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those things are so easy to plug into a DVD player and play adverts on. There is little intellectual content or justification for having them; the majority will just be advertising panels. It’s like that at the moment: if you go to a public square in Japan you’ll have three or four. Every square is like Piccadilly Circus! JvdP: Do you think that is the way of the future or do you think it’s maybe too much? Surely the planners have something to say about it. They do have something to say about it yes. I just think it is happening so quickly at the moment because the technology is new and there is still a novelty value to it. Actually we’ve got two schemes with that sort of technology happening at the moment. What tends to happen is that you have a few, and then everybody starts using them until they are everywhere.

WLM: The gherkin comes to mind I disagree that this is just decoration. In my opinion Foster & Partners are one architectural practise who use daylight well; a lot of their work revolves around daylight. But there are lots of other architects building lots of things that don’t acknowledge daylight as a light source. Our buildings are much denser, the space more deeply planned. We’re trying to pack more and more people into less space in the city so space is becoming a premium. But for me, the true sustainable lighting is daylight. And that’s the connection we’ve got to rediscover. 7th January 2007 Extract from the Light and Emotions Research on going by Synovate Qualitative Research and Philips Lighting

WLM: Do you think they can enhance or is it potentially doom-laden? I think it could potentially be doom laden, unless somebody realises that we could end up with City Squares with screens everywhere. You could end up with everybody living in Vegas, simply because the technology has become readily available and affordable. Well I would hope that actually we would have... WLM: Better taste? Yes, I would hope so. But we’re such a media driven society now. WLM: How does that fit with ecology? What’s happening in those terms? Well that’s a very bright area for what we do. I really think that the sustainability issue is a real opportunity for the lighting designer’s profession. I think we need to be more socially responsible about what we do. Every time I put a dot on a drawing it’s a bit of energy used on somebody else’s behalf. I’m ultimately responsible for the energy they use and it is something we have to address seriously. I see that as a key to promoting professional lighting and design. People have the skills and the qualifications and the moral responsibility to apply lighting sensitively and in the right context. But they also have the responsibility of minimising energy consumption and deciding responsibly not to light certain things. I think sustainability is also going to facilitate our reconnection to daylight. We are already seeing this. Over the last 30 years or so, architects seem to have lost the skill of daylight design. They don’t design buildings to be day lit any more. Windows aren’t considered as a means of getting light into buildings; they consider them as decoration on the side of the building. How can I do my window layout, how is it going to make my façade look? It is all about decoration...

PLATFORM

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Profile for Luminous – International Lighting Magazine

Luminous 1 | Grid Stifles Imagination?  

Grid Stifles Imagination? | Piazza San Magno, Legnano, Italy | Martin Lupton, London,United Kingdom | Las Palmas building, Rotterdam, The N...

Luminous 1 | Grid Stifles Imagination?  

Grid Stifles Imagination? | Piazza San Magno, Legnano, Italy | Martin Lupton, London,United Kingdom | Las Palmas building, Rotterdam, The N...