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ANNUAL REPORT

FACULTY OF ENGINEERING, LTH

2009

LUND UNIVERSITY


Lund university

Content The Dean

4

Undergraduate Studies

6

Student Intake

7

International Collaboration

11

International Student Exchange

12

Postgraduate Studies

14

Research

16

EU-funded Research

17

Personnel

18

LTH in media

22

Honorary Doctors

23

Awards and Grants

24

Finance

27

Key Facts and Figures

32

The Board

34

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

3


Faculty of Engineering is booming Lund University in business terms: Lund University as the corporation, the faculties as subsidiaries. If the Faculty of Engineering (LTH) were a company listed on the stock exchange, I would be buying a few extra shares in it right now. In the wake of the financial crisis, many people predicted that 2009 would be a really bad year. For some this was indeed the case but not for LTH. Not quite everything went our way but many things did go fantastically well. The year’s results show solid finances with potential for strategic investments. We succeeded in obtaining external research funding on an unprecedented scale. This meant that we didn’t have time enough to take on as many researchers and doctoral students as we would have liked. This created a surplus that we are now going through as we acquire new coworkers. So these are all positive concerns. The subsidiary is in fine shape!

WE SOMETIMES DESCRIBE

4

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT

Four development areas The University is working strategically on four development areas: attractive learning environments, strong research and innovation environments, increased visibility and investments in infrastructure. As far as attractive learning environments are concerned, we have invested in improving the laboratory activities within first cycle studies. We believe that this is a determining factor in the quality of technical education and in the achievement of good final qualifications in laboratory and experimental working methods for our students. We are making efforts to develop strong research and innovation environments in several ways. Through the recruitment of a top-level expert in materials chemistry, we have strengthened the environment and created conditions for links to nanotechnology research, ESS and Max IV.


The subject of physics is also being consolida- Relations with other higher education ted to ensure successful research. institutions We believe that increased visibility can generate There is a lot of talk about ranking as a part success in various ways, such as improved recru- of the benchmarking of higher education instiitment and exposure to external funding bodies. tutions. There are numerous different ranking lists. Lund University usually figures among the In September we inaugurated the Vattenhaltop hundred out of around 8000 universities in len Science Centre at LTH. Here, school pupils the world. LTH is normally not ranked alone as from the region will be able to come into conwe are a part of Lund University. tact with science and technology in an attractive way, as they meet our students and lecturers. We “Högskolerankingen 2009”, the ranking of believe this will be very significant for the future higher education institutions published by the South Skåne Chamber of Commerce and Induof LTH. stry, puts Lund University in 7th place. If ofWe put a lot of effort into producing good inficial KPIs are used to evaluate LTH, we end formation for the internet. Catalogues and visits up in 2nd place as the highest ranking technical to fairs are still important ways of generating higher education institution in Sweden. visibility. Our new catalogue of study programmes and the brochure “Life after LTH” have We draw great advantages from being part of received a lot of praise both from professionals Lund University as we can easily link medicine, technology, natural sciences and economics and from readers. through cross-boundary research projects During the year we launched three new research within the university as a whole. Elsewhere, portals: the Sea Portal (Havsportalen), the Food cooperation is required between three or more and Medicine Portal (Livs- och läkemedelsporuniversities in order to achieve the same objectalen) and the Innovation Portal (Innovationstive. portalen). All three will become important meeting-places for researchers from different With the conditions set for us by 2009, we can departments, thereby facilitating across-boun- look towards 2010 with confidence. One of the dary working method while highlighting this factors of our success is cross-boundary work: between the departments within LTH, between research. the faculties within Lund University, between That the infrastructure is being reinforced and universities and between countries. I am thereneeds yet further reinforcement is obvious from fore happy to quote a Europolitician: the fact that LTH will celebrate its 50th anniversary in 2011. Over the past few years we Unity is our strength have therefore put a lot of money and effort Diversity is our wealth into renovating, modernising and renewing the buildings on campus. During the year our students’ union building turned 15 at the same time as the union itself turned 25, events which were celebrated with a Anders Axelsson jubilee week as a warm-up for LTH’s 50th anni- Dean LTH versary.

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

5


Undergraduate Studies IN THE AUTUMN OF 2009,

the number of first choice applicants to LTH grew by 29 % compared to the previous year. Competition for places has increased on all programmes. A combination of demographics with large age groups, economic recession, an increased interest in science and technology together with LTH and Lund University’s good reputations have generated a lot of applicants per place. LTH is popular! LTH could not admit as many students in the autumn of 2009 as in previous years because the student quota is already filled. Instead, the qualifications of the admitted students were higher, so they should have better chances of successfully completing their studies. It is very positive that the proportion of female students enrolled in the Master of Science programme in Engineering has increased considerably.

for marketing Lund University in view of the introduction of fees for overseas students from 2011. The work to ensure the highest quality in education has gained additional traction this year from the new evaluation system drawn up by the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education. In the new system, the quality of degree projects will be highlighted as an indicator of good quality for the educational programme as a whole. Inspired by this, we at LTH have extended our faculty-wide evaluation system with the possibility for students to assess their experiences of the degree project. In the Higher Education Agency’s evaluation system, links to professional life and employability are also emphasised. This has also emerged from alumni surveys as something that students felt was lacking in their education. We have taken note of these views and, among other measures, we have invested in combined study and careers guidance early on in the programmes.

This year, the Faculty’s arts programmes, Architecture and Industrial Design, have operated in their new forms as schools. The new master’s programme in Industrial Design has been validated and established in the course of the year The Bologna agreement work has now been and the plan is to admit the first students to the applied throughout the educational system at programme in the autumn of 2010. LTH. The planning of the final, specialising, At Campus Helsingborg, among other things, two years of the Master of Science in EngineLTH runs Bachelor of Science programmes ering programme is now complete. After comin engineering, as well as foundation year and prehensive work on formulation, there are now foundation semester programmes in techno- many possibilities for common access to specialogy. There is a demand in industry for qualifi- lisations for many different programmes. cations in automation technology and this has led to LTH’s decision in 2009 to establish a new undergraduate engineering programme, starting in 2010, in electrical engineering with automation technology.

In summary, one can say that LTH has many students with high expectations and that all the staff share the major responsibility of providing them with the prerequisites for a good education and a promising start to their career.

LTH offers eight two-year master’s programmes which are mainly aimed at students from outside the EU/EEA. In the autumn of 2009, 162 new students were recruited to these programmes, representing a strong increase compared to the previous year. As the programmes function well with a high throughput there are now hundreds of satisfied alumni around the world. These alumni will come to be an important channel Ingrid Svensson Assistant Dean for Education 6

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


Student Intake Number of full-time student equivalents (FTE), annual performance equivalents (APE) and degrees awarded (DEG) in the calendar years 2007, 2008 and 2009 2009

2009

FTE

APE

Biotechnology

265

240

Chemical Engineering

416

346

Civil Engineering

221

Computer Science

2009

2009

2008

2008

DEG

FTE

APE

2008

2007

2007

DEG

FTE

APE

91

42

252

230

83

58

374

314

91

70

265

233

88

41

84

61

374

323

86

195

88

38

208

70

192

92

46

208

191

92

286

225

79

45

41

249

211

85

63

261

236

90

Electrical Engineering

485

407

84

80

53

446

396

89

76

402

340

85

Environmental Engineering

117

93

71

79

18

105

95

90

26

115

103

90

Engineering Mathematics

175

16

157

90

45

166

151

91

31

169

157

93

Engineering Physics

37

241

233

97

43

231

218

94

32

217

184

85

Industrial Management & Engineering

32

700

663

95

120

700

595

85

115

702

608

87

116

APE/FTE(%)

2008 APE/FTE(%)

2007 APE/FTE(%)

2007 DEG

Master's degrees in

InfoCom

84

81

97

47

71

67

94

45

84

78

93

18

Mechanical Engineering

377

332

88

69

361

328

91

71

375

325

87

56

Nanoscience

146

112

77

19

142

128

90

23

141

111

79

11

Risk Management

202

182

90

33

185

157

85

15

171

137

80

1

Surveying

490

446

91

70

456

412

90

78

453

424

94

78

4 206

3 713

88

700

3946

3494

89

752

3937

3450

88

668

Architecture

260

231

89

55

271

231

85

60

253

226

89

56

Fire Protection Engineering

149

137

92

53

150

139

93

45

151

145

96

29

Industrial Design

117

97

83

15

126

101

80

12

130

112

86

14

Total Arch, FPE & ID

526

466

89

123

547

471

86

117

534

483

90

99

278

242

87

59

249

86

26

200

188

94

19

79

71

90

8

63,8

55

86

14

51

44

86

6

-

0

1

0,5

1,8

360

5

0,6

2,5

417

8

1,2

3

1

1

1

1,25

6,5

520

7,5

11,9

3

0,1

0,1

Other Total Master's degrees

Bachelor's degrees in Biotechnology Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science

3

1,05 214

4

3,7

8

Electrical Engineering Geomatics Multimedia Engineering

2 8

Production Engineering Software Engineering

-

1

1

0,5

0,65

130

1

0,5

2,5

Total Bachelor's degrees

358

315

88

73

315,05

279

89

60

259,7

253,9

98

51

International Master's programmes

278

206

74

69

178

151

85

56

127

107

84

45

51,5

66

128

27

Continuation course for BSc graduates Vocational Food Technology

4

1 42

44

104

19

45

63

140

16

2

Foundation year

111

81

73

70

30,5

44

39,5

38

96

Separate course modules, etc.

432

338

78

389

295

76

380

303

80

15

19

131

31

30

97

36

35

97

TM (Economics students)

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

7


Where do our students come from?

Skåne

Gothenburg

Stockholm

Central Sweden

Northern Sweden

2009

2008

2009

2008

2009

2008

2009

2008

2009

2008

Lund total

54%

56%

10%

8%

10%

8%

8%

8%

2%

2%

Helsingborg total

79%

78%

6%

5%

3%

5%

3%

4%

2%

1%

Electrical Engineering

70%

60%

3%

9%

7%

3%

3%

7%

2%

0%

Computer Science

66%

78%

1%

9%

10%

1%

7%

7%

1%

0%

InfoCom

63%

61%

4%

8%

11%

5%

13%

3%

2%

0%

Engineering Physics

46%

48%

13%

11%

14%

11%

9%

4%

0%

4%

Chemical Engineering

69%

61%

7%

2%

2%

7%

5%

4%

0%

0%

Architecture

57%

54%

9%

6%

9%

15%

9%

7%

6%

4%

Biotechnology

53%

56%

11%

6%

10%

9%

5%

9%

1%

0%

NanoScience

64%

53%

6%

9%

8%

9%

11%

13%

0%

0%

Mechanical Engineering

56%

59%

10%

6%

10%

6%

7%

7%

2%

2%

Enginering Mathematics

40%

61%

5%

8%

15%

8%

20%

13%

5%

0%

Civil Engineering

56%

51%

14%

10%

7%

6%

8%

8%

2%

4%

Environmental Engineering

38%

42%

19%

10%

10%

8%

11%

2%

3%

2%

Industrial Management & Engineering

45%

44%

17%

17%

16%

17%

11%

7%

1%

3%

Industrial Design

58%

55%

19%

5%

16%

20%

3%

5%

0%

0%

Surveying

35%

34%

14%

5%

9%

10%

8%

17%

6%

9%

Fire Protection Engineering

32%

37%

13%

10%

13%

10%

13%

15%

3%

7%

Computer Engineering HBG

94%

100%

2%

0%

2%

0%

0%

0%

0%

0%

Civil Engineering HBG*

71%

74%

9%

7%

4%

0%

4%

8%

1%

3%

Foundation Year

81%

76%

4%

6%

4%

12%

4%

0%

5%

0%

* Previously, the three construction engineering streams - Traffic and Roads, Railway Engineering and Architecture and Built Environment - were measured separately. For the year 2009, the students from all three programmes were surveyed together, which means that the figures for each individual programme cannot be compared with previous results. The comparison is made with Architecture’s earlier figures, as they had most respondents in previous surveys.

Source of Information leading to choise of LTH 2009

2008

2007

Close to home

Good reputation

City of Lund

LTH prospectus

14%

18%

17%

2009

39%

73%

61%

Friends

21%

19%

17%

2008

37%

72%

58%

Internet

30%

30%

27%

2007

39%

73%

67%

Family

21%

17%

17%

2006

34%

72%

65%

Visit to LTH

13%

13%

11%

2005

37%

67%

68%

Other LTH students

8%

7%

8%

2004

39%

67%

68%

VHS* Directory

4%

4%

5%

2003

40%

70%

68%

Teachers

3%

3%

3%

2002

35%

67%

68%

School Career Advisors

3%

3%

3%

2001

37%

65%

72%

2000

40%

58%

67%

1999

40%

54%

65%

1998

41%

53%

65%

1997

37%

34%

47%

1996

48%

37%

27%

1995

54%

26%

39%

*VHS = National Agency for Higher Education

8

Reasons for choosing LTH

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


Source of information leading to choise of LTH programme 2009

Prospectus

Friends

Internet

Family

Visit to LTH

LTH-students

LTH totalt

15%

23%

28%

22%

14%

8%

Engineering Physics

11%

24%

26%

24%

17%

7%

NanoScience

19%

19%

31%

22%

19%

8%

Enginering Mathematics

5%

5%

29%

24%

24%

10%

Electrical Engineering

16%

18%

29%

15%

22%

10%

Computer Science

9%

23%

31%

20%

13%

3%

InfoCom

18%

13%

27%

20%

9%

13%

Mechanical Engineering

14%

30%

21%

25%

12%

8%

Civil Engineering

16%

19%

23%

28%

9%

9%

Environmental Engineering

24%

20%

41%

11%

8%

11%

Industrial Management & Engineering

11%

34%

24%

26%

11%

11%

Surveying

30%

23%

32%

18%

9%

6%

Biotechnology

14%

20%

27%

23%

23%

5%

Chemical Engineering

27%

11%

29%

29%

16%

7%

Fire Protection Engineering

10%

22%

40%

18%

12%

2%

Architecture

9%

25%

35%

25%

9%

11%

Industrial Design

0%

21%

24%

21%

28%

7%

Proportion of women admitted

MSc programmes

2009

2008

2007

2006

32,5%

28%

28%

27%

BSc programmes

21%

24%

18%

20%

Architecture

53%

60%

55%

59%

Fire Protection Engineering

29%

22%

24%

21%

Industrial Design

42%

50%

69%

56%

International Master’s Programmes

26%

28%

26%

25%

Electrical Engineering*

14%

10%

8%

11%

* One of the programmes which succeeded in recruiting more female students in 2009 is Electrical Engineering, which increased its share of women by almost 30% between 2008 and 2009.

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

9


Elin Östman free radicals, metabolic syndrome and glycemic index. These fashionable words in the media and key terms for the health-conscious are concepts no one knows better than Elin Östman, reader in industrial nutrition at LTH. As people around the world are increasingly affected by adult-onset diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases, interest in understanding how different ingredients in our food affect us is growing. ANTIOXIDANTS,

Together with other medical and food researchers and a number of food companies, she has been part of the Antidiabetic Food Centre, AFC, at Lund University for several years. “Thanks to this type of interdisciplinary platform, we have good chances of getting results from our projects as everyone contributes with different qualifications”.

She is involved in several other projects, among them the EU “Healthgrain” project in which re“Though unfortunately the term ‘glycemic in- searchers ascertain what it is that makes whole dex’ has been so misused that we researchers grain foods so healthy. In another project, she sometimes hesitate to use it. People refer to the is studying whether certain undesirable substan‘GI method’ and they mean that one should eat ces are present in processed foods, for example a lot of fat and protein and few carbohydrates. in baby foods. In between all this, lectures, But those of us researching GI think that one supervisions, report writing, research applicashould indeed eat carbohydrates, but mainly one tions and other administrative tasks take up a should choose the ones with a low GI, that is lot of her time. food that makes blood sugar levels rise slowly and leads to a lesser increase in insulin”, ex- A memorable event last year was when Elin Östman and two colleagues from LTH won the plains Elin Östman. first round in the business development comThe discoveries of the past few years have me- petition, Venture Cup. They were commended ant that the GI is no longer studied as an iso- for their business idea to study beta-glucans, a lated phenomenon but in its interaction with coveted blood sugar-reducing substance which other factors, such as the composition of the is present in oats and barley. Beta-glucans vary intestinal flora and the dietary fiber present in somewhat in appearance and can work in slightfood products. Here, the fact that Elin Östman ly different ways. But with the researchers’ new finds herself in a university with a broad and method, food companies can establish whether varied range of research on food in which dif- the beta-glucans that are present in their specific ferent projects can be of use to one another is food products have the right properties. an advantage. As a functional food researcher she is not short of a market for her new findings. Just now she and Professor Inger Björck are working on a patent. “Whey contains amino-acids that control insulin to give constant blood sugar levels. We have succeeded in identifying the optimal composition of these amino-acids. The plan is to sell the license to companies who want to add them to drinks or dairy products for example”, says Elin Östman. Elin Östman Docent, Industrial nutrition

10

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


International Collaboration WITHIN LUND UNIVERSITY, internationalisation is

a leading strategy aimed at achieving the highest quality in education, postgraduate studies and research. This applies not least to the Faculty of Engineering, LTH. This is why it was so encouraging when, in its major review of the quality assurance work within Lund University, the Swedish National Agency for Higher Education observed that “in some faculties, for example the Faculty of Engineering (LTH), internationa-lisation is also a central part of the activity” (Report 2009:30 R).

In 2009, the Swedish Parliament pushed through a law making joint degrees possible. This opens up major opportunities for more in depth international cooperation, not least in the area of postgraduate research studies. An internal mapping of international research cooperation was carried out in 2009 and showed that informal, joint supervision of doctoral students is already a reality in practically all departments at LTH.

LTH’s activities in China and Japan continue to grow. In the autumn of 2009, the first batch of 23 students in LTH’s China specialisation stream Two important conditions for successful inter- studied for a term in Hangzhou, and a joint denationalisation are effective communication and gree agreement was signed between LTH and integration. An important tool for this is the Keio University, Tokyo. A large, highly qualified, Language Policy for LTH which was established top-level delegation from the Chinese Academy in February 2009. of Engineering, CAE, visited LTH in June. A central feature of internationalisation is student exchange. The number of outgoing exchange students increased by 15% in 2009. On the other hand, the number of degree projects carried out abroad decreased, which meant that altogether the volume was largely unchanged compared to 2008. The number of incoming exchange students dropped noticeably, a phenomenon which affected Lund University as a whole. This may depend on the global financial crisis, but it serves at the same time as a reminder that even LTH and Lund University must market themselves actively as a top class study destination. In principle in 2008 LTH achieved the objective of 25 % of students on its longer study programmes having studied abroad. In 2009 the objective will not be reached, largely due to the decrease in exchanges within the architecture programme. But the interest for exchange studies does seem to be growing fast once more; in the November 2009 round of applications, the number of requests for study abroad had risen by 50%! The upturn most probably depends on increased, more coordinated and better targeted information efforts aimed at LTH’s students.

Two internal projects have also begun on the quality assurance and simplification of administrative work. The first project affects the processes up to selection and nomination for overseas studies. The second project affects all the following stages from nomination, via credit transfer, to the issuing of a degree. These will be reported on during the spring of 2010.

Per Warfvinge Assistant Dean for International Affairs

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

11


International Student Exchange France Germany Spain Scandinavia Övriga Europa North America Asia South America Australia & New Zealand

2009 81 83 54 13 120 45 31 18 12

2008 80 98 58 6 121 53 20 22 26

2007 91 80 64 10 112 54 9 27 25

Foreign students studying at LTH

2006 86 77 72 12 154 55 9 4 2

Diagram 6 160

2009 2008 2007 2006

140

120

100

80

60

40

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

Inkommande studenter Utresande studenter Master studenter 258 208 273 176 321 178 0 France Spain Scandinavia 64 Övriga Europa 390 Germany 198 436 237 75 426 292 72 469 330 61 472 312 111 484 304 117 Balance of foreign exchange294 at LTH 2000 - 2009 419 162 20

North America

Asia

South America

Australia & New Zealand

500

375

250

125

0 2000

2001

2002

Incoming students Outgoing students* International Master students

12

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

* The considerable increase in the number of students studying abroad is due to the fact that since the autumn semester of 2005 information on those carrying out their Master’s projects in other countries i availible.


LTH students studying abroad

2009

2008

2007

2006

Architecture

24

34

40

29

Industrial Design

1

2

2

3

Fire Protection Engineering

4

7

7

14

Biotechnology

23

11

12

17

Chemical Engineering

0

2

3

4

Computer Science

4

2

4

6

Electrical Engineering

70

38

40

67

Engineering Mathematics

14

11

21

18

Engineering Physics

6

8

6

5

Environmental Engineering

4

6

3

6

Industrial Management & Engineering

20

25

22

27

InfoCom

0

0

2

4

Mechanical Engineering

19

10

26

30

Nanoscience

9

7

10

9

Risk Management

12

17

9

8

Surveying

11

4

13

15

Arkitekter Brandingenjรถrer Civilingenjรถrer Civil & Traffic Engineering 12 12 2002 58,3 9,4 14,9 2003 6,3 10,1 Master's projects 57,6 37 73 2004 9,8 11,5 Internship course62,5 26 35 2005 50,0 0 13,3 Total 296 304 2006 41,7 4,8 15,7 2007 48,2 3,4 17,2 2008 46,7 14,9 22,5 2009 32,7 7,5 19,0

Totalt 82,612 74,080 83,8 63,3 312 62,2 68,8 84,0 59,2

9 62

333

Proportion of graduates having studied abroad

Diagram 3 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

2002

2003

Architecture

2004

2005

Fireengineer

2006

2007

2008

MSc in Engineering

2009

Total

ANNUAL REPORT โ€ข 2009

13


Postgraduate Studies OVER THE PAST YEAR,

Lund University has established a plan of action for quality assurance regarding third cycle studies for 2009-2010. The plan is based on Lund University’s policy for quality assurance in education for 2009-2012.

The doctoral students’ section within the students’ union has contributed to ensuring that all three research boards and the research drafting committee today have very active and committed postgraduate representatives.

During the year, the number of doctoral students to pass their PhD examinations at LTH has decreased, which is of course an effect of the decrease in the number of newly admitted doctoral students during 2004 and 2005. The proportion of newly admitted female doctoral students during 2009 increased to 39%. As the proportion of women in our undergraduate programmes is around 30%, this is very encouraging. During the year, a survey of doctoral students was carried out, showing that the majority of doctoral students are satisfied with their situation but that there is a lot of room for improvement when it comes to information about the range of postgraduate courses available.

During the year, the basic rules and regulations governing third cycle studies have been reviewed. Shortly, the study handbook for postgraduates will be updated. The information available on the Faculty’s home pages has also been made clearer.

Ulla Holst Deputy Dean

Postgraduate students 2009 - 2001 2009

14

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

Total number enrolled

114

134

105

121

86

107

167

139

167

Women (%)

39

30,5

34

26

34

33

30

27

35

PhDs awarded

94

112

121

117

135

127

114

95

81

Women (%)

27

30

32

34

24

28

29

33

26

Licentiates awarded

42

43

38

59

73

63

91

77

56

Women (%)

19

32,5

16

30

27

30

24

22

21

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


Anders Rantzer Head of the Department of Automatic Control, looks back over 2009, he sums it up as a successful year characterised by strong growth. WHEN PROFESSOR ANDERS RANTZER,

“In the manufacturing industry the field of built-in systems is growing fast. More and more products feature small built-in computers that help to control parts of the product”.

“For us, 2009 was a year of expansion in which we were able to take on new doctoral students and post doctoral researchers; now we will soon be announcing vacancies for permanent posts”.

Another important event during the year was when the Department was assigned strategic research funds for the Excellence Centre at Linköping/Lund in Information Technology (ELA large part of the growth at the Department LIIT.) An active guest programme is also planof Automatic Control comes from the Linnaeus ned with a series of workshops at the Pufendorf Grant which was awarded in 2008. It means an Institute which are kicking off now in 2010. additional SEK 7.5 million per year from the “We have 10 office spaces which we fill with Swedish Research Council plus a further SEK 1 guests during the whole year, divided into four million from Lund University. periods with different themes and a conferen“The Linnaeus Grant is a ten-year grant which ce in the middle of each period”, says Anders makes it possible to build up a strong research Rantzer. environment around the management of complex technological systems. This gives us the opportunity to think in a more long term perspective”, says Anders Rantzer. “It is quite unique, even in an international context, to have ten-year grants. There are not many places where one can have such a long term perspective”. Three research areas have grown fast during the year: medicine, energy and the manufacturing and processing industry. ”Cooperation with the Faculty of Medicine has increased sharply during the year. Among other things, we have a project in which diabetes patients can get support from mathematical models in controlling their blood sugar levels”. In the field of energy we are working with Danish partners on wind power, to coordinate our wind turbines together so as to use the wind more efficiently. If the wind drops we want to coordinate with other wind turbines so that they can quickly adjust their energy production”.

Anders Rantzer

Head of the Department of Automatic Control

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

15


Research Faculty of Engineering (LTH) continues to develop in a very positive way. LTH has the major advantage of being an important part of Lund University’s strong research environments in which multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary cooperation continues to grow. RESEARCH AT LUND UNIVERSITY’S

In recent years we have also witnessed an increase in cooperation between different higher education institutions. This became particularly evident in applications to obtain a share of the long-term strategic funding which was announced in the government bill on research and innovation. The bill included a major investment in technological research and research in medical and life sciences. During the first half of the year, a lot of work was dedicated to writing applications which were evaluated by the Swedish Research Council, FORMAS, VINNOVA and the Swedish Energy Agency in collaboration. When the evaluations were complete and the results were out, it emerged that research groups from LTH are taking part in 11 of the 12 fields that were allocated to Lund University. For LTH, the biggest areas are nanoscience and nanotechnology, IT and mobile communications, e-science and production technology.

The news that ESS (European Spallation Source) is to be located in Lund and that MaxIV will be built came out in 2009. Both these investments will be of major significance for LTH and require long term investment in research connected to these areas. During the course of the year, LTH has received grants for established researchers amid very tough competition from the European Research Council. Research funding from the EU constitutes a very important and growing part of LTH’s external research funding. A new and prestigious research programme, “Wallenberg Scholars”, was introduced in Sweden during the year and a researcher in nuclear physics from LTH was among the ten first to be awarded the distinction.

Ulla Holst Deputy Dean

16

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


EU-funded Research became entitled to participate in the EU’s research programmes in the early 1990s, Lund University’s Faculty of Engineering (LTH) has been active in European research cooperation. The seventh framework programme (FP7) has been ongoing since 2007 and during 2008 the first contracts were signed and the projects started. EVER SINCE SWEDEN

LTH’s groups of researchers are involved in around 30 ongoing projects and coordinate three major cooperation projects which include a number of European partners. The thirty projects are expected to bring in EUR 15 million (around SEK 157 million) in EU grants. LTH accounts for just over 30 % of the University’s participation in the EU’s framework programme and takes home about 45 % of the total EU subsidy. LTH increased its income from the EU’s framework programme by 15 % between 2008 and 2009. Besides the contracts that have already been signed, 10 project contracts involving researchers from LTH are currently being negotiated. LTH’s researchers participate in several of the FP7 programmes, above all in Information & Communication Technologies, Nanosciences, Nanotechnologies, Materials & New Production Technologies, Food, Agriculture and Fisheries, Biotechnology and Transport.

The European Research Council (ERC) The European Research Council’s individual research grants, the ERC Starting Grant and the ERC Advanced Grant, are applied for and awarded amid very tough international competition. It is therefore particularly gratifying that up to and including 2009, three researchers have been awarded these grants: Fredrik Kahl, Mathematics, Anne L’Huillier, Nuclear Physics and Bengt Sundén, Heat Transfer. In 2009 another researcher, Professor Marcus Aldén, was awarded an ERC Advanced Grant but the contract will come into force during 2010. The EU’s sixth framework programme The EU’s sixth framework programme (FP6) ended in 2006. The last contracts in the framework programme, however, were signed as late as 2007 and around twenty projects are still ongoing, with the last of them expected to end in 2012. Other EU-funded programmes Besides the EU’s framework programmes, researchers also take part in other research programmes such as the environment and energy programme Intelligent Energy Europe and the Public Health programme.

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

17


Personnel Current human resources situation IN 2009, an increased influx of external funding resulted in more appointments of younger researchers and lecturers than in previous years. This also applies to the proportion of doctoral students which is now growing after several years of reduced recruitment to research studies. A considerable share of the recruited senior lecturers is made up of associate senior lecturers, often recruited from among the younger researchers. 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 Doktorandtjänst 374 352 349 391 400 477 Administratör/Tekniker/Övriga 227 218 228 238 254 285 Lektor 191 194 176 164 181 184 Annan undervis. och forsk. pers. 212 175 185 162 165 192 Professor 153 157 161 164 167 166 Adjunkt 53 54 62 67 73 84 Forskarassistent 35 36 37 37 40 41 Gästlärare 20 18 22 13 9 9 Totalt 1 265 1 204 1 220 1 236 1 289 1 438

Personnel - Full-time equivalents

500

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

450

400

350

300

250

200

150

100

50

0 al

tor

c Do

nt

de

stu

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Recruitment In 2009, 12 new professors were appointed, 7 through promotion and 5 in competition. (Of the 5 appointed through competition, 1 was selected on artistic grounds, 2 had been advertised as professorships and 2 as senior lecturers’ posts.) In 2009 a total of 25 new senior lecturers were appointed, distributed as follows: »» Conditional appointment (insufficient training in teaching and learning in higher education) – 6 »» Converted - 1 »» Promotion from assistant senior lecturer to senior lecturer – 1 »» Assistant senior lecturer – 10 »» Senior lecturer – 6 »» Promotion from lecturer – 1 In total there are 28 adjunct professors of whom 7 took up their positions in 2009.

18

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


Younger researchers IN THE CONTEXT of the University’s special investment in younger researchers, LTH has selected six subject areas for the appointment of assistant senior lecturers: Industrial Marketing , Community Safety and Preparedness – Multilevel Risk and Vulnerability Analysis, Innovation Technology, MatProfessor Lektorfocusing Adjunkt Gästlärare F o U Adm. personal Biblotekspersonal Tekniskto Totalt hematical Statistics onAnnan Stochastic Systems applied Energy, Environment and Climate, Personal 2015-2019 Kvinnor 24 % 2 % 18 % 27 % 6 % 19 % 8 % 23 % 16 % Biomechanics and Food design for12 % Metabolic Benefits. 2015-2019 Män 19 % 10 % 20 % 11 % 20 % 33 % 23 % 16 % 2010-2014 Kvinnor

16 %

13 %

14 %

18 %

4 %

19 %

8 %

46 % 15 %

2010-2014 Män 25 % 13 % 36 % 11 % 8 % 6 % 0 % 20 % 15 % Share of departures for retirement in the number of appointments in Oct 2009 (retirement age 67 years)

50 % 40 %

2015-2019 Women 2010-2014 Woman

2015-2019 Men 2010-2014 Men

30 % 20 % 10 % 0 %

or

ss

ofe Pr

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Se

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Ad

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ls

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ar ibr

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L

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Generational turnover Retirement rates among professors and senior lecturers in the last five years have been among the lowest within Lund University. 16 per cent of the women and 19 per cent of the men in a 5 year period are affected. The next five years until 2019 will be more noticeable as a further 25 per cent of the male and 24 per cent of the female professors are expected to retire. Among the senior lecturers, the effects of retirement are not as marked. The prognosis is built on the assumption that senior lecturers choose to work until the age of 67. There will also be an increased in the proportion of departures for retirement among lecturers and technical staff in the coming years. Eight professors became emeritus (receiving retirement pensions) in 2009.

Kvinnor Män

2006 2009proportion 2006 2009 2009 Comparison of the of women and2006 men at LTH 26 27 44 52 10 in different 168 offices October 2006 and October 2009 162 159 174 35

Women

2006 8 35

2009

2006

17 39

23 51

2009 28 56

2006 21 55

Men

100 % 80 % 60 % 40 % 20 % 0 %

2006

2009

Professor

2006

2009

Senior lecturer

2006

2009

Postdoctoral research fellow

2006

2009

Researcher

2006

2009 Lecturer

2006

2009

Doctoral student

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

2009 135 274

19


Equality and equal treatment of students During the year, five women got the opportunity to dedicate themselves partly to working assignments which further their qualifications through financial support for the underrepresented gender. The professorship in Computer Science at LTH was awarded to Hedda Andersson, which means that a female visiting professor will be engaged for a year. LTH was also assigned RQ 08 funds to invite visiting lecturers of the underrepresented gender. The funds are used to invest in activities that are in need of female role models. In addition, LTH RQ08 funds were used to carry out a study regarding the psychosocial working environment of doctoral students. The holders of the Lise Meitner* visiting professorship for 2009 were Professor Marjatta Lyyra, Temple University, Philadelphia, USA and Dr Gunilla Wieslander, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala.

During the year, LTH coordinated 12 LTH-wide research studies courses in which 167 doctoral students accumulated 650 LADOK-registered higher education credits. These are made up of courses within the framework of the Breakthrough initiative’s training activities in teaching and learning in higher education, courses to support the scholarly production and communication of doctoral students and courses in the theory of science and ethics. Moreover during the year, 31 university lecturers completed 65 weeks of participation in training courses for readers and research supervisors arranged at LTH, in compliance with the requirements of the Higher Education Ordinance and Lund University.

During 2009 a mapping and information project financed by the delegation for Equality in Higher Education (DJ) was launched, in which supervisors, doctoral students and recent PhD graduates at LTH were interviewed about conThe working group for equality and equal treatditions for men and women in research and rement issues has continued its work on the recrusearch studies, among other things against the itment project “Girls in Engineering” (“Flickor background of Lund University’s survey of supå Teknis”) which is a collaboration project with a large number of upper secondary schools in the pervisors, doctoral students and alumni 2007south of Sweden involving several of LTH’s de- 2008, among other things. The project’s results will be reported and communicated during partments. 2010. During 2009, LTH and the School of Economics and Management in cooperation with our E-recruitment partner companies carried out the Female Ac- During 2009, the university-wide E-recruitment celerate Programme, which meant that a female project was based in the Student Union building engineer and a female economist won an 18 and in LTH’s Faculty Office. Its main activity month traineeship programme at three of our consisted in developing the application and infour partner companies, Alfa Laval, AstraZe- stalling it in a test environment. The E-recruitneca, Sony Ericsson and Tetra Pak. Just over 30 ment application builds on the same platform female engineers took part in the competition. and is integrated with the University’s document In the autumn of 2009, an information folder registration system. The ambition is to replace was also distributed, containing guidance on is- all paperwork within Human Resources with disues of discrimination and the working environ- gital management while improving quality and ment for students embarking on their studies. traceability, increasing flexibility, reducing processing time and making the recruitment proLTH’s common third cycle studies and cess at LTH more efficient. A pilot project was lecturer training activities in 2009 All co-workers at LTH and the LTH Break- carried out in the autumn in which LTH particithrough initiative as well as visiting lecturers pated together with staff from Human Resourfrom the Faculties of Medicine and Social Sci- ces and three departments. The E-recruitment ences are regularly involved in education and application was approved for delivery on 18 training with a focus on third cycle studies, November and will be installed live in the whole of LTH during spring 2010. research supervision and readerships at LTH. 20

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


Academic Development Unit 2009 Academic Development Unit’s teacher training and support functions at LTH cover teaching and learning in higher education, educational consultancy support, evaluation work, practicebased research in teaching and learning in higher education, knowledge dissemination and meeting places as well as assessment of teaching qualifications (teaching academy and assessment of teaching skills).

to the educational programmes at LTH and during the year it has had a number of commissions as a reviewer as well as publishing several articles in scholarly journals and collaborating actively in national and international conferences. Academic Development Unit also hosted the Second Development conference for Sweden’s Engineering programmes on 2-3 December 2009, a national conference specifically dedicaThe qualifying further training for lecturers in ted to engineering and a development meeting teaching and learning in higher education con- place for all higher education institutions and stitutes the core activity of the Academic Deve- universities that train engineers in Sweden. lopment Unit. The range of courses has been The following people were awarded the 2009 ETP developed and new courses have been introdu- distinction, “Excellent Teaching Practitioner”: ced. During 2009, 204 employees took part in »» PER BECKER a total of 476 weeks of qualifying training. All »» ULF NILSSON courses include the presentation of project re- »» ANDREAS NORRMAN ports about various issues in teaching and lear»» NINA REISTAD ning in higher education related to tuition at LTH. Several of these projects have been pre- »» TORGNY ROXÅ sented externally in various contexts, but also »» LARS WADSÖ internally, through the information sheet Lear- The distinction is given to lecturers who conscining at LTH among other things. ously and systematically develop their teaching Academic Development Unit also runs research skills and tuition. and development projects which are significant 2009 14 % 25 % 34 % 19 % 32 % 36 % 30 % 24 % 83 % 36 %

Professor Lektor Adjukt Forskarassistent Gästlärare Doktorandtjänst Annan undervis. och forsk. pers. Teknisk personal Administration/Övriga Hela LTH

2008

14 % 24 % 35 % 21 % 26 % 33 % 26 % 27 % 81 % 34 %

Full-time equivalents showing proportion of women 100 %

2009 2008 90 %

80 %

70 %

60 %

50 %

40 %

30 %

20 %

10 %

ati

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Ad

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Pr ofe

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0 %

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

21


LTH in media in the media it is usually in the context of research or researchers providing expert commentary; rather more rarely about students and education. WHEN LTH APPEARS

A large number of representatives are visible in the press – not just a few spokespersons. So there is a broad, common responsibility for LTH’s media image. For the university as a whole, however, the Vice-Chancellor Per Eriksson has quickly become a prominent representative. Certain research fields are more profitable to the media than others. Among them are construction, traffic, energy and environment, cars/vehicles, health, medicine and food. LTH appeared in just over 800 articles and media contributions in 2009. This represents a slight drop compared to previous years. In fact LTH appears approximately a third more than this, but is not named specifically in these cases; representatives are mentioned such as Lund researchers, students from Lund, etc. During 2009 LTH sent out just over 40 press releases. Most of them were about new research findings. Many get good results but others pass more unnoticed. A number of press releases are translated into English and sent out to international journalists. About 25 per cent of LTH’s total publicity derives from press releases. LTH is seldom mentioned in negative terms in the media; contrary to what many people believe, the media nearly always write only neutrally or in positive terms about Lund University. As usual, the daily newspaper Sydsvenskan is the source that reports most on the university.

22

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


Honorary Doctors (born 1961) is a well-known theorist in the area of research on atoms in strong laser fields. With his numerical methods and simulations, he completes the experimental studies that have been carried out at LTH. Among other things, his cooperation with LTH has included a sabbatical year in Lund, funded by STINT, and has resulted in around 15 jointly authored articles in recognised Physics journals. PROFESSOR KENNETH J SCHAFER

(born 1949) passed his Bachelor’s degree at Lund University, then continued his studies at UC Berkeley and has mainly been active at the University of Washington. Guttorp collaborates intensively with Mathematical Statistics at LTH and, among other things, he was the Swedish Association of Graduate Engineers’ guest professor in Environmental Studies at LTH and at the University of Linköping in 2004-2005. With his focus on statistical applications for environmental data, Guttorp’s work is very relevant today. LTH’s cooperation with him has also affected a number of programmes of study, in particular Environmental Engineering and Engineering Mathematics. PROFESSOR PETER GUTTORP

(born 1946) played a very central role in the establishment of IDEON and was its CEO for the first 10 years. Ideon’s significance for LTH, Lund University and the Skåne region cannot be overstated. Holm’s career has continued in Teknopol, Teknikbrostiftelsen and Innovationsbron Syd, all of which work on innovative processes that transform knowledge from the University into commercial activity. He has also contributed to important projects at LTH, in the field of food among others.

SVEN-THORE HOLM

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

23


Awards and Grants Professors CARL BORREBAECK and THOMAS LAURELL received the Akzo Nobel Science Award amounting to SEK 500 000. The prizes were handed out at the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences in Stockholm. Professor MARGARETA NYMAN of the Division for Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry received the Main Druvan Prize of SEK 600 000 kronor from the Dr Per Håkansson Foundation. HENRIK THELER,

from the Department of Fire Safety Engineering and Systems Safety, received SEK1.05 million from STINT for a project together with two South African researchers: “Southnorth disaster risk reduction network”. Professor ANNE L´HUILLIER, nuclear physicist at LTH, was appointed as a so-called Wallenberg Scholar when Knut and Alice Wallenberg’s foundation handed out ten research grants. She was awarded SEK 3 million per year for five years. A trio from Solid State Physics at LTH, FREDRIK BOXBERG, NIELS SÖNDERGAARD and professor HONGQI XU received the Öhrling Pricewaterhouse Coopers Innovation prize of SEK 150.000 for their discovery of piezoelectric photovoltaic (PZFV) solar cells based on nanotechnology. In an evaluation by the scientific publication “Journal of Systems and Software”, professor PER RUNESON, Software Systems, shared the fifth place worldwide. He is also part of the management of a new centre for industrial excellence, EASE, Embedded Applications Software Engineering, which was launched with funds from Vinnova in cooperation with a number of companies. KARIN JÖNSSON,

Chemical Engineering, was one of six researchers who received an environmental stipend from the Swedish Association of Graduate Engineers, SEK 235 000 for research into “Ozoning – the technology of the future for water purification?” The Ingvar Carlsson award, established by SSF, the Strategic Research Foundation, went to three returning post-doctoral researchers from LTH: PER JOHNSSON, Nuclear Physics, THOMAS MAGESACHER, EIT, and BJÖRN NILSSON, Max-lab. They received a contribution of SEK 3 million of which SEK 50 000 are a personal stipend. a researcher in the aerosol group at Nuclear Physics, LTH, was awarded a Council Research Fellowship by the Swedish Research Council. She also received a research grant of SEK 3 million from the Research Council for research into the significance of surface-active materials for cloud droplets. BIRGITTA SVENNINGSSON,

PÅL BÖRJESSON,

reader at the Division for Environmental and Energy Systems Studies, received the Volvo prize of SEK 250 000 from the Håkan Frisinger Foundation. This award recognised his research into bioenergy and biofuels, as well as the dissemination of knowledge to decision-makers in the public sector and the business world. The Swedish Energy Agency, STEM, also awarded him a research project grant of SEK 4.4 million.

The year’s biggest grant was taken home by the Nanometer Structure Consortium at Lund University, nmC@LU, led by professor LARS SAMUELSON: a new strategic grant from the Swedish government of over SEK 30 million per year. The Söderberg Commerce Prize of SEK 500 000 went to Professor GUNILLA JÖNSON, LTH, and a researcher at Linköping University. Gunilla Jönson was also awarded the Ekman medal for 2009 by the Swedish Association of Pulp and Paper Engineers. This list is not exhaustive.

24

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

25


Mattias Alveteg is a senior lecturer in soil chemistry but works only 40 per cent of the time at his department. Half of his working hours are in fact dedicated to his mandate as chair of one of LTH’s four study programmes boards, UN2. UN2 has the overall responsibility for programmes in chemical engineering, biotechnology, environmental engineering, fire protection engineering and risk management engineering.

working on their degree projects that we lecturers and researchers find out what other departments at LTH are actually busy doing. Perhaps degree projects are a resource that we could exploit more?”

“As chair I have invested a lot of time in the course evaluations that are carried out at LTH. Since 2003, over 100 000 surveys have been answered and if one digs into the results one can find a lot of interesting information, such as positive trends for certain units and programmes and cultural differences between groups of students”.

In his research on soil chemistry, one of Mattias’s goals was to produce documentation to serve as a basis for international negotiations on limiting emissions. Today there is not much time for research in Mattias’s calendar, but he is still assistant supervisor to a couple of doctoral students who are busy with preparative chromatography.

MATTIAS ALVETEG

For a few hours per week Mattias works with pedagogical training and runs a course for university lecturers on academic honesty. Experiences from the courses are built into LTH’s policy on how to counteract plagiarism in student work.

The group which is working on course evalua- “During 2009 I had trouble ‘synching’ the vations has recently started evaluating the stu- rious tasks which led to me working far too dents’ experiences of their degree projects. much. But in 2010 I plan to safeguard my free “This can become an interesting complement to time better. I share a great interest in music with the alumni surveys and the employer interviews my wife and my two children and I sing and play that are done every few years”. a bit of piano, clarinet and guitar. My latest proRunning courses with few students is expensive, ject is to learn to play the keyed fiddle (nyckelso in recent years the study programmes boards harpa, a traditional Swedish string instrument) have been working on reducing the number of that my father built and gave to my daughter. courses and specialisations without restricting And I also want to have time to go running a couple of times per week. freedom of choice for students. “It’s a bit like a 15-puzzle, but one with a thousand pieces, says Mattias, and it’s a tough job for both programme managers and timetable planners to get it all to work for the students”. Mattias sees it as a great strength that Lund University has both breadth and depth in its education and research, but he thinks this advantage is not yet fully exploited: “With 19 departments, just over 1 000 courses and 1 400 employees at LTH alone there is always a risk that working hours are wasted developing a course that is already offered to our students. Sometimes it is thanks to our students

Mattias Alveteg

Senior lecturer in soil chemistry 26

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


Finance went up in 2009 to SEK 1 458 Million which repre-sents an increase of around SEK 100 Million compared to the previous year.

The co-financing requirement lies between 15 and 20 % which means that between SEK 75 and 100 Million will be needed for this. The reported profit thus implies that the co-financing Profit for the financial year was SEK 93.6 Mil- funds are set aside at the department level. lion of which SEK 4.6 Mil-lion in education LTH’s total activity is financed up to about 52 and SEK 89 Million in research/postgraduate % by state funds. Of the funds that are destined studies. LTH thereby has a public agency capital for research/postgraduate studies, about 64 % of as much as SEK 194 Million. The surplus come from external backers. The requirement within research/postgraduate studies depends for co-financing of the state grant means that mainly on the fact that the Faculty did not ma- the scope for LTH’s own strategic investments nage to expand its activities at the same rate as is limited. new funding came in. During the year the num- The five major contributors to LTH research ber of employees grew by barely 86 full time during 2009 were the Swedish Research Council equivalents. Many of the new appointments (SEK 150 Million), Swedish companies (SEK took place during the second half of the year, 76 Mil-lion), the EU (SEK 85 Million), VINso their full impact has not yet been felt on the NOVA (SEK 77 Million) and the Swedish Encost side. ergy Agency (SEK 61 Million). LTH’S TOTAL REVENUES

Funds from external backers can be periodised over several years, which is not permitted for government funding. LTH periodises just over SEK 500 Million in funding in its yearly balancing of accounts. When subsidies are utilised, LTH is now required to co-finance them to a Intäkter per verksamhetsområde Grundutbildning not insignificant degree. 467 868 Forskning / Forskarutbildning (anslag) 341 352 Forskning / Forskarutbildning (bidrag) 545 784 Uppdragsverksamhet 102 799 Distribution of revenue according

to activity

LTH’s expenses rose in 2009 to SEK 1 364 Million. Of these, 58% were for human resources, 17 % for premises, 21 % for running costs and 4 % for depreciation. Assets were calculated at SEK 949 Million at the end of the year, represent-ing an increase of SEK 161 Million. Structural assets decreased by SEK 13 Million to SEK 122 Million and liquid assets increased by SEK 181 Million to SEK 691 Million.

7 % 32 % 37 %

23 %

Undergraduate teaching Research/Postgraduate teaching (Fac. appropriation) Research/Postgraduate teaching (Grants) External Commisions

Per Göran Nilsson Head of Faculty Office

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

27


Intäkter per finansieringskälla Grundutbildningsanslag Fakultetsanslag Uppdrag och annan försäljning Bidrag statliga finansiärer Bidrag övriga svenska finansiärer Sources financing Bidragof utländska finansiärer

440 193 339 234 147 030 299 107 134 748 96 021

Government allocation for undergraduate teaching Faculty appropriation for reasearch and postgraduate teaching External commissions and other revenues Other government financing Other Swedish financing Foreign financing

7 % 9 %

30 %

21 %

10 %

23 %

Income from external sources of financing

160 000

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

140 000 120 000 100 000 80 000 60 000 40 000 20 000

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT

s

s l a na

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28

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Grundutbildning 464 831 Costs according to activity after international elimination Forskning / Forskarutbildning (anslag) 203 732 Forskning / Forskarutbildning (bidrag) 592 437 Uppdragsverksamhet 103 154

8 % 34 % Undergraduate teaching Research/Postgraduate teaching Research/Postgraduate teaching (grants) External commissions

43 % 15 %

Personalkostnader Distribution of costs Lokalkostnader Driftskostnader Avskrivningar

797 309 232 207 280 871 52 367

4 % 21 %

17 %

59 %

Salaries and other remuneration Premises and buildings Running and maintainence Depreciation

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

29


Profit and loss statement (SEK thousand)

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

Central government grants

779 406

714 461

711 670

707 383

677 144

Revenues from commissions, fees and other remuneration

147 030

150 121

149 933

139 415

181 215

Revenues from grants

529 897

480 960

440 347

424 771

443 656

1 456 333

1 345 542

1 301 950

1 271 569

1 302 015

Rent

232 209

228 236

222 326

207 128

199 991

Running costs

280 871

280 499

261 862

243 570

271 861

Operating revenues (excl. Transfers)

Total Operating costs (excl. transfers)

Personnel costs

797 309

758 715

740 929

744 895

759 482

1 310 389

1 267 450

1 225 117

1 195 593

1 231 334

145 944

78 092

76 833

75 976

70 681

93 577

25 243

21 658

18 160

11 771

73

12 011

7 777

3 169

-1 281

Change in capital before adjustment

93 650

37 254

29 435

21 329

10 490

Change in capital after adjustment

93 650

37 254

29 435

21 329

10 490

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

Total (excl. depreciation) Profit/Loss before depreciation

Profit/Loss after depreciation Financial income and costs Net financial income/costs

Balance sheet (SEK thousands)

Assets Inventory

122 301

135 314

143 655

161 971

140 186

Accounts receivable, advances and other accounts owing

24 485

30 931

41 822

31 830

22 799

Accrued revenue

87 439

84 182

53 284

63 662

82 962

Other current receivables

23 321

26 932

30 661

5 762

6 582

Cash

691 328

510 286

439 537

373 761

269 322

Total assets

948 874

787 645

708 959

636 986

521 851

105 996

68 742

39 184

15 906

-312

-6 067

-6 067

-5 615

-5 603

Liabilities and agency capital Agency capital Capital brought forward Capital movement Change in capital for the year

93 649

37 254

29 436

21 328

10 490

193 578

99 929

63 005

31 631

10 178

333

0

221

Loans

33 440

40 371

47 709

27 950

Liquidity loan

24 750

35 750

41 250

Total Liabilities Other current liabilities

Accounts payable

30

12 750 21 776

10 516

46 204

17 880

29 926

8 359

Prepaid revenue

657 415

570 881

505 189

467 435

425 872

Other liabilities

28 841

30 260

39 205

38 794

42 916

Total

755 295

687 716

645 954

605 355

511 673

Total liabilities and agency capital

948 873

787 645

708 959

636 986

521 851

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


Revenue and costs for each activity 2009 - 2004 (before internal eliminations)

2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

Total LTH (SEK million) Revenue

1 470

1 389

1 332

1 326

1 328

1 334

Costs

1 376

1 352

1 303

1 305

1 318

1 401

94

37

29

21

10

-67

194

91

63

Revenue

475

470

462

485

459

452

Costs

472

454

453

446

432

448

3

16

9

39

27

4

84

83

67

Revenue

891

809

760

736

751

780

Costs

800

779

737

748

765

841

91

30

23

-12

-14

-61

122

23

-2

Revenue

104

110

110

105

118

103

Costs

104

119

113

111

121

113

0

-9

-3

-6

-3

-10

-6

-6

-1

Profit/Loss Agency capital Undergraduate teaching (SEK million)

Profit/Loss Agency capital Research and postgraduate teaching (SEK million)

Profit/Loss Agency capital External commissions (SEK million)

Profit/Loss Agency capital

Investments (SEK thousands) 2009

2008

2007

2006

2005

2004

Undergraduate teaching Investments Revenue* Investments/Revenue

3 347

4 581

2 956

13 588

5 563

5 475

440 228

418 367

424 367

484 973

458 718

451 808

1%

1%

1%

3%

1%

1%

Research & postgraduate teaching Investments

44 602

39 281

32 902

63 926

38 909

32 063

Revenue*

870 212

790 160

733 149

709 481

724 102

735 481

5%

5%

4%

9%

5%

4%

692

1 556

1 472

2 065

1 732

3 191

147 426

152 356

151 966

105 686

118 299

105 099

0%

1%

1%

2%

1%

3%

Investments/Revenue External commissions Investments Revenue* Investments/Revenue

*Revenue excluding transfers.

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

31


Key Facts and Figures Undergraduate studies*

Unit

2009

2008

2 007

2006

2005

440

417

424

439

422

409

5 855

5 223

5 194

5 246

5 498

5 761

%

5 185

4 622

4 583

4 541

4 978

5 009

SEK thousand/FTE

89%

88%

88%

87%

91%

87%

75

80

82

84

77

Government grants (UT)

SEK million

Full-time equivalents achieved*

FTE

Annual performance equivalents achieved*

APE

APE/FTE Government grants/FTE

MScs and Architecture degrees required by gov't 01-04 Number MScs and Architecture degrees awarded 01-04

Number

Success rate

%

2004

71 2 510 2 595

MScs and Architecture degrees required by gov't 05-09 Number

103%

MScs and Architecture degrees awarded 05-09

Number

2 625

2800

2800

2800

Success rate

%

823

812

724

801

2 800 828

External revenue* (UT)

SEK million

31%

29%

26%

29%

30%

External revenue/Government grants (UT)

%

12

16

3

9

13

18

External revenue per FTE

SEK thousand/FTE

3

4

1

2

3

4

Total revenue* (UT) excluding commissions

SEK million

3

3

1

2

2

3

Total revenue (UT)/FTE

SEK thousand

452

433

427

448

435

427

Lecturers

Number

77

83

82

85

79

74

FTE/Lecturers

FTE/Lecturer

198

194

176

164

207

208

Junior Lecturers

Number

30

27

30

32

27

28

FTE/Junior Lecturers

FTE/leaching ass.

57

54

62

67

86

100

Helårsstuderande per adjunkt

Hst/Adj

103

97

84

78

64

58

* Revenue excluding interest and transfers. At LTH departments, excluding activities commissioned to other faculties. * UT = Undergraduate teaching; FTE = Full-time equivalents; APE = Annual performance equivalents

Commissions

Unit

32

2009

2008

2 007

2006

2005

Undergraduate teaching

SEK million

27

22

13

12

11

8

Commissions/appropriation

%

6%

5%

3%

3%

3%

2%

Research and postgraduate education (R&PG)

SEK million

Commissioned R&PG/Appropriation R&PG

%

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT

2004

83

85

95

93

107

97

24%

29%

33%

35%

42%

39%


Research and postgraduate education

2009

2008

2 007

2006

2005

Government appropriation (R&PG)

Unit SEK million

339

294

289

266

252

2004 248

Gov't appropriation (R&PG)/Gov't grant (UT)

%

77%

71%

68%

61%

60%

61%

Science Research Council

SEK million

125

116

93

84

85

78

FORMAS

SEK million

31

29

28

23

28

25

Foundation for Strategic Research

SEK million

56

40

45

42

39

46

EU

SEK million

78

74

100

70

66

58

Swedish Energy Agency

SEK million

56

46

42

48

54

69

VINNOVA

SEK million

67

62

45

41

45

50

Total

SEK million

413

367

352

308

317

326

Total/Gov't appropriation (R&PG)

%

122

125

121

116

126

131

Other external revenues (excluding commissions)

SEK million

187

144

114

99

122

112

Other external revenues /Gov't appropriation (R&PG)

%

55

49

39

37

48

45

Total revenues, R&PG (excluding commissions)

SEK million

939

805

755

673

691

686

Postgraduate FTE

Number

423

414

442

467

436

503

Licentiate degrees

Number

42

43

38

59

73

63

Gov't appropriation (R&PG) per Licentiate degree

SEK million

8,1

6,8

7,6

4,5

3,5

3,9

Degrees/Postgraduate students

%

10

9

13

17

13

Doctorates

Number

94

112

121

117

135

127

Total revenues (R&PG) per doctorate

SEK million

10

7,2

6,2

5,8

5,1

5,4

Gov't appropriation (R&PG) per doctorate

SEK million

3,6

2,6

2,4

2,3

1,9

2,0

Degrees/Postgraduate students

%

27

27

25

31

25

Professors

Number

151

157

161

164

178

180

Gov't appropriation (R&PG) per professor

SEK million

2,2

1,9

1,8

1,6

1,4

1,4

Grants (R&PG)/Professors

SEK million

4

3,3

2,9

2,5

2,5

2,4

Academic staff

2009

2008

2 007

2006

2005

2004

Teachers with doctorates

Unit* Number

349

351

337

328

425

434

Revenue (UT) per teacher

SEK million

1,3

1,2

1,3

1,4

1,0

1,0

Revenue (R&PG) per teacher

SEK million

2,7

2,3

2,2

2,1

1,6

1,6

Revenue (UT+R&PG) per teacher (excl. commissions)

SEK million

4

3,5

3,5

3,4

2,6

2,6

FTE per teacher

Number

17

15

15

16

13

13

Licentiate degrees per teacher

Number

0,12

0,12

0,11

0,18

0,17

0,15

Doctorates per teacher

Number

0,27

0,32

0,36

0,36

0,32

0,29

*NOT The figures given above are based on revenues and costs in research an postgraduate teaching. in contrast to the figures for external income in the financial report. The number of teachers etc. is expressed in full-time equivalents.

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

33


The Board 2009

Ola Troedsson, Chairman IKEA Supply AB

34

Anders Axelsson, Dean Professor

Ulöla Holst, Deputy Dean Professor

Carl Borrebaeck Professor

Kerstin Gillsbro CEO NCC Boende AB

Solveig Melin Professor

Agneta Ståhl Professor

Gerhard Kristensson Professor

Lars-Erik Wernersson Professor

Jan Sternby Research Director Gambro Lundia AB

2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


Representatives for personnel organisations

Christer Nilsson Research Engineer (TCO)

Teresa Hankala-Janiec Teaching Assistant (SACO)

Student representatives

Fredrik Lidberg Student

Olof Hägerstedt Postgraduate Student

Per-Göran Nilsson Head of Faculty Office

Beatrice Nordlöf Faculty Coordinator

Olov Petrén Student

Secretariat

ANNUAL REPORT • 2009

35


2009 • ANNUAL REPORT


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Annual Report 2009