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The Divingbell AND THE

fl l y Butterf


flyer pages with some sort of soft pattern


copyright


LeLesscaphandre caphanet dre et leleppapillon apillon


table of contents

preface

chapter one

chapter two

chapter three

french to english dictionary colophon

(These are different texts I am exploring. This is not what the table of contents will look like.)


blank spreads needed?


preface The Diving Bell and the Butterfly is a translation of the French memoir Le scaphandre et le papillon by journalist Jean-Dominique Bauby. It describes what his life is like after suffering a massive stroke that left him with a condition called locked-in syndrome. It also details what his life was like before the stroke. On December 8, 1995, Bauby, the editor-in-chief of Elle magazine, suffered a stroke and lapsed into a coma. He awoke 20 days later, mentally aware of his surroundings but physically paralyzed with the exception of some movement in his head and eyes (one of which had to be sewn up due to an irrigation problem). The entire book was written by Bauby blinking his left eyelid, which took ten months (four hours a day). Using partner assisted scanning, a transcriber repeatedly recited a French language frequency-ordered alphabet (E, S, A, R, I, N, T, U, L, etc.), until Bauby blinked to choose the next letter. The book took about 200,000 blinks to write and an average word took approximately two minutes. The book also chronicles everyday events for a person with locked-in syndrome. These events include playing at the beach with his family, getting a bath, and meeting visitors whilst in hospital at Berck-sur-Mer. The French edition of the book was published on March 6, 1997. It received excellent reviews, sold the first 25,000 copies on the day of publication, reaching 150,000 in a week. It went on to become a number one bestseller across Europe. Its total sales are now in the millions. On 9 March 1997, three days after the book was published, Bauby died of pneumonia. In 2007 the book was adapted into a feature film of the same name, directed by Julian Schnabel, written by Ronald Harwood and starring Mathieu Amalric as Bauby. Julian Schnabel won best director that year at the Cannes Film Festival. The film was nominated for four Academy Awards in 2008 for directing, cinematography, editing and writing. It would go on to win numerous international awards, including a BAFTA for adapted screenplay, and Golden Globes for best foreign language film and best director.

This book is based off of the feature film.


chapter one

use actual file folders have them hang out a little so you could flip to each chapter text would be made out of labels


Look! He’s waking -

Page Dr. Cocheton. Quickly.


to e om

c , n to ase, e h oc ple C Dr. m 119 n o o o r et

h c o C , 9 . Dr m 11 o o r

to e s a e l p


No, no, Jean-Dominique, open your eyes -

Jean-Dominique? Jean-Dominique? No, no, keep your eyes open, you’ve been asleep for a long time, you’re waking up now. Can you hear me?


Monsieur Bauby? Excellent. Now, open your eyes wide - try to keep them open - good man -


Don’t alarmed. You’re in a in hospital. Don’tbebe alarmed. You’re a hospital. I’m a doctor.

I’m a doctor.

My name’s Cocheton.

My name’s Cocheton.

These are nurses.

These are nurses.

We’re here to take care of you.

We’re here to take care of you.

Do you remember what happened?

VVaguely aguely- -

Do you remember what happened?


I SAID, vaguely -


You’re in the Navel Hospital, Berck-sur-Mer. On the coast. In Normandy. You were treated first in Paris, and then brought here. Do you remember that?

II’’mm not notsure sur-e -


You see, Jean-Dominique, you’ve had a

STROKE

You’ve been in a coma for almost three weeks. But now you’re waking up and you’ll be fine, I promise you. I’m just going to give you one or two simple tests. I want you to keep your eyes on me.

Good. You understand -

Of COURSE I understand -


When I say blink, please


blink.


Excellent. Now, tell me your name.

Jean-Dominique Bauby.

Come on, try, try really hard, say your name.


I j us t d id

I just did

I j did tsuj I us j u t ts d d i i d d

d i d d i d t t s s u u j j II

I

t I jusst d

I JUsT DID

ju

j u

I

did tsu j I

d

u j

t s

di

d i d

s t

i d


Try saying your children’s names.

Celeste. Theophile. All right, don’t worry. It’s a slow process. Your speech will come back.

I c

I can ’ t peak?

I can’t s


can’t spe a k ? speak?

?


Why can’t you hear me?

Why can’t you hear me?

Oh, Christ. I can’t speak.

Oh, Christ. can’ttospeak. I can’t move. What’sIhappened me? I can’t move. What’s to me? I can’t remember - Ihappened - My name is Jean-Dominique Bauby.

I can’t remember - I - My name is Jean-Dominique Oh, my God Bauby. All right, all right, I’ve had a stroke Oh, Godcome - back - my memory - mymy speech’ll will come back -

All right, all right, I’ve had a stroke - my speech’ll come back - my memory - I’ll be patient - oh, God will come back okay, okay - I

believe you -

- I’ll be patient - oh, I believe - I believe okay, okay - I

God -

believe you -

I believe - I believe -



diving bell type