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Issue No. 4 Fall/Holiday 2015

RUGGED WATCHES, HARD FACTS AND TOUGH STORIES.

MOTO SASAKI BMX RIDER

COL. RICK SEARFOSS How to Become an Astronaut

POPULAR MODELS & FAN FAVORITES

ANDREA MICHELI The Importance of Time


FROM THE FOUNDER As we embark on our next quarter century, we are very thankful for how the Luminox brand has grown to become known worldwide as the leader in the category of self-powered luminous timepieces. This is a major reason we continue to be selected for elite military outfits and specialists in law enforcement, with SWAT teams around the globe wearing our watches. Over the past 5 years we've seen our brand grow well beyond our initial niche of the outdoor retailer market and law enforcement and military supply, to now include top jewelers carrying the most elite Swiss Made watch brands. We are honored to be in such outstanding company.

Customers that own and purchase top tier brands are gravitating to Luminox as their go-to knockaround watch for their active endeavors. Being viewed as an ideal "weekend watch" suits us just fine! In celebration of our 25th Anniversary, we offer a new take on our bestselling 3050 Navy SEAL series, this time with a pattern dial that looks like a simple graphic clement until one looks closely and sees it happens to be a repeating pattern of the number twenty five shown in both Arabic and Roman. We hope you enjoy this issue, and all the new watch models. All the best from Luminox.

ESSENTIAL GEAR. In extreme situations, decisions are made in the blink of an eye. You have to be ­­­­­­­able to rely on a watch that guarantees perfect visibility at a single glance. Luminox watches are Swiss Made and equipped with a unique self-powered illumination system. Without having to push a button or expose the timepiece to a light source, the time is continuously visible for up to 25 years. It’s part of what makes our watches ESSENTIAL

Barry Cohen

GEAR and why the United States Navy SEALs and other professionals world­ wide have chosen Luminox. Luminox developed the first Navy SEAL series in 1993. The unique combination of stealth and visibility is also why U.S. Air Force F-117 Night­hawk™ pilots requested Luminox watches. Luminox watches have always been essential equipment. If a watch is durable enough for the world’s toughest elite forces, it will stand up to any other rugged outdoor use. Explore this year’s collection of Luminox timepieces and see for yourself.

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CONTENT

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6

ELITE FORCES.

TRUSTED AND REQUESTED BY TOUGH STORIES. INTERVIEW WITH MOTO SASAKI.

BMX RIDER

NEWS.

10 FALL / WINTER UPDATE 2015 - 2016

TOUGH STORIES. INTERVIEW WITH COL. RICK SEARFOSS

18 HOW TO BECOME AN ASTRONAUT FAVORITES.

22 SOME OF OUR BEST SELLING MODELS. MOVEMENT.

30 INTRODUCING THE AUTOMATICS

TOUGH STORIES. INTERVIEW WITH ANDREA MICHELI.

32 THE IMPORTANCE OF TIME IN MILITARY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT OPERATIONS TOUGH STORIES. INTERVIEW WITH SCOTT CASSELL 34 FISH, THE NEW DRUG TECHNOLOGY.

38 Luminox LIGHT TECHNOLOGY Luminox.

40 OUR CO-BRANDING PARTNERS MAP.

41 WHERE YOU CAN FIND US 3


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ELITE FORCES. TRUSTED AND REQUESTED BY.

TRUSTED AND REQUESTED BY U.S. Navy SEALs

Luftrettung Christoph 2 Germany

U.S. Air Force F-117 Nighthawk Stealth Jet Pilots

Austrian Military Police

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)

NATO Tigers 313 QN squadron, Netherlands

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF)

The Royal Dutch Armed Forces

U.S. Coast Guard

Singapore Air Force

U.S. Secret Service

Nordseetaucher Tunnel construction divers

U.S. Border Patrol

Special Military Forces Israel

U.S. Marshals Service

KOPASSUS – Indonesia Special Forces

U.S. Underwater Demolition Teams (UDT)

DENSUS 88 - Detachment 88 (Special Forces

San Francisco SWAT

Indonesian counter-terrorism squad)

San Diego SWAT

GEGANA – Indonesia Special Police Forces

Las Vegas SWAT

KOPASKA - Indonesia Naval Special Warfare

Scott Cassell – Sea Wolves and Undersea Voyager Project

Barcelona Police Department

Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP)

Puigcerda Fire Department, Spain

Heliswiss Switzerland …and many other Law Enforcement Groups, Police and Fire Departments, and other elite forces around the globe.

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Moto Sasaki Rising BMX Star from the Land of the Rising Sun

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apanese BMXer Moto Sasaki is one of the top riders in the world in BMX Flatlands (a style of BMX that is performed on flat surfaces – no jumps, ramps or grindrails – focusing on balancing and spinning), a world of exciting routines and amazing tricks. Sasaki is the first Asian rider to win the Nora Cup Award, which recognizes the world’s top BMX rider, twice in a row, and he has been sponsored by Luminox since 2014. Initially, Sasaki wanted to be a professional tennis player, but an injury sidelined those plans. Tennis’s loss has been BMX’s gain, as Sasaki discovered BMX while rehabbing from that injury. As luck would have it, his bicycle was stolen and he decided to buy a BMX bike. While riding around, Sasaki went to a local park where he bumped into several Japanese pro BMX riders. When he saw the tricks they were doing, Sasaki was hooked. His next step was to buy a professional BMX bike and get started training. Moto Sasaki One of the turning points for Sasaki’s career was when he developed his signature move, the Moto Spin, which is something that only he can perform. We caught up with Sasaki between practice sessions in Japan.

How did you develop the Moto Spin? When I came up with this technique, I was really trembling but I really wanted to perfect it. Looking at figure skating, I started believing I could get the right sense of balance and I finally succeeded after many training sessions. To put it simply, the Moto Spin is a new way of using the sense of balance. As it is a unique concept, it is unrelated to other techniques and I had to educate my body from scratch. That’s why the Moto Spin is very difficult, even for professional riders. I became the number one with the Moto Spin but, of course, it was really difficult! Technique-wise, where does your inspiration come from? It comes from everyday life or ordinary work. For example, when I see a right-handed baseball pitcher delivering a pitch at a speed of 150km/ hour with his right hand and then switching to throw with his left hand, I feel this is really 6

interesting. With BMX too, if you suddenly switch the direction of rotation from right to left, everyone is surprised. To get the world title, I will need to overturn common sense. Are you currently developing some other tricks? It took me one year to reach the final stage of a new trick I am working on. In this case, the challenge of the technique was that it was nearly impossible to keep my balance. I did it once but then could not do it again for a week. I even started thinking I could never do it anymore in a lifetime of trying, but now I succeed in 1 out of 200 tries. Thus, the success rate is 0.5% but I need to reach 90% in training sessions as it will become 50% during the competition. Training is endless as I hope to show it in the World Championship to be held in Japan later this year.

How important is it to do difficult tricks? No matter how good I am, I only feel alive through the support of my fans. My Moto Spin is very innovative and no one is able to imitate it. Even after five years. Some curious riders have tried to imitate me but I’ve only heard them complaining about injuries. I also think the level of difficulty of the Moto Spin has even increased more than tenfold since its early beginnings. I stopped its development there with everyone saying it’s really difficult and no one being able to achieve this trick and to imitate me as it is too dangerous. Why do you train as hard as you do? To be honest, I don’t think I have any talent. The interesting point with BMX is that you can compensate for your weaknesses by training hard, so this is why I train very intensively. I want to be among the world’s top 10 -- I have original technique and I have more skills than some other


TOUGH STORIES. INTERVIEW WITH MOTO SASAKI.

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riders, maybe I don’t need to train that hard. However, if I don’t rank in 1st position, then it’s a defeat. I started thinking recently that while practicing a particularly dangerous trick I could get injured and then that would be the end of my competitive life. But if I give up training, then, I won’t be able to take first position and that’s also the end of my competitive life. With these thoughts, I think it makes sense to take up the challenge even if it means I risk getting injured. I train by myself, so there is no set pattern and, therefore, I can plan my own training exercises. Bearing victory in mind, I set an everyday training quota and stop training when I get to the limit to make sure that I remain injury free. I also manage my training time and I always allow myself a fiveminute break per hour of training. I am the kind of rider that neither changes his technique according to his mood nor switches to other training when failing to succeed with a trick. There are many riders like this but youngsters often say ‘when we look at his training, everything is so completely organized.’ The joints of my fingers are deformed and the skin of my hands is peeling off, but that’s proof of

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I want to be unique. I want to create a revolution in action sports and that’s why I decided to approach Luminox. how hard I train every day. I am proud of these hands. What is the source of your motivation? When I retire, I want future generations to inherit my tricks and challenge the competition. I want to become the rider who leaves his mark on history. That’s why I have no time for holidays and have no days without motivation. The spectators and riders who see my performance may think

“he’s different from the rest,” and I would be very happy to be a role model for future professional riders. What do you try to accomplish every day? I don’t really think like an athlete. I teach the youngsters that they have to live their life fully and think about the real meaning of each day. For example, when you have fun with friends, you should find a reason to do so such as becoming closer friends or picking up some new information and thus, I feel some sort of personal growth. You were a professional rider in Japan, why did you decide to compete at the world level? Some people of my generation reached the professional level and I thought I was totally able to overtake them so I got a pro-rider qualification. Then, with the prize money I won from my victory in the pro-class of the all-Japan championship, I participated in a world tournament for the first time. I finished in 6th place. With this prize money, I then participated in the world’s biggest competition


TOUGH STORIES. INTERVIEW WITH MOTO SASAKI.

in Germany. In that tournament, 80 professional riders from all over the world participated. I was totally anonymous and had nothing to lose but I went into the final round in third place. When I looked at the finalists, I studied these riders on video. After this tournament, I felt I could reach the top in the world. Has anything changed in your life since you turned to the world? Before, I had a part-time job, so I couldn’t train every day. Turning pro changed my life in the sense that I could finally start training intensively. Among so many watch brands, why did you choose Luminox? When I choose a trick, I think first about appearance and, in the same way, the number one reason is that Luminox is attractive. As I am also a top rider thinking like a trailblazer, I want to be unique. I want to create a revolution in action sports and that’s why I decided to approach Luminox. Luminox also wants its brand to be selected by people like you. I think it is pretty remarkable

that I receive support from Luminox. For a BMX rider like me, wristwatches are stylish accessories. Necklaces create centrifugal force and rings can be caught in the hand grips and lead to mistakes. Wristwatches are very sensitive but they aren’t dangerous and they can’t become a nuisance. Luminox wristwatches, in particular, are light and I don't even realize that I am wearing one. Is it important to you that BMX grows in Japan? Unfortunately, BMX is not really widespread yet in Japan. It’s more like a minor activity there. However, when competing in France, I felt confident in my ability to earn a living from BMX. There were over 50,000 spectators there and I am very excited when people shout loudly or even boo. It reminds me of baseball in Japan! When I hear that, it really brings me self-confidence. I feel I can, without question, bring the charm of BMX to Japan too. As I am a top rider, I think I can help the spread BMX in my home country. To be successful, the riders, the media, events, fans and sponsors have to work together.

What do you think the appeal of BMX is? BMX is often compared to figure skating but, recently, I think it’s more like a combat sport. As the boxer downs his opponent with one punch, the top riders perform tricks whose success rate is around 20% or maybe even 10%. During competition, the level of adrenaline is enormous and I need to perform and keep going to the end. I want to pass on my spirit to the spectators and I want them to feel the connection between the rider and the audience during a competition when I pull off my tricks. How does the future look? My first goal is to be World champion. This year is a turning point as I’ll be turning 30. There are more and more people competing with me and understanding my feelings, so I want to positively engage the next step once I win the World Champion title. I also never thought I would still meet the challenge of such dangerous tricks at my age. So, my goal is also to remain uninjured! I want to be unique. I want to create a revolution in action sports and that’s why I decided to work with Luminox.

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Tony Kanaan Indy 500 Champion

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uminox introduces the Limited Edition Tony Kanaan Valjoux Automatic. Since 2008 Luminox has partnered with Indy 500 champion Tony Kanaan to bring his signature watch series to his devoted fan base. In collaboration, they have produced five successful Limited Edition series that have changed with the evolution of Tony’s livery color, and are proud to announce the latest Valjoux model featuring his new team number and colors. Limited to 310 pieces worldwide.

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NEWS. TONY KANAAN VALJOUX AUTOMATIC 1180 SERIES.

No. 1181 44 mm

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NEWS. SR-71 BLACKBIRD 9080 SERIES.

TM

SR-71 Blackbird

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uminox announces the return of the successful SR-71 Blackbird Limited Edition Valjoux Automatic. This model features a deep Midnight Green enamel dial and re-designed crowns and pushers with a pyramid surface for aesthetic appeal and ease of manipulation. Created with input from Lockheed test pilots, the SR-71 features the famous Valjoux 7750 Automatic Chronograph movement renowned for its quality and reliability, with the added advantage of Luminox Light Technology. Limited to 300 pieces worldwide.

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No. 9098 44 mm 13


NEWS. P-38 LIGHTNING 9440 AND 9420 SERIES.

TM

P-38 Lightning

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he P-38 Lightning timepieces are the first vintage-inspired models in the Luminox collection. The fighter plane had a unique and compelling design and the watches pay homage to this industrial pre-war design with their cushion shaped stainless steel case, and dial font pulled directly from the instruments in the plane cockpit. The new 9427 GMT and 9447 Chronograph models feature a handsome smooth grain tan calf leather strap with ivory stitching. These straps are 4mm thick single piece leather with rough cut edges (essentially like a belt for the wrist) adding to the vintage character of the series.

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No. 9447 44 mm

No. 9427 44 mm 15


NEWS. ATACAMA FIELD DAY DATE 1920 SERIES AND CHRONOGRAPH ALARM 1940 SERIES.

Atacama Field

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he Chilean Atacama Desert, one of the driest areas in the entire world, was the inspiration for the Luminox’s Field series introduced in 2010. The Atacama Field Series blend the functionality of a modern Swiss Made timepiece with an updated retro look and rugged styling. The newest pieces, day-date models (1920 series) and chronograph alarm models (1940 series), feature both earthy and bold new color ways, and the return of the classic Black-on-Black. Photo by Luca Galuzzi, www.galuzzi.it

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ATACAMA FIELD DAY DATE 1920 SERIES

No. 1922.BOB 45 mm

No. 1924.M 45 mm

No. 1924 45 mm

No. 1929 45 mm

ATACAMA FIELD CHRONOGRAPH ALARM 1940 SERIES

No. 1942.BOB 45 mm

No. 1944.M 45 mm

No. 1944 45 mm

No. 1949 45 mm

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Rick Searfoss

XCOR Aerospace’s Chief Test Pilot & former NASA Astronaut Colonel Rick Searfoss talks about his personal journey and the plans for flight testing the Lynx Spacecraft.

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he Lynx two-seat suborbital spacecraft, roughly the size of a small private airplane, will carry people or payloads to an altitude where they will experience weightlessness and see the stars above and the Earth and its atmosphere below. A crucial element aiding in the 2016 targeted launch is Col. Rick Searfoss. As a Former NASA Astronaut, and a previous test pilot for XCOR, Col. Searfoss will be a primary test pilot for the Lynx suborbital vehicle. Through his extensive aerospace experience, Col. Searfoss is an obvious choice to pilot the Lynx. His aerospace knowledge and experience comprise of piloting two space shuttle missions, STS-58 (October 18 to November 1, 1993) and STS-76 (March 22-31, 1996), and commanding the STS-90 mission (April 17 to May 3, 1998). Including spending 39 days in space, Col. Searfoss has logged over 5900 hours flying time in 71 different types of aircraft. He is also no stranger to XCOR and has piloted XCOR’s EZ-Rocket 8 times; most notably at the Countdown to the X-Prize Cup in Las Cruces, NM, October 2005. He also flew all forty test flights of the XCOR Rocket Racer LOX/kerosene prototype, including three airshow flights at the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) Oshkosh AirVenture. Searfoss retired from NASA in 2003 and is currently test piloting commercial space flights including the XCOR Lynx. How long have you been a test pilot with XCOR and what is your previous test pilot experience? I spent nine years in the astronaut core as a test pilot. Prior to that I spent time as a test pilot at Edwards Air Force base in California. I was also a 18

graduate of the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School. And after 10 years as a fighter and test pilot in the air force, I was one of 23 would-be astronauts selected by NASA from 2,500 applicants. What attracted you to becoming a test pilot? My father was in the Air Force so I grew up around aviation, plus I always wanted to be an astronaut and being a test pilot was the only pathway to the field. I graduated from the US Air Force Academy in Colorado with a degree in aeronautical engineering and completed a master’s in aeronautics at the California Institute of Technology. What has been your most memorable flight to date? Definitely the space shuttle mission I commanded. It was the most complex and arguably the most productive research mission to date, and incredibly rewarding. This Neurolab mission involved very specialized and challenging experiments. It remains the only Space Shuttle mission to have an entire book published of peerreviewed scientific papers from its experimental results. What is the most exciting part of being in a space shuttle? Once you’re in orbit you’ve already finished the most dangerous part of the job, which is the launch. For the first 45 minutes I couldn’t see anything because I was strapped in and we were nose high, but when I got out of my seat the shuttle was upside down and I saw a panorama of some desert part of the world and it was so spectacular that I wondered how I was ever going to get my work done because I just wanted to stay glued to the window.

Rick Searfoss

Have you ever had a near death experience when flying a space shuttle or test flying? I experienced an emergency on the launch of my second mission when the hydraulics failed and the alarms sounded, but my philosophy is that if anything goes wrong it will either be one part of the system and there are very clear procedures to fix it, or else it will be like Challenger [the space shuttle that disintegrated on launching in 1986] and there’ll be nothing you can do. It’s always in the back of your mind that you might die, but fear is a good thing – it keeps you sharp. What has been your favorite vehicle to fly to date? The Columbia was a very unique vehicle to fly, but based on pure fun, I would have to say the P-51 Mustang!


TOUGH STORIES. INTERVIEW WITH RICK SEARFOSS.

GET READY FOR TAKE-OFF +4-6 MINUTES

COAST UPWARDS ENGINES OFF – 58,5 KM 192,000 FEET

APOGEE – 103 KM (338,000 FEET) WEIGHTLESSNESS

RE-ENTRY

MAX G-FORCE AT PULLOUT: 4 G POWERED ASCENT MAX AIRSPEED – MACH 2.9 +3 MINUTES

MAX. ALTITUDE: 103km/64miles GLIDE AND CIRCLE

MAX. SPEED: Mach 2.9. (3550 km/h) SOUND BARRIER: T +58 seconds

HORIZONTAL TAKEOFF FROM RUNWAY

DURATION: +/– 60 minutes MAX. G-FORCE 4G

HORIZONTAL LANDING TOTAL FLIGHT TIME 60 MINUTES

HORIZON: Brazil to Florida

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Do you have a nickname at XCOR? I don’t really have a nick-name specific to XCOR. I had a call sign in test pilot school that developed because I was one of the oldest guys in the class, and already married with children, so they called me ‘Pops’ and it stuck. A lot of kids grow up dreaming of being an astronaut, what piece of advice would you give them? Only those with an unwavering passion – as well as a degree in engineering, natural sciences or medicine and at least three years of related professional experience – should consider space travel, he says, for quite apart from the intensity of the work, both training and missions involve prolonged absences from family. Do you have a favorite quote/saying? I do. It’s a quote by President Teddy Roosevelt. “It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the

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arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause; who at best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement; and who at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who have never tasted victory or defeat.” The quote illustrates the attitude of taking risks, mixing it up and understanding that visions can be challenging but to push past the challenge and go for it. The team at XCOR has the same attitude shared among coworkers. I love working with other people who want to take on great challenges to accomplish new things.

lessons taken into consideration while flying the Lynx. However, I am very excited to be part of something that has never done before, especially while working alongside a group of very experienced, talented and creative people.

What are you most looking forward to when flying the Lynx suborbital vehicle? I am really looking forward to returning home safely. I will be testing a brand new vehicle, so I must approach it methodically with all my prior

How important is time in space? Depending on the specific mission activity requirements, it is very important for precise elapsed time measurement and timing functions. For example, rendezvous or deorbit “burns” (firing

As an experienced pilot, what are some unique challenges that you foresee with suborbital flight? Testing the changes in aerodynamics in the transonic regime, where some of the flow around the vehicle is supersonic while some still remains subsonic, due to the potential flying qualities and handling challenges that might arise. Other than that, the whole aspect is getting it out of the atmosphere, using the reaction control system. It effectively is a spacecraft, so it will be interesting to take it higher and faster.


TOUGH STORIES. INTERVIEW WITH RICK SEARFOSS.

the maneuvering engines) have to be initiated on strict timelines. Other activities aren’t so critical time-wise. On suborbital missions, we’ll need to keep track of timing in conjunction with the flight profile and trajectory. What do you look out for in a watch when travelling to space? What technical features should it have? Key things are functionality and ease of use. Mode transitions should be straightforward and user-friendly – you don’t have time to screw around with your watch, you’re very busy! I personally like having a sweep second hand for timing certain events – the analog “sweep” helps your pacing of the event. The approximate flight time of the XCOR suborbital flight is 45 minutes. What can one to expect and feel during those 45 minutes? During takeoff you’ll experience roughly 3 times the acceleration of a commercial jet on

takeoff. Right after liftoff, the pilot will pull up into a near-vertical climb, and for the next 3 minutes you’ll feel increasingly more acceleration through the chest as you climb out and eventually reach 3Gs acceleration. At engine cutoff you’ll experience an instant transition to zero G, which will last about 4 – 5 minutes. During that time, using the Lynx reaction control system – small thrusters – the pilot will be able to maneuver for great views of the earth and the thin blue line of the atmosphere off on the horizon. Getting oriented for reentry, Lynx will descend back into the atmosphere, reaching a peak of 4Gs deceleration early in the reentry. After that, it’s just a glide back to the landing runway, enjoying the view and experience the whole way. Touchdown will be at about 170 mph, then coast and brake to a stop on the runway.

After completion of the flight test phase, we will start flying payloads and passengers (approximately 1-2 years from now). Next we will start flying our ‘production version ‘of the Lynx (the Mk II). That will take 1-2 years following the Mk I. Once we are flying commercial flights with the Lynx Mk II we will develop the payload bay for the Mk III (stronger version of the Mk II). Once that is ready we will start flying heavy payloads and launching the small satellites. After the Lynx Mk III it is time to develop an orbital vehicle, enabling high speed point-to-point travel and/or to orbital destinations and beyond. That might be 10-20 years away. Article by Firehole Composites

What is XCOR’s vision and what does XCOR envision in five years’ time? First we need to successfully enter and pass the flight test phase with our prototype (Lynx Mk I).

XR-5K18 engine system being developed for use on the Lynx Suborbital Reusable Launch Vehicle

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FAVO R I T E S Some of our best selling models

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SEA

SERIES

No. 1526 44 mm

No. 6502 45 mm

No. 3152 44 mm

No. 4241 45 mm

No. 4221 45 mm

No. 3182.BO 44 mm


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uminox has been the watch of choice for professionals like the Navy SEALs, SCUBA legend Stan Waterman, the US Coast Guard, law enforcement divers and many more for the past 25 years.

night diving, deep diving, diving in poor visibility or wreck diving. The Luminox Light Technology (LLT) ensures that all its watches have easy and immediate readability and are Always Visible constantly glowing for up to 25 years.

For a professional diving watch, it is critical and can even be the difference between life and death, that the time is visible in any and all conditions, be it

No. 3001.BO 43 mm

No. 3051 44 mm

No. 3057.WO 44 mm

No. 3955.SET 44 mm 23


FAVORITES. SOME OF OUR BEST SELLING MODELS.

AIR

SERIES

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No. 9441 44 mm

No. 9421 44 mm

No. 9272 44 mm

No. 9278 44 mm


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tilizing aircraft-inspired details, the watches of the Luminox AIR series pay tribute to some of the most remarkable strategic aircraft in aviation history. Created under official and exclusive worldwide license with Lockheed

No.

9382

44 mm

Martin, the Luminox Air collection includes the F-117 Nighthawk, F-22 Raptor, F-35 Lightning II, the vintage inspired P-38 Lightning and the Limited Edition SR-71 Blackbird.

No.

9388

44 mm

No. 6402.BO 45 mm 25


FAVORITES. SOME OF OUR BEST SELLING MODELS.

LAND SERIES

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No. 1943 45 mm

No. 1945 45 mm

No. 1922 45 mm

No. 1861.BO 48 mm


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he Luminox LAND collection represents timepieces per feced for professionals in military and law enforcement and motor sports. The RECON series meets the requirements of military personnel for analog watches that can also be used as simple and efficient navigation tools on the ground.

Since 2008 Luminox has partnered with Indy 500 champion Tony Kanaan to bring his signature watch series to his devoted fan base. In collaboration, they have produced five successful Limited Edition series charting TK’s racing career, including the Ultra-Light PC Carbon Chronographs.

The Field Series in Day Date, Chronograph Alarm and Automatic movements update the very traditional Field watch category with vintageinspired styling, rugged appeal and modern functionality.

No. 8802 45 mm

No. 1105 44 mm

No. 8841.KM.SET 48 mm

No. 8821.KM 45 mm 27


FAVORITES. SOME OF OUR BEST SELLING MODELS.

SPACE SERIES

No. 5241.XS 45.5 mm

No. 5121.GN.XS 45.5 mm 28

No. 5127.XS 45.5 mm


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n 2013 Luminox launched a line of signature watches Made for Space and designed with the input from test pilots and astronauts from SXC and XCOR Space Expeditions. The SPACE Collection includes the SXC/XCOR GMT Series in stainless steel or ultra-light carbon reinforced polycarbonate, the Pilot

Luminox is the official watch partner of XCOR Aerospace. For more information visit www.XCOR.com

Professional Titanium Analog Digital, and the new numbered edition XCOR Valjoux Automatic Chronograph.

No. 5023.XS 45.5 mm

No. 5027.XS 45.5 mm

No. 5021.XS 45.5 mm

No. 5021.GN.XS 45.5 mm 29


AUTOMATICS

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ore and more people are discovering the magic of mechanical movements – automatic movements actually interact with you, as the movement of your wrist keeps them wound – with no battery to change! Automatic movement is a mechanical movement with a self-winding design which harnesses the energy produced by wearer’s motion to wind the spring. The watch maintains its power reserve if you wear it every day otherwise it is advisable to store it on a watch winder to keep it at full power. In a move that answers the demands of the marketplace, Luminox has been increased its use of automatic movements throughout its range including the three new Special Edition Valjoux Automatic Chronographs featured this Fall.

No. 9401 44 mm 30

No. 1511 44 mm

No. 9461 44 mm


MOVEMENT. AUTOMATICS.

No. 1512 44 mm

No. 1861.BO 48 mm

No. 1513 44 mm

No. 1526 44 mm

No. 1801.BO 43 mm 31


Andrea Micheli The importance of time and time management in Military and Law Enforcement operations.

Time is a very important factor in our life. It regulates our activities during the days, weeks, months and years. Time is precious, limited, cannot be stopped or accumulated and without proper management, it runs out or is wasted.

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n our frenetic world, the ability to manage time is essential in order to be able to enjoy life and live stress free. Being organized and using time management is the best way to stay organized and prioritize tasks as life is full of any kind of deadlines we must take into consideration every day. Napoleon used to say that he may lose a battle but he never will lose a minute. In a civilian environment, not being on time could lead to an uncomfortable situation; in a Military or Law Enforcement environment it could be crucial and mean the difference between life and death.

“WHEN EVERY SECOND COUNTS, READING TIME CORRECTLY, QUICKLY AND IN ANY LIGHT CONDITION CAN BE PARAMOUNT FOR OPERATIONAL SUCCESS.“ The main difference between a civilian and a military or police context is that in order to survive and successful achieve goals, every single soldier and police officer has to perform perfectly as a team. A team can be successful only if each 32

individual is in the right place, doing the right thing, at the right time. Starting an assault or initiating a search warrant while not everyone is ready could mean losing a battle, or failing to arrest a wanted criminal. In medical emergencies is time even more crucial. For traumatic injuries, the probabilities to prevent death and/or increase the chance of survival are the greatest if the patient receives professional medical care within an hour, referred to as “the golden hour”. In military and police operations when every second counts, reading time correctly, quickly and in any light condition can be paramount for operational success. Even if there are other important factors which could affect the result of an operation - like communication, coordination and cooperation - time remain a crucial point - in particular if communication fails. Today we often rely on our smartphone or other high tech devices, but the fastest, safest and simplest way to tell the time is still a wristwatch. Especially during physical activities that require special attention, while carrying equipment or when you constantly need to keep track of time, a wristwatch is just the best tool. In the Military and Law Enforcement fields a watch is essential gear along with other items such as a helmet, body armor or personal weapons. It is important to have a quality watch that is easy to read in different light conditions and works well in all elements - land, sea, air - weather conditions and terrain, as lives depend on it.

Andrea Micheli

About the Author: Andrea Micheli is a former Swiss Army NCO, international recognized Military and Law Enforcement specialized journalist and Shooting Instructor. He partnered with Luminox to create the RECON Series of timepieces.


TOUGH STORIES. INTERVIEW WITH ANDREA MICHELI.

"In the Military and Law Enforcement fields a watch is Essential Gear along with other items such as a helmet, body armor or personal weapons." 33


FISH,

THE NEW DRUG

A true blue explorer, Scott Cassell’s exploits are undertaken with unwavering commitment to a clearly defined goal – the protection of the world’s oceans and their inhabitants

W

hen I was 11 years old, I played hooky from school, borrowed my brother’s 10-speed bike and went about 30 miles over the hills from Mountain View to Half Moon Bay on a dangerous twisty highway road to go snorkelling in the murky tide pools of Central California. These are some of the best memories of my childhood. In these tide pools were juvenile fish, lobster, invertebrates, sea stars, anemones and corals – it was magical. In contrast, my family life was tortured with two heavy-drinking parents and near nightly beatings, one of which left me with a broken jaw. That is most of what I remember from my childhood. The oceans gave me peace, focus and hope. When I tell people the sea is my mother, I mean it’s not only because up to 71 percent of the oxygen I’m breathing comes from her and the food I eat is a product of the favourable weather the seas maintain on earth, but because I love her as a mother. She wasthere giving me what I needed as a child when my parents did not. RECOn “COMBAT” DIVES There is nothing worse than a bully. Bullies cause wars, kill children, rob people and do what they can to further themselves without regard for others. I hate bullies. Most commercial fishermen and all poachers are bullies. They kill or capture the innocent for personal gain with little regard for others or their effect on the environment. Most commercial fishermen I’ve met will often resort to loud profanity, threats or even violent behaviour if you challenge their “job” – solid signs of bullies. And poachers are much worse. Over the last 20 years, I have made countless rECOn dives into the bullies’ den. I prefer to perform rECOn missions completely alone to reduce the small footprint, thus making my efforts stealthier. These are called Solo Black Missions. The more secret I am, the better the evidence gathering and success of each mission. In 34

blacked-out gear – even wearing short underwater ghillie suits – with my O2 CCR leaving no bubbles, I operate directly under the killers’ boats, as they conduct their cowardly lawless acts upon Nature. Quietly, I hover below them and film the results. Corpses drift past me, still-blinking sea turtle heads, still-alive finned sharks, entrails of endangered fish – all caught by my camera as evidence as my heart fills with hate for this filth of humanity. The public seldom hears of what I do. My motivation has always been about preserving life, not getting attention. Working in the absence of the media has been a blessing. To this day, I don’t like public attention. Privacy is rich and I cherish it. But now, some of my stories should be heard. THE REALITY OF SEAFOOD Organised crime reaches between 35 and 50 percent of all seafood around the world. Fishcan be worth thousands of dollars and a personcan be worth as little as $100 to eliminate.Totoaba swim bladders from Mexico, people have been murdered for; shark fins, people have been murdered for; sea lion penises, people have been murdered for. This is what people are responsible for when they eat these species. A short time ago, I posed as a brightly dressed dumb American tourist at the fish market in Ensenada, Mexico. I discovered a baby great white shark (a protected species) for sale. It was beheaded and the fins were cut off, but you could easily tell what it was. For the most part of over an hour, I hovered nearby until Iwatched it get sold to an American buyer of a California restaurant chain as “swordfish”. Heavoided eye contact with me and I think he did not like the fact another American was around. Perhaps he saw me as a threat, but he concluded his purchase of the “swordfish” and continued his foray. American officials and the

Scott Cassell

Cassell is the founder and head of Sea Wolves Unlimited LLC, an organization that uses Special Ops techniques on “rECOn missions” to identify the killers of endangered marine species, and bring them to justice.

media portray our fish as legal and safe. With my own eyes, I have seen that this is not true. Yet, Americans eat fish without true knowledge of what it is or where it comes from and blissfully suck down sushi without a clue… or maybe they don’t want to know? I honesty don’t know. For a long time, local law enforcement from different countries would secretly accept my findings (evidence) from rECOn missions into their bag of weapons to be used as legal evidence against their countrymen as their laws permit. My actions had value and poachers paid the legal price for breaking the law and have been imprisoned. Our oceans are dying at the hands of man. For years, I felt that some of my work was doing some good. Against my warrior


TOUGH STORIES. INTERVIEW WITH SCOTT CASSELL.

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spirit, for the sake of those I love, I have decided not to go public with any specific facts, locations or even species ruled by these criminals. What fish are you really eating in the US? The reality is that even right here in River City: You may be eating endangered fish tainted with organised crime. Despite what the chest-beating commercial fishermen are thinking right now and how they may yell at me (or even threaten my life again) about their “jobs”, corruption, greed and bullies are an ever-present fact in this worldwide industry, and it is only going to get worse. I want to remind you, this is a not illegal drug; this is about fish. Don’t believe me? Do a search on the Web and see for yourself.

MY FRIEND WARNED ME THAT IF “THEY” EVER THINK I WOULD BECOME A PROBLEM, THEY WOULD KILL MY LOVED ONES. Some of the species of fish are so highly endangered that they attract the attention of “traditional” Chinese consumers. The more rare and protected, the more these Chinese want it for either status or phony “traditions”. This insatiable and extremely unethical and selfish demand will destroy the entire species without regard, while demonstrating a complete lack of concern for how it affects the rest of the world. Although theChinese may be the worst offenders, they certainly are not the only ones. Japan, Singapore, Malaysia, India, Philippines and Russia are just a very short list. The fact is, the US has its share of these creepy offenders. To put it another way, about 900 million people make a living killing the sea. They are paid a living to do so. Crab, tuna, marlin, swordfish, whale, dolphin, krill, shrimp, cod, haddock, albacore, halibut, flounder, sardine and countless other species caught wild – they make money from death. Some scientists are paid a salary by the fisheries to do bad science to support so-called “sustainable fishing” to blur the facts, so that even the media does not know the truth. Have you heard people in the media scoff, “Even the scientists can’t agree!”? Well, this is why. Bad science for hire. Organised crime. Entire cultures, economies and even religions are built on fishing. It is supported by communities, and entire countries. It is made “legal” 36

and even defended with military might. Yet, when a volunteer tries to save animals or habitats, they are often shunned, ridiculed, attacked and even killed. So here’s a question: How many individuals can you name that are paid a salary to save our oceans? Selfless volunteers, yes, but paid professionals? I cannot name a single person. Those trying to save our seas (and by doing so save the human species) are outvoted, outgunned, outmanoeuvred (legally) and very out-funded. Why? There is no profit in saving our oceans; unless of course, you count the future collapse of humanity. But that powerful variable is conveniently left out of the equation by bad science and shoddy media reporting. I pray I’m wrong. In fact, I really want to be wrong. The blissful ignorance I once enjoyed is terribly missed. But, to be wrong is to forget all the sights burned into my mind and to hope hundreds of brilliant, honest, committed scientists are also wrong. But, I would trust science long before I would trust the media, crooked scientists or politicians to tell the truth. There is very little short-term profit in truth. DRUGS VERSUS FISH We have entered an era when fish are becoming so rare that to some, they are worth much more than a human life. In fact, organised

EQUIPMENT Riffe mask 2 x Luminox watches Ghillie suit shoulder shroud Riffe wetsuit Red Tech BCD Combat CCR (OMG C96 or LAR V.2) TAC Board (compass, depth gauge, watch, Intova blacked-out camera) US Divers Rocket fins SOG fighting knife Slingshot & ammo Watershed depth-compensated thigh (dry) bags DSLR Canon cameras, batteries Memory, Red Dog radio Armor Express ATACS ballistic vest LBE MOLLE harness vest Whites amphibious boots Red Tech depth-compensated CVB2 rucksack Electrophysics 9350EOS Night Vision, Electrophysics thermal camera Compass Delorme InReach SE iPad x 2 with Watershed iPad bag, GPS antenna, navigation app & maps Tent & sleeping bag with concealment system Solar charger


TOUGH STORIES. INTERVIEW WITH SCOTT CASSELL. crime is involved now because some species of fish are as valuable as illegal drugs like cocaine – and treated in exactly the same way. People are paid off or murdered and smuggling is a daily way of life. Most of this demand comes from China and they pay top dollar. When I was a kid, I often watched a TV commercial where the cartoon mascot named Charlie Tuna would constantly try to be caught, but he never could because he wasn’t of high enough quality. There were so many tuna, the world could not run out. In fact, they were so incredibly plentiful, they were called “chicken of the sea”. In 2013, tuna was placed on the endangered species list. Funny, after the American buffalo, I thought we would learn a lesson. Clearly, greed and ignorance prevented that from happening.Japan consumes about 70 to 80 percent of theworld’s tuna, and a large bluefin tuna can sell for half a million dollars or more in Japan. They are worth as much or more than illegal drugs. If this kind of money is available, what makes you think organised crime is not involved? As fish are pushed further into scarcity, the price will only go up, and if there is money to be made at this level, do you really think laws will protect them? THE UNSEEN SIDE OF HIGH RATINGS Our world has changed since I was a kid. When I was born, there were 3.1 billion people and the oceans were at risk of being depleted. Now, with 7.2 billion people, the oceans are depleted and dying. Not possibly dying in the future, but dying now. Yet, bad science has just announced to the shoddy media that American fisheries are improving and the public believes it, and there are many more great white sharks than before, never mentioning that new technology has simply allowed science to track them better, making them appear more numerous. With Discovery Channel’s Shark Week prostituting the disastrous misrepresentation of sharks as being dangerous, bloodthirsty machines rather than a beautiful,

Totoaba macdonaldi: The swim bladder is a valuable commodity considered a delicacy in Chinese cuisine

incredibly important species, sharks remain largely unprotected around the world. Only three to five percent of the shark species fished for shark fin soup are left. That means 95 to 97 percent of the world’s sharks have been killed in just 20 years. At this rate, several species will be extinct in one to five years. But Discovery Channel has to maintain their ratings no matter what the cost, right? Now, with seemingly every channel competing for ratings with “shark porn” at the expense of sharks, I see them gettingcloser and closer to extinction because the public watches this trash, feeding the beast. One of the last shows I did for Discovery Channel had a lady director that decided to steal my experiment and give it to a scientist without my permission (or even telling me) to get a better “show” from the target species of the documentary. After I called them on it, they said, I would never work in TV again! They would ruin me! Well, she is helping to run Shark Week now. To make a bad situation even worse, many people actually believe that there are mermaids and megalodon (an extinct shark species that lived millions of years ago) secretly living off our coasts! These tragic “fakeumentaries” border on criminal, with easy-to-miss disclaimers, and the producers are laughing at you all the way to the bank. I have heard the argument that Shark Week has a message about saving sharks, but you can’t have both messages side by side! Protect something promoted for you to fear? How dumb does Discovery Channel think you are? Maybe I should not answer that. Please, I implore you, question everything involving our oceans, the media and the fish we eat. Remember, somewhere in San Diego, folks feasted on a baby great white shark, probably thinking it was swordfish or marlin. You don’t need to believe people like me; just do your own research and find your own way. Then, please have the courage to look in the mirror. Do what is

right, even if it is difficult. The future of our oceans is in our hands and our hands alone as consumers. If we don’t learn the realities fast and become responsible, our oceans don’t stand a chance. If the oceans fail, so do we all. The sea is our mother. She gives us most of our oxygen, drives weather that supports global agriculture and feeds billions. I don’t know about you, but I’m not going to sit by and watch my mother be murdered without one hell of a fight. What kind of son or daughter are you? Enjoy your sushi.

The oceans are extremely vulnerable to overfishing, a moneymotivated activity that seriously threatens coastal livelihoods all over the world

One of the ocean activist’s greatest fears is that without sharks to keep another apex predator, the Humboldt squid, in check, whole ecosystems may be wiped out

Article by ASIAN DIVER magazine Photos Scott Cassell & Luminox

HUNTING POACHERS, POLLUTERS AND ECO-TERRORISTS IS COSTLY AND DIFFICULT AS NEW TECHNOLOGIES HAVE ARISEN TO MAKE THE MURDEROUS SLAUGHTER OF THESE INOFFENSIVE CREATURES EVEN MORE DEADLY EFFICIENT

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TECHNOLOGY. LIGHT TECHNOLOGY.

Luminox Light Technology (LLT) All Luminox watches feature a self-powered illumination system employing tiny micro gas light sources. This unique Swiss technology guarantees unsurpassed ability to read the time, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, for up to 25 years. Each watch has micro gas lights mounted on the hands, dial, and, when necessary, also on the bezel.

This unique technology does not depend on an external light source to “charge“ fluorescent paint on the dial or hands in order to glow, nor do Luminox w  atches require the push of a button to light up as do watches with electroluminescence.

1 LLT Micro-Gas tube in detail (Magnified. Actual size is 0.5 mm diameter) 2 LLT Micro-Gas tube in daylight (Magnified. Actual size is 4 mm x 0.5 mm) 3 Glowing gas 4 Phosphorescent powder layer 5 Glass housing

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MAP. WHERE YOU CAN FIND US.

NORTH AMERICA CANADA | MEXICO | UNITED STATES OF AMERICA CENTRAL AMERICA COSTA RICA | FIJI | GUATEMALA | HONDURAS | PANAMA SOUTH AMERICA ARGENTINA | CHILE | PERU | URUGUAY | VENEZUELA EUROPE

AUSTRIA | BELGIUM | BULGARIA | CROATIA | CZECH REPUBLIC | DENMARK | ESTONIA

FINLAND | GERMANY | GREECE | HUNGARY | ICELAND | IRELAND | ITALY | KOSOVO | LATVIA LUXEMBURG | MACEDONIA | NETHERLANDS | NORWAY | POLAND | PORTUGAL | RUSSIAN FEDERATION | SERBIA | SLOWAKIA | SPAIN | SWEDEN | SWITZERLAND | UKRAINE | UNITED KINGDOM

ASIA AFGHANISTAN | ARMENIA | BANGLADESH | BRUNEI | CHINA | FIJI | HONK KONG | INDIA INDONESIA | IRAN | IRAQ | ISRAEL | JAPAN | JORDAN | KASAKHSTAN | KOREA | KUWAIT | MACAU MALAYSIA | MONGOLIA | NEPAL | OMAN | PAKISTAN | PHILIPPINES | SAUDI ARABIA | SINGAPORE SRI LANKA | TAIWAN | THAILAND | UNITED ARAB EMIRATES | VIETNAM

AUSTRALIA AUSTRALIA | NEW ZEALAND AFRICA

ANGOLA | BOTSWANA | EGYPT | KENYA | MALAWI | MAURITIUS | MOZAMBIQUE

NAMIBIA | SEYCHELLES | SOUTH AFRICA | TANZANIA | UGANDA | ZAMBIA | ZIMBABWE

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2015 PIKES PEAK INTERNATIONAL HILL CLIMB Jeff Zwart, 8x Pikes Peak Champion Race Car Driver

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JBR.L018.3 Ed.11/2015

Luminox Magazine Fall / Holiday 2015