__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

1


CONTACT

CONTENT NEW

Borneostraat 80 A

sales france saveca - art and paper distribution

1094 CP Amsterdam

62 rue André Joineau

ELS SIREJACOB & BRAM DEBAENST

The Netherlands

93310 Le-Pré-Saint-Gervais

sales flanders and brussels luster publishing

sales the netherlands bis publishers

Louiza-Marialei 2 2018 Antwerp Belgium +32 (0)3 298 37 23 lusterweb.com

CAMPER FOOD & STORIES

France

CREATIVES ON CREATIVITY

Linda van Gaalen

contact@saveca-

STEVE BROUWERS

contact: sales@bispublishers.com

artandpaper.com

contact:

+31 (0)6 5425 1560

+33 (0)1 48 10 98 40

Hilde Seys

bispublishers.com

saveca-artandpaper.com

AVAILABLE TITLES LUSTER

+32 (0)478 81 05 21

sales uk acc art books

sales usa acc art books

AVAILABLE TITLES TESHIMA & PUBLIC SPACE

press and pr

Sandy Lane

6 West 18th Street

contact:

Old Martlesham

Suite 4b

Hadewijch Ceulemans

Woodbridge

New York NY 10011

hadewijch@lusterweb.com

Suffolk ip12 4sd

USA

+32 (0)3 298 37 23

United Kingdom

hilde@lusterweb.com

sales brussels and wallonia adybooks Rue de Rotterdam 20

+1 800 252 5231

+44 (0)1394 389 950

accartbooks.com/us

accartbooks.com/uk

André Delruelle

sales germany, switzerland, austria, poland, russia, baltic states gingko press verlags gmbh

andre.delruelle@adybooks.be

Schulterblatt 59

+32 (0)475 32 94 16

20357 Hamburg

4000 Liège Belgium contact:

ussales@accartbooks.com

uksales@accartbooks.com

sales other countries Contact acc art books uk or luster

Germany gingkopress@t-online.de +49 (0)40 291 425 gingkopress.com cover image Laura Claessens, from Into the Woods graphic design Joke Gossé & Sarah Schrauwen All prices and release dates are subject to change.

5

7

8 16


NEW

NEW

CAMPER FOOD & STORIES ELS SIREJACOB & BRAM DEBAENST

TIPS, STORIES AND DREAMY PHOTOS OF FOOD AND LIFE ON THE ROAD

Chef and food stylist Els Sirejacob and food photographer Bram

Debaenst both know all about food that tastes as good as it looks.

CAMPER FOOD & STORIES ELS SIREJACOB

They have something else in common as well: they both love

photos BRAM DEBAENST

things they love most in life. It’s a cookbook with lots of recipes

finish Softcover

travelling in a camper van. In this book, they’ve combined the

release date March 2021

and tricks to prepare good food on the road all year round. It’s also

format 19,5 × 25 cm

so much more: the beautiful photos will spark your imagination

and the personal stories really bring the wonderful feeling to life of being on the road and free. The chapters correspond to the

different regions and countries Bram and Els visited in Europe: from the Black Forest in Germany to Cornwall and from the

Ardennes in Belgium to Albania. The practical tips – where to

pages ca. 240

isbn 9789460582691 nur 500, 440

language English

price € 24,95 / £ 22 / $ 28

camp or not to camp, how to avoid stress before your trip, what to pack, … – are an extra asset.

As a food stylist, Els Sirejacob knows how to bring food to life. She cooks, writes recipes, and is passionate about vegetables,

nature, and freedom. That’s why she loves campervan road trips

with her family. Bram Debaenst is specialised in food photography for commercial clients as well as for lifestyle publications.

5


NEW

NEW

CREATIVES ON CREATIVITY STEVE BROUWERS

MR B I

U

N

G

O

Don’t forget to have fun.

How would you describe yourself? My name is Mr Bingo and I am an artist. Then people usually ask: what sort of things do you make? And then I say: just look at the pictures, it’s too hard to explain. And is Bingo your real name? No, my real name is... different. But in 1998 I played a round of bingo at Garled Bingo in Maedstone in Kent, and I won 141 pounds and 27 pence, and that’s how I got the nickname Bingo. People just started calling me Bingo and it sort of stuck. I liked the fact that I had a new name and I added a Mr to it two years later, at university. I started signing work Mr Bingo when I was twenty. How did you grow up? What did your father and mother do? I am still growing up. My childhood took place in a little village in Kent in the south east of the UK, that was populated with about 2,000 white, quite old fashioned, probably racist and homophobic people in the eighties. My father was an estate agent and my mum was a speech therapist, normal people. Did your childhood influence your ideas about creativity? I sort of feel that there was always something that drove me to be creative from a really young age, but I don’t know what it was inspired by exactly. No one else in my family did creative stuff, so as stupid as it might sound, it feels like a natural thing I was born with. Did your parents support your creativity? Yes, they did actually. That’s one thing I have to give them credit for. Although I am very different from the rest of my family, they always backed what I was doing. Even though I was weird, they didn’t really expect anything from me. They just said: do your thing and see what happens. When was the first time you knew you wanted to be an artist/designer? I spent most of my time in school writing in my book or drawing pictures, but at the time I didn’t know that that could be a job. I grew up playing those shoot-‘em-up games, where you had to kill loads of people in space, so the first creative thing I wanted to do was be a computer game designer.

36

N

I

T

E

D

K

I

N

G

D

O

M

What is creativity to you? To me, it’s making something out of nothing. It’s really an amazing position to be in, to just sit there with pen and paper and then something will happen and I make a thing and then people react to it, and even buy it. Before becoming an artist, you worked for advertising agencies. Yes, I was a commercial illustrator for about 14 years. It’s what I always wanted to do when I left university. In my spare time I was building up a social media presence, and I started having fans. It wasn’t something I planned for, but it happened organically. In 2015 I did a Kickstarter crowd-funding campaign that did very well, and I realised that these fans were serious in backing people like me, and that this potentially could pay for me to have a career. And that’s when I decided to stop working for clients and be an artist. Drawing pictures is nice, and drawing pictures for people is one thing, but drawing pictures for yourself is so much more rewarding and satisfying. Where are you the most creative? I can do it everywhere, but I rarely come up with ideas sitting at a desk. Most of my ideas come when I am walking around, so I spend as much time I can just wandering around on the streets, listening to music, normally with a simple purpose like delivering something, taking something to the post office or just walking to a shop or getting lunch. I never force ideas, I never brainstorm. I used to do that when I was a freelancer. You were given a brief, do this in two days, and so you would sit down and thrash it out, whereas now I am freer. If I don’t come up with an idea every day, it’s okay. What inspires you? Everything, every single thing. Just stuff I see around me. The other day I saw some roofs here outside the window, and I thought it would be funny to just draw some roofs, just like that. Literally because that was what I was looking at. Who inspires you? A lot of comedians, like Chris Morris, I like his dark sense of humor. And a lot of different artists whose style I have copied, uhm, been influenced by over the years. And of course, David Shrigley, but I haven’t met him. I find it a bit scary to meet people who have influenced me.

37

CREATIVES

ON

CREATIVITY

Does creativity have to create a better world? Whenever you can, you should try to create a better world. Especially in advertising, but also in graphic design. For instance, last year I did an event in Amsterdam that was called Jump Trump. Visitors could climb up the stairs and jump onto a big 8-square-metre cushion with a huge portrait of Trump on it, effectively trashing his face by jumping on it. It was very popular: 20.000 people jumped on his face in one weekend. I for one am always looking for that controversial dimension.

For this book, Steve Brouwers (creative director at SBS) inter-

There is a lot of humour in your work. There is no magic formula to create a funny idea. Basically, I think that you should differentiate yourself from the mainstream in whatever way you can, and humour, irony, and being very honest are all quite effective ways to achieve that, but they’re never a good starting point.

viewed 42 makers – painters, photographers, graphic designers,

Did your childhood influence your way of thinking about creativity? When I was eleven years old, my nine-year-old sister was killed in a car accident right in front of my mother’s eyes. She was hit by a car as she was crossing the street. I was the only one left at home. My parents were grieving and for about 5 or 6 years they were in a lot of pain. It made my world much smaller, and I just didn’t want to cause them any trouble. I was constantly drawing in my room and making things, just to lock myself away in my own world. It was a very difficult time, but although it might be strange to say, for me something positive came out of it. As an artist, you are a collector of people’s collections. As a designer and art director, I often work with other people’s images. I am basically the composer of the idea that I came up with, bringing all these elements together: the copy, the design, the photography, or the illustration or the video… In that sense I am very accustomed to, and almost more interested in other people’s photographs. About 20 years ago, I also became quite interested in flea markets, like the ones in Brussels. I always saw a lot of amateur photography and family photo albums lying there. I started to look through them and noticed the mistakes and the mark of the amateur in them. Something about these albums is very positive, very funny and light, and I started to recognise certain narratives in these albums. For instance, I found an album where a family was trying to solve one of the greatest mysteries of photography, which is how to capture a black dog on film. This family had tried to take pictures of their black dog for 15 years, but it was a total disaster, because the dog was almost always a black silhouette. By the end of the album they were probably so frustrated that they started to expose the images of the dog, and for the first time you start seeing 20

A FASCINATING LOOK INSIDE THE MINDS OF 42 CREATIVE MASTERMINDS, INCLUDING STEFAN SAGMEISTER, GEORGE LOIS AND HARRY GRUYAERT

conceptual artists, furniture designers, video artists, advertisers

release date April 2021

their creative process, their inspirations and their most memorable

format 19 × 24 cm

– from all around the world. He asked them about their childhood, achievements. The question that kicks off every interview –

“What is creativity to you?” – resulted in an inspiring collection of

the dog’s eyes and character, but then everything else was overexposed. Those are the kinds of stories I’m talking about. I started turning these stories into publications. In 2007 I had my first big solo show in Utrecht (Netherlands) in nine big museum spaces, just with the work that I had generated from images that I found, and that I made a story with. In a way, this was also a product of my work as an art director.

personal conversations that provide an extraordinary insight into the artists’ minds.

And then out of all those amateur images, you made a book about failure. How did you come up writing that book? What you see nowadays is that people in the creative field use tools that are very close to perfection. Look at the cameras on our phones, there so perfect that you need an application to fuck up your image, to make it look authentic. The rendering that architects use in their presentations looks better than when the building is made for real. Everything is perfect, but this perfection is not really a good starting point for a new, innovative, creative idea. To get an idea, you need to go in the wrong direction. You need to make, metaphorically speaking, a mistake.

CREATIVES ON CREATIVITY STEVE BROUWERS

Interviews with: Nel Aerts, Alain Biltereyst, Conrad Botes, Jenny

finish Hardcover pages 272

isbn 9789460582837 nur 640, 765

language English

price € 29,95 / £ 30 / $ 35

Brosinski, Tad Carpenter, Emily Forgot, Matt Clark, Jim Dive,

Sue Doeksen, Bendt Eyckermans, Paul Fuentes, Harry Gruyaert, 21

Ryan Gander, Tony Gum, Stephanie Hier, Wade Jeffree & Leta

Sobierajski, Maira Kalman, Erik Kessels, George Lois, Anna Mac,

Debbie Millman, Jonathan Monk, Mr Bingo, Morag Myerscough, Navid Nuur, Gemma O’Brien, Max Pinckers, Pixie Pravda, Kay

Rosen, Stefan Sagmeister, Paula Scher, Yuko Shimizu, Sammy

Slabbinck, John Stezaker, Charline Tyberghein, David Uzochukwu, Joris Van De Moortel, Anne-Mie Van Kerckhoven, Dominic Wilcox, Matt Willey and Shawna X.

7


AVA I L A B L E T I T L E S L U S T E R

100 BELGIAN ICONS

SILVIE BONNE

DEREK BLYTH

A UNIQUE AND OUT-OF-THE-BOX GUIDE WITH 100 INSTAGRAMMABLE SPOTS AND TIPS IN BERLIN

AVA I L A B L E T I T L E S L U S T E R

BERLIN GUIDE FOR INSTAGRAMMERS

LEARN ALL ABOUT THE ICONS OF ‘THE WORLD’S STRANGEST COUNTRY’

marie-elisabeth lüders house 5

ICONIC

pleasures

23

Most sandwiches in Belgium are ordinary. But the Martino is surprising. Some say it was invented by a professional footballer called Albert De Hert who ran a snack bar on the De Coninckplein in Antwerp. One day in 1951, a footballer called Theo Maertens came into the snack bar looking for something to eat. His nickname was Martino. He was a little drunk and asked Albert to make him up a sandwich that included everything that he had in the cool cabinet. Albert got to work. He sliced a baguette, spread it with raw steak américain, then added chopped onion, sliced gherkin, pili-pili sauce, cayenne pepper, ketchup, Worcester sauce and a dash of Tabasco. The broodje Martino was born. Or maybe not. A snack bar in Ghent called Martino claims it invented the sandwich during the Second World War. A hungry German soldier went into Martino and asked for the best sandwich on the menu. He was served a sandwich with raw mince, along with onions, egg, anchovies and Tabasco sauce. It was meant to be disgusting, an act of defiance, but the erman loved it. No one knows the true story. But the Martino snack bar in Ghent stopped serving the Martino in 2007. It was just too much trouble, the owner said.

The Marie-Elisabeth Lüders House can be found along the banks of the Marie-Elisabeth Lüders House

Spree and is part of the symbolic “Band des Bundes” (“The Federal Row”), the

how to get there

The beautiful structure was designed by architect Stephan Braunfels

S3 (green) or U6 (purple) to Friedrichstrasse station.

government buildings around the Reichstag. (@stephanbraufels) and is photogenic from every angle. A pedestrian bridge over the Spree connects the various Reichstag buildings and is the symbolic connection between East and West. Next to the Marie-Elisabeth-Luders house, you can see an inscription where

S3, S5, S7, S9 (green) to Berlin Hauptbahnhof. M5, M8, M10 (trem) to Berlin Hauptbahnhof.

the wall was located (this is part of the “Berliner Mauerweg”), and a few meters further you can also see an effective remnant of the wall. The building was named after Marie-Elisabeth Lüders (1878-1966), the first

BROODJE MARTINO

woman to be promoted to a professor in Germany. As a Member of the Parliament, she pioneered the improvement of the situation of women and the unemployed, the protection of children and young people, and the reform of criminal laws.

fun facts

During the summer months, an impressive film- and light projection is played daily on all walls and windows of the Marie-Elisabeth-Lüders House. Every evening, at sunset, you can go for a 30-minute performance about the history of Reichstag. Not only very interesting to look at, but also very special to capture.

instagrammable places in the neighborhood coffee food

BERLIN GUIDE FOR INSTAGRAMMERS

Refinery High End Coffee, Albrechtstrasse 11B (9 min. walk) Zimt & Zucker, Schiffbauerdamm 12 (8 min. walk)

@stephanbraunfels #marieelisabethludershouse #berlinarchitecture #peoplewalkingpastwalls

Cou Cou, Reinhardstrasse 37 (5 min. walk)

see

Paul Löbe Haus, Konrad-Adenauer-Strasse 1 (2 min. walk) Futurium, Alexanderufer 2 (4 min. walk) Bundestag, Platz der Republik 1 (6 min. walk)

insta tip

To capture this building, it is ideal to add a person to it, so you can tell how big it is. If you stand on the other side of the water and you position yourself directly opposite the circle, you don’t have to wait long for passers-by to form a nice composition. You can wait until the passenger (or biker) is right in the middle or on the left or right side of the circle.

2

SYLVIE BONNE 3

22

English | 224 p.

English | 232 p.

€ 19,95 / £ 18,95 / $ 25

€ 19,95 / £ 17,95 / $ 23

isbn 9789460582738

isbn 9789460582745

ICONIC

traditions

Koersmuseum Polenplein 15 Roeselare +32 (0)51 26 24 00 koersmuseum.be

CYCLE RACING

ALSO AVAILABLE NYC GUIDE FOR INSTAGRAMMERS SILVIE BONNE

English | 224 p.

€ 19,95 / £ 17,95 / $ 23 isbn 9789460582264

74

8

100 BELGIAN ICONS DEREK BLYTH

75

It’s tough on a bike in Belgium. Not like the Netherlands where cycling is a pleasure. The rural roads in Belgium are often paved with bumpy cobblestones. Add to that potholes, broken glass and road diversions along the way. You have to be mad to cycle in Belgium, people say. And yet. It’s Sunday morning, and you see tight packs of racing cyclists dressed in identical lycra jerseys. They flow gracefully across the flat landscape, speed down the canal towpaths, cross the bleak moors of Limburg. It’s mainly in Flanders, where the flat landscape is perfect, but also along the towpaths and abandoned railway lines of Wallonia. They might stop along the way at an old cafe to warm themselves in front of an iron stove. The walls covered with faded photographs of cycling heroes. Then it’s back on the bikes. Another twenty kilometres of hard riding on rough roads before lunch. The country is famous for cycle races like the Ronde van Vlaanderen and Liège-Bastogne-Liège. Each a test of endurance. Many of the low hills in the Flemish Ardennes have become gruelling cycling challenges, like the Oude Kwaremont, the Koppenberg and the Muur van Geraardsbergen. They might not look impressive compared to the Alps, but these cobbled slopes are punishing on a bike. Some of the hills are protected monuments, ranked along with Bruges and the Grand-Place in Brussels. Even if they weren’t, no local official would ever dare to put down asphalt. It might seem mad, but Belgian cyclists love the rain, the hills, the cobbles.

9


AVA I L A B L E T I T L E S L U S T E R

POSTERS ‘ANTWERP’ & ‘BRUSSELS’

AVA I L A B L E T I T L E S L U S T E R

BEA MOMBAERS – ITEMS & INTERIORS BEA MOMBAERS

INSPIRATION FOR EVERY MOMENT OF THE DAY IN BEA MOMBAERS’S STYLE

POSTER ‘ANTWERP’ SANNY WINTERS

format 50 × 70 cm

paper Munken Pure Rough 120 g production Printed with UV

resistant inks, delivered in a tube with barcode sticker isbn 9789460582783 prijs € 25

BEA MOMBAERS – ITEMS & INTERIORS BEA MOMBAERS

English | 240 p.

AVAILABLE SOON

ILLUSTRATIONS FROM

isbn 9789460582844 THE

BRIGHT SIDE OF

€ 45 / £ 40 / $ 50

isbn 9789460582530

Sigrid Vandensavel Hadewijch Ceulemans

THE BRIGHT SIDE OF BELGIUM HADEWIJCH CEULEMANS & SIGRID VANDENSAVEL

English | 272 p.

€ 9,95 / £ 25 / $ 35

isbn 9789460582134

10

11


AVA I L A B L E T I T L E S L U S T E R

TANGUY OTTOMER

Handelsbeurs Antwerpen

AVA I L A B L E T I T L E S L U S T E R

TIME MACHINE – ANTWERPEN

Tanguy Ottomer

Past & Present

CAN YOU RECOGNIZE THE STREETS AND SQUARES IN THE ANTWERP OF YORE?

HANDELSBEURS ANTWERPEN

BISTRO BELGE

PAST & PRESENT

NOSTALGIC PLACES TO EAT

TANGUY OTTOMER

IN BELGIUM

JEAN-LUC FEIXA

English & Dutch | 192 p.

TONI DE CONINCK

English | 160 photo’s | 208 p.

€ 45 | isbn 9789460582400

English & Dutch | 272 p. € 25 / £ 25 / $ 30

isbn 9789460582585

STRANGE THINGS BEHIND BELGIAN WINDOWS

€ 17,50 / £ 16 / $ 21

isbn 9789460582714

301

DAVID HELBICH Photographs

BELGIAN SOLUTIONS 304 pages

VOLUME 1

ALSO AVAILABLE

TIME MACHINE – ANTWERPEN TANGUY OTTOMER

English & Dutch | 216 p.

LUSTER

9 789460 581571

6th edition

3rd edition

€ 21,95 / £ 17,95 / $ 24 isbn 9789460582721

BELGIAN SOLUTIONS VOLUME 1

TIME MACHINE – ANTWERPEN MEMORY GAME 60 cards

€ 15 | isbn 9789460582776

12

BELGIAN SOLUTIONS VOLUME 2

QUIRKY BELGIAN LETTERBOXES /

YOU’VE GOT MAIL

DAVID HELBICH

DAVID HELBICH

BIJZONDERE BELGISCHE

English | 301 photos | 304 p.

English | 302 photos | 304 p.

BRIEVENBUSSEN

isbn 9789460581571

isbn 9789460581991

English & Dutch | 160 photop.

€ 20 / £ 19 / $ 30

€ 20 / £ 19 / $ 30

PETER SCHOUTEN

€ 14,95 / £ 15 / $ 20

isbn 9789460582578

13


AVA I L A B L E T I T L E S L U S T E R

3rd edition

AVA I L A B L E T I T L E S L U S T E R

What The Fuck!

What The Fuck!

THE ILLUSTRATED BOOK OF SONGS

TENS

WHAT THE FUCK!

SOUTH AFRICA

CLOSE TO NATURE

MADE IN CUBA

TOM DE GEETER

A ROAD TRIP

INSPIRING HOUSES OFF THE ROAD

MOLLY MANDELL & JAMES BURKE

COLM BOYD

English | 200 p.

English | 180 photop.

MIRJAM BLEEKER & FRANK VISSER

MIRJAM BLEEKER & FRANK VISSER

isbn 9789460582271

English | 258 p. + booklet

English | 256 p.

English | 256 p.

isbn 9789460582547

isbn 9789460581984

English | 260 p.

€ 25

€ 24,95 / £ 22 / $ 28

isbn 9789460582615

isbn 9789460582486

€ 12,50 / £ 11 / $ 13,95

BEST BUILDINGS

€ 39,95 / £ 36 / $ 50

€ 25 / £ 23 / $ 32

€ 39,95 / £ 36 / $ 50 isbn 9789460582349

THE INVISIBLE MARK ÉLISE VAN THUYNE

HOLLAND

2nd updated edition

BEST BUILDINGS BELGIUM

BEST BUILDINGS BELGIUM

BEST BUILDINGS HOLLAND

BEST BUILDINGS BRITAIN

THE INVISIBLE MARK

ARCHIST

HADEWIJCH CEULEMANS

TOON LAUWEN

MATTHEW FREEDMAN

ÉLISE VAN THUYNE

IF ARTISTS WERE ARCHITECTS

English & Dutch | 232 p.

English & Dutch | 200 p.

English | 200 p.

English | 160 + 8 p.

isbn 9789460582233

isbn 9789460582356

isbn 9789460582554

isbn 9789460582288

€ 21 / £ 16,95 / $ 25

14

€ 21 / £ 16,95 / $ 25

€ 21 / £ 16,95 / $ 25

€ 39,95 / £ 36 / $ 50

FEDERICO BABINA

30 posters

€ 14,95 / £ 14 / $ 19

isbn 9789460581823

15


English | 112 p.

HENDRIK WILLEMYNS

MARCEL SMETS

English | 228 p.

French | 96 p.

Publisher: Teshima

Publisher: Public Space

€ 25 | isbn 9789491789267

€ 30 | isbn 9789491789243 Publisher: Public Space

@

ok

co

bo

ce

w

eb .

fa

us

00

se

de

cre ts

hid

en

50 0

hid d

/t h e

@l

e5

m

r

st er

th

.co

ec m

ret

.co

ns ec

e

s

s

STIJN BOLLAERT A.O.

PETRA PFERDMENGES

English, Dutch & French | 208 p.

Publisher: Public Space

Publisher: Public Space

16

oo k

ns

5

idd ret

FOUNDING ALIVE ARCHITECTURE

English & Dutch | 300 p.

€ 29 | isbn 9789491789205

eb

0h idd e ets #

00 h

ns ec

THE PREDIKHEREN MECHELEN

fac

50

m

€ 25 | isbn 9789460582479

PLACE

| c ur io te #l .c us rb us om be oo te /u lg ks rb iu i oo tg | @ m ev ks .c c e om ur rij | # io l cu u u s sb rio te r el us gi be u m lg iu m

PHILIPPE VIÉRIN

lu

AVA I L A B L E T I T L E S T E S H I M A & P U B L I C S PA C E

FONDEMENTS DU PROJET URBAIN

AVA I L A B L E T I T L E S T E S H I M A & P U B L I C S PA C E

ROOM OF IMAGINARY CREATURES

€ 24 | isbn 9789491789175

17

Profile for Luster

Luster titles spring 2021  

Luster titles spring 2021  

Profile for lusterweb
Advertisement