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On the Community responds to Verge of greatness withdrawal A&E 4

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Opinion 8 & 9

CHIPS LUTHER COLLEGE

“Let the chips fall where they may.”

March 14, 2013

Vol. 135, No. 17

Since 1884

Campus destruction Students’ cars damaged in accident Graffiti mars pool construction site

Jayne Cole/Chips

Fender bender. An accident Saturday, March 9 occured at approximately 12:15 a.m. in the Olson parking lot, causing an estimated $8,400 in damages.

Sarah King

News Editor

Six cars were damaged in the Olson parking lot resulting in an estimated $8,400 in damages. Decorah Police responded to a car accident on Luther Campus at approximately 12:15 a.m. on March 9, 2013. The responding officer wrote in their description of the incident that Elliott Scheck (‘13) “pulled into parking lot too fast taking wide turn [sic]. [His] vehicle hit six separate vehicles parked in the parking lot before coming to rest in the west corner of the parking lot.” Antonio Bautista (‘14) was one of the students whose car was damaged and

was called to the scene around nine a.m. “The damage to my car was minor compared to the other cars,” Bautista said. “I was the lucky one in this incident. I’m waiting to hear back from the other party’s insurance company to contact me so they can fix the damages.” According to the police report, Scheck, who is of legal drinking age, “was found to be impaired and under the influence of alcohol.” In addition to legal ramifications Scheck may face, the college could charge Scheck with violating the Luther Code of Conduct. Students found damaging property in Accident continued on page 10

Abby Carpenter/Chips

Serveying scurity standards. Lead Security Officer Dean Carolan poses near the new pool, which was vandalized by an unknown person Feb. 27.

Abby Carpenter

Staff Writer

Vandalism has become an increasingly Several instances have occurred, including a message spray-painted inside the new pool construction and damage done to a student’s car. The increase has prompted Luther security to look into purchasing and installing cameras. On the evening of Feb. 27, an unknown perpetrator broke into the new pool building and painted the message “ABY According to Director of Campus Security Bob Harri, although the message indicates that the Luther sorority Alpha Beta Psi did the vandalism, there is some evidence that

Nordic Studies Center planned Katherine Mohr

Endowed Chair in Norwegian

Staff Writer Language and Modern Nordic

Photo courtesy of Photo Bureau

Leaving a legacy. The Center will be named after President Richard and Judy Torgerson.

The Board of Regents announced that O. Jay and Patricia Tomson have committed $1.25 million to a new Center for Nordic Studies, to be named after President Richard and Judy Torgerson. The Tomsons endowed the money as a challenge gift, with the understanding that Luther would raise enough money to match the $1.25 million by May 31, 2014. The $2.5 million will fund the salary of the chair of the center, called the Tomson Family

Culture, for many years. The Center for Nordic Studies will not be a physical building, but instead a presence on campus much like the Center for Ethics and Public Life or the Center for Sustainable Communities. “We like to refer to these types of centers as being centers without walls,” Director of Development in Principal Gifts Ann Sponberg Peterson said. “So it ends up being not something that we can build, but a spirit of

ABY is innocent. “We have had some instances that we can connect to pledge month in the past,” Harri said, “but I don’t know if this one is related to that, or if somebody else wrote the message, trying to point the blame at that organization.” ABY President Emily Wilson (‘14) is adamant that the sorority is not to blame. Her main argument is that the message said “ABY was here” and not “AB was here.” “When you pledge Greek life, you have to learn the Greek alphabet, so it’s just common knowledge,” Wilson said. “Our girls take pride in making sure we write Vandalism continued on page 10

Inside Torrenting

Dedication continued on page 10

Casey DeLima/Chips


LUTHER COLLEGE CHIPS

News

2

March 14, 2013

Student pushes for Arabic

Dylan Hinton

Staff Writer

as their focus for their international studies major or minor.”

The culture, religion and languages in the Middle East continue to gain importance in the

students and future world travelers, the

shift, (‘14) are pushing for Arabic classes to be

the Midwest. Of the 14 institutions in the

“The repercussions of the Arab Spring will

offer courses in Arabic. “Offering Arabic could be something that

one of the six languages of the UN and the major language of the Middle East.”

idea to establish a base for Arabic courses in the future are part of a project in conjunction with the Benjamin A. Gilman scholarship, which funded her abroad experience.

attract students in the region to our school.”

Courtesy of Jess Landgraf

“25 January.” drop.” 25 international studies students have

“I have found Arabic to be an incredible

“Going forward, humanitarian crisis and political crisis will come out of the Arab

in the Middle East in the future, Arabic is a As large as the challenges surrounding

the critical languages of the world.”

Stier speaks on social activism

PEACE WEEK

A Wisconsin native, life events such as

Bailey Mulholland

Staff Writer role as national campaign manager for the

change. Activist and former “Obama to

the violence, corruption and discrimination

a dinner with students beforehand. “Often college students are inspired to sponsered the lecture along with Paigaam.

him with individuals who bridged that “gap,” such as Wisconsin politicians Russ his commitment to change, the politicians advocated for Stier to receive a position on the Obama administration despite his

a gap there,” Stier said.

Hosted by Campus Ministries Thursday, March 14:

Jin Park Red Against Rape

in Africa. One of the goals is to end rape and violence that result from the mining – which

red to express your support and gather for a group

involvement in the campaign.

Shadows of Abuse, display in the Union

campus resolutions,” Stier said. “In a lot of

Friday, March 15:

150 campuses. The campaign hopes to States. Stier believes that a collaborative effort will empower social activism. “

Center) Saturday, March 16:

Bailey Mulholland/Chips

Inspiring conversation. Rahul Patel (‘14) asks JD Stier questions at the student dinner.

BREAKFAST ALL DAY!

Sunday, March 17:

M t W th F s Su

“Nothing fancy, just good food” 817 Mechanic St. Decorah 52101

Gender Equality. Free


LUTHER COLLEGE CHIPS

News

March 14, 2013

Seven-day Forecast

Thu

Fri

Sat

Sun

Mon

Tue

Wed

Life outside Luther

News you can use from around the globe

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Sequester passed, Peter Jarzyna

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Staff Writer

For many students, national affairs like sequestration fall to the periphery. Fortunately, its effect on college students will be meager at most, leaving work-study, grants and loan funding mostly unscathed. The sequester, a package of federal spending cuts, is the alternative that resulted from the Joint Select

Additionally, the Federal TEACH Grant may see some waiting to hear guidance on that. Work-study, however, will remain untouched, and years. wants or needs to work the ability to work on campus,”

Compiled by: Jayne Cole News Editor

Conclave to elect pope amid uncertainty Cardinals enter the Sistine Chapel on Tuesday to elect the next pope amid more upheaval and uncertainty than the Catholic Church has seen in decades: There’s no front-runner, no indication how long voting will problems. On the eve of the vote, cardinals offered wildly different assessments of what they’re looking for in the next pontiff and how close they are to a decision. It was evidence that Benedict XVI’s surprise resignation has for unity may go unheeded, at least in the early rounds of voting.

deal to make $1.5 trillion in spending cuts over the next 10 years. It was initially intended to take effect at the beginning of 2013, but as a means to avert the imminent

cut back on that.”

*** Kim Jong Un visits front lines amid tension North Korea’s young leader urged front-line troops to be on “maximum alert” for a potential war as a state-run newspaper said Pyongyang had carried out a threat to cancel the 1953 armistice that ended the Korean War. Kim Jong Un told artillery troops stationed near disputed waters that have seen several bloody clashes in past years that “war can break out right now,” according to a report by North Korean state media. Kim’s visit and the armistice claim are part of a torrent of angry North Korean rhetoric that has followed last week’s U.N. sanctions over Pyongyang’s Feb. 12 nuclear test. Pyongyang has also vowed to strike the United States with nuclear weapons.

enforcement until March 1. According to Director of Financial Aid Janice Cordell, sequestration will affect the Luther College campus and individual students in very small ways, if at all. students, at least with what we know right now,” Cordell said. “There are some proposals for additional changes that could affect students later, but those are unknown at this time.” will see is a 5.5% decrease in funds sent from the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant and Federal Work-Study. make those differences up, so students really be impacted by the loss of those funds,” Cordell said. to make sure that our students have the funding that they need to be able to attend.” Other potentially impacted programs include the Federal Pell Grant, which is funded for this coming year, but could experience trailing factors the following year.

Courtesy of washingtonpost.com

2013 Sequester Breakdown. Congress plans to cut $85.4 billion, evenly split between domestic and defensive programs.

Senate funds student groups Student Senate

Luther College the allocation of this funding.

This semester, Student Senate

resources to student organizations and student-led initiatives. The Co-Curricular and Leadership Committee of Student Senate was responsible for reviewing all of the funding requests to determine how the student money earmarked for funding leadership initiatives and student organization projects was to be allocated. Following the review by the Co-Curricular Committee, the full Student Senate voted to approve

Student Senate had a $2,000 budget for over $6,000 requested from a total of 21 student organizations. Of these student organizations, 13 were funded. For more details on the amount of money allocated and initiatives funded, please visit the Student Senate website at http://www.luther. edu/studentsenate/proposal/ under “Allocation Student Senate Funding Spring.” In order to keep student organizations accountable for spending, all of the funded groups are required to provide Student Senate

with proof of use of funding. While Senate would like to completely fund all leadership initiatives, our limited budget prevents us from doing so. Student Senate is excited, however, to announce that funding for student organization leadership initiatives for 2013-2014 will expand by at least $2,000, allowing us to distribute approximately $6,000 over the course of the academic year. Contact President Laura Harney (‘13) or the CoCurricular Activities Committee, if you have any questions or comments regarding funding proposals or Student Senate.

Correction Fracking and frac sand mining were used incorrectly in “Fracking Fears,” published March 7. Fracking is hydraulic fracturing, while frac sand mining is the mining of sand used to assist with hydraulic fracturing. Winneshiek County is at risk for frac sand mining.

Judge strikes down NYC ban on supersize sodas A judge rejected New York City’s pioneering ban on big sugary drinks Monday just hours before it was supposed to take effect, handing a defeat to health-minded Mayor Michael Bloomberg and creating uncertainty for restaurants that had already ordered smaller cups and changed their menus. State Supreme Court Justice Milton Tingling said the 16-ounce limit on sodas and other sweet drinks arbitrarily applies to only some sugary beverages and some places that sell them.

*** Modest quakes shake Southern California An earthquake left Southern California with the jitters Monday but no serious damage as the temblor caused swaying and rolling from the desert to the coast, sending children scrambling under their desks and The 9:55 a.m. quake had an estimated magnitude of 4.7, Nick Scheckel, seismic analyst at the California Institute of Technology’s seismological laboratory in Pasadena, said.The epicenter was about 100 miles southeast of Los Angeles.

*** Michigan Laughfest breaks record for fake mustaches Magnum P.I., Ron Burgundy and Ron Swanson would be impressed. Organizers of an annual laugh festival in Michigan say they’ve broken the world record for the most people wearing fake mustaches. Gilda’s LaughFest is reporting that 1,544 people donned various shapes and sizes of dark mustaches on Thursday, the Grand Rapids festival’s opening day.

*** Fat cat in Texas slims down An obese stray cat found wandering six months ago near Dallas has slimmed down to 34 from 41 pounds and been adopted by the veterinarian overseeing his care. Dr. Brittney Barton said Friday that the orange tabby dubbed Skinny is doing well on a special diet to help lose weight and increase his metabolism.

News Compiled from: http://ap.org


Arts & Entertainment

4

March 14, 2013

Verge trotting “On the Verge” blends wit, lessons and time travel. Margaret Yapp

Staff Writer

In popular entertainment, time travel usually

Photos Courtesy of Brittany Todd

Adventure times. Kelly Harris (‘15), Emily Ebertz (‘15) and Jaime Giannettino (‘14) take a journey through space and time in “On the Verge, or – the Geography of Yearning.”

Sunday Service @10:30am . St. Benedict School (402 Rural Ave.) . 563-387-7706 is offering rides from campus to their 10:30 church service. A van with the LifeHouse logo leaves from the Union @ 10:00 Sunday mornings.


LUTHER COLLEGE CHIPS

Arts & Entertainment

March 14, 2013

Stage warming jazz

5

Photo Courtesy of The Hot Club of San Francisco

All that jazz. Center Stage Series performing ensemble The Hot Club of San Francisco will perform their unique style of gypsy jazz this Friday, March 15 in the CFL.

Ingrid Baudler

Staff Writer

Cafetheoria: Table talks of literature and death Noah Lange

Staff Writer

Graphic by Noah Lange/Chips

It was super


LUTHER COL

6

Featu

March 14, 2013

I must confess... Students and the mysterious ‘admin’ on the popular ‘Luther College Confessions’ Facebook page. Eve Christensen

Staff Writer

The Luther College Confessions page on Facebook has been the focus of many conversations on the Luther campus in the last couple of weeks. A page for scandalous stories, proclamations of love and rants of all kinds, it has garnered hundreds of posts and over 800 “likes.” Current students, transferred former students, alums and others not associated with Luther have posted confessions on the page, created on February 21. The page was created for fun, because the administrator of the page, an anonymous Luther student, noticed how popular confessions pages were becoming in other communities. “I don’t think it’s done anything positive or negative for the community,” the admin said. “I just think that it’s given people an inside look into the unspoken — sometimes taboo — thoughts of college students.” The admin said that they appreciate it when people post real confessions. Many of the posts are just people trying to complain about things, but the admin likes it when the page is used for its original intention. The admin prefers to remain anonymous because the page is set up anonymously for the people who are posting. Additionally, some of the confessions are statements that the admin would not like to be connected to. Kira Stammer is a confessor and former Luther student who transferred after last year. She thinks that some people have found help and support within the page. On the other hand, Stammer finds that there are negative aspects to the page. “I dislike some of the negativity and condescension,” Stammer said. “Just because someone makes a confession that goes against what you believe doesn’t mean you have to be rude, you know?”

Casey Schultz (‘13), a confessor himself, said that the page serves two purposes for the Luther community: a place where students can get things off their chests without being addressed directly by anyone, and a place where students can have fun by either posting fake confessions or making funny comments to others. Schultz believes that the page is a venue where people can connect with each other anonymously and discover that everyone has problems just like they do.

real. In terms of whether the college would take action if someone posted something threatening on the site, Kraus said that a student could report a threat to Student Life. The college is not, however, monitoring the page at this time.

Schultz personally enjoys reading the funny confessions, whether they are real or not. He does not appreciate the judgment passed on between people. “I don’t particularly like that judgment, because in the end, it’s still people who are posting these. It’s fellow human beings. It’s fellow people,” Schultz said. “They’re not on any other level any higher or lower than anybody else.” Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the College Kevin Kraus said that he doesn’t think the page reflects well or badly on Luther College as a whole, since none of the confessions can be proven Graphic by Noah Lange/Chips

Tenured Professors series: Sean Burke Chips profiles newly tenured professors in the Staff Writer

the community and atmosphere. Burke’s hard work in the religion department at Luther has not gone under the radar. During his time here, he and other faculty members have created and built a vocational J-Term course for students who want to experience a new realm of possibilities. Burke’s passion in his work is getting his students to think critically.

would come out in the morning and there would be cows. That was an adventure.” Burke earned his Masters of Divinity at the Lutheran Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Penn., and later received his doctorate from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, Calif. Burke joined the Luther College faculty because he wanted to be closer to his hometown – a New Jersey suburb of New York City. Small town life was a big adjustment for him. Before coming to Decorah, he had only lived in a city of 40,000 people or more. Despite the change, he has enjoyed

there really is an eagerness to learn, and the students really want to do their best.” Burke feels honored to be a part of the Luther faculty. “My colleagues recognize the quality of the work I do and the contribution to Luther College,” Burke said. “That means a lot to me.” Being tenured has given Burke the opportunity to be more creative and take more risks in the classroom. He is constantly thinking of new ways to teach with his new job security, and is planning to stick around at Luther for many years to come. In addition to teaching at Luther, Burke plays the organ at St. James Episcopal Church in Independence, Iowa. He also enjoys spending time with his Yorkshire terrier, Herbie.

Emily Gehlsen

Emily Gehlsen/Chips

Prof. Sean Burke


LLEGE CHIPS

ures

March 14, 2013

All fun and games?

Does playing affect academic performance? Chips Hannah Garry

Staff Writer

Colin Robinson (‘16) points to his Xbox as the source of his devoted gaming. “Once I got my Xbox, that’s kind of when it took off,” Robinson said. “I instantly signed up for Xbox Live and got into online gaming.”

The Stats According to a study conducted by the Pew Internet and American Life Project, 59% of college students play video games and 56% play online games. The same study also found that 48% of college student gamers agreed that gaming keeps them from studying. According to Director of Residence Life Kris Franzen, the number of students getting distracted by video games has only increased since this study was conducted in 2003. “I think I’ve seen it more in the last few years than when I initially started,” Franzen said. She referred to a poll conducted by Luther last year that showed video games listed as a top distractor from academic study for the first time. “I think it’s easy to quickly grab a controller in between classes, in the evening to socialize with friends and it’s almost becoming part of the culture now in college,” Franzen said.

A Student Perspective Colin Robinson (‘16) is a participant of that gaming culture. Robinson estimates that he spends anywhere between 10 and 24 hours per week playing video games, depending on his schedule that week. In comparison, Robinson guesses that he spends between 15 and 20 hours a week on homework. Robinson relates the devotion with which he approaches gaming to that of athletes and their sport, although he sees an important difference between the two. “Sports actually will get you somewhere in life,” Robinson said. “Video games, they’re pretty much neutral, at least for me.” Although he sees the value in athletic participation, Robinson claims he treats video gaming with the same, if not more dedication than he treats Pound, the ultimate frisbee team he plays for. While claiming never to have skipped a class or even an assignment due to gaming, he concedes that he may have skipped one ultimate frisbee practice for gaming. “I ended up playing “Skyrim” instead of going to practice,” Robinson said. “That was a one-time deal though.”

Hannah Garry/Chips

Plenty to play.

Res Life Perspective While playing video games can be an innocent pastime, it can also, like anything, be taken too far. When gaming starts to affect a student’s academic performance, Franzen said, a professor may notify SASC who will notify the Hall Director and the student’s RA. Franzen says this can also point to a more sinister issue. “I think the statistics say 10% of students are having addiction issues with gaming. It’s such a hard thing to detect because, first of all, it’s legal. It’s not like alcohol or drugs. It’s a legal thing and it generally takes place kind of behind closed doors in residence halls,

so it’s not something that there’s a lot of physical signs you can see early on,” Franzen said. Franzen says that addictions come to their attention generally through one of three channels, Student Academic Support Center, Resident Assistants, or roommates. She says that excessive gaming can cause roommate issues because one roommate is generally spending a lot of time in the room to play games. “It’s not necessarily something we’re seeing every day -Kris Franzen but we’re gradually seeing more of it. We’re expecting to see more of it as time goes on,” Franzen said. The main issue with a gaming addiction is that it can lead to poor academic performance.

“I think it’s easy to quickly grab a controller in between classes ... it’s almost becoming part of the culture now in college.”

7

“We’re potentially losing students for academic reasons because gaming can be part of that,” Franzen said. First-year Olson RA David Zalk (‘15) thinks that while low academic achievement may be an issue with this first year class, struggling with procrastination is not necessarily unique to the first-years on campus. “I would say it’s a problem with every first-year class, and I feel like it’s a problem with most college students,” Zalk said. “Nobody really wants to do work until they know the deadline’s looming.” Zalk has, however, had to deal with residents not completing their assigned work this year. He ascribes many possible causes, the biggest two being going out on the weekends and getting distracted by the Internet. “I would say definitely the Internet is probably the largest [distractor] I’ve seen. People always talk about how they go to work on their homework and then sit on Facebook for two hours,” Zalk said. While Zalk does feel that procrastination is an issue, he would not necessarily blame video games. “I’ve definitely had a lot of issues with residents not doing homework and procrastinating, but I would say there’s two or three kids that game a lot on my floor. They have not necessarily been the kids I’ve had problems with,” Zalk said. In the case of kids who are struggling academically, Zalk says that he can help them by encouraging them or assisting them in making a schedule. However, he maintains that it is ultimately the student’s responsibility to complete his or her assignments. “I cannot make them do their homework,” Zalk said. “You’re at college – I’m not going to hold your hand. It’s your job to finish your homework and it’s your job to do your academic studies.”

The Fun of the Game While a gaming addiction can be serious, Franzen understands that gaming is a pastime enjoyed by many on Luther campus. “We use it as a programming option where there’s different contests and things like that because we know students enjoy it,” Franzen said. Robinson talked about the effect gaming has on his mood. “If I’m playing “Halo online, and I’m doing bad, nobody wants to be in the room at the same time as me,” Robinson said. “If I’m doing good, my emotional status is very high, and I’ll be in a really good mood.”


Opinion

8

CHIPS

Chips is a student publication of Luther College in Decorah, Iowa. The paper is designed, composed, edited and managed entirely by Luther students. It is published weekly during the academic year, excluding the month of January. The opinion section is designed to provide a forum for Chips , its staff members and the Luther community. Opinions expressed in articles, editorials or columns do not necessarily represent the views of the Chips staff. The author is solely responsible for opinions expressed in Chips commentary. Chips will not accept submitted articles or campus announcements. Submissions for letters to the editor should be submitted as a word document to chipsedt@luther.edu with “Letter to the Editor” as the subject line. Letters to the editor are subject to editing without changing the meaning of the letter. Authors will not be notified of changes prior to publishing. Letters must be signed, 400-500 words and submitted by Sunday at 5 p.m. the week before publication. Publication of all letters is at the discretion of the editor. Contact Chips Phone: 563.387.1044 Fax: 563.387.2072 E-mail: chipsedt@luther.edu Advertising: chipsads@luther.edu website: http://lutherchips.com

Editor-in-Chief...................Michael Crowe Managing Editor..........................Ethan Groothuis News Editors...............................Jayne Cole Sarah King Features Editor......................Jessy Machon A&E Editor......................Walker Nyenhuis Sports Editor..................................Matt Yan Staff Writers.........................Ingrid Baudler Eve Christensen Hannah Garry Emily Gehlsen Dylan Hinton Noah Lange Katherine Mohr Sam Molzahn Brita Moore Bailey Mulholland Margaret Yapp Head Copy Editor...................Benj Cramer Copy Editors...............................Katie Hale Kirsten Hash Ad Representative.................Charlie Bruer Becca Dugdale Ad Accountant.....................Ramesh Karki Photography Coordinator..........Casey DeLima Web Manager...........................Noah Lange Web Technician...................Nathan Haines Design Technician...................Noah Lange Social Media Director..............Drew Mick Adviser.............................Martin Klammer Associated Collegiate Press lutherchips.com

March 14, 2013

Editor’s note: A version of Hagerott’s letter, “Reflections on a college search” appeared first on the Chips website, www.lutherchips.com, on Thursday, March 7. All the following letters respond to that piece, which has been reprinted below for convenience.

Reflections on a college search It was with sadness that I withdrew from the Luther College search. My wife and I found it to be a wonderful place. People we met were so genuinely friendly. But in light of articles published in Chips and decorahnews.com that used a very narrow lens to interpret who I am and what I stood for, I feel it now necessary to explain why I withdrew from consideration. Moreover, how I was portrayed and judged in the articles holds implications for Luther's future hiring and promotion practices. Luther is an appealing place, and I was immediately taken with what I saw and heard of it: a youthful energy, an uncommon commitment to community, a "Secret Sauce," as one alumnus described it to me. But academic excellence; as a veteran from Afghanistan and a government to "serve with distinction for the common good." And the common good I perceived to be a broad and inclusive community. But, as the presidential search matured, I realized a fundamental issue for Luther dating from 2009 had now emerged, and became the only theme to be debated in the open press, and one I did not anticipate:

Moreover, I have for three decades been open and welcoming to other faiths, demonstrated over years of seagoing ship assignments and

The role of Chips I am writing in response to the controversy that has surrounded this publication and the decision by Dr. Mark Hagerott to withdraw his candidacy from the Luther presidential search. While I, like most people, have an opinion

service with the Army in combat zones ashore, where I worshiped in interdenominational Protestant military services). Despite my record, the debate as framed both in the school newspaper and the community paper became one sided, portraying a requirement for theological conformity. Counterpoints were conspicuously absent. Such a demand for conformity surprised me, because as I read on the website, the Luther family was "... of all backgrounds, we embrace diversity." At Annapolis I worked with, hired, mentored and led persons of all faiths, genders, sexual orientations and political persuasions, and I maintained an impeccable record of tolerance. And, this is why I am concerned for Luther going forward. Was the debate in the press representative of the majority of Luther faculty, alumni and students, or the voice of a small vocal minority? Is the experience of the past week the sign of things to come, the beginning of a narrow litmus test for future faculty, staff, for even Regents? Might which will be reviewed for the correctness of their theological stance on certain issues? Will it be unacceptable for the next dean to be a Catholic? In the shadow of the historic 2009 ELCA vote on human sexuality, will Luther show tolerance for persons who hail from more conservative congregations in the ELCA, or for those groups which broke away? Will donations from alumni from more conservative religious viewpoints still be welcome? approach the 500 year anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, when Martin Luther challenged the reigning orthodoxy of his time. Perhaps the orthodoxy today is “political correctness” on college campuses across America? My hope is that Luther College will be a source of a new reformation, one that encourages persons, from liberal to moderate of educating the next generation of undergraduates. It was to that end, and is my hope now, that my decision to end my candidacy will allow this important debate to continue without distraction at Luther College. Dr. Mark Hagerott, Annapolis, MD

on the matter, I wish to keep it private as not to stain the ensuing contents of this letter with bias. As a Luther graduate and former Chips staff member I could not be more proud of this publication. I implore the campus, community and administration to view this as a moment of profound importance for student journalism. Chips exists as a forum for student voice, and this voice is what seems to have been at the root of this controversial situation. Chips is not, and has never been, a means of propaganda disseminated to the student body by the administration. I do not mean to suggest that Chips exists to subvert the administration or undermine the goals of the college. In fact, when I was at Luther, the paper and the administration had a very healthy relationship. This also illuminates the excellent leadership

of President Torgerson and the trust he, and his staff, have put in the students at Luther. Few people would dispute that Luther is a lovely and open community. I am truly sorry that Dr. Hagerott felt that this publication contradicted his convictions that Luther was a wonderful and friendly place. Although this is an unfortunate series of events, I could not be more proud of my alma mater and the faith it has shown in its student body. I think the Chips staff, and its leadership, should be recognized as one that has conducted itself with dignity and integrity the administration and the greater Luther community to continue to support this forum for student opinion.

questions were asked about his membership in the Missouri Synod

On religious views Having given a combined 59 years of service to Luther College we have strong loyalty to and concern for this great institution and its future. We were able to attend both in person or virtually each of the two sessions for faculty and staff with both of Luther's presidential candidates. We applauded the presidential search committee's recommendation to the Board of Regents of Dr. Mark Hagerott for the position.

that body espouses. Why weren't these issues raised at that time? Did the persons with those concerns attend the forums? What we do remember is that Dr. Hagerott did say, when asked about his Missouri Synod background, is that he considers himself more inclusive of a broader worldview than that of his core church. We know Luther grads who belong to a very conservative former ELCA congregation who did not want their church to leave the ELCA and do not espouse the conservative beliefs of their congregation, yet remain loyal and active members because it is their church family. We also know many Missouri Synod members who are in similar situations. The same can be said for many faithful Roman Catholics, lay and clergy alike who do not share many of that church's beliefs including birth control, ordination of women, abortion and many more. I think you get the point. Finding a great president such as those Luther has had in the past is no easy task. There are very few out there and the search committee will indeed have a big challenge before them. We only hope they can

Yvonne M. Kuhlman


LUTHER COLLEGE CHIPS

Opinion

March 14, 2013

Where do we go from here? I am finishing my fifth year at Luther, and it is safe to say that I have fallen in love with this place. My love for the college is so strong that I have not once cheated and fantasized about teaching at St. Olaf, or even Carleton! But this love affair has hit a rough patch as of late. Since the announcement of our two finalists for the Luther presidency, tensions and anxieties in my beloved community have risen dramatically.

During the past six weeks, I have been a participant in more than one intense conversation involving my hopes for and concerns about one or the other candidate. I know such discussions have been duplicated across the Luther community. Without a doubt, some of these discussions have turned into passionate exchanges. Understandable. After all, many of us are in love with Luther, which means we are deeply invested in its future. If Dr. Hagerott’s statement of withdrawal and the reactions to it demonstrate anything, they show us that there are lots of hurt feelings in the aftermath of this process. His statement also gives me pause as a member of this community to consider in what ways, perhaps even unintentionally, I may have contributed to any of this pain, and how I can work toward remedying it. At the same time, and in the interests of healing, I must push back on one point in Dr. Hagerott’s statement: his hope that a new reformation at Luther will overturn the “reigning orthodoxy” of

Campus pastors respond We are writing as campus pastors to share our reflections on Luther’s presidential search. We are four voices this year while Karri Anderson serves an interim year during Amy Larson’s sabbatical. We offer our perspective for the sake of fruitful community conversation. Last Thursday, March 7, Dr. Haggerott, the single finalist in Luther’s presidential search, posted a statement in Chips and decorahnews.com explaining his withdrawal from the presidential search process, citing “a narrowing lens of theological affiliation.” Drawing on two pieces independent from the search process, an opinion article in Chips and a local online news article, Haggerott noted that the “debate ... became one sided, portraying a requirement for theological conformity.” If “a narrowing lens of theological affiliation” drove this process, this logic suggests that Dr. Ann Hill Duin, who fits the ELCA affiliation to match the bias claimed, would have been the finalist. The letter in Chips from Noah Lange voicing concerns about the relationship of ELCA and LCMS Lutherans was a thoughtful articulation of questions that have bearing for the Luther community, rather than the imposition of a theological filter. Our community regularly engages in a lively conversation of faith and learning that happens in many venues, including the classroom, Chapel, table talk, small groups like t.r.e.c. and Journey Conversations and other forums,

On healthy debate

“political correctness” infecting college campuses such as ours. I understand his criticism that Luther needs to reflect more deeply on how to be inclusive of those from more conservative Christian backgrounds. But whenever the construct of “political correctness” is employed in public discourse, it often comes across as an attempt to silence historically marginalized voices and to roll back the clock to the good old didn’t have to concern ourselves with endeavor to promote diversity in its admissions, faculty and staff hiring, and institutional governance is not an “orthodoxy” in need of a reformation. It is a commitment to which we should cling fiercely, one that transcends the almost singular concern for Lutheran diversity expressed in Dr. Hagerott’s statement. If “political correctness” is our greatest sin, then in the words of Martin Luther, let us “sin boldly.” Otherwise, let’s drop the language of “political correctness.” These two

including Chips. Regarding the reference to a lack of counterpoint, there were two thoughtful letters posted on March 7 in Chips online that were available for anyone who took time to follow the conversation. An alumnus, who is an ELCA pastor, and a current student weighed in with thoughtful views urging the community to reexamine assumptions regarding denominational labels, especially within the alphabet spectrum of ELCA, LCMS and WELS Lutherans. Dr. Haggerott is right to push back against concerns of being narrowly defined because of any particular Lutheran initials or labels. Denominational identities do not define or contain our spiritual journeys and views. Unfortunately, he employed the same kind of labeling of the Luther community by framing the letter in opinion piece and news article he cited with a puzzling connection to the 2009 ELCA assembly. The 2009 ELCA assembly vote allowed, but does not require, that congregations may call a pastor in a committed same gender relationship and congregations may choose to support committed same gender relationships. This vote was shaped by a faithful, intentional corporate discernment of how the church best embodies the love of Christ in relationship with our LGBTQ sisters and brothers. The 2009 assembly cast their vote in good faith after listening to strong differences among faithful ELCA members. The Luther community is blessed by people of diverse and contrasting faith commitments, including gay and lesbian faculty and staff who are married as Iowa law allows, as well as coworkers and students who disagree with the ELCA’s 2009 decision and Iowa law allowing same gender marriage. The implication of a college agenda driven by the 2009 ELCA assembly simply doesn’t hold water. Life together with sharp differences and contrasting faith commitments can be complicated, even messy at times. Dr. Haggerott’s “impeccable record of tolerance” is commendable. Still, it is still reasonable to think that the community would explore how his record of service and his faith commitments might inform his potential leadership. The role of president

I write in response to the recently published statement from Dr. Mark Hagerott following his decision to withdraw from the Luther College presidential search. I found it surprising and unfortunate that Dr. Hagerott chose to withdraw and denigrate Luther College based on several articles in the local and college news. Whatever the background of Luther College's next president, I hope she or he is willing to engage in healthy debate, rather than exiting with a series of rhetorical questions and parting shots. Dr. Hagerott was not dismissed from

9 words always wound and divide; they never heal and restore. Where do we go from here? My hope is that in this interim period, someone will step up for our community and lead us in a richer, more personal and intimate conversation with one another. We need someone to help us discern together what it means to be a college of the church, what core values and commitments we wish to maintain as we move further into the twenty-first century. I am not this person. I have neither the clout nor the credentials. Nor do I know who this person is. But if and when such a person, or group of people, rise to the occasion, I will do my best to be at their service. In the meantime, let us wish both Dr. Hagerott and Dr. Duin all the best in their future endeavors. May the time we spent engaging with both candidates enable us better to understand who we are and who we hope to become. Todd Green, Assistant Professor of Religion

at Luther requires not only tolerance but also an understanding that diversity at Luther is a commitment that grows from our living faith legacy. The Search Committee would surely have prepared a thoughtful and fair approach for fruitful conversation about such matters. The withdrawal precluded that possibility. Lutherans are among the first to admit that we are a complicated family. There is no official dialogue or partnership between the Evangelical Lutheran Church

share a common name and common texts, but depart from each other on core beliefs and practices that affect how communities are shaped. In life together we learn how to work in spite of various differences. LCMS and WELS Lutherans find many ways to be faithfully engaged and contribute to life at Luther. While some of our perspectives may differ, we appreciate Dr. Haggerott’s wishes for the Luther community to “be a source of a new reformation, one that encourages persons, from liberal to moderate to religious conservative, to participate with confidence in the mission of educating the next generation of undergraduates.” To that we say, Amen! Like any community, we are vulnerable to tripping over fault lines and buying into popular narratives of religious, political and cultural conflicts. Luther’s Mission Statement commits us to a deeper conversation that affirms: “... the liberating power of faith and learning. As people of all backgrounds, we embrace diversity and challenge one another to learn in community, to discern our callings, and to serve with distinction for the common good.” In the spirit of our common mission, we remain committed to the ongoing dialogue of faith and learning and to thoughtful, prayerful participation in the continued search process for Luther’s next president. Mike Blair, Karri Anderson, David Vásquez & Amy

consideration: he chose to withdraw from the search. I don't know all the reasons the search committee extended I’m sure it was in Luther College’s best interest. I would hope any candidate would support that. It is unfortunate that Dr. Hagerott would circumvent that conversation in order to try to defend himself and publicly attack Luther College based on news articles and opinion pieces. Matters of theology and church

College presidential search. That said, statement more revealing of his style

“political correctness” and his view that “tolerance” of diversity is adequate are inconsistent with my experience of the direction of Luther College. Most revealing, perhaps, is the simple fact that he felt the need to issue such a statement at all.


LUTHER COLLEGE CHIPS

News

10

March 14, 2013

Piracy policy on campus Casey DeLima

action when copyright holders notify them of illegal

Staff Writer downloading and torrenting when it’s found torrenting

Torrenting is common on many college campuses, yet many students do not understand Luther’s file sharing policy. A common misconception many students share is that there is a ‘three strike’ system, warning students first when they are caught file sharing on the network. One Luther student spoke about their torrenting and knowledge of Luther’s policy. “I torrent a lot, but I guess I don’t know a lot about Luther’s policy,” the student said. “I always thought there was a kind of three strike system, and you would be warned before you get kicked off of the network.” Though there isn’t a set ‘three-strike’ policy, violators are not always immediately taken off of Information Services Paul Mattson (‘81) explained that consequences vary on a case-by-case basis. “The context matters,” Mattson said. “However, if there is a repeated offense, privileges would definitely be lost.” According to Mattson, Luther is obligated to take

on the network. “We don’t have tools where we’re able to sniff out nefarious behavior on the network,” Mattson said. “That being said, there are functions and forces on the Internet that do watch. We do occasionally get notices of this behavior that the copyright holder says is going on and we are obligated to bring this behavior to a halt.” Mattson emphasized individual accountability. “The responsibility for what one may or may not do lies with the students,” Mattson said. “There are two things that could potentially happen when someone violates the use policy. One is that the student could lose privileges to the network, and the other – which is completely independent of Luther College – is that the copyright holder may or may not press a charge.” One possibility is that the IP address that has been reported to Luther will be translated into the name of the student who violated the policy, and as a result they could be taken off of the Luther network. That means no more access to my.luther, Katie, or other

websites. “Being kicked off of the network would make it very hard to be a successful student,” Mattson said. “Students would be highly motivated to not violate the use policy anymore. Our expectation is that students are doing the right thing and that they’re highly incented to be in the community and on the network, so it would be surprising if we didn’t get a result of this behavior ceasing.” The loss of Internet privileges could be enough to keep students from violating the policy. “It definitely wouldn’t be fun to be kicked off of the network,” the anonymous student said. “It’d be impossible for me to get most of my schoolwork done.” Luther has high expectations for its students and hopes they transcend this illegal behavior. “Luther is all about a transformational experience,” Mattson said. “Part of that transformational experience is going from being a kid and the consequences when things go bad are relatively light to being an adult and needing to think about one’s actions and the consequences that accrue from them. We treat people like adults.”

Security to install cameras OWI arrests cause concern Vandalism

continued from page 1

Accident continued from page 1

the college or community are in violation of the Luther Code of Conduct and are subject to disciplinary action by Luther. declined to comment on the individual investigation. However, he expressed concern over the numerous OWI arrests involving Luther students this year. “While we are fortunate no individual student has been seriously injured as a result of a drunk driving incident, at my previous campus four students lost their lives in one accident,” Landstrom said. “We have been extremely lucky to this point. I do not wish to point all our bets on luck continuing to favor us in the future.” Landstrom does not see this problem being resolved by individuals alone. “I believe we need to take stock as a community regarding the choices that are being made concerning alcohol use and the unsafe (and illegal) operation of vehicles,” Landstrom said. “We need to be discussing this issue as a community and asking important questions about how to increase the likelihood students will make different, and better, decisions.”

the ‘psi’ ( ).” There is no way of knowing who the real perpetrator is, because there weren’t any security cameras. Unknown to whomever wrote the message, Coordinator of Visual Media Aaron Lurth (‘08) had a computer set up in the construction site taking pictures for a time-lapse video. Unfortunately, something went wrong and the computer stopped photographing the day before the pool was vandalized. Thankfully, whoever is responsible for the message wrote it in a convenient place. “What happened there isn’t so serious, because it’s going to be covered up with cement anyway,” Carolan said. Other acts of vandalism are

more serious. On Saturday, March 2, another unknown vandal damaged to Jessica Zottola’s (‘15) car, which was parked outside of Playground House. When she went back to her car later that night, she found that not only had her windshield been completely kicked in, but all four tires were slashed as well. Again, there is no way of knowing who was responsible for the damage. “I called the cops at 2:30 in the morning which is just a weird experience to begin with, and they were about as helpful as Mario and Luigi,” Zottola said. “It was terrible. They gave me an incident report number, and that’s about all they really did.” To prevent instances like these from happening, Security is exploring the option of purchasing cameras to install around campus for next year. As of right now,

Luther is a camera-free campus. Students have mixed feelings about this. “It’s hard to say that it would be nice to have cameras on campus, because honestly that would limit a lot of the freedoms that we have,” Zottola said. “Cameras would make it more of a Big Brother kind of thing, and I don’t think anyone at Luther wants that. It’s a very free campus and I appreciate that.” Harri acknowledges the fact that students enjoy having a campus without cameras, but the increase in destructive activity calls for action. “It’s my understanding that in the past there’s been a concern that students don’t like them and don’t want them, but that’s going to change,” Harri said. “We’ve had a lot of students express their interest, so we are exploring purchasing cameras at this time.”

Nordic Studies Center to strengthen program Dedication continued on page 1

programs. They have life that way, but they don’t have that structure like a building.” Peterson said the fundraising is a task of

Center, and what it’ll accomplish and most importantly, how are students and how are faculty really served by this.” The Richard L. and Judith A. Torgerson with the International Studies Program.

donate. “We [visit] people who care deeply about such programs,” Peterson said. “We talk about the scope and the vision of the

International Studies Program Victoria Christman says she is excited to see how the

partnership develops. “[We’ll be] doing the same sort of things relationship will look like,” Christman said. “In part that’s because we’re still growing the International Studies Program. The major has only been around for 2 years.” The Torgerson Center for Nordic Studies will offer programming of a range in disciplines including sustainability, immigration, health care, political science and social work. The Tomsons decided to endow the college with the gift to commemorate semester as president. “Being able to give this gift while [President Torgerson] was still here was very important to those donors,” Peterson said. There is not a set timeline

to hire the chair of the Center. Christman says she hopes the chair will be energetic and willing to help bring in interested students. “The Scandinavian Studies program has been weak in recent years in terms of number of students,” Christman said. “So it is one of the programs that has been struggling, especially because people in the program retired recently. There was angst among the administration that this would be a fatal blow to the program. The fact that [donors] came forward and funded the Center for Nordic Studies when [they] did couldn’t have been better timing.” Christman has high hopes for the Torgerson Center for Nordic Studies. “It could be a hallmark program of the college,” Christman said. “It unites our environmental focus that we’re already known for; it unites our international focus that we’re becoming known for. These are the hallmarks of Luther and this Center draws on those strengths, so it’s set up for success.”


LUTHER COLLEGE CHIPS

Sports

March 14, 2013

11

Men’s Tennis aims high Norse fall to nationally ranked teams, look for doubles players to step up. Sam Molzahn

Staff Writer

The men’s tennis team started the month with a trip to Michigan to get in top shape for the spring season. The team played Earlham College, ranked 30th in the nation; Case Western Reserve, 7th in the nation; and unranked Kalamazoo College during their trip in Michigan. The team lost all three matches, finishing with a close loss (4-5) to Kalamazoo to end the weekend. James Ayer (‘14) was named IIAC player of the week for his performance. Despite three losses, the players seemed optimistic. “Michigan was fantastic this weekend,” Nick Mozena (‘13) said. “We didn’t pull out any wins, but this weekend was really a point where the team came together. Every year we have that breakthrough weekend, and this weekend was it for us. We got a lot better.” The philosophy behind the trip to Michigan was to play difficult teams and gain experience. Head Coach Adam Strand (‘04) was pleased with his team’s performance. “I thought it was a great trip for us. I think we grew a lot as a team,” Strand said. “There are plenty of teams out there we can beat, but let’s go find some teams that are a little bit better than us and push ourselves and see if we can beat them.” Ayer and Mozena play number two doubles, one of the strongest spots in the lineup according to Strand. “[Mozena] and I practice with each other about a third to a half of the practices while the rest is spent developing our own strokes and game,” Ayer said. “We always make sure we come together to mold our best abilities.” One spot that needs improvement is number three doubles. While the one and two spots have both gone 5-2, the three position has a combined 1-6 record. “[Three doubles] is our biggest question mark right now,” Strand said. “We have to find a couple of guys that can step up. They’re certainly trying hard.” Filling doubles spots can be difficult because it

Photo Courtesy of Luther College

The calm before the serve. Nick Mozena (‘13) and Quinn Foley (‘15) wait in anticipation for the opposing team to serve in a meet last year. This season, Mozena and partner James Ayer (‘14) are 9-4 in doubles action.

requires two players that can work well together. “It is very different from singles,” Ayer said. “Many players on our team who are spectacular at singles don't play as high in our lineup in doubles. There is more focus on teamwork and positioning and you have to be very specific about what kind of ball you play and especially where you place it.” The team’s home opener is April 7 against the University of WisconsinWhitewater. Following that, the team hosts Simpson College, the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and Grinnell College April 1314. Strand is looking forward to a successful year. “We want to win our league and go to the NCAA tournament,” Strand said. “Last year our guys were undefeated in the league.” Players are also aiming for another successful season this spring. “This team is going to win our conference and bring the team championship back to Luther where it belongs,” Mozena said. “Another NCAA trip is on our minds.”

“This weekend was really a point where the team came together.”

-Nick Mozena (‘13)

Photo Courtesy of Luther College

This is my racket, there are many like it but this one is mine. Ramesh Karki (‘14) returns a stroke during a meet last year. Karki, the number one singles player. leads the Norse with a 10-6 record.


LUTHER COLLEGE CHIPS

Sports

March 14, 2013

11

Men’s Tennis aims high Norse fall to nationally ranked teams, look for doubles players to step up. Sam Molzahn

Staff Writer

The men’s tennis team started the month with a trip to Michigan to get in top shape for the spring season. The team played Earlham College, ranked 30th in the nation; Case Western Reserve, 7th in the nation; and unranked Kalamazoo College during their trip in Michigan. The team lost all three matches, finishing with a close loss (4-5) to Kalamazoo to end the weekend. James Ayer (‘14) was named IIAC player of the week for his performance. Despite three losses, the players seemed optimistic. “Michigan was fantastic this weekend,” Nick Mozena (‘13) said. “We didn’t pull out any wins, but this weekend was really a point where the team came together. Every year we have that breakthrough weekend, and this weekend was it for us. We got a lot better.” The philosophy behind the trip to Michigan was to play difficult teams and gain experience. Head Coach Adam Strand (‘04) was pleased with his team’s performance. “I thought it was a great trip for us. I think we grew a lot as a team,” Strand said. “There are plenty of teams out there we can beat, but let’s go find some teams that are a little bit better than us and push ourselves and see if we can beat them.” Ayer and Mozena play number two doubles, one of the strongest spots in the lineup according to Strand. “[Mozena] and I practice with each other about a third to a half of the practices while the rest is spent developing our own strokes and game,” Ayer said. “We always make sure we come together to mold our best abilities.” One spot that needs improvement is number three doubles. While the one and two spots have both gone 5-2, the three position has a combined 1-6 record. “[Three doubles] is our biggest question mark right now,” Strand said. “We have to find a couple of guys that can step up. They’re certainly trying hard.” Filling doubles spots can be difficult because it

Photo Courtesy of Luther College

The calm before the serve. Nick Mozena (‘13) and Quinn Foley (‘15) wait in anticipation for the opposing team to serve in a meet last year. This season, Mozena and partner James Ayer (‘14) are 9-4 in doubles action.

requires two players that can work well together. “It is very different from singles,” Ayer said. “Many players on our team who are spectacular at singles don't play as high in our lineup in doubles. There is more focus on teamwork and positioning and you have to be very specific about what kind of ball you play and especially where you place it.” The team’s home opener is April 7 against the University of WisconsinWhitewater. Following that, the team hosts Simpson College, the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire and Grinnell College April 1314. Strand is looking forward to a successful year. “We want to win our league and go to the NCAA tournament,” Strand said. “Last year our guys were undefeated in the league.” Players are also aiming for another successful season this spring. “This team is going to win our conference and bring the team championship back to Luther where it belongs,” Mozena said. “Another NCAA trip is on our minds.”

“This weekend was really a point where the team came together.”

-Nick Mozena (‘13)

Photo Courtesy of Luther College

This is my racket, there are many like it but this one is mine. Ramesh Karki (‘14) returns a stroke during a meet last year. Karki, the number one singles player. leads the Norse with a 10-6 record.


Sports

12

Wrestling at Nationals

March 14, 2013 Weekly Standings Softball Coe Simpson Luther Buena Vista Central Dubuque Loras Wartburg

IIAC 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-0

Overall 13-1 17-3 1-1 3-3 2-4 1-3 1-3 3-9

Recent scores: • Mar. 6 vs. UW-Stout W 9-2, L 4-7 Upcoming schedule: • Mar. 19 vs. Bethel Univ. @ Rochester

Men’s Tennis

Photo Courtesy of Luther College

School of hard knocks. Nick Pearch (‘14) grapples with an opponent from Coe College during the Iowa Conference

DeVilbiss wins Outstanding Wrestler, six Norse qualify for Nationals. Brita Moore

Staff Writer

The Luther Norse wrestlers are making it clear that they belong in the state often called “the national capital of wrestling.” After finishing second in the NCAA Division III Central Regional in Dubuque, Luther will send six to the national championship tournament on March 15-16 in Cedar Rapids, the highest number since 2009. The six include Jayden DeVilbiss (‘15), Nick Pearch (‘14), Kyle Windquist (‘13), Garrett Bonte (‘14), Trent Flegel (‘13) and Evan Obert (‘15). Windquist and Flegel are making their second appearances. For DeVilbiss, the regional tournament was his time to shine. He was named Outstanding Wrestler of the Meet and finished first in the 184-pound weight class. “I couldn’t ever have imagined

getting that, going into the meet,” DeVilbiss said. “I ended up beating three ranked kids, two of which had beaten me earlier in the year.” DeVilbiss defeated Sam Upah of Wartburg, Ryan Sheldon of Coe and Brian Broll of Buena Vista, consecutively. “I really wanted to wrestle the Coe kid again, because he almost beat me by 15 points at the conference duals tournament, and I felt like I was a lot better than what that showed,” DeVilbiss said. Another pleasant surprise of the tournament was Pearch, who finished third in the 285-pound weight class. The 2012-13 season has been a major improvement for him, having gone 3013 after winning only seven matches at 184 pounds in 2011-12. “It helps living in Decorah over the summer, it really pushes you to stay here and train with other guys who are working out just as hard as you,” Pearch said. The wrestlers consider the team to be a full-year commitment. Pearch is one of several who trained in Decorah during the summer by doing lifts, running races and going through wrestling drills. The wrestlers also run captain’s practices on their own during the fall. “If you want to be the best, you’ve got to train all year round to be the best,” Windquist said. Another part of the “Train Like a Norseman” philosophy is being able to

peak at the right times. The coaching staff pushes the wrestlers hard through January and February before easing up a bit before the major championships, including having massage sessions during practice. “Toward the end of the year, we pull back and taper so guys start feeling a lot better,” Assistant Coach Jeff O’Gara (‘05) said. “We push through most of the competitions. Some guys might take some losses [during the regular season] that they probably wouldn’t at the end of the year.” The hard training helps the wrestlers build the strength they need to win when it counts most. “We break our bodies down as far as we can and then start recovering,” Windquist said. “Mentally, having that break, you get a little more confidence, because you feel better and have this energy.” The six Norse wrestlers will be placed in 18-man brackets where the top 8 earn All-American honors. Expectations are high. “We have the toughest qualifier in the country, and I think a lot of our guys beat some of the best guys in the country to get to nationals,” O’Gara said. Now the team will make another push to be considered one of the nation’s premier programs, with a clear chance to earn a team trophy at nationals. “We’re all guys that want it bad, and we’re willing to go the distance to get it,” Windquist said.

Coe Buena Vista Dubuque Central Luther Simpson Wartburg Loras

IIAC 1-0 3-1 1-1 0-0 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-2

Overall 17-0 7-3 3-9 7-3 2-5 2-7 6-5 0-7

Recent scores: • Mar. 3 vs. Kalamazoo College L 4-5 • Mar. 2 vs. Case Western Reserve L 2-7 Upcoming schedule: • Mar. 16 vs. St. Olaf @ Rochester

Men’s Swim and Dive IIAC Overall 3-3 2-0 Luther 3-5 2-1 Loras 2-2 1-1 Simpson 0-7 0-3 Coe Recent scores: • Feb 14-16 Liberal Arts Championships 2nd of 10 Upcoming schedule: • Mar. 20 NCAA III Championship @ Shenandoah, Texas 10:00

Women’s Swim and Dive IIAC 2-0 2-1 1-2 0-2

Luther Loras Coe Simpson

Overall 6-0 5-4 1-6 1-3

Recent scores: • Feb. 14-16 Liberal Arts Championships 1st of 12 Upcoming schedule: • Mar. 20 NCAA III Championship @ Shenandoah, Texas 10:00

Men’s Wrestling IIAC Wartburg Coe Luther Dubuque Loras Central Buena Vista Sinpson

7-0 6-1 4-3 4-3 3-4 3-4 1-6 0-7

Overall 19-0 13-6 12-8 10-8 10-13 12-6 2-9 1-14

Recent scores: • Mar. 2 2nd of 11 at NCAA Central Regional Upcoming schedule: • Mar. 15-16 NCAA III National Championships @ Cedar Rapids Photo Courtesy of Tyler Rinken

The thrill of victory. Jayden DeVilbiss (‘15) gives Coach Mitchell a hug after

Photo Courtesy of Luther College

Fight the funk. Kyle Windquist (‘13) looks to gain control of his opponent, who is trying a “funk” defensive maneuver in a 141-pound match earlier this season.

March 14th Issue  

Chips: The student newspaper of Luther College seventeenth issue of the year

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