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Page 1

PAGE 4

Get Involved, Make a Difference

Upcoming Walks and Events*

Whether walking, organizing events or finding creative ways to honor

LUSTGARTEN AND NORTHWELL TEAM UP! Northwell Health is the exclusive hospital

loved ones, our supporters come together for pancreatic cancer research!

PROGRESS

sponsor of our four 2020 metropolitan NY area walks – New York City, Westchester, Staten Island and our biggest walk of the year, Long Island. This is the second year Northwell Health has sponsored these walks, and we’re so grateful for their collaboration.

PROMISE SPRING 2020

NE WSLE T TER OF THE LUS TGARTEN FOUNDATION

A MESSAGE FROM

Kerri Kaplan, President & CEO Dear Friend of the Lustgarten Foundation,

HOPE FROM HOME: Join us in displaying

NEW YORK CITY HALF MARATHON:

THE KEEP SMILING FOUNDATION:

Peter Bernstein joined Team Lustgarten for a second year to honor his mom, who is living with pancreatic cancer. Before the race was cancelled this year, Team Lustgarten raised more than $40,000 for the Foundation’s research program. To join Team Lustgarten in 2021, contact Susanne Igneri at signeri@lustgarten.org.

Andrew Ammazzalorso, 20, started The Keep Smiling Foundation (thekeepsmilingfoundation.com) three years ago in honor of his late father, Dr. Michael Ammazzalorso. Andrew sells purple bracelets saying, “Keep Smiling, Keep Fighting” because whenever his dad was asked how he was doing, he answered, “I’m always smiling.” Andrew has raised over $3,500 for the Lustgarten Foundation.

messages of hope, participating in virtual walks, raising funds or creating an original project to spread “HOPE From Home” for pancreatic cancer patients and your community. Use the hashtag #HOPEFromHome and tag us (@LustgartenFDN) on social media. Access a variety of pre-written posts, downloadable graphics and resources to help you get started at lustgarten.org/hopefromhome.

everyone else in our community. Thank you for standing with us at this unprecedented time. In this season, we can all use good news. Today, I’m excited to share this particular issue of Progress & Promise because we have BIG good news: Four of the promising research projects you’ve helped the Lustgarten Foundation fund have just been given the green light to go into clinical trials. This means, thanks to the generosity of important donors like you, we are on the cusp of unparalleled scientific discoveries—breakthroughs that will have a profound impact on patients’ lives. Each of these projects also has the potential to accelerate the path to a cure! The Lustgarten Foundation is looking at pancreatic cancer through a variety of lenses. We are funding groundbreaking studies that are harnessing the very structure of DNA, destroying mutant cancer cells through immunotherapy, delivering radiation right inside of cancerous masses, and stopping cancer’s out-of-control growth. In this issue, you’ll read all about these advancements, as well as read a daughter’s touching story of caring for her mother after she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. And you’ll learn some inspiring ways people like you are fundraising to fight pancreatic cancer. There is so much good news in this newsletter because your support allows us to move closer to a cure. Thank you for your continued partnership! u

VIRTUAL WALKS: If your favorite walk has been cancelled, you can still register as a virtual walker and choose when and where to walk on behalf of pancreatic cancer research! Visit lustgarten.org/walk-for-research to register and find all the necessary tools for reaching your walking and fundraising goals!

*With the current state of our world, we have had to postpone, reschedule or cancel many walks and community events. For updated walk and event information, visit lustgarten.org/lustgarten-walks-and-events-updates.

Fundraise Your Way! PANCAKES FOR A PURPOSE celebrated its 10th anniversary this year by raising nearly $18,000 for research!

Anyone can find a creative way to further pancreatic cancer research, and fundraising is more fun when you do it your way! Turn a hobby into a fundraising opportunity: make and sell jewelry, quilts, or cupcakes; or ask people to donate to Lustgarten in lieu of gifts to commemorate a special milestone. Visit us at lustgarten.org/fundraise-your-way for more ideas.

With warm regards,

Join the conversation and follow us on social media! E D Q C 415 Crossways Park Drive • Suite D • Woodbury, NY 11797 • 866-789-1000 •

lustgarten.org NL0520

Be a part of the cure ... every dollar you donate to Lustgarten goes directly to research.

Kerri Kaplan President & CEO

© DIANA DAVIS CREATIVE

Please let me begin by expressing my sincere gratitude for you. With the current uncertainty and recent developments surrounding the novel coronavirus, I have never been more grateful for our community of supporters, researchers, donors and friends. Because of you, we are able to take on something as formidable as pancreatic cancer, and I’m confident that together, we will continue to serve our patients, their loved ones and

The Pancreatic Cancer Collective, a joint initiative of the Lustgarten Foundation and Stand Up To Cancer, is making groundbreaking progress in identifying new ways to treat pancreatic cancer—thanks to the support of dedicated donors and friends. Four projects funded by the Collective’s “New Therapies Challenge Grants” have made it through the second round of funding. The investigators in the following scientific projects demonstrated the most promising preliminary results during the first round of funding to allow them to now take potential therapies into clinical trials. These innovative ideas represent a bold step forward in helping patients! The Collective congratulates each of these scientists—the best and the brightest minds in pancreatic cancer research—as they move the dial to accelerate the discovery of new options for pancreatic cancer patients who so desperately need better treatments. CO N T I N U ED O N N E X T PAG E

C

lustgarten.org


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PAGE 3

CO N T I N U ED FRO M PAG E 1

The Double Helix: Offering New Insights and Possibilities Alan D’Andrea, MD, and James Cleary, MD, PhD, both of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, are breaking new ground in pancreatic cancer research. Drs. D’Andrea and Cleary are putting together the pieces of a complex puzzle by investigating DNA damage through their study, Exploiting DNA Repair Gene Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer. Why look at DNA damage? The answer is simple. When there is a mutation or error in our DNA, the cell usually recognizes it and either fixes it or self-destructs. However, defective DNA repair is common in the formation of many cancers—including pancreatic cancer—and plays a critical role in cancer progression. Irregularities, if left unchecked, can cause errors and mutant cells to spread and form tumors. Drs. D’Andrea and Cleary are leveraging their experience in DNA repair in other cancers to bring novel treatment options to pancreatic cancer patients. Based on their findings, the team is developing three clinical trials, each combining gemcitabine, a standard of care chemotherapy, with a different DNA repair inhibitor. The most promising combination(s) will be identified for potential validation in larger trials. This team’s ultimate goal is to discover biomarkers that would allow doctors to select the most effective combination of treatments for each patient.

Destroying Mutant Cancer Cells Through Immunotherapy With their grant, Robert Vonderheide, MD, DPhil, of Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, Elizabeth Jaffee, MD, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, and Beatriz Carreno, PhD, the University of Pennsylvania, are looking to discover more about KRAS in an investigation entitled Immunotherapy Targeting Mutant KRAS.

The Pancreatic Cancer Collective (pancreaticcancercollective.org), a strategic partnership of the Lustgarten Foundation and Stand Up To Cancer to improve pancreatic cancer patient outcomes, has awarded additional funding of up to $16 million to four teams of top researchers as part of its “New Therapies Challenge Grants.” These four projects are part of the Collective’s bigger plan to investigate a wide variety of pancreatic cancer research approaches.

KRAS plays a vital role: It is a key regulator responsible for cell survival. But if a mutation occurs, its function goes off course, allowing harmful cells to multiply out of control. The result: cancer. This is no small threat, as KRAS is mutated in more than 90 percent of pancreatic cancer patients. The team is looking at the body’s own immune system—specifically T cells—to fight off mutant KRAS (or mKRAS)-induced tumors. T cells can recognize and kill target cells, and the team has demonstrated the ability to generate T cell responses to mKRAS proteins. The next phase of this important work is to design a vaccine for patients expressing the mutant KRAS gene.

Directing Radiation Right into the Tumor Team leader Julie Sutcliffe, PhD, and co-leader Richard Bold, MD, both from the

University of California, Davis, are exploring new pancreatic cancer treatments and bringing them into clinical trials. The crux of their important work centers around the protein integrin alphaVbeta6. This protein is specifically expressed in many malignancies but not in healthy organs, and overexpression of alphaVbeta6 typically correlates with poor prognosis. AlphaVbeta6 is overexpressed in nearly 100 percent of pancreatic cancers. The goal of this research—titled Molecularly Targeted Radionuclide Therapy via the Integrin AlphaVbeta6—is to identify, through targeted imaging, patients who would benefit from treatment using peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) to attack tumors expressing this specific protein. PRRT is a tumor-targeting approach, and the idea behind this innovative study is to treat pancreatic cancer by delivering a small amount of radioactive material directly into the tumor.

Stopping Cancer’s Out-ofControl Growth In pancreatic cancer, the KRAS protein is left unregulated. As a result, cells divide out of control and form tumors. Approaches to inhibit the activity most commonly seen in pancreatic cancers have been unsuccessful to date. This is why the investigation Targeting SHP2 In Pancreatic Cancer—led by René Bernards, PhD, Netherlands Cancer Institute with co-leaders Hana Algül, MD, PhD, Technical University of Munich, and Emile Voest, MD, PhD, Netherlands Cancer Institute—seeks ways to mitigate the destructive aspects of this protein. They have found that tumors expressing mutant KRAS are killed when treated with an SHP2 inhibitor. Additionally, in preclinical testing, they tested drug combinations inhibiting particular proteins in malignant cells. The team has designed a trial to determine the efficacy, safety and tolerability of SHP2 inhibitors, as SHP2 is a promising drug target in pancreatic cancer, in combination with ERK inhibitors. The team hopes by inhibiting SHP2 and ERK, a cell signal that is believed to drive cancer growth, they can slow down and ideally stop the growth of pancreatic cancer. u

CAREGIVE R . ADVO CATE . FU N D R AIS E R .

Lauren Deftly Wears These Hats … And More Lauren La Femina knows one thing for certain: When pancreatic cancer strikes anyone in the family, nothing is ever the same. And when that person is your mother, the world can feel as if it has suddenly collapsed around you. Prior to her diagnosis, Lauren’s mother, Lucille, experienced stomach pain and had surgery to remove her gall bladder. One week later she became jaundiced and Lucille’s doctors thought a gall stone perhaps had been missed. But during the procedure to remove it, they realized a tumor was blocking the bile duct from the pancreas. Lucille heard the words no one is ever prepared to hear: “You have pancreatic cancer.” “I was blindsided and utterly devastated, and my mother wanted to give up the fight even before she started,” shared Lauren, remembering the pain of the moment. “You automatically think the worst—but I knew we had to stop crying, we had to be strong, we had to fight.” Just 26 at the time of her mother’s diagnosis, Lauren was happy and busy with her career supervising an accounting department—but overnight she had a new priority: her mom.

Lauren’s team at the 2019 Brooklyn Walk

Not everyone has the inner strength to be a caregiver, but Lauren rose to the challenge with dignity and grace. She completely took care of her mother’s complex—and often daunting—needs. Logistics, treatment, depression, nutrition, pain management— Lauren managed it all and became her mother’s strongest advocate. It was no easy task. It was mentally and physically exhausting and at times heartbreaking for Lauren. However, she drew strength and resilience from her mother and the support of her family and friends, who were all committed to getting Lucille better. Because Lucille’s disease was diagnosed at Stage IIB, she was a candidate to have part of her pancreas removed through a Whipple procedure. This complex operation was successful and after 10 rounds of chemotherapy, Lucille’s latest scans show no evidence of disease! Lucille received excellent medical care at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City— but there is little doubt her daughter’s love,

devotion and care greatly aided the work of her medical team. Now, you might imagine that someone who has taken care of a person with a lifethreatening illness would want to take it easy—not Lauren. She has participated in a Pancreatic Cancer Research Walk for the Lustgarten Foundation and plans to take part in at least one more walk this year. Lauren’s team Fighting for Lucille and Remembering Toni (named in honor of Lauren’s mother Lucille and in memory of her friend’s grandmother Toni who succumbed to pancreatic cancer) raised over $5,000 to help the Lustgarten Foundation advance the world’s most innovative pancreatic cancer research. Lauren is an ardent supporter of the Lustgarten Foundation. “More needs to be done to figure out how to prevent the disease and how to cure more patients,” expressed Lauren. “The Lustgarten Foundation is leading the charge and that means everything to patients and caregivers who have the toughest job of all—getting through a pancreatic cancer diagnosis.” u

Lauren with her mother, Lucille

Support from people like you enables us to transform the landscape of pancreatic cancer research, and therefore transform the lives of patients like Lucille. Please consider making a life-changing gift today.


PAGE 2

PAGE 3

CO N T I N U ED FRO M PAG E 1

The Double Helix: Offering New Insights and Possibilities Alan D’Andrea, MD, and James Cleary, MD, PhD, both of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, are breaking new ground in pancreatic cancer research. Drs. D’Andrea and Cleary are putting together the pieces of a complex puzzle by investigating DNA damage through their study, Exploiting DNA Repair Gene Mutations in Pancreatic Cancer. Why look at DNA damage? The answer is simple. When there is a mutation or error in our DNA, the cell usually recognizes it and either fixes it or self-destructs. However, defective DNA repair is common in the formation of many cancers—including pancreatic cancer—and plays a critical role in cancer progression. Irregularities, if left unchecked, can cause errors and mutant cells to spread and form tumors. Drs. D’Andrea and Cleary are leveraging their experience in DNA repair in other cancers to bring novel treatment options to pancreatic cancer patients. Based on their findings, the team is developing three clinical trials, each combining gemcitabine, a standard of care chemotherapy, with a different DNA repair inhibitor. The most promising combination(s) will be identified for potential validation in larger trials. This team’s ultimate goal is to discover biomarkers that would allow doctors to select the most effective combination of treatments for each patient.

Destroying Mutant Cancer Cells Through Immunotherapy With their grant, Robert Vonderheide, MD, DPhil, of Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, Elizabeth Jaffee, MD, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, and Beatriz Carreno, PhD, the University of Pennsylvania, are looking to discover more about KRAS in an investigation entitled Immunotherapy Targeting Mutant KRAS.

The Pancreatic Cancer Collective (pancreaticcancercollective.org), a strategic partnership of the Lustgarten Foundation and Stand Up To Cancer to improve pancreatic cancer patient outcomes, has awarded additional funding of up to $16 million to four teams of top researchers as part of its “New Therapies Challenge Grants.” These four projects are part of the Collective’s bigger plan to investigate a wide variety of pancreatic cancer research approaches.

KRAS plays a vital role: It is a key regulator responsible for cell survival. But if a mutation occurs, its function goes off course, allowing harmful cells to multiply out of control. The result: cancer. This is no small threat, as KRAS is mutated in more than 90 percent of pancreatic cancer patients. The team is looking at the body’s own immune system—specifically T cells—to fight off mutant KRAS (or mKRAS)-induced tumors. T cells can recognize and kill target cells, and the team has demonstrated the ability to generate T cell responses to mKRAS proteins. The next phase of this important work is to design a vaccine for patients expressing the mutant KRAS gene.

Directing Radiation Right into the Tumor Team leader Julie Sutcliffe, PhD, and co-leader Richard Bold, MD, both from the

University of California, Davis, are exploring new pancreatic cancer treatments and bringing them into clinical trials. The crux of their important work centers around the protein integrin alphaVbeta6. This protein is specifically expressed in many malignancies but not in healthy organs, and overexpression of alphaVbeta6 typically correlates with poor prognosis. AlphaVbeta6 is overexpressed in nearly 100 percent of pancreatic cancers. The goal of this research—titled Molecularly Targeted Radionuclide Therapy via the Integrin AlphaVbeta6—is to identify, through targeted imaging, patients who would benefit from treatment using peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) to attack tumors expressing this specific protein. PRRT is a tumor-targeting approach, and the idea behind this innovative study is to treat pancreatic cancer by delivering a small amount of radioactive material directly into the tumor.

Stopping Cancer’s Out-ofControl Growth In pancreatic cancer, the KRAS protein is left unregulated. As a result, cells divide out of control and form tumors. Approaches to inhibit the activity most commonly seen in pancreatic cancers have been unsuccessful to date. This is why the investigation Targeting SHP2 In Pancreatic Cancer—led by René Bernards, PhD, Netherlands Cancer Institute with co-leaders Hana Algül, MD, PhD, Technical University of Munich, and Emile Voest, MD, PhD, Netherlands Cancer Institute—seeks ways to mitigate the destructive aspects of this protein. They have found that tumors expressing mutant KRAS are killed when treated with an SHP2 inhibitor. Additionally, in preclinical testing, they tested drug combinations inhibiting particular proteins in malignant cells. The team has designed a trial to determine the efficacy, safety and tolerability of SHP2 inhibitors, as SHP2 is a promising drug target in pancreatic cancer, in combination with ERK inhibitors. The team hopes by inhibiting SHP2 and ERK, a cell signal that is believed to drive cancer growth, they can slow down and ideally stop the growth of pancreatic cancer. u

CAREGIVE R . ADVO CATE . FU N D R AIS E R .

Lauren Deftly Wears These Hats … And More Lauren La Femina knows one thing for certain: When pancreatic cancer strikes anyone in the family, nothing is ever the same. And when that person is your mother, the world can feel as if it has suddenly collapsed around you. Prior to her diagnosis, Lauren’s mother, Lucille, experienced stomach pain and had surgery to remove her gall bladder. One week later she became jaundiced and Lucille’s doctors thought a gall stone perhaps had been missed. But during the procedure to remove it, they realized a tumor was blocking the bile duct from the pancreas. Lucille heard the words no one is ever prepared to hear: “You have pancreatic cancer.” “I was blindsided and utterly devastated, and my mother wanted to give up the fight even before she started,” shared Lauren, remembering the pain of the moment. “You automatically think the worst—but I knew we had to stop crying, we had to be strong, we had to fight.” Just 26 at the time of her mother’s diagnosis, Lauren was happy and busy with her career supervising an accounting department—but overnight she had a new priority: her mom.

Lauren’s team at the 2019 Brooklyn Walk

Not everyone has the inner strength to be a caregiver, but Lauren rose to the challenge with dignity and grace. She completely took care of her mother’s complex—and often daunting—needs. Logistics, treatment, depression, nutrition, pain management— Lauren managed it all and became her mother’s strongest advocate. It was no easy task. It was mentally and physically exhausting and at times heartbreaking for Lauren. However, she drew strength and resilience from her mother and the support of her family and friends, who were all committed to getting Lucille better. Because Lucille’s disease was diagnosed at Stage IIB, she was a candidate to have part of her pancreas removed through a Whipple procedure. This complex operation was successful and after 10 rounds of chemotherapy, Lucille’s latest scans show no evidence of disease! Lucille received excellent medical care at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City— but there is little doubt her daughter’s love,

devotion and care greatly aided the work of her medical team. Now, you might imagine that someone who has taken care of a person with a lifethreatening illness would want to take it easy—not Lauren. She has participated in a Pancreatic Cancer Research Walk for the Lustgarten Foundation and plans to take part in at least one more walk this year. Lauren’s team Fighting for Lucille and Remembering Toni (named in honor of Lauren’s mother Lucille and in memory of her friend’s grandmother Toni who succumbed to pancreatic cancer) raised over $5,000 to help the Lustgarten Foundation advance the world’s most innovative pancreatic cancer research. Lauren is an ardent supporter of the Lustgarten Foundation. “More needs to be done to figure out how to prevent the disease and how to cure more patients,” expressed Lauren. “The Lustgarten Foundation is leading the charge and that means everything to patients and caregivers who have the toughest job of all—getting through a pancreatic cancer diagnosis.” u

Lauren with her mother, Lucille

Support from people like you enables us to transform the landscape of pancreatic cancer research, and therefore transform the lives of patients like Lucille. Please consider making a life-changing gift today.


PAGE 4

Get Involved, Make a Difference

Upcoming Walks and Events*

Whether walking, organizing events or finding creative ways to honor

LUSTGARTEN AND NORTHWELL TEAM UP! Northwell Health is the exclusive hospital

loved ones, our supporters come together for pancreatic cancer research!

PROGRESS

sponsor of our four 2020 metropolitan NY area walks – New York City, Westchester, Staten Island and our biggest walk of the year, Long Island. This is the second year Northwell Health has sponsored these walks, and we’re so grateful for their collaboration.

PROMISE SPRING 2020

NE WSLE T TER OF THE LUS TGARTEN FOUNDATION

A MESSAGE FROM

Kerri Kaplan, President & CEO Dear Friend of the Lustgarten Foundation,

HOPE FROM HOME: Join us in displaying

NEW YORK CITY HALF MARATHON:

THE KEEP SMILING FOUNDATION:

Peter Bernstein joined Team Lustgarten for a second year to honor his mom, who is living with pancreatic cancer. Before the race was cancelled this year, Team Lustgarten raised more than $40,000 for the Foundation’s research program. To join Team Lustgarten in 2021, contact Susanne Igneri at signeri@lustgarten.org.

Andrew Ammazzalorso, 20, started The Keep Smiling Foundation (thekeepsmilingfoundation.com) three years ago in honor of his late father, Dr. Michael Ammazzalorso. Andrew sells purple bracelets saying, “Keep Smiling, Keep Fighting” because whenever his dad was asked how he was doing, he answered, “I’m always smiling.” Andrew has raised over $3,500 for the Lustgarten Foundation.

messages of hope, participating in virtual walks, raising funds or creating an original project to spread “HOPE From Home” for pancreatic cancer patients and your community. Use the hashtag #HOPEFromHome and tag us (@LustgartenFDN) on social media. Access a variety of pre-written posts, downloadable graphics and resources to help you get started at lustgarten.org/hopefromhome.

everyone else in our community. Thank you for standing with us at this unprecedented time. In this season, we can all use good news. Today, I’m excited to share this particular issue of Progress & Promise because we have BIG good news: Four of the promising research projects you’ve helped the Lustgarten Foundation fund have just been given the green light to go into clinical trials. This means, thanks to the generosity of important donors like you, we are on the cusp of unparalleled scientific discoveries—breakthroughs that will have a profound impact on patients’ lives. Each of these projects also has the potential to accelerate the path to a cure! The Lustgarten Foundation is looking at pancreatic cancer through a variety of lenses. We are funding groundbreaking studies that are harnessing the very structure of DNA, destroying mutant cancer cells through immunotherapy, delivering radiation right inside of cancerous masses, and stopping cancer’s out-of-control growth. In this issue, you’ll read all about these advancements, as well as read a daughter’s touching story of caring for her mother after she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. And you’ll learn some inspiring ways people like you are fundraising to fight pancreatic cancer. There is so much good news in this newsletter because your support allows us to move closer to a cure. Thank you for your continued partnership! u

VIRTUAL WALKS: If your favorite walk has been cancelled, you can still register as a virtual walker and choose when and where to walk on behalf of pancreatic cancer research! Visit lustgarten.org/walk-for-research to register and find all the necessary tools for reaching your walking and fundraising goals!

*With the current state of our world, we have had to postpone, reschedule or cancel many walks and community events. For updated walk and event information, visit lustgarten.org/lustgarten-walks-and-events-updates.

Fundraise Your Way! PANCAKES FOR A PURPOSE celebrated its 10th anniversary this year by raising nearly $18,000 for research!

Anyone can find a creative way to further pancreatic cancer research, and fundraising is more fun when you do it your way! Turn a hobby into a fundraising opportunity: make and sell jewelry, quilts, or cupcakes; or ask people to donate to Lustgarten in lieu of gifts to commemorate a special milestone. Visit us at lustgarten.org/fundraise-your-way for more ideas.

With warm regards,

Join the conversation and follow us on social media! E D Q C 415 Crossways Park Drive • Suite D • Woodbury, NY 11797 • 866-789-1000 •

lustgarten.org NL0520

Be a part of the cure ... every dollar you donate to Lustgarten goes directly to research.

Kerri Kaplan President & CEO

© DIANA DAVIS CREATIVE

Please let me begin by expressing my sincere gratitude for you. With the current uncertainty and recent developments surrounding the novel coronavirus, I have never been more grateful for our community of supporters, researchers, donors and friends. Because of you, we are able to take on something as formidable as pancreatic cancer, and I’m confident that together, we will continue to serve our patients, their loved ones and

The Pancreatic Cancer Collective, a joint initiative of the Lustgarten Foundation and Stand Up To Cancer, is making groundbreaking progress in identifying new ways to treat pancreatic cancer—thanks to the support of dedicated donors and friends. Four projects funded by the Collective’s “New Therapies Challenge Grants” have made it through the second round of funding. The investigators in the following scientific projects demonstrated the most promising preliminary results during the first round of funding to allow them to now take potential therapies into clinical trials. These innovative ideas represent a bold step forward in helping patients! The Collective congratulates each of these scientists—the best and the brightest minds in pancreatic cancer research—as they move the dial to accelerate the discovery of new options for pancreatic cancer patients who so desperately need better treatments. CO N T I N U ED O N N E X T PAG E

C

lustgarten.org

Profile for Lustgarten Foundation

2020 Spring Newsletter  

2020 Spring Newsletter  

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