Issuu on Google+

Luke Clayton Sinopoli Portfolio of Selected Works 2007-2014


Luke Clayton Sinopoli lukesinopoli@gmail.com 703-300-5935


01

21

31

49

59

67

79

91

105

109

123

RESUME


University of Cincinnati Graduate House TYPE: ACADEMIC; PROGRAMMING & ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN LOCATION: CINCINNATI, OHIO PARTNER: DREW SUSZKO DATE: 2013 In this self-guided studio which focused on how design influences peoples’ behaviors, my teammate and I explored graduate housing on University of Cincinnati’s campus. Stemming from the University’s desire to distinguish itself as a research-oriented powerhouse through its graduate and doctoral programs, this proposal centered on a Graduate House for UC that would transform campus life and cultivate greater social interaction between residents, students and the community. Inspired by the residential college model, elements of monastic living, and contemporary positions on integrating academic and off-campus living, this proposal aimed at balancing spaces for academic life and social life, private space versus public space.


PRIVATE SPACES Each student is provided with a small amount of private space, where amenities are shared with adjacent units. Connecting each room, the traditional corridor is expanded to accommodate a number of loosely programmed spaces, intended to foster interaction. 3


4


SOCIALIZING

EATING

RESEARCHING 5


6


SHARED SPACES Each of these programmed areas accommodate a variety of functions; at their most basic are eating, researching and socializing. The conglomeration of these spaces make up the Graduate House’s shared space system meant specifically for the House’s residents. 7


8


LOWER LEVEL READING ROOM 9


10


STORAGE (BIKE)

INTRAMURAL

COMMUNITY CENTER

FITNESS

CLASSROOMS

PUBLIC PRESENTATION

MEDIA LIBRARY

CONFERENCE

GARDEN / COURT

DINER

COMMON

LIVE

PUBLIC

PLAY

SERVICE

FOOD GARDEN

REC ROOM

SPA

MEDITATION SPACE

WORK

VENDING

CATERING KITCHEN

DINING HALL

BREAKOUT SPACE

BAR

MAIL (C)

MAIL (L)

REC READING

ART STUDIO

STUDIO SPACE

LABORATORY

KITCHEN (L)

STORAGE (BIKE)

FITNESS

MEDITATION SPACE

COMMUNITY CENTER

CLASSROOMS

PUBLIC PRESENTATION

MEDIA LIBRARY

CONFERENCE

GARDEN / COURT

DINER

CATERING KITCHEN

DEAN RES

MAIL (L)

ART STUDIO

ASSEMBLY

GALLERY

LABORATORY

STUDIO SPACE

TUTOR SUITES

WASTE (C) DEAN’S RES

STUDY ROOM

DOUBLE BRs

WASTE (L)

MASTER’S RES

STORAGE (OTHER)

FAMILY SUITES CUSTODIAL (L)

LAUNDRY

CUSTODIAL (C)

11

L

SINGLE BRs

COMMON LOUNGE

KITCHEN (L)

REFLECTIVE READ

PARKING

DOUBLE BRs

MASTER’S RES

CUSTODIAL (L)

MAIL (C)

REC READING

BIZ INCUBATOR

PARKING

GREEN HOUSE

VENDING

DINING HALL

BREAKOUT SPACE

BAR

FOOD GARDEN

REC ROOM

SPA

TUTOR SUITES

STUDY ROOM REFLECTIVE READ

INTRAMURAL

S

COMMON LOUNGE

ASSEMBLY

GALLERY

BIZ INCUBATOR

BATHROOMS (W)

BATHROOMS (L)

CUSTODIAL (C)


PROGRAMMING Programming was a significant component to this project. Critical programs were identified and ranked from most important to least important with respect to their ability to foster interaction at multiple levels: residents, UC students, and the adjacent community.

04

GREEN HOUSE

)

03

SINGLE BRs WASTE (C)

N’S S

02

WASTE (L)

STORAGE (OTHER)

FAMILY SUITES

LAUNDRY

BATHROOMS (W)

BATHROOMS (L)

01

12


SITE PLAN The House was divided into two buildings, forming a central pedestrian mall and connecting the busy retail street to the south to the bustling heart of campus. 13


14


GEOGRAPHICAL FEATURES W CALHOUN ST

W MCMILLAN ST

CIRCULATION 15


PROMINENT VIEWS, AXES, AND GREENS

GEOGRAPHICAL FEATURES

SITE SELECTION The site was selected to act as a strategic gateway or southern portal into the campus. This edge of campus has very few prominent connections between the newly revitalized retail district along Calhoun and McMillan Streets and UC’s own Main Street.

ACCESSIBILITY 16


17


18


19


20


Residence Hall Renovation TYPE: PROFESSIONAL; ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN & RENOVATION LOCATION: CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS DATE: 2012 Tasked with updating a number of the university’s historic residence halls, the firm was challenged with preserving the facades of these significant structures while enhancing the lifestyle of the university’s well-known undergraduate residential colleges. The process sought to understand the implications of future renovations based on a few key factors: access, structure, program, main entry and circulation. Each of these variables were singled-out, analyzed and reassembled to develop a series of comprehensive options for the client’s review. ROLE: My initial role was to manage the digital model of the existing structure – originally outsourced and constructed based upon its 1930s drawings. Towards the design, I was charged with developing initial strategies and concepts for accommodating the common space program, access and circulation of the first floor and lower levels of the residence hall, eventually fusing these with the residential floors above.


CONTEXT AND CIRCULATION 23


EXISTING TUTOR COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION AND CIRCULATION

PROPOSED HYBRID ORGANIZATION AND CIRCULATION

24


STRUCTURAL BEAM LOCATIONS

EXPLORATION IN INTERNAL ACCESSIBILITY

25


26


ITERATIVE EVOLUTION OF GROUND FLOOR PLAN 27


28


29


ENTRANCE STUDIES Early concepts concentrated on the building’s access and circulation on the first floor. As the building had many level changes, including a 30” plinth which the majority of the first floor rested upon, different strategies were explored to provide accessible and meaningful approaches to the building’s interior. 30


Designing for Reuse: Mixed-Use Structure TYPE: ACADEMIC; ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN LOCATION: PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA DATE: 2014 Identifying issues in the limited lifespan of buildings due to economically engineered tactics of planned obsolescence, this thesis proposal approaches design and construction from a different vantage point. Rather than designing buildings that are constructed and demolished completely, what if certain building elements were designed to remain? What components would be left behind as usable infrastructure? What would the building look like? How would it be used? In essence, it means a building meant to be adaptively reused, a building designed for change. This proposal explores what it would mean for a building to be a continual construction site, where certain common elements remain and new or specialized elements become interchangeable - a contemporary ruin, of sorts - viewing the shared permanent portion of the building more as a system of infrastructure than as a traditionally programmed structure. The building proposal is comprised of two parts: the permanent and the ephemeral. This proposal explores how the permanent can accommodate the many different uses of the ephemeral via configuration of structure, chase and corridor space.


SITE Located in the southern part of Olde Kensington, Philadelphia, the site is situated between a recently gentrified neighborhood to the south and a former industrial corridor to the north. The site is chosen strategically to capitalize on these two areas in great flux as an ideal environment to suggest an adaptable building proposal. 33


34

1/4

mi


35


Temp Occupiable Space Temp Infrastructural Space Perm Occupiable Space Perm Infrastructural Space

STRATEGIES The permanent system is meant to be a conduit to allow multiple units to plug in to it, essentially a series of corridors vertically and horizontally oriented. The system is designed in such a way that each tenant can construct their own unit during any time in the life of the building without disturbing the general functions of the units around them. 36


TEMPORARY AND THE PERMANENT

VERTICAL CHASE CONFIGURATION

DUAL STRUCTURAL SYSTEM

TOTAL BUILD-OUT CONFIGURATION 37


PROGRAM One of the primary roadblocks for constructing a building intent upon change is that change is not predictably foreseeable. This proposal intends to accommodate programming that is by its very nature temporary.

Programs such as: - Incubator space - Pop-up retail - Transitional restaurant space (i.e. food truck to perm. location) - Temporary art exhibition space - Field office locations - Short term apartment/lease 38


39


40


41


42


43


44


45


46


TWO SYSTEMS This project proposes two structural systems. The first system, at the core, facilitates the buildings main arteries, conveying people and services laterally and vertically – creating a core and anchor to which units will be fixated. In these corridors is a 3’ utility strip that provides access to the plenum space below each floor for maintenance and hook-ups for new construction The second is a lighter external structure meant to be a permanent scaffolding for temporary units. Supported by thin/light columns and bracing, the units can be constructed onsite with available space on all sides for workers to access. 47


48


Cincinnati School of Environmental Learning TYPE: ACADEMIC; SITE PLANNING & ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN LOCATION: CINCINNATI, OHIO DATE: 2011 This graduate design studio focused on developing a school of environmental learning in an urban neighborhood near a thriving retail street and an iconic neighborhood church. While responding to its context, the core idea of this proposal was to expose the site to an environmental process - the water cycle - and design the building and its landscape around it. By designing a setting that would tell the story of rainfall, collection, filtration, storage and reuse as educational tools allowed experimentation with developing inside/outside relationships with the building spatially and structurally. External the site, the school is scaled in harmony of its urban context with a focal entry point on its north side, oriented towards the neighborhood landmark of the church and acting as a backdrop for a new public plaza. Internally, a series of hallways follow the flow landscape terraces culminating in indoor/outdoor laboratory adjacent a water body used for the study of plant and aquatic life.


WEDGE

DOUGHNUT

EXPLODED BLOCK

HYBRID 51


52


SITE STRATEGIES

53


SITE PLAN

54


SOLAR STRATEGIES

Surface Runoff

Roof runoff

Main storage and filtration area

Roof runoff

Vegetated Channel

Underground conveyance Underground conveyance

Catchment areas

CIRCULATION 55

WATER FLOW


Secured Entrance

Public Plaza Second Floor Terrace

Limited public access

School Courtyard

School secured during public events

Access to Public

No access

Public Entrance

Drop-off

OPEN SPACE

EVENT ACCESS 56


57


Third Floor Gymnasium (ht. `) Classrooms Media Center/Library Community Spaces Corridors

Second Floor Gymnasium / Health Clinic Classrooms Media Center/Library Community Spaces Corridors

First Floor Great Hall Classrooms Specialized Classrooms Media Center/Library Community Spaces Corridors Maintenance

58


Fabric Forms and the Module TYPE: ACADEMIC; MATERIAL STUDIES TEAM: FREDERIK BERTE, JORDAN LEWIS, & ANDREW NEWMAN DATE: 2012 FABRIC CASTING Fabric casting was the common interest in the group as a means of exploring fluid form from a material that, when cured, would be solid and massive. Of particular interest was the tendency of fabric formed concrete to be unrecognizable as a material. The textural imprint of fabric onto the surface of the concrete was also of interest as it was another means of transforming the concrete from a known material to an unknown material. THE MODULE The team was encouraged to consider integrating the idea of the fabric pours with that of the module; one, for the sake of greater applicability of the proposal as a construction element, and second, as a means of exploring deeper functional solutions to using concrete and the connection between materials in ways not previously explored. As the investigation progressed, it was recognized that there were even greater benefits of the module related to texture. The modular elements, when assembled created another level of texture at the macro level that contributed to the idea of rendering the materiality of the concrete obsolete.


FORMWORK In considering the formwork and the module it was paramount that the material that made up the formwork was resilient enough for repeated use - a strategy derived from an interest to save material and time while ensuring consistent modules with each pour. We decided on quarter inch thick polycarbonate as the material would not degrade with each pour. 61


62


FORM & MATERIAL It was decided that the interlocking concrete elements would not be structurally possible as the concrete would be brittle at these connections. Instead, interlocking would be in the form of tabbed inserts that would be integrated within each poured module, evident in the polycarbonate formwork. The bottom three layers in each pour would accommodate a tabbed polycarbonate layer to facilitate this connection. Finally, it was also considered to switch to a hexagonal module which would provide greater opportunities for interlocking without being too complicated. 63


64


65


66


The Baths at Cranbrook TYPE: ACADEMIC; SITE PLANNING AND ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN LOCATION: BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MICHIGAN DATE: 2012 As a two quarter course, this graduate design studio focused on comprehensive design from conceptual site strategies down to detail design. The following work embodies the culmination of the first quarter which focused on site strategies and conceptual design of this proposed spa on the Cranbrook school campus just north of Detroit Michigan. This design focused on converting an under-utilized site facing a prominent green space on the Cranbrook campus. Space between an existing structure and this prominent green space is limited so various studies focused on narrow building configurations while designing for ample natural sunlight


SITE STRATEGIES The proposed site was selected as part of an infill strategy transforming the a long strip of green called the “Grand Allee� into a green heart of the campus. As the proposed site resided on the north side of an existing building, access to natural daylight became a large focus of this design. 69


70


DAYLIGHT ACCESS Access to daylight became a prominent driver in the design. As such, a light scoop became the primary architectural feature, garnering some influence from the campuses historic architecture, while providing interior spaces with washes of daylight. 71


72


73


74


FIRST FLOOR SITE PLAN

NORTH ELEVATION 75


76


FRAMING

SHEAR WALL

DIAPHRAGM

COMPOSITE 77

LAYERS As the design evolved, the building’s interior spaces were formed through a series of layers. Some of these layers acted as light scoops, providing different types of light for different types of spaces.


78


Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition TYPE: ACADEMIC; URBAN DESIGN LOCATION: NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE DATE: 2014 TEAM: DREW SUSZKO, GRETCHEN KEILLOR, KEN KO, AARON GUTTMAN This year’s competition site, located in Tennessee’s state capital, Nashville, was situated in an underdeveloped yet historically significant district north of the downtown. Prone to flooding, the project site spanned an area between the city’s civic mall and the river, a neighborhood comprised of an eclectic mix of former industrial buildings, parking lots, state offices and older condominiums. Charged with proposing an economically viable urban development plan for the site, each team was required to integrate a newly proposed minor league baseball stadium and supporting mixed use development into the competition proposals. ROLE: Urban Designer; The team was divided into three groups: Finance, Marketing and Design. I oversaw the design group, focusing on implementing the program, open space and circulation as determined by the team’s vision for the site while contributing to the competition graphics.


CAPITAL CITY BLUES Our team’s vision for the site dealt with the transiencies typically plaguing capital cities. The site’s competing narratives were viewed as distinct systems seeking unification. 81


82


COMMUNITY HEART Our team’s proposal transformed the impending ballpark into the community heart, imbuing it with a framework capable of addressing a variety of different neighborhood and city-wide functions. This heart was part of a larger promenade (formerly a bikeway) that formed a centralized pedestrian linkage from significant public museums along the mall to the newly redeveloped waterfront. 83


84


85


86


87


10

4 5

10

10

5 5 4 10

7

10 4 5 5

Meandering Bikeway

36’ 48’

5 5

12

8

20 Shared

8

12

60’

88


89


4 7

8

8

7 4 10

6

10 4 7

8

8

80’

8

8

8 4 4 10.5 10.5 6 10.5 10.5 4 4 8

80’

90


Kunming Xishan Urban Park TYPE: PROFESSIONAL; PLANNING AND URBAN DESIGN LOCATION: KUNMING, YUNNAN, CHINA DATE: 2009 Kunming, known as the Spring City - because of the city’s yearround agreeable weather, is renowned for its flower festivals. Nestled between two of Kunming’s most treasured landscapes, West Mountain and Dian Lake, this proposal delivered an urban park anchored by a central flower expo and growing fields - a collection of what would be some of the city’s largest attractions. The team was charged with accommodating a myriad of programs such as a Botanic Garden, Art Exhibition and studio spaces, Resorts and spas, and Flower Expo center and surrounding flower fields. Orienting these programs along a small sliver of developable land between the mountain and the lake, the proposal sought to accommodate a large amount of program that had the best of both worlds, access to the mountain to the west and views to the lake in the east. ROLE: Urban Designer; Managed design vision and implementation from the initial kick-off meeting to the final report. This meant mediating information between economic and environmental reports; balancing ideal programmatic mixes and development strategies with ecological and historic preservation as well as recommended water infiltration infrastructure - tied to a cohesive structure of open space, circulation and developable areas that were part of a larger narrative for the city and region.


PRESERVATION AND PLANNING The large amount of program proposed for the park actually provided many opportunities for preservation and ecologically sensitive design and planning. Existing roads, buildings and farm fields were planned for reuse rather than demolition to not only minimize costs, but also helped preserve some of the important history of the site. 93


94


tM Wes a ount in Dian Lake

Context 95


FLOWER FIELDS Transitioning the existing farm fields into flower fields for Kunming’s annual flower festival also led to an immediate rural aesthetic. This rural aesthetic influenced a large part of the planning of the park’s infrastructure: the reuse of the existing village as well as the preservation of many of the vernacular roads and pathways. 96


Planning Structure: North-South Spine

97

Landscape Zones


Circulation

Land Use

98


Resort Villas

99

Research Forest

Botanic Gardens

Forest Park

Arts Village

Business Retreat

Flower Fields

Cultural Village


100


VIEW OF ARTISTS PLAZA

101


ARTIST VILLAGE The park’s centerpiece is the Artist Village, an existing farming village planned for relocation and demolition. We convinced the client to preserve its inherent structure, revitalize choice building stock, re-inhabit and re-fill as a local artists village, accommodating live-work studios, food streets, theatres and boutique hotels. 102


VIEW TOWARDS BOTANICAL GARDENS

103


104


The Monumental Core Framework Plan TYPE: PROFESSIONAL; PLANNING AND URBAN DESIGN LOCATION: WASHINGTON DC DATE: 2007 In 2003, Congress declared the national mall as a “substantially completed work of civic art”, closing it off to future museum and monument installations. Future museums and monuments would need to be located elsewhere, ideally integrated into the surrounding urban fabric. As a response, the Framework Plan proposes a series of near, mid and long term strategies for strengthening the connections between the National Mall and the immediate urban context. Through a comprehensive evaluation of the city’s historic plans, current public space framework and future growth, the Plan implements a surgical strategy to identifying areas for future museums and monuments that would catalyze future growth while preserving historic connections; increasing livability downtown. ROLE: Urban Designer; Responsible for developing initial urban structural concepts, phasing implementation and graphic depiction.


Planning Influences 107

Monumental Framework Plan


108


Yundonghai Landscape Masterplan TYPE: PROFESSIONAL; PLANNING AND URBAN DESIGN LOCATION: SANSHUI, GUANGDONG, CHINA DATE: 2008 Referred to as a D.E.E.P. Project - collaboration between Design, Environmental, Economic and Planning teams - the task was to enhance an existing masterplan based upon implementing more intelligent economic, environmental, and planning principles to refine and establish a new CBD, entertainment and government districts and a variety of new housing villages. The planning sought to develop an interconnected green waterfront edge about a newly constructed water body as a means of linking/unifying each of the lakefront nodes through a variety of infrastructures and activities. ROLE: Urban Designer; Managed revisions to the existing planning framework: developing districts, programming, character, landscape zones, open space framework, circulation and water systems. Developed design guidelines for lakefront promenade.


STUDY AREA

DESIGN AREA

SANSHUI

111


FOSHAN

112


113


Proposed Land Use Plan

Existing Land Use Plan

Development Suitability

Economic Development Model 114


Accessibility

115


Circulation - Typology

116


117


118


ACCESSIBILITY / GATEWAYS

PUBLIC TRANSIT

BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION 119


120


121


122


Sindh Education City TYPE: PROFESSIONAL; PLANNING AND URBAN DESIGN LOCATION: KARACHI, PAKISTAN DATE: 2011 This massive university city of over 3600 ha will be the first of its kind in Pakistan, housing over a dozen of the country’s top universities. This design proposed a central ‘address road’ by which each university would be oriented. By concentrating activities and circulation along this central corridor, opportunities were created in developing urban nodes and centers for student life. The primary urban node of this project came in the form of a central urban Spine created by the overlapping of two Main Streets. ROLE: Urban Designer; Focused on articulating the land use plans into clearer urban fabric through hand rendered drawings applied to a 3D model. Borrowing from principles of Muslim city design, the spatial and circulation hierarchies focused on developing a mixture of private developments for student housing amidst a larger framework of public amenities such as a souk and Mosque.


125


126


4

Souk / Bazaar District along the Central Spine 1. 2. 3. 4.

127

Retail Souk / Bazaar Souk Gateway Plaza Transit Stop Institutional Pedestrian Gate 5. Institutional Main Vehicle Gate 6. Public Entry Plaza 7. Mixed Use Retail Anchor 8. Education City Administrative Offices 9. Recreational Open Space 10. Education City Formal


5

4

5

6

4

7 6

5

4 1

5 1

3 2

4

6

6

8

9

128


2

5 4

8

129


9 8

7

3

6

4

1 4

5

Events District along the Central Spine 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Cultural Events Center AKU Athletics Stadiums Transit Stop Institutional Pedestrian Gate Institutional Main Vehicle Gate Public Entry Plaza Mixed Use Retail Mixed Use Residential Residential Commons

130


14

8

12

Village Mixed Use District 1. Retail Souk / Bazaar 2. Souk Gateway Plaza 3. Transit Stop 4. Institutional Pedestrian Gate 5. Institutional Main Vehicle Gate 6. Public Entry Plaza 7. Mosque 8. New Residential 9. Anchor Retail Mixed Use 10. K4 Greenway Open Space 11. Education City Public Commons 12. Agricultural Preservation Zone 13. AKU Residential Village 14. Existing Village Core 15. Village Expansion Zone 16. Village Gateway and Bazaar

131

11


15 5

16

4

10 6 7

3

3

1 2

2

9

13 132


Luke Clayton Sinopoli lukesinopoli@gmail.com 703-300-5935 EDUCATION

2010 - 2014

The University of Cincinnati, Ohio Master of Architecture

2000 - 2005

The Pennsylvania State University, Pennsylvania Bachelor of Landscape Architecture

EXPERIENCE

Sketchup AutoCAD Rhino

May 2013 - Sep 2013

GBBN Architects | Architectural Intern Cincinnati, OH

July 2012 - Dec 2012

KieranTimberlake | Architectural Intern Philadelphia, PA

Sep 2011 - Dec 2011

BHDP Architecture | Architectural Intern Cincinnati, OH

Mar 2011 - Jun 2011

CK NBBJ | Architectural Intern Boston, MA

Apr 2008 - Jul 2010 Sep 2007 - Mar 2008 Jul 2005 - Aug 2007 HONORS

Revit

AECOM | Urban Designer Guangzhou, GD, China

GIS 3DS Max

Sefaira THERM IES

EDAW|AECOM | Designer Brisbane, QLD, Australia EDAW|AECOM | Designer Alexandria, VA

Photoshop Illustrator

2013

University Graduate Scholarship

Indesign

2012

University Graduate Scholarship

Lightroom

2010

AIA Honors Award | Planning and Urban Design Monumental Framework Plan

2010

University Graduate Scholarship

Premiere After Effects

COMPETITIONS 2014

Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition

2011

Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition

2006

URBAN VOIDS: Grounds for Change

2004

Flight 93 National Memorial International Design Competition

Woodworking Laser Cutter Concrete Milling machine


Thank you lukesinopoli@gmail.com 703-300-5935


Luke Sinopoli Architecture and Urban Design Portfolio