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William Landell Mills: How does lighting get articulated in a project? We try to base everything we do on a strong conceptual foundation. I believe in going through the concept process to arrive at a solution rather than just instantly walking in and saying right this is the best thing to do in this space. It is not about generating a list of kit and locations to put it in; it’s about generating a reason for the kit being in a certain place and doing a certain thing. I think if you look at the work we do, our foundation, you will see that we’re trying to make projects, excuse the cliché: people centred. We want to make the lighting about the people in the space. It is not just about glorification of architecture or light and design; it’s about creating space for people or a place for people to be in. WLM: Why is that people centred? It reflects my personal philosophy on lighting which I developed when I very first got into design. I don’t think there is one correct approach to lighting design. The biological, the physical, the science, the art, the product, the architectural – these different approaches can all generate a really good lighting solution. But if you have people contributing from different backgrounds then you’re going to get an even better solution. WLM: How did your background influence your work? I think what happens is your background – mine is academic and science and engineering – may influence your approach. But ultimately it’s the passion for lighting and the love of lighting design that connects everything and becomes the common language. Then your training becomes a greater influence than the tools you actually use on the job.

Martin Lupton Lighting Designer BDP, London, United Kingdom

Martin Lupton is one of the industry’s leading lighting designers, eagerly sought after for projects and seminars. William Landell Mills and Jasmine van der Pol join him for a wide-ranging discussion of his profession, his views and his ideas.

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DIALOGUE

Jasmine van der Pol: Do you generally start with a team? This really depends on what we are asked to do. If we’re commissioned to do a lighting project and we are asked to do a presentational pitch, we’ll drag in four or five people from our group and we’ll all sit round the table and throw lots of ideas around. We always try to base our pitch on a concept or a series of concepts, just to demonstrate to people how we work. If we are invited to join we want to sit down with the design team and go through the process with them as well. In that way we find we can work with the architect and inform each other’s thinking and sometimes the lighting concept makes the space work better and the architecture changes to facilitate that. WLM: What do you think are the lighting trends? I think one of the big trends I see with lighting at the moment is media facades. You’re essentially turning facades into TV screens by putting lots of LED pixels on them. You are beginning to see them everywhere. It’s a technology-driven solution. The trouble is that

Profile for Luminous – International Lighting Magazine

Luminous 1 | Grid Stifles Imagination?  

Grid Stifles Imagination? | Piazza San Magno, Legnano, Italy | Martin Lupton, London,United Kingdom | Las Palmas building, Rotterdam, The N...

Luminous 1 | Grid Stifles Imagination?  

Grid Stifles Imagination? | Piazza San Magno, Legnano, Italy | Martin Lupton, London,United Kingdom | Las Palmas building, Rotterdam, The N...