomfortable with using our outfits in any way, we could rip it off, swing it around and throw it into the crowd.

Has it enhanced your career at all to have competed in the architecture duel?

S: People in Japan kept writing the Field Operations founder, Jim and asking, “What’s going on? What’s this cheese project?” He got some random e-mails from people, so it was definitely out there on a broader level to a different group then we would have been exposed to, or would be exposed to us.

Did you have any expectations coming into the event?

M: I just wanted to make sure that we made a really cool model and had a lot of fun. My expectations were definitely met. I think it was way more fun than I thought it would be, mostly because I was a little nervous just being on stage in front of 500 drunken people, but I think it was way better than I thought it would be in terms of feeling super creative.

Field Operations ARCH DL III High Line Park Cheese Agriculture

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“I was a little nervous just being on stage in front of 500 drunken people.”

RANDY MAKIEJ

Randy was formerly part of the Boston “underground zine movement” where he wrote under such nom de guerres as “the Reverend Shitbob Kreig” and published six page photo spreads on bicycle safety that included his nude visage. Since reformed, he lives in Brooklyn and covets brunch, like all good yuppies.

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FROM

So in regard to moments of inspiration, do you two find that in business, the creative process is sullied by the expectations and the flows of business, as opposed to taking your skills and applying them in a free form manor?

S: It’s hard to compare on a general level what it would be like at other firms because both Maura and I have only worked for Field Operations, but there’s definitely a time crunch that I think limits the ability at all levels. Sometimes you are imaging things you haven’t completely designed yet, so that moment of creativity when you are trying to figure out what you are making actually sometimes gets rushed by. M: The process in our office is very fast. We have to show the idea to our boss first and convince him quickly and then if you have him on your side, take it a step further to show it to the client. There are certain ways that we use quick graphic techniques or 3-D imaging in the computer to show what will look good, quickly and so sometimes you’re sort of resorting to how you have been working previously. There’s nothing that makes your creative process explode like a change of material and totally being caught off guard.

You knew it would be cheese, but you didn’t know it would be a green roof?

M: Exactly, no. We thought it would be— actually Sierra had some great ideas about what she thought it could be.

I want to hear those!

M: It was like every family in Manhattan has to support themselves. S: Because some of the previous briefs were so outlandish in a really fun way, we were trying to get in the headspace of solving that kind of a problem quickly. So we were just making up ideas. I think one of them was if the government decided to become dependent on bio-fuels. All agricultural land would be turned over to bio-fuels and so all people would have to find a way to support themselves food-wise. They would have to have every kind of growing gardens in their own apartment or in their own home or on balconies and rooftops, or whatever. And so what would that building look like if you had to design that. M: In retrospect, that would have been such a huge endeavor to be taking on for the competition. But that’s what we were thinking, so when it came to be a very manageable, albeit large, roof garden, we were a little relieved.


A:ADAM BARUCHOWITZ Q: OBREAHNY O’BRIEN PHOTOGRAPHY BY PETER SVARZBEIN

Once a full time Wall Street day trader, Adam Baruchowitz has “diversified his intellectual properties” from the turbulent brokerage houses of the late 1990s, across the lines of web media, print periodicals, philanthropy, and the environment.

Heeb Magazine Wearable Collections MPCP Nu Yorker Day Trading

RIGHT Adam at ARCHDL3 Illustration by Dave Franzese

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True to the spirit of entrepreneurialism, Baruchowitz cements his varying pursuits with an underlying business acumen that enables him to foresee the monetary and far reaching social values of such endeavors. My interview with Adam was prompted with fifteen minutes notice. Proverbially nonchalant, he agreed to meet me in the café on the floor of his building. Perusing a stand of independent film flyers, I soon notice a bobbing mass of long brown curls framing a wide smile walk through the door. It’s Adam. He’s wearing a fitted orange t-shirt that reads: RETIRED, lose jeans and sandals; he never stops smiling. We take a seat after he buys me a grapefruit soda and opts for a mango flavor. The first topic of conversation is his business background. An economics major with a minor is Asian studies; Adam pursued finance after graduating from Brandeis University. He took up with Block Trading in Boston, and capitalizing on the growing need for day trading instructors, Adam was hired to teach in New Orleans. It is at this point that Adam’s vibrant smile slightly flickers as he recounts his somewhat grim days in the Crescent City. “There were a whole bunch of us crammed in a room down in New Orleans; it was a gold rush. We were trading stocks during the day but the market was up and down so

most weren’t making money and the brokerage house that was paying me to be down there was bouncing checks left and right. I’d go for weeks without pay.” Living from hand to mouth, Adam found comfort in the community of friends he made amongst the other traders and locals in New Orleans. “I’ve always found comfort in a pack of people. I watch out for them and they watch out for me. That’s how I survive; through friendships.” Without forewarning, the brokerage firm sponsoring Adam’s stay in New Orleans handed him a one-way ticket back to New York. With less than $15,000 dollars to his name and no other funds to cover his basic living costs, Adam had to use that money to exclusively day trade in order to build himself out of his rut. Treading the line of homelessness, Adam challenged the market and about a year later ended up with his own brokerage firm on Wall Street. Still guided by a sense of friendship and community, Adam invited his brother and his close friends to New York, where he taught them how to short term trade his money into a thirty-person fully profitable brokerage house. “It was great. It was my dream. All my friends and my brother was in the office, we were hanging out, playing video games, day trading C O N T I N U E D and we were

“I involve my friends because business is a way to stay in touch; an excuse to meet up and look after each other.”

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all making money.” Unfortunately the testosterone utopia did not last long as the shifting market once again diminished profits and Adam chose to close the brokerage house in favor of trading on his own. “In trading I try not to rush what is not up. When I get into a deep hole, I take a step back and assess the situation. A good trader does not get emotional and does not lose discipline.” Around this same time, Ethan Ruby, Adam’s best friend and partner in the firm became paralyzed from this chest down after being hit by a car while walking on the Lower East Side. Driven by his need to help his friend Ethan, and identifying a relatively untapped resource abundant in the city, Adam founded Wearable Collections. A for-profit organization, it cleverly makes its money through a three step process of collecting used and unwanted clothing in poly carts around the city, then selling them to a distributor who

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recycles the clothing into reusable textiles. Following through with his mission to Ethan, portions of the profits are contributed to the Miami Project to Cure Paralysis (MPCP), a leading spinal cord research facility. The recycling element of Wearable Collections’ mission has made Adam an unintended advocate for the environment as his company helps reduce the plethora of toxic chemicals that the garment industry produces every year. “By pushing the reuse of textiles without producing any harmful by-products, we are cutting back on hazardous waste and saving the environment.” Aside from the fast paced finance lifestyle and environmental initiatives, living in New York City afforded Adam the opportunity to room with Joshua Neuman, a former philosophy professor at New York University. It was in his NoHo apartment that Adam watched Joshua begin to develop HEEB magazine, a Jewish Satirical online and print publication. “It was the post 9/11 era and here they were branding this magazine “HEEB”; it was a very

anxious time and I was hesitant about the idea, but watching them I became inspired as I realized that HEEB would be a portal for the young Jewish world.” Taking this energy and growing with it, Adam assumed the official role as business developer and has essentially evolved into “the public face of HEEB.” Recognizing web media’s increasing taste for niche publications like HEEB, Adam created NuYorker.com with friend and Leo Prieto, Chile’s top technology blogger. After spending time in South America and forming a network of comrades, Adam realized there is a huge market of Hispanics interested and enthusiastic about American, specifically New York, popular and underground culture. In turn, NuYorker.com strives to break the language barrier by relaying New York cultural and media news in a Spanish language medium. “I see myself as a point person for Chileans coming through New York. I’m a human Myspace.” Our flow of conversation is broken by Adam’s cell phone; his smile still unwavering from his

enthusiasm over his various projects, he speaks softly to his long-term girlfriend. Off the phone, I decide to hit him with one last question; all of his endeavors have an underlying ability to make money, so I bluntly ask Adam if there is a corresponding profit motive in these activities. “Money is a remnant of a good project put together well. I do these projects because it is important for me in some way to remain relevant; to communicate information through the web and across continents. I involve my friends because business is a way to stay in touch; an excuse to meet up and look after each other.” Listening to this I realize that above all things, Adam is a great pragmatist, who has made relationships that cross all fields of business, print and online entertainment, the environment and philanthropy. “Honestly, I am still figuring out who I am amongst all these things”

OBREAHNY O’BRIEN

At twenty-one years old Obreahny O’Brien has a Bachelors of Science in Accounting, is pursuing her Masters of Science in Taxation, is a licensed Notary Public, and licensed real estate agent in the State of New York. Aside from doing corporate taxes, she is a satirist and is breaking into philanthropy with fellow KPMG employees on onekindthing.com, which aims to impact the community through the accummulation of simple acts of kindness.

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A:MICHELLE COLLINS Q:NICHOLAS  HALL

We wrote some haikuquestions for Michelle Collins. It is Spring. Whatevs.

Votergasm is a great fucking idea. How was it conceived? The same way my eight Ghost children were conceived, with Vodka and good friends.

But seriously, friends and I wanted to sleep with others who cared. Will you do it in two-thousand eight? Looks like a roused electorate.

IMAGES BY DANIEL ARBELL0 Michelle Collins (young) Haiku Best Week Ever Tom Cruise Votergasm Brangelina Michelle Collins (old)

Hello Ms. Collins, how has it all been going? The blue lake in Spring. My brain is melting Already and we haven’t Started.  I am good! You are a woman. You are a comedian. Who did you sleep with? Don Rickles and I Go way way way way way back. Draw your conclusions. That was a really lame joke, good thing I’m a man! Seriously, though... Male comedians bank on self-hate and dick jokes.How do you compete?’ With material Based on things like vadg cancer.And hating myself. Alexyss Tylor is Eve Ensler with more balls. Why are we laughing? Saying lines like “He Done Ejaculated all Up In Your Brain” and “He’ll Give You A Mouth Full of Sperm” in front of your Mother is genius.

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Too scarred by oh-four To do it again. But fear not, you can still fuck. Candidategasm? The three leading Dems all look sort of fuckable. If John Edwards was Single and less creepy, def. For now, Obama. You hosted LVHRD’s Architect’s Duel this Winter. Did you eat the cheese? Finding fingerprints In American cheese is Unappetizing. Plus, cheese tends to give Me a terrible case of Sweat-Fueled Fever Dreams. You do the blog for VH1’s Best Week Ever Haiku on that, go. Pop Culture pays the Bills. Paris Hilton Pays the Bills. Most are jealous. But blogging is not That simple. Day in, day out Hollywood rules life. Day in, day out, my College education is Flushed down the toi-toi.

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Everyone involved in the Entertainment biz Who isn’t themselves An actor envies The celebrities that theySu surround themselves with. You’re Jewish. Why are Jews funnier and betteractualized than Goys? All you guys need is a Waspy Holocaust to Liven up the laughs! You Can’t Make It Up is your hilarious blog. Does it get you work? Somehow, posting pics of dogs in casts landed me This interview. Yes. Michelle Collins from EastEnders owns you on the internets. Destroy?

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But let’s be honest It’s kind of the greatest job In the entire world. So you write about celebrities. Do you think Tom Cruise is insane? Yes yes yes yes yes. Mission Impossible III. Yes yes yes yes yes. Do you think Katie is in trouble? Does Brad’s heartstill belong to Jenn? Brangelina is A convenient way to fill Up haiku poems. Do you write gossip because you hate or envy the celebrities?

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Let’s be honest here. Only her exposed nipples Trump mine on the net. But my crotch shots are More prized and more Googled than Hers could ever dream. You like to call things ‘Hilario Dawson’ when they are funny. Why? This answer makes me Livid Tyler. Why?  Because They are Brill Paxton. Your blog sometimes reads like cuteoverload.com. Dead puppies. Now what? I love animals. Dogs Cats Goats Stoats Birds Cows Yaks Elks Fish Geese Rats BUT What the hell kind of question is that? Dead puppies? Uh... Fur coats. Thank you!


A:STEVE SPURGAT Q: DOROTHY BALL

Urbis Publishing Algorithms Renaissance Trendsetting Crack Rehab

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARK MILLER

Steve Spurgat and I sat down to talk about his 20,000-memberstrong website Urbis,an active community where creative types can get feedback from their peers and media companies can do effective market research. We discussed the value of tastetracking, the importance of an honest critique, and the math making it all possible.

So of the three categories of people you imagine using Urbis—creative people, those who love creative people, and those with opportunities for creative people—which do you fall into? Which do I fall into? None. No, I take that back. You know, I actually came to New York to be a writer.What kind of writer? A playwright. I wanted to be like a Sam Shepard, I wanted to produce and act and write for the theater. And that’s when I initially had the idea to start Urbis. I learned a lot about the politics involved with any writer, artist, musician getting that publishing deal, getting that music label to sign them. So much was about who you know. And so the idea came into my head that it makes more sense for a community to define what’s the most relevant as opposed to one or two experts, very The Wisdom of Crowds, James Surowiecki… I ask the question because it seems like—and I’m in publishing, and certainly guilty of this—most people on the editorial side are there because, in some way, they want to be writers.

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So those three groups are distinct, but they’re also so similar. Right. The second group we reach is actually more than people who love and support creative people—they’re also those who feel like they have some insight into trends, to what is good. And essentially, how we serve the publishing houses and the media companies is we acquire data about content through the ranking system, the reviews, and the data we have about who’s doing the reviews. They can use that data to find something to publish or something to sign or something to sell. There’s a ton of math behind the scenes. Are there people now who are not submitting material, but just reviewing? There are, but very few. And there will actually be more when they have more of an incentive. We have a social currency on Urbis—you earn credits by reviewing people and you spend the credits to receive reviews. And we will, at some point, allow members to buy and sell credits among one another. So you could actually review

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people and sell credits to another member who doesn’t want to bother reviewing other people. Like Second Life! Yes, but a little different. With a real purpose. Did you start out with the idea of using this credit system, or did you have to implement it out of necessity? That was one of the core ideas. It’s karma. It’s providing an incentive for people to give and receive feedback, and it’s incredibly viral on the site right now. The way it

3 KINDS OF URBIS USERS

opinion, and everyone else jumps on that opinion. Or everyone tells the really hot girl she’s a great writer even though…you know, she’s just the hot girl. Personalities affect judgment in workshops. On Urbis, initial impressions of work are stripped of any user data. You don’t know anything about the creator of the item except for their age. However, the personality, the brand behind the writer is also important to readers, so we also measure blunt

creative people, those who love and support creative people, and those who have opportunities for creative people.

“Take Amazon collaborative filtering, give it some crack, add pink, you’ve got Urbis.” DOROTHY BALL

Dorothy Ball is a writer and an editor at the Princeton Architectural Press. She is from New Orleans and enjoys dancing to brass bands and top-40 hip-hop, key-lime pies, and coldbrewed iced coffee.

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works is you receive a review, but you can’t actually see it unless you have enough credits to unlock it. So you’re forced to review other people, who then get reviews that they need to unlock. And we hold the reviews to very high standards, so you can’t just write a bunch of words or just say “I like it” or “I don’t like it” to earn credits. We have a moderation system that prevents that from happening. You must write very quality reviews in order to receive quality reviews. Why “Urbis”? A lot of thinking went into “Urbis,” actually. It’s a real word, Latin for city. The word urban stems from urbis. And during the Renaissance, Rome was referred to as the “Urbis Romae.” Rome was a community that fostered creativity. Urbis is a community that fosters creativity. Did you have a lot of workshop classes when you were in school? I did, yeah.And did you think about those when you were designing this? I did. I thought about what works in workshop settings and what doesn’t work. One example of something that doesn’t work is this element of groupthink, where one person has an

force metrics like popularity.Sounds like a lot to track. There’s more. We also consider the abilities of the reviewers. So both the creative people and the reviewers are being judged by the community. We also look at rating habits, in terms of whether someone’s rating higher than average, lower than average. And we consider experience. The more reviewers do, and do it well, the more weight their ratings have. So their vote has more weight? When they say “this is a 3,” it means more than if I’d said “this is a 3” when I’ve written only one other review? Exactly. And that’s just a few of the things we do. The rest, how the algorithm really works, is a really big trade secret. There’s also a lot we do with the knowledge we have about the users. If you’re the New York Observer, for example, you have a very particular type of reader, and you’d want to be sure the people who are reviewing content that could be for the New York Observer would be the sort of trendsetters, jetsetters, certain age range, live in New York, etc. How do you find out if someone’s actually a trendsetter? By their interests. When they tell

us their tastes and interests, and we can deduce a lot. How do you do that? Pull-down menus? The mechanism for acquiring that data isn’t live yet, but we’ll do it in different ways. Members have an incentive to tell us about themselves—the more we know, the more relevant media we can deliver to them.I’m trying to remember if I was asked if I was a trendsetter when I registered… Well, we don’t ask, “are you a trendsetter,” because everyone thinks they’re a trendsetter. We can deduce more based on their interests. It’s similar to how the Amazon collaborative filter system works, but on crack. Take Amazon collaborative filtering, give it some crack, add pink, you’ve got Urbis. Crazy that an algorithm can tell you if something’s good writing or not… Well, there isn’t now, and never will be a perfect science

to opinion, right? Even Google has an imperfect science around opinion, using a democratic system of counting the number of links to web pages with relevant key words. The highest-ranked webpage isn’t always what you’re looking for. If a thousand people submit an item to a media company through Urbis, we don’t expect that media company to acquire or distribute the number-one highest ranked, but they can peruse the top fifty or a hundred and look at the feedback, the kind of people that like certain kinds of media, and all the other qualitative and quantitative data we have. That’s far more than what these companies currently have to acquire relative media and potentially personalize distribution of that media.

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ADVERTISMENT


FTRS In this third issue of ours we’ve decided to use the FTRS section to both educate and entertain. Paul Pope sheds light on the three people who’ve driven and inspired him so greatly, while Russell Robertson’s trio of hybrid taxis are examined and possibly applied to New York’s streets. Pedro Reis paints a tri-flash portrait of New York in his RGB NYC photo piece and we speak to Elaine Brown regarding the relevance and future of a third political party in the upcoming election year. Prepare to be pleased and informed.

Mark miller

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Paul pope THREE INFLUENCES OF THE UNPARALLELED ARTIST

B E G I N T R A N S M ISSIO N F R O M T H E D ES K O F P AU L P O P E When the chance to do the cover for LVHRD MGZN issue 3 came up (well, to be honest, I demanded the cover), they asked me to write something about three different areas of creative work that I float around in: comics, fashion design, maybe illustration, poster design, silkscreen printing, store installation, or something relating to the film industry. In each case I’m brought in to do the usual thing graphic designers do--that is, discover interesting visual solutions to conceptual problems, like some paper-sailing Christopher Columbus. This idea soon morphed into writing about three of my artistic influences, and tie the cover design into that. I liked that better, personally. I mean, I like people who are enthusiastic about the stuff they’re into, and I’m into drawing comics and sexy pictures. I’m not into prowrestling or greasy spoons or Belle And Sebastian or collecting porcelain statues of sad-faced clowns.

THIS PAGE: 100% Cover jacket

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I . G UI D O

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C R E P A X

Guido Crepax is another artist-designer I love. Crepax was a chain smoking, espresso drinking, Milanese cartoonist who began his professional life as an ad man, gaining early fame by winning awards for various projects executed for big corporate Euro-clients, such as Shell Oil. Throughout the 1960s, Crepax generated dozens of LP cover designs for the Italian market, putting a 12” face on everything from Stravinsky to Stan Getz. That’s cool enough on its own, but by the mid-60s he turned all of his energy toward comics. With his unusual page compositions and visual inventions, Crepax created an entire alphabet of comics, all his own.

on everything else. None of which Crepax delivered. His women were often naked, sure, but somehow he treated his material with an aloof, improvisational attitude which boys don’t have the patience or wit to follow. It was only years later I began to see the brilliant design structures under girding his page compositions, the subtle sensualism his work suggests.

I first met Crepax in the pages of Heavy Metal in the early 80s.  Initially, I strongly disliked his drawing style, which I considered to be lazy and dull. Little did I know, young boys who read comics, are largely obsessed with detail and anatomical accuracy. They want big muscles on their men, big breasts on their women, and big explosions

CLOCKWISE: A single panel from Crepax’s Bianca, 1971 Panel from Batman Year 100 Paul Pope’s latest book, PulpHope 100% film trailer, by Xylanol Studios, 2002.

Crepax opened my eyes to the idea that a cartoonist can do any damn thing he pleases. He can bring in a love of music, of color, of history, and the opposite sex. He made his comics SEXY, and did it in inventive, original ways.

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III . TA D A N O R I Y O K OO

II . R E N E G R UAU If you know French poster art or fashion design, you undoubtedly know Rene Gruau. If not, you’ve undoubtedly seen his work somewhere before. His dancing images of long-legged, curvy showgirls and elegant Audrey Hepburn Sphinxes are buried in soil of popular culture. In his mind lived a galaxy of sauntering silhouettes, slinking like solar eclipses, flashing comet-women trailing plumes of fire, in sequins, fans, and heels. I was abruptly reacquainted with Gruau’s frozen fireworks, his long-legged ladies, at no less a place than the Moulin Rouge, while standing in line for the show on a cold Parisian night, waiting to see some long-legged fireworks in the flesh. His elegant, startling poster designs capture the energy and allure of live performance like nothing else, and designers have spent decades trying to reverseengineer the things he made look so simple. TOP: Color sketch for a 1981 poster design by Rene Gruau for the classic Fellini film, La Dolce Vita. BOTTOM: “Meanwhile” by Paul Pope

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From Gruau, I gained a way to capture the energy of dynamic performance. I learned how to telegraph the crackling energy, the leaping, live moment, how to transmute this something which leaves no trail into something with shape and static form, how to contain and preserve the fleeting moment, give it a paper shadow, and keep it warm and alive for all to see.

I am into Tadanori Yokoo. He’s an incredible artist who has had a powerful influence on my own approach to graphic-visual design.  Yokoo slummed his way through the 1960s doing tons of thrown-away magazine illustrations, endless book covers, and garish poster designs, all of which positively shimmered with expressive, unstoppable energy. He was heavily influenced by the Push-Pin Studio, the swirling, sitar-meets-marching-bandvibe of the Beatles’ mid-60s psychedelic period, and the edgy “fuck-you” in-joke of Factory-era Andy Warhol. Yokoo took a page from Pop Art’s book, combining in his work all sorts of gaudy visual clichés and worn-out picture-tropes which older, more established designers had long since rejected.  His 1960s work is full of things like trite, smiling Geisha girls from Meiji-era soap labels, crudely drawn lotus pedals torn from cheap boxes of imported incense, and stodgy Ukiyo-E era Samurai warriors brandishing long swords. These he combined in endless variations within new fields of visual play, creating an entirely new dream world for expressly Japanese eyes. The imagery spoke with a subversive vibrancy, winning immediate attention among his peers. It was punk rock, it was scary, it wasn’t imported from the West--it was new. It was loud and alluring and ugly and affirming, something the kids got and the adults didn’t. Yokoo led me back to Pop Art, and to a healthy embrace of creative collaboration with artists from other disciplines. Most cartoonists hate Pop Art, since so many of those guys ripped-off cartoonists’ work, turned around and sold it back to Sotheby’s for a killing. Yokoo taught me you could rip off Pop Art, turn right around and sell it everywhere else.

TOP: Poster for Japanese film star Ken Takakura, who starred in many popular Yakuza crime/noir films (1968) BOTTOM: Alternate design for the large 12 color silkscreen for Diesel Industries.

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A GREEN FLEET OF YELLOW T E X T

TODDJATRAS I L L U S T R A T I O N LIZTAN New York’s 13,000-strong fleet of gas-guzzling Ford Crown Victorias will largely be phased off the streets by 2012, replaced with hybrids as part of Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s visionary PLANYC2030, a comprehensive program to reduce the city’s carbon emissions thirty percent by 2030. The world’s cities cover a mere 1% of the Earth’s surface yet generate an astounding 80% of the greenhouse gases that are pushing our environment toward a disastrous tipping point. The stakes are high.

Husband and wife team Russell Robertson and Jeanne Pfordresher from Brooklyn-based Hybrid Product Design & Development have developed a prototype of what could become the taxicab of our future. Their three takes on New York City’s classic black-and-yellow checker design, which they call their TRIO (the Mini, Mogul and Citixen), are sleek hybrid vehicles in search of a production deal.

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Taxis may seem insignificant compared to the hordes of cars choking our streets and highways, but converting them is a highly visible step that could help sway public opinion and boost uptake of environment-friendly technologies. Sales of hybrids actually fell last year, most likely because of shrinking tax incentives, and accounted for only 1.5% of U.S. sales last year. Hybrids are thought to contribute 80% less pollutants and greenhouse gases than comparable gasoline cars

while typically getting at least 36 miles per gallon, compared to the paltry 14-mpg of a Crown Victoria. Running hybrid taxis will shave a whopping $10,000 a year off the fuel bill per vehicle, and Bloomberg estimates that the move will have the same clean air benefits of removing 32,000 privately owned cars from the streets.   The technology is considered to be only an intermediary step on the way to a more perfect, truly transformative technology such as hydrogen-based fuel cells or even engines that are powered by air. Still, the numbers are compelling, a nobrainer, and until some utopian future arrives, hybrids are a solid bet. And not all of them will be Toyota Priuses and Ford Escapes. Most auto manufacturers are getting in on the game, but there’s plenty of room for smart upstarts like Robertson and Pfordresher, who are sculptors by training, industrial designers by trade and consider themselves “strategic thinkers” above all else.

CLICK IMAGE TO SEE MORE

They’ve spent four years developing TRIO and are currently shopping the concept to investors to build an actual prototype, which would cost $1 million to make and would be used by the Taxi Licensing Commission in a crash test. From there, Robertson estimates it would cost $30-40 million and take two years to get the cars on the street. The three models feature a clean, minimal aesthetic that is instantly recognizable, like something of a mix between a classic London cab and a futuristic moon rover, exactly the kind of thing that would send vacationers back home buzzing about hybrids. For durable city use, the body is built onto a modular

frame chassis, designed so that it can accept various hybrid drive trains and engines designs, the details of which will be decided once financing is secured. 

thousands with the goal of a mostly hybrid fleet by 2012. If you’ve already driven one, then you already know the pleasures of sitting in traffic, idling noise and emission free.

The design maximizes the interior while maintaining a smaller footprint, only 70 inches wide it is somewhat thinner than a Toyota Scion but is also higher and features a pushed forward driver seating position, giving the driver a more commanding view of the road and better sight lines. Each will carry four passengers and a wheelchair.

In the same way that New York leads the world in trendsetting, perhaps changing our armada of taxis would impose a new worldwide, or at the very least, American standard. The possibility of a new, iconic taxi fleet to replace the extinct checkered cabs is an element that has been missing from New York’s streets for a nearly a decade. Thanks to Mayor Bloomberg’s new legislation forcing the taxis to go hybrid, we could be seeing the era of the TRIO.

Today there are already 400 hybrid taxis on New York’s streets. By next year that figure will climb into the

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Whigs Off To America Elaine Brown and a third political party hope to impact the coming Presidential election T E X T

NICHOLASHALL

The Democratic and Republican parties have been playing king of the hill for about 150 years. The Democrats originally formed around protecting the practice of slavery. The Republicans have just finished presiding over a second Nixonian era. Elaine Brown, a former leader of The Black Panther Party, is running for the nomination of the Green Party, the only relevent third party in the country today. I asked her if there was room for that change and got scolded: “There must be change.” The last President of the United States of America to be elected from a political party other than the Democratic or the Republican was President Zachary Taylor, the Whig nominee for the election of 1848. Upon his inauguration he promptly abandoned the Whig party platform and undertook his own pragmatic, ideologically evasive course, before dying just sixteen months into office. Prior to that the American political system had been dominated by an ostensibly philosophical debate between the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans, on the topic of states’ rights versus federallyvested power. State’s rights was not actually

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a philosophical issue, though, especially going into the mid-ninteenth century. It was actually a euphemism for slavery, arguably the central moral conflagration of American history, the predominant source of our country’s early wealth, and quite nearly the source of it’s early destruction. ‘State’s rights’ was an abstraction that served at the time to allow the men of government to both confront and avoid the atrocity in which they were all complicit. Both parties accepted the term, batting it back and forth like a tennis volley across a net tracing the Mason-Dixon line. Elaine Brown sees these games still going on today, with Democrats and Republicans

amiably batting back and forth abstractions like Morality, Unity, Freedom, or Terror, diversions from real problems like a racist criminal justice system, an alarmingly unequal distribution of wealth in America and the world, and an executive culture of flagrant lies and warmongering. “The line between the Democrats and the Republicans is hardly visible,” she says, “they are seeking to maintain this system of capitalism that really gives rise to all of this, and really gave rise to the United States itself.” If you detect a hint of Marxist thought in Ms. Brown’s position, it’s because

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“If you looked at the anti-war movement, you didn’t see any black people out here marching”

F R O M

she carries those ideas over from her days as a part of, and head of, the Black Panther Party. And they are appropriate today because they exist in the platform of the Green Party, from whom she is seeking the nomination to run for President in 2008. But political ideologies, Marxist or otherwise, are not Ms. Brown’s main focus. For now she’ll leave that to the party. “They have the ideology,” she says, “but they have not gotten past their own inherent character as majority white middle-class.” This reveals a major part of Ms. Brown’s election strategy, as well as her critique of the American political process. She wants the Green Party to help her take a message into the ghettos and trailer-parks of poor America that they can do better, and that the government can, and should, help them. But this cannot be

an ideological appeal; it has to be more tangible than that in order to break through the deafening appeals of hunger and joblessness. Perhaps they could start with breakfast? “When I was in the Black Panther Party, we started a free breakfast for children program, and some of the socalled ‘leftists’ at the time said, ‘What’s a free breakfast for children program? We need to get out here and march against the war.’ Well if you looked at the anti-war movement, you didn’t see any black people out here marching.” She says that the party’s message in this program was that the government should provide services for people who are struggling to feed their families. “And people got that message,” she says, “but they got it because we fed them, not because we stood up there all day long telling them.” Ms. Brown thinks that this approach to grassroots organizing can bring the

Libertarian candidate, Steve Kubby, has said he would end the war on drugs. Running Man co-star, Yaphet Kotto, feels America is heading in the wrong direction. Prohibition Party candidate, Gene Amondson, credits Sasquatch sightings to drunkenness. millions of poor and workingclass Americans, especially black Americans, who do not vote in great numbers, out to the polls. She believes that, between the party’s resources and her understanding of how to organize in poor communities, the Green Party can become a focal point as well as a catalyst for this marginalized voting bloc. And she believes that this bloc could be big enough to make a difference. A meaningful third political party would certainly disrupt the usual back-and-forth of Washington. If Democrats and Republicans can no longer define themselves as simply the opposite of the other, then both will be held more accountable for their positions, as they will have to triangulate between two opponents, instead of just salvo at one. There is one other problem with her third-party run, though, one specific to the party she has chosen to run under, and the populations that she wants to reach, one that is both practical and ideological: the brand. Even given a massive and massively successful grassroots campaign, the specter of media will never leave politics. Every politician

Elaine Brown addresses a group of reporters, at a press conference following Huey P. Newton’s visit to China in 1971

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and party will likely have to be able to communicate it’s brand and the brand of it’s candidate in sound bite, television commercial, and website form in order to ever again poll nationally. And given thirty seconds, ‘Green’ is generally going to come through as ‘environmentalist’. Her solution to this problem is simple and powerful, if not quite complete, “Now clearly,” she says, “If I get the nomination from the Green Party to run for president, can’t you see that that would have an immediate impact on how the Green Party is viewed?” What she is arguing for is something uncommon in politics, bold action, a clear and intentional step away from the predominant thread of debate. However serious or realistic her candidacy is, it’s underlying assumption is very serious, and convincingly realistic coming from her: That the current story of politics, one told in alternating parts by Democrats and Republicans, is not the whole story. There is a third voice ready to contribute, she says, and it will change the story for the better.

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RGB NYC BY PEDRO REIS

I intended to capture a different New York. Instead of focusing on its architecture, space, or people, I decided to capture traces of its culture through its street art. The walls, traffic signs, and mailboxes are covered with stickers, tags, and pasted paper with different sorts of content from simple ads to true individual statements. Art or vandalism is a difficult question to answer. My guess is that there’s an individual need for expression and a need to be part of the city. Street art leads individuals to create a deeper link with the space making it their own territory. This project is my tribute to the city and to these mostly unknown artists. Drifting through the almost empty streets of SoHo, I kept the number 3 in mind. Each resulting photo forms a sort of new graffiti-like composition generated by triple exposures of different street art pieces or street signs that form the language intrinsic to the city. On the other hand, each exposure has its own color, red, green or blue, so the randomness of color could be added to the final result, thus revealing a new and more colorful city--one live city. RGB NYC.

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Mark miller

ADVERTISMENT

BOB: Now turn completely around, thank you.

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ADVERTISMENT

SXY

MIGHTY MOUTH I was not surprised when LVHRD asked me to write a brief article on the topic of “third base.” My confident outlook, youthful enthusiasm, and prodigious sex life are the fertile grounds that most writers dream of. My life in New York is a rich soil which nurtures abundant fields of hilarious story-trees that constantly blossom ripe joke-fruits and are seasonally plagued by swarms of longwinded farming-metaphors. But not all of us are me, we can’t all share my vast understanding of genitalia. It has been suggested that some of you could care less about getting to “third base” because you aren’t even sure of what “third base” means? Unacceptable. This is article will serve as the definitive definition of third base. Print it and carry it with you wherever you go. The third step of physical intimacy when equating intercourse to American baseball, getting to third base involves using your mouth and tongue to stimulate your partner’s genitals. Getting to third is a delicate process, and you may strike out several times before finding a partner high enough to give you the go-ahead sign. Patience, or stronger drugs, are essential. Third base follows second base, over-the-clothes groping, and precedes going balls deep. Third base comes three steps before sixth base, an audacious move that has left hundreds with ruptured ear drums. Stealing third is not allowed. Do not steal third. And with those brief words of wisdom, I leave you to enjoy your summer months amongst the throngs of New York singles. Speak clearly, walk confidently, and remember that all of your romantic actions, especially the 6-4-3 double play, have consequences.

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DAVE FRANZESE


ADVERTISMENT

The French have always been good at seeing the future of art, fashion and culture. America has a long history of co-opting things and “improving” them. Nous Non Plus combines both of those qualities into

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a hooky and colorful power-pop. A collective of American and French dilettantes obsessed with the hip, swinging sounds of 60s France, Nous Non Plus pop with a tight rhythm section, synths and guitars offering up multiple melodic hooks, and the talented crooning of one Céline Dijon. Her

NOUS NON PLUS Nous Non Plus will be smoking cigarettes and touring France all summer long. Regardez, Ecoutez, et amusez-vous bien.

singing invokes party boy Jacques Dutronc strongly, a puissant voice prone to bubbly interjections. The band’s lyrics are mostly in French, a cheeky move some may find overly eccentric, but it shows that with this band style counts for everything. Nous Non Plus follow their own fashionable yeh-yeh beat, and although you might need a translator for some numbers, several of the jumpier songs are in our beautiful native tongue, including the witty dance floor anthem of the year “One Night in Paris.” Remember when music was mopey and heroin-chic? Me neither. Who wants to stand around looking moody in a beret doing a Jean-Paul Satre impression when you could be dancing and/or rocking out? They’re incroyable and adorable. Their music is unpretentious and au courant, the kind of band you want to go see not just to bob your head, but also to dance in a French way. Despite our love of Nous Non Plus, one mustn’t ignore the fact that they’d be singing in German if it weren’t for American GI’s. You’re welcome. steve roberts

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Amelie Chabannes came to New York from Paris four years ago. She was sick of the French intellectual art scene, sick of being marginalized because she drew pictures instead of painting. New York meant fresh

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opportunity and fresh pain, a challenge that would mold or break her. Perhaps, more accurately, she’s molding New York. Luxe Gallery represents Amelia in New York and she’s busy getting ready for shows in Paris and Brazil. Amelie works with “the accident of the hand.” She doesn’t

AMELIE CHABANNES

sketch or trace her drawings before they go down. It’s a one shot deal with inspired mistakes. Her drawings reveal the violent spread of life, guts sprouting flowers, tubers, amoebic space trees, and tentacles that recall Japanese Hentai. When asked about the obsessive detail in her work, the billion micro lines and cellular flecks that surround her women and monsters, she laughed. “Yes, it can be very obsessive. It’s like meditation for me. Everyone has their method. I have a friend who eats raw meat while he paints. “You have to be haunted to do good work,” said Amelie. “We’re all composed of ghosts, a sense of the past.” I mentioned I’d seen some pictures of her online. “Oh god, which ones?” “The skydiving ones.” “Oh no! That was my bachelorette party! They kidnapped me and forced me onto the plane.

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Amelie Chabannes’ work can be viewed on her website and will be displayed in France and Brazil by Luxe Gallery.

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After I jumped I couldn’t think about anything else for weeks. It was the most amazing feeling in the world. Right before I fell asleep it would be there, that soaring, limitless flight.” LOGAN ANTILL


NN LVHRD EVNT

DANCE RIGHT



JUNE 14, 2007 DWNTWN LOS ANGELES LA CITA HOST: MFG, OBEY GIANT

DANCE RIGHT Dance Right is a weekly party at La Cita in Downtown Los Angeles that has been making kids shake ass since July of 2006.  Hosted by MFG (Matt Goldman) with OBEY GIANT, the resident DJs, DJ Diabetic and DJ PUBE$ bring a varied musical style that always gets the people moving. Dance Right is all about moving away from the Hollywood scene, both in approach and location, and throwing parties that we would like to go to. We love to work with our friends, make people dance, and bring a DIY quality to the events that makes everyone feel at home. We are all artists, musicians, designers, and otherwise creative folk who like to surround ourselves with those cut from the same cloth. To keep the night ever evolving, we have frequent guest DJs from a variety of backgrounds who bring a variety of styles. On June 14th, we made Hollywood’s LAX resident MIKE B slum it in our grungy Mexican bar and Chicago’s party starter, Nightfox, flew in to open the night. Diabetic was setting up his big New York show at the Jonathan Levine gallery, so PUBE$ held the night down with the guest DJs. The three solicited ass shaking from a packed house. No one went home disappointed or dry. MATT GOLDMAN

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PhotogRAPHY by the squid + MFG

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On September 12th, 1986 Francis Ford Coppola brought one of the best three-dimensional films ever created to Ecpot Center, “Captain EO.” An intergalactic story told through the song and dance of the Captain himself,

DTD

Michael Jackson. As laser beams blaze overhead, accompanied by real in-house smoke and searchlights, Michael Jackson and his crew of Star Wars-esque characters set out on a mission to deliver a gift to

The Stereoscopic Epcot Pop Flick

AN ATTEMPT TO REVIVE OUTDATED TECHNOLOGY

The Supreme Leader, an alien queen played by Oscar winner, Anjelica Huston. The gift is, of course, a song and dance number that eventually defeats The Supreme Leader’s evil ways and transforms her into a beautiful woman, and her planet into a lush utopia. Captain EO and his team successfully accomplish what their motto

PUT ON YOUR 3d glasses

suggests, “We are here to save the world.” While “Captain EO” may be the 3-D movie we remember best, three-dimensional visual technology has been around since the mid 1800s, with the first 3D movie

Captain EO 3-D Movies Epcot Center Stereoscopic Vomit

patent penned in the late 1890s.  Strangely, process hasn’t changed much when filming a 3-D movie.  Two cameras, mounted a few inches apart, are used to generate two films, which are projected at the screen; the viewer wears 3-D glasses that isolate one of the projections to each eye, which generates the three-dimensional effect. There are two primary types of 3-D glasses: red and blue,

In our never ending search to be entertained, the methods by which the

and polarized. The red and blue glasses were the 3-D glasses

entertainment is delivered has become far too complex,

of choice during the golden age of 3-D in the 1950s. Polarized

what with the microchips and such.  Allow me to take

glasses are the device of choice for high budget 3-D productions,

you back to a more simple and innocent time in American entertainment. When men were men, women were diabolical, and space rocks floated through the air and seemingly hit you in the face.  That time

like “Captain EO” (which cost Disney just over $1 million per minute to film), because they allow for color viewing, something red and blue glasses don’t allow. Instead of tinting the two separate films being

is the year 1986, the place is Disney’s Epcot Center, and the film was the

projected like the red and blue glasses do, the two synchronized films are

3-D masterpiece “Captain EO” starring the incomparable Michael Jackson.

projected with different polarizations, which are properly assigned to your

Most people see Disney’s Epcot Center merely as an opportunity to drink around the world, sipping alcohol from 11 different countries and

eyes through the polarized lenses. Unfortunately, both Michael Jackson and 3-D movies have

vomiting in the bathroom of a miniature British village. However, since the

experienced a devastating fall from grace since their 1986 hay day. Despite

death of the World’s Fair, Disney’s Experimental Prototype Community of

their current unfavorable status, both Michael Jackson and 3-D movies play

Tomorrow has been the place Americans go to see the future.

an integral role in the history of American entertainment and I miss them both, every day.

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MICHAEL GARRIDO

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EXERCISE YOUR INTERNET SKILLS WITH SOME GOOGLE MAPS ACTION.

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doug jaeger

The number of drive-in theaters in the US has plummeted from nearly 5000 in 1958 to roughly 500 today. One of the strongest images of Americana is being erased from our great nation due to our need for massive home improvement superstores. Actually enjoying a drive-in movie has become difficult, but not impossible and the dilapidated skeletons of these American icons can be found with the right map and a keen eye. We’ve mapped out some of the carcasses and still kicking remains of the tri-state area’s drive-in movie theatres for your exploration.

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