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CONTENTS

JULY AUG 2 02 1

36

EDITOR’S LETTER

Scene 42

D E S I G N D I S PAT C H The little black book of all things new and fabulous in the local community.

Radar 50

AS TOLD TO Four interior experts sound off on the flavor and ingredients of their region’s design.

58

C O L L A B O R AT I O N Alison Pickart brings a West Coast perspective to de Gournay’s Scenic Collection of wallpapers.

60

ART + CRAFT Known as the first minimalists and modernists, the Shakers continue to influence furnishings across the country.

Market 68

M AT E R I A L Of-the-earth elements take center stage in the latest wallcoverings, rugs and trims.

74

TREND New design-forward hotels beckon travelers to make a reservation.

82

SPOTLIGHT These creatives are honing in on handcrafted techniques and artisanal touches.

Living

LUXESOURCE.COM

96

K I TC H E N + B AT H Colorful materials shine in exquisitely adorned bathrooms.

108

THE REPORT Joyful accessory dwellings take the party out back.


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CONTENTS

FEATURES

116

128

142

146

Haven for Heritage

Love Language

Carving a Niche

Transcending Tradition

Far-flung influences and family heirlooms infuse a designer’s refresh of her parents’ own historic Charleston home.

A 1905 bungalow becomes a textural backdrop for an Atlanta couple to layer cherished artworks, furnishings and objects.

Charleston artist Katy Mixon repurposes the leftover materials from her painting practice for companionate creations.

Light, modernism and the surrounding tree canopy inform a resort-like new residence in a classic Atlanta enclave.

Written by Paige Porter Fischer Photography by Julia Lynn

Written by Monique McIntosh Photography by Jeff Herr

Written by Maile Pingel Photography by Peter Frank Edwards

Written by Mikki Brammer Photography by Robert Peterson

ON THE COVER: Designer Alexandra Howard updated this 18th-century Charleston single house for her own parents, keeping the family room fresh with undressed

windows toward the garden and Benjamin Moore’s Bavarian Cream on the woodwork. Moss green accents provide pop atop an RH sectional and vintage club chair that both wear cream-colored textiles—the latter reupholstered by Powell’s Upholstery LLC in C&C Milano linen. Page 116

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Walls


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PAMELA LERNER JACCARINO VICE PRESIDENT, EDITOR IN CHIEF DESIGN DIRECTOR

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Pam Shavalier

Brittany Chevalier McIntyre

ART DIRECTOR

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HOMES EDITORS Kate Abney Grace Beuley Hunt Lisa Bingham Dewart Mary Jo Bowling Paulette Pearson Jennifer Pfaff Smith Shannon Sharpe DIGITAL

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MANAGING EDITORS

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MARKET

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SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Jamie Beauparlant, Kimberly Solari Brown ASSOCIATE GRAPHIC DESIGNER

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ADAM I. SANDOW CHAIRMAN OF SANDOW

ERICA HOLBORN CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

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VICE PRESIDENT, PARTNER + PROGRAM SUCCESS DIRECTOR, PARTNER SUCCESS

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PROGRAM SUCCESS MANAGER + ANALYTICS SPECIALIST – LUXE PREFERRED

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NATIVE CONTENT EDITOR + TEAM LEAD

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Heather Schreckengast PRODUCTION OPERATIONS MANAGER

Jody M. Boyle

SANDOW was founded by visionary entrepreneur Adam Sandow in 2003 with the goal of building a truly innovative media company that would reinvent the traditional publishing model. Today, SANDOW is a fully integrated solutions platform that includes leading content, tools, and services, powering innovation for the design and luxury industries. Its diverse portfolio of media assets includes Interior Design, Luxe Interiors + Design and NewBeauty. Materials Innovation brands include global materials consultancy, Material Connexion, game-changing material sampling and logistics platform, Material Bank, and materials reclamation program, Sample Loop. SANDOW brands also include research and strategy firm, ThinkLab. In 2019, SANDOW was selected by the New York Economic Development Council of New York to become the official operator of NYCxDESIGN Week, beginning in 2020. sandowdesign.com


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REGIONAL SALES DIRECTORS Adrienne B. Honig Karlee Prejean AUSTIN + SAN ANTONIO PUBLISHER Jim Wilson CHICAGO REGIONAL PUBLISHER Kathleen Mitchell DIRECTORS Tracy Colitte, Carolyn Funk, Taylor Greene COLORADO REGIONAL PUBLISHER Kathleen Mitchell PUBLISHER Terri Glassman DIRECTOR Katie Martin DALLAS + FORT WORTH PUBLISHER Rolanda Polley DIRECTOR Leslie Shelton GREATER NEW YORK PUBLISHER Trish Kirsch ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, NEW YORK Donna Herman ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER, CONNECTICUT Amy McMillan Tambini DIRECTOR, NEW YORK Maritza Smith DIRECTOR, HAMPTONS Michelle A. Gianonne HOUSTON PUBLISHER Amy McAnally DIRECTOR Carol Lamadrid LOS ANGELES ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Athena MacFarland DIRECTOR Virginia Williams ARIZONA PUBLISHER DIRECTOR

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Stacey Callahan Jennifer Chanay, Susan Goldstein, Susan Preville PACIFIC NORTHWEST PUBLISHER Debby Steiner DIRECTOR Cathy Cruse SAN FRANCISCO PUBLISHER Lisa Lovely DIRECTOR Sara McGovern SOUTHEAST ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Sibyl de St. Aubin DIRECTOR Suzanne Brandt SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA PUBLISHER Alisa Tate ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Kali Smith REGIONAL PUBLISHER DIRECTORS

@luxemagazine Luxe Interiors + Design , (ISSN 1949-2022), Arizona (ISSN 2163-9809), California (ISSN 2164-0122), Chicago (ISSN 2163-9981), Colorado (ISSN 21639949), Florida (ISSN 2163-9779), New York (ISSN 2163-9728), Pacific Northwest (ISSN 2167-9584), San Francisco (ISSN 2372-0220), Southeast (ISSN 2688-5735), Texas (ISSN 2163-9922), Vol. 19, No. 4, July/August, prints bimonthly and is published by SANDOW, 3651 NW 8th Ave., Boca Raton, FL 33431. Luxe Interiors + Design (“Luxe”) provides information on luxury homes and lifestyles. Luxe Interiors + Design , SANDOW, its affiliates, employees, contributors, writers, editors, (Publisher) accepts no responsibility for inaccuracies, errors or omissions with information and/or advertisements contained herein. The Publisher has neither investigated nor endorsed the companies and/or products that advertise within the publication or that are mentioned editorially. Publisher assumes no responsibility for the claims made by the Advertisers or the merits of their respective products or services advertised or promoted in Luxe. Publisher neither expressly nor implicitly endorses such Advertiser products, services or claims. Publisher expressly assumes no liability for any damages whatsoever that may be suffered by any purchaser or user for any products or services advertised or mentioned editorially herein and strongly recommends that any purchaser or user investigate such products, services, methods and/or claims made thereto. Opinions expressed in the magazine and/or its advertisements do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the Publisher. Neither the Publisher nor its staff, associates or affiliates are responsible for any errors, omissions or information whatsoever that have been misrepresented to Publisher. The information on products and services as advertised in Luxe are shown by Publisher on an “as is” and “as available” basis. Publisher makes no representations or warranties of any kind, expressed or implied, as to the information, services, contents, trademarks, patents, materials or products included in this magazine. All pictures reproduced in Luxe have been accepted by Publisher on the condition that such pictures are reproduced with the knowledge and prior consent of the photographer and any homeowner concerned. As such, Publisher is not responsible for any infringement of the copyright or otherwise arising out of any publication in Luxe. Luxe is a licensed trademark of SANDOW © 2011. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and retrieval system, without the written permission of the Publisher. ADDRESS SUBSCRIPTION REQUESTS AND CORRESPONDENCE TO: Luxe, PO Box 16329, North Hollywood, CA 91615. Email: subscriptions@luxemagazine.com or telephone toll-free 800.723.6052 (continental US only, all others 818.487.2005). ®

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LETTER

Perhaps it’s the return of the plush, squishy sofa, or maybe it’s the clogs, overalls and macramé that I’ve seen in fashion these days, but it feels like we’re having a bit of a free-form ’70s moment. Slowly shedding the maskwearing, hand-sanitizing of the past year-and-a-half, we are re-emerging into sunnier, more relaxed days. It’s a time of eclecticism and optimism, with home and design at the center of it. We’re excited to be living through this period of strong desire and enthusiasm for all things home, with much relocation and decoration taking place. In this issue, we report on playful accessory dwellings popping up across so many backyards, the return of the Shaker influence in design and the latest of-the-earth wallpaper and textiles. There’s endless design inspiration for those who seek it. Indeed, this summer, our homes are for living and loving.

Pamela Jaccarino VP, Editor in Chief @pamelajaccarino

LUXESOURCE.COM

photo: chelsae anne horton. jewelry: susan’s jewelry collection.

EDITOR’S

Summer of Love


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SCENE W R I T T E N B Y K AT E A B N E Y

PROPER ENGLISH KENSINGTON WALK BY ZOFFANY

When Zoffany design lead Peter Gomez set out to create Kensington Walk, the brand’s latest collection of textiles and wallcoverings, he didn’t need to look far. As a champion of emerging creatives, he first turned to an artist he’d worked with before, Royal College of Art alum Sam Wilde. It was Wilde’s drawings of koi carp (like those seen in the exotic Kyoto Gardens of

Kensington) that got his wheels turning. The result was Eastern Palace (shown far left), a pattern taking its cues from the neighboring Japan House London and depicting the Asian nation’s main islands guarded by fauna and native botanicals. Tucked away from the flurry of urban life, yet still touting the perks of it, Kensington “carries within it a sense of escapism—a real, refined luxury we wanted to capture,” Gomez says. The collection’s remaining SKUs thus sprung from the West London enclave’s many storied sites. There is Cope’s Trail, a Jacobean floral partly inspired by the late Holland House; Long Water, an abstracted botanical based on scenery of Hyde Park; and Persian Tulip (shown left), pulling from the ornamented Arab Hall at Leighton House. If Kensington Walk sounds diverse, then so is Kensington, a melting pot of a community historically home to artists from all corners of the globe, much like Zoffany. “The English aesthetic,” Gomez explains, “is very much borrowed from worldly influences that did not originate in the U.K.” zoffany.com

CHECK IN

Found on the fringes of the university by the same name, the Loews Vanderbilt Hotel is on a mission to master Southern hospitality. Part and parcel to the swanky Nashville property’s multi-year renovation efforts, it recently debuted three new designer suites ranging from 1,000 to 1,600 square feet each. Called Baritone, Creator and Belle, each is inspired by Nashville icons for the ages: Johnny Cash, Loretta Lynn and the collective leading ladies of country music. From functioning fireplaces to full-size dining rooms, guests enjoy all the trappings of a luxury apartment. Chicagobased Simeone Deary Design Group headlined the plush appointments, which include hardwood floors, textural wallcoverings and supple textiles like velvet, leather and fringe. On our list? As a nod to the famously blackclad crooner, midcentury-style lighting and moody hues bring a masculine vibe to the Cash-inspired suite, which also boasts a full kitchen, walk-in closet and Peloton fitness bike. loewshotels.com/vanderbilt-hotel

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proper english photos: courtesy zoffany. check in photo: courtesy loews vanderbilt hotel.

LOEWS VANDERBILT HOTEL


DISPATCH DESIGN SCENE

ON VIEW

“ELECTRIFYING DESIGN: A CENTURY OF LIGHTING”

LYNIELLE & RICHARD LONG

an example of our culture,” Richard says. Below, Luxe delves into their roots. longandlongdesign.com How did the agrarian influences of your youth impact you? RL: Humbleness, modesty, a straightforwardness and connection to the land. Using courtyards, porches and windows to make it feel a bit like you’re outside, even when you’re inside the house. Birmingham architects Lynielle and Richard Long have an inkling about destiny. Their families first crossed paths generations ago, when Lynielle’s grandparents and Richard’s great uncle were neighbors in rural Randolph County. The married Alabama natives first met as students at Auburn University. Richard went on to cut his teeth in custom residential architecture at Dungan & Nequette Architects; Lynielle at the Rural Studio, then Philadelphia’s Wallace Roberts & Todd. They launched their eponymous firm, Long & Long Design, in 2015. Core to their work is a belief in the inherent poetry of Southern architecture, with its classical traditions, deep porches and connection to the land. “Architecture is

044

LUXESOURCE.COM

How do you mix those throwback details with modern ones? LL: We’re trying to impart that old-world charm with modern amenities, and to continue to edit for beauty. What projects are coming up? RL: We have a new construction project for empty nesters on Lake Martin and another in Birmingham with amazing views of Oak Mountain; it’s inspired by European farmhouses, with lots of stone, timber beams and courtyards. And the most rewarding part? RL: Seeing someone live their life in the building you’ve designed. LL: You know you’ve done well when they invite you back for dinner.

CREATIVE COUPLE PHOTOS: PORTRAIT BY ROB CULPEPPER; ARCHITECTURE PHOTO BY JEAN ALLSOPP, JEAN ALLSOPP PHOTOGRAPHY. ON VIEW PHOTOS: COURTESY THE HIGH MUSEUM OF ART.

CREATIVE COUPLE

How does utility beget beauty? That’s a question that the High Museum of Art’s latest exhibition—on view through September 26 in Atlanta—seeks to answer. Organized by the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, “it marks the fi rst large-scale lighting show in the United States in about 40 years,” says curator Monica Obniski, who oversees the show’s second stop and sole Southeastern venue. Instead of a chronological survey of lighting, this exhibition is a thematic one. It traces the emergence of the first bulbs in the 19 th century, the scope of available materials and technologies over the decades and the impact of electrical lighting on major avant-garde design movements. From subtle innovations with the simple bulb to complex interactive installations, “Electrifying Design” presents approximately 80 specimens culled from top international collections, including works by visionaries Verner Panton, Moooi, DRIFT, Memphis Milano, Ingo Maurer and more. high.org


DISPATCH

AGE OF ADORNMENT MODERN MATTER

SCENE

DESIGN

Addison Weeks co-founders Lee Addison Lesley and Katherine Weeks Mulford first teamed up 20 years ago, after meeting through the graphic design industry in Atlanta. Their designer-favored jewelry, which they showed at High Point, inspired a cult following and countless custom requests. But it was at the urging of Charlotte designer Barrie Benson (with whom they’ll release their third collaboration, Workhorse, in August) that they ultimately parlayed their love for gemstones—such as the pink jade Charlotte designer Catherine M. Austin first proposed for a client’s closet—into high-end hardware. On the heels of two additional designer collaborations (Eddie Ross, Michelle Nussbaumer) the Charlotte-based duo recently rebranded the interior fashions arm of their company as Modern Matter in 2021, with aims to ramp up designer partnerships and introduce new product categories soon. New for now: Cosmos—a collection of heavyweight spheres inspired by astral bodies and tinkling brass bells sourced from an antiques shop. modern-matter.com

TALKING SHOP History means a lot to Helen Rutledge. The Charleston native—whose greatgreat-great grandfather served as South Carolina’s first governor and greatgreat uncle signed the Declaration of Independence—had frequented the Mount Pleasant shop of beloved antiques picker Bill Musser for years until her opportunity to take over his space came in 2019. “It was Bill’s tutelage and sourcing that got me started in this business,” says Rutledge, a Renaissance woman whose CV highlights include helping launch the iconic wrap dress for Diane von Furstenberg and directing the Charleston Antiques Show. Her boutique’s name, Bibelot, means “an object of rarity,” and its inventory lives up to the hype. Storytelling is the cornerstone of Rutledge’s eclectic curation, seen in furnishings, objects and textiles culled from five continents—be it an 800-year-old Chinese carved-stone basin, 18th-century Indian warrior panel, turn-of-the-century Indonesian wedding bed or 19th-century Belgian potter’s table. bibelothome.com

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age of adornment photos: portrait by olly yung, olly yung photographer; cosmos collection photo courtesy modern matter. talking shop photos: peter frank edwards.

BIBELOT


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RADAR AS

TOLD

TO

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COLLABORATION

|

ART

+

CRAFT

Luxe uncovers the local context, landscape and culture of place, which informs design in lasting ways.


FOUR LEADING DESIGNERS DISCUSS THE POWER OF PLACE. AS TOLD TO MARY JO BOWLING

California Dreaming Nathan Turner

Nathan Turner, Los Angeles

I was raised on a ranch in Northern California. Growing up, food was a huge part of my family and culture. At the Alisal Ranch, a resort where I designed the guest rooms in a classic California Monterey style, they are famous for their pancakes and pastries. It’s fitting because I was taught on the ranch that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, and necessary to set the day up right. Food is a big part of my life, and my feeling is, ‘What good is a really great-looking house if the food on the table isn’t delicious?’ Along with food, I think you can’t talk about the state without talking about our Spanish architecture, particularly in Southern California. Our history is embedded in it, and the oldest buildings we have in the state are the missions. I am extremely influenced by the old Spanish-style homes and downtown buildings in Los Angeles. To understand my choice of materials and colors, you would have to understand the soft light of this state. It’s very close in quality to the light in the South of France. The artist David Hockney talked about how unique the light in California is, and how beautiful. And I believe the movie industry started here because of it. The light affected my style without me realizing it at first, but working in this incredible natural light has allowed me to have a lot of fun with color.

Nathan Turner at the Alisal Ranch in California.

LUXESOURCE.COM

The common thread throughout this region is an easy-going lifestyle with a big emphasis on outdoors and bringing the outdoors in. It’s a laid-back vibe, but it’s stylish. I gravitate to relaxed, natural materials—linens over silks, for example. I love using wicker, grass cloth or seagrass—anything with an outdoor feeling to it. I have completed interiors all around the country, but even if I’m doing a traditional, formal interior in New York City, there’s still a little California in it.

photo: noah webb.

TO TOLD AS RADAR

American Accents


BUILDER: PureHaven Homes ARCHITECT: Habitations Design Group INTERIOR DESIGNER: PureHaven Homes PHOTOGRAPHER: Melissa Kelsey

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TO TOLD AS RADAR

Midwest Modernism Holly Hunt

House of Hunt, Chicago

I grew up in West Texas, but I’ve been living in Chicago since 1976. I started my business here in 1983, and at that time, it was unusual for a design business not to be headed up out of New York or Los Angeles. I like it here because the people are warm and honest. When you are running a business, common sense is important—and common sense is a community element here, as in Texas. The Midwestern work ethic and what they call “Midwestern nice” are real things, and when you are staffing a business, that’s great.

Holly Hunt in the lobby of Chicago’s Design Center at the Merchandise Mart.

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Also, art is everywhere in the streets of Chicago, and it’s inspiring. We have grandscale public sculptures by Alexander Calder, Joan Miró, Jean Philippe Arthur Dubuffet and Pablo Picasso. I am struck by the richness of them and how they are so accessible. Of course, that’s not the only art here. I love the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and The Art Institute of Chicago. We have great theaters, dance, orchestras and restaurants. There are some people who would be surprised to learn that life is not slow in Chicago.

photo: cynthia lynn.

This city is also the heart of Modernism. This is the home of the Chicago School and of Bauhaus in America. Chicago is where Mies van der Rohe settled and did a lot of important buildings. In fact, you can’t talk about Chicago design without discussing its architecture. The architecture is strong, but it is also about the clean lines and the proportions of the Modernist movement. There’s a timeless quality about it, and it’s certainly influenced my work as I’m about clean, timeless design. Before buildings went up around it, I used to be able to see the Aon Center from my apartment. It’s the perfect Modernist building, with a clean, pure design, and I have admired it often over the years.


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Mimi McMakin at her home in Palm Beach with her dogs Mango and Anchovie.

Pretty in Palm Beach Mimi McMakin

Kemble Interiors, Palm Beach

I was born in Palm Beach, and my family has been looking at the same sunset for many generations. This is an extraordinary area and an extraordinary town. It’s filled with beautiful beaches, glorious weather and people who like to be outdoors. After all, this place is enclosed by water, with a lagoon on one side and the ocean on the other. In Palm Beach, we have an elegant and beautiful way of living that’s attractive to people. There’s a high standard for architecture here. The older structures are beautiful, and the new buildings are pretty and well-built. A lot of the influence in this area is Mediterranean—our buildings tend to have high ceilings, beautiful plaster walls and big windows for the view. Many interiors feature tile floors and handpainted murals. Personally, I love rattan, sisal rugs, glazed walls and tile floors.

My firm works everywhere—including Europe—but we’ve found that once people see how we live in Palm Beach, they decide they want to live the same way, so we often end up including Palm Beach elements. We make happy, beautiful places that you miss when you leave.

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photo: sonya revell.

We aren’t known for prissy design, in fact, our design could be considered irreverent by some. In my own home, the kids used to ride skateboards inside! Here we are known for interiors where you can put your feet up and really relax and live. I think something that makes us different is that we have a great deal of openness. You can be walking down the street and find yourself peering over a hedge into a beautiful garden and at a lovely home—walks can almost be like a garden club tour. Our lifestyle is clearly on view, and you don’t get that in New York City when your home is 27 stories in the air.


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James Farmer in his Perry, Georgia dining room.

Southern Hospitality James Farmer

James Farmer Designs, Perry, Georgia

The great Southern writer William Faulkner said: “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” I am the fourth generation of my family to live in Perry, Georgia. If you came to my home, you’d find my GreatAunt Irene’s big, beautiful platter hanging in the entryway. You’d see china, artwork and needlepoint from different generations of my family mixed with a traditional Schumacher fabric in a modern colorway. It’s a very Southern thing to be purveyors of family heirlooms and objects. And if Aunt Irene could see her things mixed in with mine, she’d say: “Honey, it’s all fabulous.” One of the signatures of a Southern home is an embrace of collections and curated objet d’art. I have long maintained that the concept of “less is more” never made it south, as most Southerners are collectors. I personally collect odds and ends of silver pieces, including a serving spoon meant for spring peas and a fancy fork for bacon.

I think people unfamiliar with the South would be surprised at how avant-garde we are and have always been. We wear our fine clothes to football games, eat fried chicken with silver forks and drink bourbon in a julep cup. For us Southerners, it’s an unapologetic mix of the high and low, the old and new and the lost and found.

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photo: emily followill.

Another thing Southerners love and cherish is brown furniture. I like these pieces because they are a sturdy foundation to build upon in interior design. There’s nothing like an old bow-front table that’s built up a beautiful wax patina over the years mixed in a room with old mirrors and art from every decade. When you have all new furniture in a room, it’s not very exciting. But when you add old with the new, it’s an adventure for the eyes.


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ALISON PICKART ENCHANTS WITH A NEW DE GOURNAY WALLPAPER COLLECTION. W R I T T E N BY B R I T TA N Y C H E VA L I E R M C I N T Y R E

RADAR

COLLABORATION

Nature’s Aura

Interior designer Alison Pickart’s design for de Gournay draws on the landscape of the magnificent redwoods and includes woodland creatures, such as raccoons, foxes and red-tailed hawks.

The most fitting collaborations are effortless. Tell us about your relationship with de Gournay. As a bespoke heritage brand, de Gournay’s work has always caught my eye. I started by using the designs in smaller spaces and then worked up to larger applications. After a few projects, I became friends with owners Rachel and Hannah Cecil Gurney and the de Gournay team. The brand is very much in line with my design ethos: “If you can imagine it, you can do it.” But it was this one project in East Bay,

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which will be published in an upcoming issue of Luxe San Francisco, that helped to bring about this exciting collaboration. You give your client a lot of credit for this collection. What was the inspiration? I proposed the idea of using a different de Gournay pattern. However, this client is very clued-in on the local flora and fauna. He loved the direction but wondered what we could do that would be “very California.” I looked out the windows of the second-story property surrounded by three large redwood groves and thought, “Done! It’s redwoods and can’t be anything else.” I often look to nature and see hundreds of different colors, shapes and textures together. The most unlikely combinations are the most spectacular. Panoramic patterns tend to veer traditional. How did you strike a versatile

note with this scene? Nature always provides the ultimate baseline of beauty, and I believe this collection can be enjoyed from any perspective. In many ways, the different colorways can be the aesthetic catalyst. In addition to the original, there is a lavender version (Aurore), a sepia tone style (Eau Forte) and a blue one (Mare Verde). When you move into the lavender and sepia tone colorways, the inflection is more fantastical and otherworldly, and that helps skew an interior more modern versus traditional. Where do you envision this being used? Any location that has a high ceiling, like a dining room or foyer. We’re installing the lavender colorway in my studio’s conference room with 12.5-foot ceilings. Personally, I would love to see it in Kamala Harris’s Washington, D.C., dining room—I think that would be a fantastic nod to California.

photo: chris andre.

Imagine meandering through California’s magnificent redwood forests teeming with woodland life—squirrels, bobcats, native lilies and sword ferns. It’s a setting that San Francisco interior designer Alison Pickart majestically captured in de Gournay’s firstever West Coast-inspired Scenic Collection of wallpapers. Here, Luxe chats all things whimsy with the designer.


Customizable Color Dorian door levers with hand glazed ceramic The Dorian Collection is sleek, but makes an impact. Its tapered shape references Greek columns, making it a contemporary design with a classic reference point. Available in nineteen metal finishes and twenty-three glaze colors. To learn more about Dorian offerings, contact us at 212.758.3300 or browse the collection at sherlewagner.com


CRAFT ART

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Shaking It Up

RADAR

WITH UTILITY AND BEAUTY TOP OF MIND, THE SHAKER INFLUENCE IS MORE PROFOUND THAN EVER.

photo: courtesy the long confidence.

W R I T T E N BY H E AT H E R C A R N E Y

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Schedule your free design consultation today (or try our new Virtual In-Home Design Service) at containerstore.com/custom-closets.

©2021 The Container Store Inc. 50215

Laren® Closet Design by Doniphan Moore Interiors


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Rafi Ajl’s Gathering Chair and Bench (previous page), Brian Persico’s Span Table (top) and Kim Markel’s Glow collection (below) all exhibit hallmarks of Shaker design—quality, authenticity and beauty.

TOP VIGNETTE: COURTESY BRIAN PERSICO. BOTTOM FURNITURE: COURTESY KIM MARKEL.

CRAFT + ART RADAR

Rumor has it that with just two fingers you can effortlessly lift an original Shaker chair. Such is the elegant, weightlessness of the design—lightness, utility and beauty intertwined into one. It is the Shakers, who, after all, ostensibly spawned the modern design movement when one of their chair prototypes was spotted by students at a Danish design school in the early 20th century. And yet 240 years since the Shakers established roots in the U.S., their values of self-sufficiency, craft and optimism resonate more than ever in American design. “There is something incredibly comforting and hopeful about the Shakers,” says Lacy Schutz, executive director of New York’s Shaker Museum, who is overseeing the institution’s move to a new building and renovation by Selldorf Architects. “They modeled a way of life we’re longing for today—gender equality; racial equality; respect for the environment; pride of craft.” That ethos inspired Berkeley furniture designer Rafi Ajl of The Long Confidence, whose first memory of Shaker design started in Brooklyn with his parents’ ladder back maple dining chairs. “They are these special objects—refined and functional,” he remarks. “I’ve appreciated them more as they’ve aged with grace.” Beauty and timelessness are threaded throughout Ajl’s work, including his thin and strong tapered Spindle Bench and his cleanlined Gathering Chair. “In a throwaway culture, to have things that have provably and measurably endured is highly valuable,” reflects Ajl. Brian Persico was drawn to the Shakers’ emphasis on sustainability, citing their devotion to growing and harvesting their own materials. For his Windham Chair series, the Catskills-based designer experimented with post-and-rung construction, using local hardwoods he fells and splits along the grain, resulting in a stronger and lighter frame. The seats are woven with hickory bark or rawhide, and the finishing touch is the joinery pins in the chair back, which he carves from white-tailed deer antlers collected on walks. “Materials of the same place have a tendency to go well together,” he says. Most surprisingly, perhaps, is the community’s embrace of technology and progressive ideas (think: flattening the round broom)—qualities that attracted Hudson Valley designer Kim Markel. “This combination of ingenuity and resourcefulness is so admirable. It’s about finding solutions in unexpected places,” says Markel, alluding to her dreamlike Glow series, which uses a recycled resin composite that took years to perfect. “The shape is familiar but the material is almost foreign to the matter.” As Schutz explains, a Shaker-influenced furnishing doesn’t have to feel or look like one would expect. “People want something that has meaning and is connected to a set of values,” she says. “It’s a lot more interesting to see how the ethos is manifesting itself in ways that may not be immediately obvious.”


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P R O M O T I O N

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DISCOVERIES FRESH.DESIGN.FINDS.

NEWPORT BR ASS The Muncy Kitchen Collection delicately combines creativity and artisan manufacturing, pairing industrial al knurled elements with a beautifull bent tube spout, exemplifying stunning unning craftsmanship. newportbrass.com com

THE CONTAINER STORE CUSTOM CLOSETS The innovative design of Avera Custom Closets takes all the benefits of a built-in closet and puts them within reach. Schedule a free design consultation today. containerstore.com/custom-closets

LEE INDUSTRIES The Lee Uncovered collection brings the comfort of the indoors, outside. Upholstered in performance Sconset Chalk fabric, the U160-Series Hampton outdoor sectional features a teak frame to weather all elements. leeindustries.com


P R O M O T I O N

WESTERN WINDOW SYSTEMS The Series 7950 Bi-Fold Door is designed to smoothly fold and stack against side walls, connecting the indoors with the outside and expanding your living space. westernwindowsystems.com/performance-line/ series-7950-bi-fold-door

BROWN SAFE As the premier manufacturer of luxury watch and jewelry safes, Brown Safe specializes in one-of-a-kind security solutions that meet the exacting needs of its clients. brownsafe.com

J. TRIBBLE A premier builder of custom-designed sink bases, J. Tribble handcrafts cabinets that are a valuable asset for designers with a discerning eye, and for homeowners looking for something truly distinctive. jtribble.com


MARKET MATERIAL

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SPOTLIGHT

Explore earthy and elevated accents, a fresh ensemble of creatives and design-forward hotels to top your travel bucket list.


MATERIAL MARKET

Natural Attraction FROM SISAL AND RAFFIA TO MICA AND JUTE, OF-THE-EARTH MATERIALS PROVE FRESH AND TIMELESS. P R O D U C E D BY K AT H R Y N G I V E N W I T H S A R A H S H E LT O N P H O T O G R A P H Y BY K R I S TA M B U R E L LO

BLUSHING BEAUTY Clockwise from top left: Puka Grasscloth Wallcovering in Blush by Linherr Hollingsworth / kravet.com. Mineral Mica Wallcovering in Dusty Blush / carlisleco.com. Atomic Grasscloth Wallcovering in Ice Cream / auxabris.com. Burma Whitewash Rattan Bowl / hivepalmbeach.com. Sandy Lane Fabric in 485 by Travers / zimmer-rohde.com. Underwood Abaca Macrame Braid / samuelandsons.com. Majani Brass & Raffia Trim by S. Harris / fabricut.com. Ovina Sisal & Wool Rug in Dove / starkcarpet.com. Hillevi Grasscloth Wallcovering in Peony & Off-White by Peter Fasano / johnrosselli.com. Abaca Horizon Wallcovering in Cinnamon / carlisleco.com.


GREEN THUMB Clockwise from top left: Rustica Grass Roman Shade in Burlap / hunterdouglas.com. Madeleine Sisal Wallcovering in Linden by Michael S. Smith / hartmannforbes.com. Hillevi Grasscloth Wallcovering in Kiwi by Peter Fasano / johnrosselli.com. Cadiz Cork Wallcovering in Titanium by Stroheim / fabricut.com. Braided Square Base Urn / mainlybaskets.com. Sankara Jute Border / samuelandsons.com. River Jute Rug / usa.armadillo-co.com. Farnham Long Tom Pot #3 by Peter Wakefield / hivepalmbeach.com. Gizi Evergreen Jute Rug / annieselke.com. Jacob Stripe Ramie Window Covering in Linden by Michael S. Smith / hartmanforbes.com. Strié Sisal Wallcovering in Green Tea / jimthompsonfabrics.com.

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MATERIAL MARKET

ORGANIC FORMS Clockwise from top right: Buscemi Grasscloth Wallcovering in Bastille Brass / bridgetbearicolors.com. Desi Sisal Grasscloth Wallcovering in Skylight / thelawnsco.com. Ikat Grasscloth Wallcovering in Pearl by Crezana / johnrosselli.com. Manning Sisal Rug in Ivory / starkcarpet.com. Dunes Jute Rug in Natural / annieselke.com. Mia Ceramic Pot / hivepalmbeach.com. Capa Raffia Trim in Hemp / pindler.com. Narrative Abaca & Mulberry Wallcovering in Crystal / weitznerlimited.com. Zumberi Abaca Rug / pattersonflynnmartin.com.


GARDEN PARTY Clockwise from top left: Wild Flower Sisal Wallcovering in Sleepy Blue / thibautdesign.com. Rattan Grasscloth Wallcovering in Seacloud and Bronze / madeaux.com. Argus Grasscloth Wallcovering in Aqua/Metallic Sisal by Peter Fasano / johnrosselli.com. Cape May Raffia Wallcovering in Pale Blue / thibautdesign.com. Waterfall Woven Wood Shade in Hampton in Almond / theshadestore.com. Hexagon Wood Veneer Wallcovering in Ivory / yorkwallcoverings.com. Caspian Blue/White Marbleized Pot / hivepalmbeach.com. Rattan Wallcovering in Off-White / arte-international.com. Briar Raffia Tape in Sage / fschumacher.com. Dunes Jute Rug in Bleached Oak / annieselke.com. Loop Cut Jute & Wool Rug in White / marcphillipsrugs.com. Faux Bois Pot / hivepalmbeach.com.

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A D V E R T I S E M E N T

Style That’s Smart DISCOVER THE INTELLIGENCE OF CRYPTON HOME FABRIC … BECAUSE REAL LIFE HAPPENS

Everyone deserves a soft place to land. At home, that place should also be cozy, carefree and loaded with style. Crypton creates fabrics that are beautiful, lush and stylish with unique performance technologies that give upholstery spill repellency, cleanability, plus stain and odor resistance. Elegant, sustainable and trusted by top interior designers, Crypton Home Fabrics are available at chic, sophisticated furniture showrooms throughout the country, including Arhaus, Cisco Home and many others. Learn more at crypton.com.


A D V E R T I S E M E N T

clockwise from top : Coastal Casual The coastal living style isn’t about proximity to water, but more so, a state of mind. The Camps Bay rattan chair by Universal Furniture feels as fresh as an ocean breeze year-round, with its open frame and plush Crypton fabric cushions. Sleep Green Rest easy in the Tombo bed with “Inside Green” from Cisco Home. Crypton’s Greenguard® Gold-certified Lester Snow fabric always comes clean with permanent stain resistance. Inside, Tombo is made with all natural, responsible, organic materials—for a safe and sound sleep. Oops, Rewind Crypton Home Fabric is a no-stress, no-mess, antimicrobial wonder. Spills bead up like magic—even sticky or buttery ones. Stains lift easily with only mild soap and water. Try it yourself at home; order a free test kit today at crypton.com. Divine Dining Nowhere is Crypton fabric more important than in the dining room, where upholstered chairs mean family and guests can gather longer and more comfortably. Here, Arhaus’ refined, modern Jagger chairs are upholstered in P/K Lifestyles Mixology fabric with a Crypton finish—ensuring spills are never a problem. opposite: Menswear-Inspired The Paxton sofa from Arhaus, with its low profile and curved lines, feels current and timeless at once. With English rolled arms accentuated by meticulous pleating, it looks as expertly tailored as a Savile Row suit. Shown here in Crypton Suntory Stone striped linen.

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MARKET

TREND

SUITE LIFE Check out by checking in to these new design-centric hotels. W R I T T E N A N D P R O D U C E D BY S A R A H S H E LT O N

Party People

PHOTO: ALICE GAO.

Meet The Goodtime Hotel, the brainchild of Grammy Award-winning artist Pharrell Williams and hospitality maven David Grutman. The Ken Fulkdesigned, 266-room property offers exactly what the name suggests. Art Deco nuances and cheeky, colorful designs abound throughout the lobby, suites and cabana-clad rooftop pool, Strawberry Moon, creating a hangout that has enough nostalgia and contemporary splash to appeal to past, present and future sunseekers. thegoodtimehotel.com

Clockwise from top right: The Beach Towel in Lauren’s Sage Stripe / $69 / businessandpleasureco.com. Antique Brass and Glass Ice Bucket / $100 / williams-sonoma.com. Florio Shower Gel / $40 / ortigiasicilia.com. Malibu Round Sofa / $9,300 / marieburgosdesignthestore.com. Minimalist SW Coffee Table by Soft-Geometry / $949 / 1stdibs.com. Sabu Fabric in Red & Rose by Rose Cumming / Price upon request / wellstextiles.com. Belen Hat / $395 / yosuzi.com. Hollis Single Light Vanity / $219 / hinkley.com. Flower Power Hoops in Coral Pink / $1,550 / beabongiasca.com.

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the wendover collection rugs that inspire feizy.com


TREND MARKET

Brooklyn’s Boerum Hill neighborhood recently welcomed a new kid on the block with the opening of the Ace Hotel. Roman and Williams designed the ground-up build and interiors, making this their third collaboration with Atelier Ace. The resulting hotel offers an “undecorated and tactile spirit,” say the designers, who drew inspiration from the surrounding industrial areas, artist Jean-Michel Basquiat and the traditions of studios and work spaces. acehotel.com

Clockwise from top right: Nordic 1-Light Pendant / $328 / maximlighting.com. Mattis Rug / Price upon request / scottgroupstudio.com. No. 3 Body Wash / $20 / rudysbarbershop.com. Essential Check-In L in Red / $870 / rimowa.com. V-10 Leather Sneaker in White Nautico Pekin / $150 / veja-store.com. Finn Leather Daybed / $3,127 / mgbwhome.com. Stelton EM French Press in Red / $80 / crateandbarrel.com. Pinot Grigio White Oak Flooring / Price upon request / legnobastone.com. Katan Fuchsia Throw by Designers Guild / $335 / neimanmarcus.com.

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PHOTO: STEPHEN KENT JOHNSON, COURTESY ATELIER ACE.

City Slicker


MASTERCOOL

P R E S E R V I N G T H E TA S T E O F N AT U R E REDEFINE PERFECTION

Discover more at mieleusa.com/mastercool #LifeBeyondOrdinary

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TREND MARKET

With its effortless brand of California hospitality, Palisociety’s newest outpost, Palihouse Santa Barbara, has settled into a 1920s Spanish Colonial blocks from the Pacific Ocean. Offering just two dozen rooms, the property is intimate and chockfull of charm. Communal areas, like this living room adjacent to the bar, combine subtle coastal elements, preppy plaids, vintage treasures and, what founder Avi Brosh calls, “American Riviera” touches. palisociety.com

Clockwise from top right: Orphéon Eau De Parfum / $188 / diptyqueparis.com. Carrick Plaid in Jade & Tomato by Colefax and Fowler / Price upon request / cowtan.com. Framework Pillow in Terracotta / From $255 / brookperdigontextiles.com. Cane Partition in Charcoal Black / $2,900 / industrywest.com. Faux Shell / $250 / jaysonhome.com. Coupe Dining Chair by Barbara Barry / Price upon request / bakerfurniture.com. Mini Tiber Wall Light / Price upon request / hectorfinch.com.

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PHOTO: COURTESY PALISOCIETY.

Easy Rider


“With Western Window Systems, we were able to put a lot of multi-slide doors in and still meet the energy objectives we were chasing.” - Dan Coletti, president, Sun West Custom Homes


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Moving glass walls and windows for all the ways you live.


A NEW WAVE OF MASTER ARTISANS RETURNS TO HANDCRAFTED METHODS AND TIME-HONORED MATERIALS. P R O D U C E D BY K AT H R Y N G I V E N W I T H S A R A H S H E LT O N

photo: nico schinco.

SPOTLIGHT MARKET

Inspiration Nation

ERIN LOREK

“The thing about light is that it’s always changing,” explains Erin Lorek of Lorekform. After studying light from the object’s point of view at North Carolina’s Penland School of Craft, Lorek developed her own glass and iron process, and has since honed her craft while operating out of Brooklyn Glass studio in Gowanus, New York. For each piece, including The Surround Pendant, shown, she ladles glass onto large iron plates that start out as clay, and then presses various textures into the mixture to refract light. A simple lost-wax casting process transforms the pattern into iron and creates imperfections, which add their own narrative to the original texture. This deep dive into materiality and form are a true expression of an artist dedicated to the evolving pursuit of light. lorekform.com

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SPOTLIGHT

photo: winona barton-ballentine.

MARKET

MATTY CRUISE

When asked why handcrafting furniture is still important today, Matty Cruise of Corbin Cruise admits it’s because the artform is disappearing. While the digital age has certainly contributed to accessibility and exposure, he says there is something primal about working with your hands, especially as fewer people learn these valuable skills. For Cruise, this includes metal smithing, fabrication and experimentation with steel, brass, bronze and aluminum out of his workshop in upstate New York. The Aqueduct Bench and Fluted Console, shown, for example, are part of his new Gouge Collection, in which an invasive finish is used to age the pieces with a striking patina. His Collection No. 1 Coffee Table and Lattice Mirror Frame are also favorite designs, the result of slowing things down, sitting with the materials and seeing where his imagination takes him. corbincruise.com

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LIFE’S BEST MOMENTS. FURNISHED.™ MONTEREY COLLECTION Schedule a complimentary virtual design consultation or shop online. SummerClassicsHome.com/Luxe


SPOTLIGHT

photo: jacqueline marque.

MARKET

NATALIE ERWIN

A celebrated artist in her own right for decades, New Orleans resident Natalie Erwin was constantly on the hunt for beautiful frames to complement her work. So, the recent launch of Fleur Home, a bright, happy collection of customizable mirrors and trim, seemed to be an organic evolution for the painter. Each piece is handmade from wood and finished in hues from color purveyors Benjamin Moore, Sherwin-Williams and Farrow & Ball, as well as in bespoke tones. The designs are a nod to all the wonder and whimsy that her city has to offer. Even her mirror names pay homage to New Orleans, such as Garden District Laurel, Satsuma, Audubon and Carnival Proteus (all shown). Further fueling her creativity, Erwin has collaborated with other artists she admires, including Riley Sheehey, with several more in the works. fleurhome.com

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Dreamy nights and bright mornings. matouk.com


SPOTLIGHT

photo: andrew ingalls.

MARKET

BENNET SCHLESINGER

For Los Angeles artisan Bennet Schlesinger, inspiration is found through the maintenance and cyclical rhythm of creation itself. Made from bamboo, paper and ceramic, his evocative and ethereal lighting pieces come to life through many steps—moments he describes as quiet action. Having grown up watching his uncle shape surfboards, he was taught by his family to see form and notice details in both art and functional objects, a practice he continues today. The fabrication process for the shades, which has been years in development, involves bamboo for the structure with layers upon layers of translucent paper sheets and archival glue for an overall effect that radiates warmth. Producing thoughtfully considered works that still exude ease and natural expression is certainly no small feat. bennetschlesinger.com

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m a r b l e o f t h e w o r l d .c o m part of The Stone Collection

arizona | colorado | florida | texas | utah

Botanic Wave, Brazil


SPOTLIGHT

photo: gerard + belevender.

MARKET

NINA CHO

Detroit-based product designer Nina Cho credits her education for giving her the freedom to form a unique way of creating. Having studied woodworking and furniture design at Hongik University in Seoul, South Korea, followed by a focus on 3D design at Cranbrook Academy of Art, Cho now tells her story through pieces of furniture, and is influenced by the artistic ethics of her Korean heritage. In discussing her vision, the artist says, “There is beauty in empty spaces and it’s about respecting absence as much as the object.” This reductive aesthetic is a combination of Eastern philosophy with experimental form, exemplified in works like the Maung Maung Mirror and Cantilever Table, both shown. Through the use of various mediums and materials including glass, metal, wood and marble, Cho aims to make sculptural works that blur the lines between art and design. ninacho.com

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A D V E R T I S E M E N T

| SO UTH E A ST |

NOTABLES S O P H I ST I C AT E D.C U R AT E D. S T Y L I S H .

PEACOCK PAVERS Bring the look of natural stone to your construction, landscaping or remodeling project. Peacock Pavers’ handcrafted, patented process gives each paver subtleties of texture and color that replicate ancient cross-cut stone. Patent number: 11,000,970. peacockpavers.com

A MINDFUL HOME Home now needs to be more than smart. It should be interconnected, thoughtful and anticipatory, and the technological devices that you interface with should be elegant, intuitive and reliable. Using a design-based philosophy, a clear and concise process and a carefully curated suite of products, A Mindful Home brings bespoke solutions to elevate your space. amindfulhome.com

MOORE & GILES Functional, lasting luxury handmade in the United States, Moore & Giles’ collection of furniture showcases the inherent beauty and timeless appeal of natural leathers. Pictured is the Kemper Channeled Slipper Chair in Mont Blanc Caramel. mooreandgiles.com


FEATURING GIFT & HOME

SEPT. 20–22, 2021 Join us at Fall Design Week for access to leading trends, products and showrooms you won’t want to miss, plus a virtual education experience leading up to the show to help take your business to the next level.

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Jewel-box bathrooms and playful outbuildings bring summertime magic to a full crescendo.


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Daring Details DESIGNERS MAKE A SPLASH WITH ALL-ENCOMPASSING, ELEVATED BATHROOM SCHEMES. W R I T T E N A N D P R O D U C E D BY K AT H R Y N G I V E N

Fortune favors the bold, or so they say, but nothing could be more true for today’s top designers who are transforming bathrooms into jewel-box spaces with striking, statement-making elements. Whether a grand main bath with double sinks or a charming powder room, both functionality and high design are equally important. From graphic and colorful stone to decorative wallcoverings and finishing touches, the drama is here to stay.

photos: courtesy noa santos.

In Manhattan, designer Noa Santos went big with Guatemala Verde marble for nearly every surface in the powder room. RH Modern faucets and Articolo sconces complete the look, while a Kelly Wearstler for Visual Comfort & Co. lighting fixture decorates the ceiling.


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Is this a main bath? It’s a powder room but can also function as a full bath. These spaces are unique because they’re one of the only areas in a home that nearly everyone, including guests, experiences, but not for a lot of time. This allows for the opportunity to make a really dramatic, special statement without the risk of fatigue. Like this marble! Talk to us about it. The clients love stone of all types. They wanted something impactful, so the idea was for someone to walk in and feel enveloped by the marble, which is polished Guatemala Verde. It has this glowing effect. Because the stone is so bold, I wanted the other elements to fall in line, both serving a function while still looking beautiful. What about lighting? Creating equal lighting throughout is really important, especially when the powder room has a directional window. If you don’t light from above and from the sides, very harsh shadows will be cast. We added the sconces and overhead fixture, and also installed brass louvers with caning at the window to bring in a soft light and add visual interest without taking away from the stone. Why did you choose brass details? Green marble lends itself to a warmer metal, which plays well with the wood flooring. I wanted most of these brass components—the fittings and hardware—to be pretty minimal and recede. The shower without any glass sort of shrinks back and doesn’t detract from the fact that this is an exquisite powder room. Even with the striking components, there is a certain quietness in this space that is really beautiful. nainoa.com

LINEAR APPEAL The latest quartz surface designs from Cambria take their cues from nature, subtlety incorporating blue and green hues into elegant, veined patterning. For Ivybridge (top), Cambria’s head of design, Summer Kath, was inspired by the lush greenery from a trip to Kyoto, Japan, and wove dark teal diagonal lines into the white background for a lovely marbling effect. The color and movement of the Aegean Sea influenced Kendal (bottom), which features a soft swirling palette that mimics the ocean. Both are available in matte or high gloss with a variety of edge treatments. cambriausa.com

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GREEN WITH ENVY PHOTO: COURTESY NOA SANTOS. LINEAR APPEAL PHOTO: COURTESY CAMBRIA.

FOR DESIGNER NOA SANTOS, THE STORY FOR THIS SOPHISTICATED NEW YORK BATH STARTS WITH STONE.


T H E K E N SINGT O N WALK CO LLE CT IO N Celebrating the beauty and heritage of British design Jerry Pair, ADAC, 351 Peachtree Hills Ave., Suite 508, Atlanta, GA 30305 404.261.6337 zoffany.sandersondesigngroup.com @zoffanyusa A PRO UD M EMB ER O F S AND E RSO N D E S IG N G RO UP


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COPPER POINT IVEY DESIGN GROUP

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“The thing about powder rooms is that they have to be functional, but they don’t have to be that functional,” explains designer Jamie Ivey of Ivey Design Group. It’s one of the few places in the home that is style first, she says, which translates to permission to have fun. The starting point in this central Virginia home was the sleek and modern sink by

Porcelanosa that paired perfectly with a copper faucet. After searching extensively for the right wallcovering, Ivey finally landed on Arte’s Focus Facet motif, which she wrapped the walls and ceiling in. With angled lines and a textured surface, the wallpaper shines much like a bright penny when the sunlight hits just right. iveydesigngroup.com


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MIRROR MIRROR When it comes to finishing touches in the bath, mirrors are the ultimate accessory. From whimsical silhouettes to luxe materials and metallic detailing, these reflective accent pieces deserve their moment in the spotlight. Designer Cara Woodhouse explains, “Whether looking for something more decorative, modern, glam or whimsical, there’s a mirror out there to put on your wall.”

Clockwise from top right: Tennyson by Bunny Williams for Mirror Image Home / $1,795 / bunnywilliamshome.com. Melody / $2,100 / carversguild.com. Waverly by Made Goods / $1,350 / mecox.com. Bobbin Mirror / $1,203 / susieatkinson.com. Gloria Mirror / $1,300 / arteriorshome.com. Reunion Mirror by Busetti Garuti Redaelli / $455 / ligne-roset.com.

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MARBLE MOMENT In a traditional Victorian home in Deal, New Jersey, the marriage of old and new was the guiding principle for a modern main bathroom update. Lead designer Cara Woodhouse built the design around the existing green tile, mixing in elements like rich Calacatta marble and unlacquered brass fittings. “I have an obsession with stone,” Woodhouse admits, adding that she’ll incorporate it everywhere she can when it comes to the bath. With the statement-making materials in place, Woodhouse turned to the functional features such as storage and detailing, building in a custom double-sink vanity and relaxed West Elm Mirrors. carawoodhouse.com

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photo: courtesy cara woodhouse.

CARA WOODHOUSE INTERIORS


YEARS ADAC is celebrating 60 years of providing the Southeast with the very best in high-end home furnishings. From furniture and lighting to wallcoverings and fabrics, ADAC showrooms offer well-crafted, inspiring products with point of view. Open to the Tradea&unique Public More info at adacatlanta.com 351 Peachtree Hills Ave, Atlanta Monday – Friday | Open to the Trade & Public @adacatlanta | #adacatlanta More info at adacatlanta.com


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Providing bespoke capabilities and mix-and-match options, Emtek’s Select platform has extended into cabinet hardware. Customers can choose from a range of sizes, designs and finishes including, below, the Cabinet Pull with Rectangular Stem and Knurled Bar in Satin Copper, a new finish for the brand. emtek.com

OFF THE WALL

Cosentino has launched the Dekton Craftizen Collection, an innovative range of large-format stucco material that can be used on the floor and also for cladding. Inspired by the Venetian building material, the design is offered in five natural colors including Umber, a lovely terra-cotta hue, and includes a production process that runs on almost 100% recycled water and renewable energy. The collection debuts later this year. cosentino.com

ON THE SURFACE A stunning standout within Antolini’s substantial stone offerings is Cristallo Glacè, a quartz that features lovely tone-on-tone detailing. Part of the Exclusive Collection, which consists of more than 80 extraordinary materials, this natural stone is durable enough for indoor and outdoor installations including countertops, kitchens, bar areas and more. antolini.com

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PHOTOS: COURTESY RESPECTIVE COMPANIES.

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carefully curated inter ior s andreaschumacherinteriors.com


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photos: tim lenz.

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Small Wonders PLAYFUL, PRACTICAL AND OH-SO-PRETTY ACCESSORY DWELLINGS ARE TAKING THE AMERICAN BACKYARD BY STORM. W R I T T E N A N D P R O D U C E D BY G R AC E B E U L E Y H U N T

There’s a certain magic to a backyard hideaway; a conjuring of escape from the comforts of home with ageless appeal. Perhaps it is this very quality that spurred a movement of quarantined homeowners to convert or construct petite outbuildings devoted to good times and creative pursuits. The way we see it, the trend is a win-win for maximizing property while staying young at heart. Take inspiration from these bite-sized exemplars around the country. Designer Bryan Graybill and Historical Concepts President Andrew Cogar looked to the primitive, monochrome homes of early Nantucket and Newport in selecting Benjamin Moore’s Narragansett Green for the façade of Graybill’s East Hampton cocktail shed. With a view to easy-breezy entertaining by the pool, the accordion window with mahogany sill functions as a self-catering bar.


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For Bryan Graybill, designing a cocktail shed at his Hamptons home alongside architect Andrew Cogar proved a great opportunity to flex his background in hospitality design. “My husband and I love to entertain, but we also like to be part of the party, so we tried to create a selfdirected environment,” he explains. “We wanted a casual hosting program, and to keep guests and wet bathing suits out of the kitchen when they need a drink. We defined that purpose first and the architecture followed.”

For the exterior expression, Cogar and Graybill drew inspiration from East Hampton village—specifically, from its one-room schoolhouse whose modest scale and circa 1784 charm felt apropos. “Reclaimed materials were key to bringing a sense of nostalgia into the present,” says Graybill. Cement tile (allegedly salvaged from stables in Spain), irregular-width wood siding to reflect hand planing of the 18 th century, a simple shake roof and burnished brass details all lend to the historical ethos, while restaurant-grade appliances, including an ice maker, dishwasher and refrigeration suite, offer all the modern comforts of a tiny resort. “There’s something fun and ceremonial about ‘opening up the bar,’ ” says Cogar, pointing to the pool-facing accordion window, a busy watering hole in the summer months. Meanwhile, the interior functions as a dressing room (replete with an outdoor shower off the back) and a berth-like loft accessed via ladder provides guests (and often Graybill himself) a comfy place to steal away for a nap. “It’s such a fun little workhouse and not redundant to the kitchen,” says Cogar, adding, “if you’re going to do an outbuilding, being honest about what you want—whether that’s turning out 30 margaritas in a hour or not—will help you make the most of it.” graybillddb.com; historicalconcepts.com

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A Tallahassee, Florida, garden house by Alison Carabasi with interior design by Cary Langston of Langston Sprowls Design Group serves as a sophisticated pool lounge—and fully functional HQ. “The client had been paying so much in rent for her downtown office that the garden house paid for itself in a few months,” shares Carabasi.

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schoolhouse rocks photo: tim lenz. friends & follies photos: carolyn allen.

Working with a build team of Amish craftsmen in her native Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Alison Carabasi has carved a chic niche for herself: designing exquisite custom garden houses, which are then shipped as a single, finished piece to discerning clients around the country. Below, Carabasi shares her insight on the accessory dwelling’s limelight moment. Origin story: I’m from an artistic family and grew up appreciating pretty homes. But this all started when I made my own garden house and saw how much my whole family fell in love with it. Every time I looked out my window, it made me happy. My kids called it “The Shed” in high school, and all their friends would come over and hang out. I saw how great it was to have one—how it enhanced everything about my yard, my home, my life. Business report: I noticed an uptick before the pandemic, and it’s only increased since then. You know how in England gardening is a big part of mainstream culture? I think that’s happening here more and more. There’s a growing awareness for healthy eating and healthy living, and that translates to people being out in their yards and caring for their gardens. It’s a good trend. On deck: Continuing to evolve the architectural styles we offer; one I have in mind is a pagoda. I also want to launch garden ornaments and accessories. I have a copper sphere and finial designs that are so pretty, and I just launched lanterns—for no reason other than the fact that I don’t want to see ugly lanterns on my buildings! hillbrookcollections.com


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SEEING GREEN ENTERTAINING EXPERT JOSEPH MARINI SHARES THE VISION BEHIND HIS BACKYARD RETREAT.

seeing green photo: courtesy joseph marini. time honored photo: joshua mchugh.

At my home in St. Petersburg, Florida, a shed became the foundation for my garden studio. Syncing the look to my home’s Georgian exterior was important, so I opted for hipped roofs and an all-white exterior. To take advantage of the garden views, I installed two reclaimed French doors instead of windows, and built in two lime-washed benches. One serves as my work space, the other as a floral arranging and potting spot. Cases were built on top to house collections of glass and silver floral vessels, which I look forward to setting out for small garden parties. But for now at least, the studio is all mine. athomewithjoseph.com

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TIME HONORED

In 1929, Frederick P. Ristine, a Philadelphia investment banker, and his wife, Elizabeth, moved into BetzFred, the aptly named Wayne, Pennsylvania, English Arts and Crafts estate that would be their country home. Fast forward nearly a century and

seeing an irreplaceable diamond in the rough, Lauren Wylonis scooped it up with a view to restoration. While the property was renamed the Heydon Estate, everything else was lovingly patched, painted and coaxed back to period glory. Even the original potting shed, which stands like a beacon at the entrance to a walled English garden (which Wylonis nostalgically planted with lavender, hydrangeas, redbud trees, salvia and roses), got a fresh face lift befitting its roots.

Today, BetzFred is home to a young family who saw a great place to raise children in its fairy-tale grounds rich with nooks and crannies and history. While outbuildings are on the rise, this grand specimen, modeled after the potting sheds of old English country homes, reminds that “structures are super important, interesting focal points to gardens,” says Wylonis. “This has been true for years and years and years.” kingshavendesign.com; kingshavenproperties.com


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DESIGN HAPPENS HERE

Welcome to luxesource.com, where engaging design stories, stunning photography, and a robust resource directory combine to inform and inspire. Take a look around, and make yourself at home.

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After years in New York, a designer returns South to reimagine her parents’ historic Charleston abode.

Haven for Heritage


Interior Design: Alexandra Howard, Alexandra Howard Inc.


Designer Alexandra Howard added a coat of Fine Paints of Europe’s Rembrandt Red to the front door of her parents’ Charleston home, flanking the feature with tropical jatropha topiaries in antique French cast-iron urns from Tucker Payne Antiques. “I thought trees would be unique,” she says, selecting the evergreen species for its fiery coral flowers. Pine cone-adorned Vicksburg lanterns by Copper Sculptures Inc. lend a gaslit glow.


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t age six, Alexandra Howard loved to curl up on the floor of her family’s historic Charleston home and persuade her father to join her for art projects. “We would work on them for hours upon hours,” recalls her father, Dr. Gene Howard. “Designing, drawing, creating: That was the language she spoke. If we said to Alex, ‘Draw the water lilies at Giverny,’ she could grab some oil pastels and do it in reasonable facsimile.” So, it seemed destined that her parents—including her mother, Elizabeth—would ask their now-designer daughter to reimagine the same home that had first stoked her creativity. Completed in 1789, the Harleston Village residence had been lovingly restored and remodeled by the Howards once before, when their daughter was still a child. Years later, architect Beau Clowney fashioned a period-appropriate addition for the home, establishing a large kitchen and family room downstairs and spacious main suite one floor above. Next came Gene’s passion project: a tropical garden to encircle the home, reminding him daily of his childhood abroad. “My father was the third generation in his line of family to be born and raised in India,” reveals Howard. “His father was an infectious disease specialist dedicated to the eradication of malaria, and he traveled extensively, collecting beautiful art and furniture along the way.” He grew to appreciate the beauty of hand-crafted, artisanal pieces, a love he passed down to his son. “My father inherited many Indian treasures, from a teak campaign chest to a brass tray table, and each one has a story to tell,” the designer notes. Heart set on employing those narrative-rich “stories” as a springboard for the redesign, Howard scoured the world for additional antiques to balance the gravitas of her family’s heirlooms. But acting as de facto builder for a slate of renovations, she first overhauled the bathrooms and kitchen. Capitalizing on Clowney’s sound enhancements, she embraced the “airy, treehouse feel” of the home’s combination eat-in kitchen and family room, keeping those spaces gracious and garden-inspired—with mostly undressed windows to show off the home’s original moldings

as well as the enveloping subtropical gardens. All-brass hardware keeps things classic, while an unexpected brecciated marble—Arabescato Corchia—injects an element of surprise. Not one to shy from color either, Howard assembled a palette that pulls fresh greens from the surrounding flora, providing a natural foil for the ruddy hues of her parents’ Southeast Asian keepsakes. “To me, reds, oranges and golds are the historical colors of Southeast Asia; they’re colors of the old temples, of monks’ robes,” the designer notes. “I have never been into trends, and I always gravitated toward those tones, even when they may have been considered dated.” To wit, she adds this bit of advice: “I think it’s important to design with what you like, not what you think you should like.” The formal living room is a point in case: Its jaw-dropping Kurdish rug delivers the rich gem tones Howard believed the project needed, in concert with carved reliefs between the windows, framed in alternating red and gold silks. A Chinese lacquered screen (one of several similar iterations throughout the residence) brings drama to one end of the space, while beside the fireplace, a charcoal etching on rice paper—procured from Angkor Wat in Cambodia—commands center stage above an antique Japanese kimono box taking a turn as a coffee table between two caneback settees. “I wanted every single item I brought into the home to be long-lasting, to be something I’d be proud to inherit, and to be appropriate for the age and history of the house itself,” says Howard, underscoring the mantra of a city known for fiercely upholding historic preservation and classicism. “When you live in a house with bone structure like this, I believe it demands a certain reverence and begs for traditional pieces.” Ensuring each objet d’art would become a conversation piece was key. “I sourced the kinds of accessories that would have guests percolating with questions about the history of the home,” explains Howard, who even had de Gournay’s Early Views of India wallcovering hand-dipped in tea for a custom patina. “I didn’t want anyone to ever be able to pinpoint when this home was designed, but for it to feel truly international and collected over a lifetime. Anyone can recreate a ‘look.’ But it takes knowledge and heart to create a home.”

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Above: An antique Turkish Bergama rug, sourced from Double Knot in New York, delivers history and richness to the entryway, which Howard freshened with Benjamin Moore’s Crown Point Sand paint. Stanton’s Sahara sisal from Designer Carpets graces the restored stair treads. The framed elephant print was culled from a favorite 19th-century book in the homeowners’ collection. Left: A Chinese folding screen teams with Indian wood and Chinese gilt carvings, giving gravitas to the formal living room. A Kurdish rug grounds the custom sofas Howard upholstered in Robert Allen cotton, paired with pillows of Christopher Hyland silks and bolsters of Christian Fischbacher red velvet. At right, a Cambodian wood carving of apsaras suspends above a Chinese altar table-cum-console from 17 South Antiques.


Howard had the dining room’s scenic paper, de Gournay’s Early Views of India, dipped in tea for a custom patina. Biedermeier-style vintage walnut dining chairs—reupholstered in Claremont linen—enhance the graceful curves of a Georgian mahogany triple pedestal table as draperies of Pierre Frey’s Sari silk in ivory, complete with custom-colored Christopher Hyland tassel trim, soften the backdrop.


“I didn’t want the design of this home to feel trendy; I wanted it to be long-lasting, long-lasting, and something my parents would be really proud of.” of.” –A L E X A N D R A H OWA R D

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Above: Vintage Ficks Reed bamboo sofas and club chairs compose the screen porch seating. Pillows of Peter Dunham’s Fig Leaf print impart playfulness alongside Konstantin Kakanias’s Paradise Lost design for Templeton. A vintage iron armillary from Charleston Gardenworks holds center court atop a brass tray table inherited from Howard’s grandmother while an antique terrarium houses the family’s orchid collection beyond. Opposite: Antique French caned settees, updated in Christopher Hyland’s Kirin silk brocade, lend lightness to the living room’s secondary seating. Lapis lazuli-trimmed giltwood foo dog andirons, procured from Plaza del Ángel in Mexico City, guard an antique fire back unearthed during renovations. Above, tole sconces from Fritz Porter and 1920s Italian coral vases flank circa-1875 French dolphin candlesticks from Houston’s Carl Moore Antiques.


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Right: C&C Milano’s vibrant Maremma linen on the headboard and Prelle silk velvet on the bolster bring brightness to this guest bedroom’s crisp Yves Delorme linens. Above the bed, a 19thcentury Japanese screen forms a fine coterie with an antique lacquered chinoiserie nightstand and Japanese Faïence lamp attributed to J. Vieillard & Cie. The Galerie des Lampes’ Grasshopper sconce proves useful for reading. Opposite: Howard established a conversation group in the study using a gilded Gustavian ottoman, redressed in Rodolph mohair, and pair of antique club chairs from Scott Antique Markets in Atlanta, recovered in Christopher Hyland’s lush Dani velvet in Wood Thrush. Mulberry Home’s Constantine embroidery embellishes the pillows while a Visual Comfort & Co. sconce with custom shade strikes a simpler note.


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Love Language

Rich in personality and patina, a winsome Atlanta Victorian proves ceaselessly inspiring to a design-inclined couple. W R I T T E N BY M O N I Q U E M C I N T O S H | P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y J E F F H E R R

Interior Design: Laura Jenkins, Laura W. Jenkins Interiors Home Builder: Ford Hoke, Tillman Residential LLC


Designer Laura Jenkins and architect McLean Jenkins say the eccentricities of their historic abode in Atlanta’s Grant Park have served to enrich their design sensibilities. Their foyer’s old-fashioned picture rails, for example, provide spots for meaningful pieces such as a Robert Motherwell print and an original watercolor by McLean. A gilded console from Scott Antique Markets displays souvenirs and heirlooms, including a photo of The Who taken by the architect’s uncle.


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dopting a century-old home is never a casual affair. Appreciating its timeworn bones—chips, cracks and all—requires enduring love and dedication. That much rang true for designer Laura Jenkins and architect McLean Jenkins, an Atlanta couple entwined in creative courtship with their 1905 Victorian bungalow in Grant Park. Initially drawn to the neighborhood’s historic surroundings, with its broad, walkable streets and 100-year-old oak trees, the pair found themselves smitten with the location, even if the residence itself looked worse for the wear. Fortunately, this was a duo endowed with the ability to see the thinly veiled beauty beneath: particularly, the virtues of the dwelling’s 11-foot ceilings and spacious, but separated rooms off a generous central hallway. “The spaces feel grand because of the height of the ceilings and the proportionality of the windows,” McLean notes. Closer inspection revealed original heartpine floors and wavy, period-glass windows that remained miraculously unscathed by the decades. “Those historical details gave it so much character,” adds Laura. “To see all of that intact was so special.” To make their home move-in ready, the pair first shored up its aging floors, roof and fireplaces— though busy careers delayed more significant changes until four years later. By then, they’d welcomed a son, Archer, and had both made major marks in the design world: McLean at architectural firm McAlpine and Laura founding her eponymous practice in 2018. The time between allowed them not only to learn their home’s quirks, but also to sharpen their conviction that nothing can replicate the patina of passing time. “I believe things have a spirit to them; homes, furniture and artwork have histories,” Laura muses. It’s a belief she and McLean share: They both pursued degrees in history and count concerted interest in art and architectural history. Hoping to preserve their home’s storied soul, the couple found a partner in Ford Hoke, a general contractor McLean first met through his work at McAlpine. “He navigated a tricky renovation with such grace,” says the architect, who set out to honor the bungalow’s traditional floor plan while reconsidering spaces that felt architecturally incongruous.

The home’s ’90s-era kitchen was reconfigured with custom cabinetry, soapstone countertops and brass accents, while its narrow main bathroom (likely once an enclosed porch) was torn down to the studs. Thanks to a career that has nurtured a fascination with “the beautiful math” of choreographing movement through the smallest spaces, McLean was inspired to replan the bathroom’s fixtures and door placements, making its slim footprint feel far more spacious. “It’s about creating relationships on axis that balance the layout of the rooms and their relation to one another,” he explains. “You don’t necessarily even pick up on it; it just feels right.” The design team restored doors, windows and moldings to their original forms but, per Laura, retained as many dents and cracks as possible. “I always like to say my work is about the perfectly imperfect,” says the designer, who also let her home’s textural backdrop inspire its selection of furnishings, favoring vintage finds and family heirlooms. Even fresh introductions, such as a kitchen banquette the couple designed together, incorporate rich details like embroidery and fluted woodwork that hold their own alongside classic designs. By combining everything from Jacobean to early 20th-century modernism, the mix arrived somewhere new altogether. “It’s all about creating style tensions,” Laura says. Each room’s distinctive character directly informed its unique compositions and arrangements. The long entry hall, with its original picture rails, intuitively became a gallery for the Jenkins’ large collection of artworks—including a few by McLean—displayed in an old-fashioned manner. McLean likewise lent his handiwork to a custom Yves Klein Blue mural on the walls of son Archer’s sunlit bedroom. In rooms receiving less natural light, Laura leaned in to the moodiness with more muted wall colors. A terra cotta bowl her mother received as a wedding gift in the ’60s triggered the earthy hue used for the dining room, while soft blush walls and gray textiles bring a romantic feel to the main bedroom, invoking the shades of dawn and dusk. Curating surfaces with books and mementos was always a must, the designer notes. “The layers are so important; they’re what make a home personal.” And although its rooms feel composed, the couple knows they will never be static. “The age of an old home is almost akin to how we ourselves age, in the layers of experience we add over time,” McLean says. And for anyone who’s ever truly loved an old home, nothing could be more beautiful.

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Left: Harmonizing with the home’s existing heart-pine hardwoods in the entry hall, an English burled wood chest provides pleasing contrast to the graphic silhouette of Knoll’s Bertoia chrome side chair. A circa-1960s work on paper by Spanish artist Eduardo Chillida and an Empire-style gilt-and-mahogany mirror suspend in tandem from the restored picture railings above. Opposite: The living room receives “beautiful natural light, so I wanted to showcase our high ceilings, artwork and collections,” Laura notes. Vintage finds (an original Eero Saarinen tulip chair salvaged from an old library, a Percival Lafer lounge chair) mix with new ones, including a white-leather sofa by Design Within Reach, ceramic sculptures by Atlantan Jessica Dorman on the mantel and a Julian Chichester cocktail table from Holland MacRae. A vintage antelope mount keeps watch over proceedings.


Left: With the dining room naturally receiving less sunlight than other spaces, Laura opted to emphasize its atmospheric qualities using a custom terra cotta color for the walls. The hue was inspired by a vintage bowl— a gift from the designer’s mother— that now rests upon the room’s antique leafed bar table. The framed drawing on yellow paper is by Atlanta artist Ben Smith. Opposite: The dining room demonstrates Laura’s deftness for combining periods, with a mix that includes a glass-andLucite table—made custom for McLean’s parents in the ’70s— Eames molded fiberglass side chairs through Herman Miller, two lacquered Art Deco chairs and an original Flos Arco lamp. Ghost, an entrancing equine piece by the late James McLaughlin Way, anchors the scene.


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Right: The breakfast nook benefits from the interesting silhouettes of a Cassina zig-zag chair, adjustable Stokke high chair for son Archer and a French Thonet-style table Laura found at Savoy Flea in Chicago. Le Corbusier’s Lampe de Marseille illuminates watercolors by McLean, available through Spalding Nix Fine Art, and a custom banquette by Holland MacRae donning a colorful Clarence House textile based on the work of Paul Klee. Opposite: The couple worked closely with Amir Nejad of Royal Custom Cabinets to fashion the kitchen’s fresh millwork, painted Benjamin Moore’s Waller Green to bring out the mossy undertones of soapstone counters from Marmi Natural Stone. A Clé tile backsplash and vintage French baker’s cart from R Hughes help integrate the space within the century-old abode. The Kallista unlacquered brass faucet is from Ferguson.


Left: Matte-black chalkboard paint provides a perfect backdrop for bolder pieces in the study, including a mixed-media work by New Orleans artist Aimée Farnet Siegel. A vintage Knoll Platner table, brass floor lamp by Juniper Design and antique daybed from McLean’s childhood home complete the reading nook. Opposite: Doing double duty as Laura’s office, the study encapsulates the designer’s love of juxtapositions: pairing a vast and solemn antique Belgian desk with an almost cartoonish foam tubular chair by French brand Moustache. Reference books are always close at hand, whether piled on the floor or filed on the delicate brass Anthropologie étagère.


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Above: In the main bedroom, custom blush paint mimics the mood of a trio of European cityscapes—two inherited from Laura’s grandmother and another McLean purchased while visiting Venice. Vintage finds include the Ligne Roset Togo Fireside chair, glassand-walnut sconce from City Issue and wood-and-steel cocktail table from 214 Modern Vintage in High Point. Opposite: A leopard-print Stark rug provides a playful, yet neutral backdrop for the main bedroom’s vintage elements, including twin rattan tables, two burled-wood Art Deco stools and a spectacular Gaetano Sciolari brass chandelier. A 1970s Kimberly Kyser painting gifted by McLean’s mother and found French letters, originally penned in the 18th century, serve as sentimental touchstones.


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Carving a Niche South Carolina artist Katy Mixon transforms her paintings’ leftover materials into artworks of their own. W R I T T E N BY M A I L E P I N G E L | P H O T O G R A P H Y BY P E T E R F R A N K E D WA R D S

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harleston painter Katy Mixon can find inspiration in nearly anything—even a peach pit plucked from the sidewalk. “I collect random objects along my walks,” she notes, pointing to the textural leaves, seeds and pine cones lining the shelves of her Wagener Terrace studio, a roomy work space in a converted 1920s ExxonMobil office. Just a short distance away is historic Magnolia Cemetery, which Mixon likes to visit for a break in the day. “It’s green and on the water, with beautiful old headstones,” she says of the marsh-side setting, quite the contrast to her former Brooklyn environs. Since her move South in 2019, the languid Lowcountry topography has been making an impression. “I’m working on a painting that feels quite aquatic; I pick up on whatever landscape I’m working in,” she notes. “Tone.

Subject. It’s all drawn from what’s around me.” So, too, has Mixon’s color palette shifted since her return to the Carolinas of her youth. “My pieces are brighter than before; there’s such great natural light here.” Following landscape studies, some inspired by floods and wildfires (“Climate change is local news now,” she says), Mixon begins each painting by layering monochromatic oil pigments—“cadmiums, ochres, siennas, umbers”—onto wood panels she then carves up using traditional wood-working tools. As she etches into each painting, Mixon is careful to collect and cache every lifted segment. Crucially, these tiny fragments are later assembled and installed together as site-specific amalgamations—auxiliary works to the paintings that first forged them. But these do not represent the artist’s only stab at sustainability, as she’s started to explore other ways of repurposing studio materials. Partly inspired by a Gee’s Bend quilt she saw

at Atlanta’s High Museum of Art, as well as the sewing handiwork of her grandmothers, Mixon, who earned her MFA at UNC Chapel Hill, began saving the colorful muslin cloths used for painting cleanup—then turning them into quilts. One is currently on its way to Charlotte’s The Mint Museum for a September exhibition, “Break the Mold: New Takes on Traditional Art Making.” “These pieces come out of the paintings, broadening the idea of what the work is and making the creative process visible,” Mixon affirms, eying the shelf of curiosities from her strolls. Having grown up in an agricultural family in Orangeburg, South Carolina, she’s come to view her own practice as cyclical or seasonal, much like farming. The first part of this year she devoted to painting (or “planting”), while the coming months will bring sculpture and quilting (or “harvesting”). “I used to see them as separate interests,” she notes, “but now I understand that they all fit together.”


Charleston artist Katy Mixon’s Wagener Terrace studio proffers sunlit space for her self-styled practice, Mixon Studio, which encompasses painting, carving, sculpting and quilting (opposite). The artist catalogs castoff fragments of her works within pegboard-mounted Lucite bins (left). A dollop of cadmium red on a palette knife supplies scarlet accents (below right). After her paintings’ surfaces have slightly cured, Mixon artfully chisels their layers using traditional wood-working tools (bottom).

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TRANSCENDING TRADITION An intuitive approach to a tailored family home brings a modern touch to one of Atlanta’s most charming neighborhoods.

W R I T T E N BY M I K K I B R A M M E R | P H O T O G R A P H Y BY R O B E R T P E T E R S O N

Architecture: Linda D’Orazio MacArthur, Linda MacArthur Architect, LLC Interior Design: Tanya Lacourse, Violet Marsh Interiors Home Builder: Craig Bass, Avalon Custom Homes, LLC Landscape Architecture: Jeremy Smearman, Planters, Inc.


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Collaborating with general contractor Craig Bass, architect Linda MacArthur enhanced this Atlanta home’s connection to the outdoors via a modern expanse of floor-to-ceiling glass windows and doors by Sierra Pacific. Designer Tanya Lacourse followed suit with contemporary furnishings such as ivory velvet RH sofas and a pair of Century Furniture Catbird chairs in a Romo gray bouclé. Pillows of Zinc Textiles’ Kuba Kay fabric contribute graphic pop.


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tlanta is a vast metro of six million people, but locals know it better as a collection of hundreds of in-town neighborhoods heaped with history and charm—each with a distinct personality. For a former Californian who’d originally moved to the city with the intention of staying two years, the charisma of its historic neighborhoods became hard to resist, and he’s now spent two decades as an Atlantan. Having renovated several residences in the past without ever quite finding what he wanted within an intown footprint, this homeowner finally opted to build from the ground up, securing a well-situated lot in Morningside—a Midtown-adjacent enclave just minutes away from multiple parks and the Atlanta Botanical Garden. Residential designer Richard C. Hatch initially fashioned the residence to meld with Morningside’s traditional façades. But as priorities changed, the question became how to maximize the footprint Hatch had established while updating it for the homeowner and his family’s evolving needs. “I really wanted something personal, and very functional for teenagers,” he notes. It was also important that the homeowner and his partner have space for various hobbies, such as cooking, distilling and brewing, woodworking and 3D printing. Enter architect Linda D’Orazio MacArthur, who worked within Hatch’s already-established footprint to adapt a residence that embraces modern living while respecting the classic vernacular of its milieu. “There’s a definite scale to homes in the neighborhood and we worked really hard to maintain that character,” explains the architect. “It’s very clean, with very little detailing, and it’s a pretty good size house, but it doesn’t really look that big from the front.” By changing the roof lines and adding glass to the rear, MacArthur achieved something decidedly more contemporary. Bringing on Jane Hollman—a designer who specializes in interior architecture, space planning, kitchens, bars and related spaces—ensured showstopping details and workhorse rooms, such as the cook’s quality kitchen, that are as chic as they are useful. In realizing these revisions, general contractor Craig Bass didn’t miss a beat. “The fact that he could come in and pick up where the original builder had left off, and make all elements come together as if he’d started from scratch, was pretty

impressive,” the homeowner notes. “He also lives in the neighborhood, so he gets what it’s all about.” When it came to interiors, designer Tanya Lacourse’s fresh instincts melded perfectly with the owner’s vision for a home that subtly transcended tradition but would still be welcoming. “If you look at the front of the house, you don’t necessarily know how modern it is until you come inside,” she says. “Though it’s modern, it needed to feel inviting and warm; there’s nothing cold or sterile about it.” Lacourse looked to another designer, Lee Kleinhelter, in a consulting capacity early on in the project. Kleinhelter’s initial suggestions for many of the home’s upholstery hues and textures led the way for nubby rugs and textiles; velvets; and Belgianinspired translucent finishes on natural hardwoods, paired with wallpaper and stone accents. For the powder room, Lacourse tapped New York City-based artist Jill Malek for a custom digital wall covering inspired by Japanese weeping willows. To up the intrigue, she embellished with a gray smoked-glass fixture that resembles a glowing geode, giving the space sophisticated drama. “It’s gorgeously moody and the light sort of dances along the wall in this really interesting way,” the designer explains. Keeping the downstairs palette to a mostly timeless neutral selection of creams, blacks and browns, Lacourse accented with moments of muted green and warm peach, with the latter adding an aspect of romance to the dining room. “People could say it’s pink, but it almost reads like a neutral,” Lacourse says of the shade, adding, “It has an earthiness rather than a sweetness.” And since the client wanted a home where he could just as easily host a party or cozy up with a book, the design team ensured its spaces would feel flexible and seamless. Answering the owner’s request for a resort-like backyard sanctuary, the home’s convivial pool surroundings flow naturally into the open, airy living spaces—including an inviting screened porch that extends the living room footprint. Here and elsewhere along the home’s posterior, sunlight spills generously through floorto-ceiling windows that frame landscape designer Jeremy Smearman’s plant selections below. “The idea was to create a simple, tailored landscape reflective of the clean lines of the architecture,” notes Smearman, careful not to compete with Morningside’s native assets. Furthers MacArthur: “You look out the back windows and you see all these beautiful trees. That’s one of the great things about Atlanta: We’re a city in a forest.”

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Right: Spearheading the space planning and interior detailing of the home’s hardest-working spaces, designer Jane Hollman of Studio Entourage devised the kitchen layout and suggested the idea of a scullery, painted in Farrow & Ball’s Green Smoke, to supplement counter space and storage. Lacourse then accented the main cooking space with McGuire counter stools and milk glass pendants by Bert Frank. Opposite: Lacourse and the client worked closely with Natalia Makarova of Karpaty Cabinets to conceptualize the kitchen cabinetry, which boasts stained black oak on the island, Farrow & Ball’s Skimming Stone paint on the perimeter cabinets and matte black pulls from Matthew Quinn Collection throughout. A CB2 concrete table cuts a sleek silhouette in the sunlit breakfast area beyond.

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Left: In the dining room, a sculptural Oly chandelier offers a dramatic focal point above Patricia Urquiola’s origami-esque Diamond dining table and Tobia and Afra Scarpa’s Miss chairs, both for Molteni&C. Arteriors’ Myrtle sconce punctuates walls of Farrow & Ball’s Setting Plaster, perfectly matched to a peachy Casamance drapery textile from Ernest Gaspard & Associates. Opposite: Walls and ceiling awash in Sherwin-Williams’ Black Fox telegraph a moody vibe in the study, where a Design Within Reach sofa joins several Arteriors light fixtures and furnishings, including abstract cocktail tables in alternating brass and black finishes. The Larsen and Lee Jofa lumbar pillow fabrics were recommended by designer Lee Kleinhelter, who consulted with Lacourse during the project’s initial stages.


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Right: Lacourse’s bold selections for the powder room harmonize, but don’t compete. A whimsical custom wall covering by NYC artist Jill Malek sets the tone of the space, where a semicircle of striking Sydney quartzite from CIOT nests within a custom vanity by Karpaty Cabinets. A smoked-glass geode fixture by Hammerton Studio adds a glamorous grace note. Opposite: The homeowner wanted the main bedroom to feel like a luxurious boutique hotel, so Lacourse responded with a serene, muted palette, including walls of Sherwin-Williams’ Sensible Hue and an RH bed upholstered in Kleinhelter’s suggested slate blue. The Interlude Home swivel chair— donning a gray Pollock tweed from Kleinhelter’s boutique, Pieces Inc.—defers to a Global Views bench in a vivid Romo cotton.


PHOTO: ROBERT PETERSON


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Profile for Luxe Interiors + Design Magazine

Luxe Magazine - July/August 2021 Southeast  

Luxe Magazine - July/August 2021 Southeast  

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