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LUKE McCANN Architecture Portfolio


Resume Education: Bachelor’s of Fine Arts, Sculpture, Minnesota State University, Mankato Master’s Candidate, Architecture, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Abbreviated Work History January 2019—Current August 2018—December 2018

Teaching Assistant, Renaissance Architectural History Teaching Assistant, Architectural History Survey 1

August 2017—May 2018

Teaching Assistant, Environmental Technology

May 2017—August 2017

Research Assistant, Sustainable Development Case Studies for AIA MN and MPCA Grant Work for Upper Midwest Resilience Studio

January 2017—May 2017

Teaching Assistant, Baroque Architectural History

April 2016—August 2016

Crew Foreman, Creative Lawn and Landscape

October 2015—April 2016 January 2015—October 2015

Staffing Coordinator, Atlas Staffing Incorporated Fabrication Work


Contents

-Water Sabi -Dichotomous Solar Rejuvenation -Hiawatha Residential Dissemination -Wabasha Office Building -Brick Skyway -EcoVillage Assemblage -Independent Contracting Projects -Undergraduate Sculpture Work -Echoes in the Future


WATER SABI

This project was a 4 day collaboration project with students from Kansai University in Osaka, Japan. The prompt was to design a Japanese tea house in the context of the anthropocene. We situated our tea house in the Tosabori river, literally in it. In the midst of a bustling metropolitan area, the Water Sabi tea house provides a complete escape from the urban environment. Windows into the space allow the light and color of the polluted river to cast ever changing shadows in the tea room, while landings in the stair case leading down to the tea room feature windows at high and low tide, providing one last connection before descending below. Not all connection is lost below however, as the tokonoma reaches above the water, and the structure, providing a constant light. In Japan I worked without a computer, in watercolor and pencil (Above) Upon returning home, I revisited the project in Rhino, V-Ray, and Photoshop (Right)


The effect of high and low tide can be seen here in the sections


DICHOTOMOUS SOLAR REJUVENATION

In a daylighting studio with professor Mary Guzowski, I designed this campus meditation and revitalization center. The 3 light wells reach above the surrounding buildings to bring light down through both levels of the building from dawn till dusk all year round. This concept was arrived at through physical modeling, investigating the effects of bringing light into a dark, subterranean space. The upper level of the building is full of light, and lined with warm wood, expanding from the wood structure. The lower level is dark, lit only by the lightwells, and a wall washed with light from an overhead trench. This contrast of light quality provides users with whatever experience they need for their own meditation and relaxation. Visualizations for this project were done with Sketchup and Illustrator


The upper level experiences daylight no matter the season, while the lower level always has natural daylight, in a more controlled manner The effects of the daylighting design were tested through physical modeling (Left)


HIAWATHA RESIDENTIAL DISSEMINATION

In a re-examination of the traditional conservatory, this project aims to bring back pre-settlement plant life. The Hiawatha area of Minneapolis was once a prairie, with a large variety of plant species. Today the Hiawatha trail is surrounded by mowed lawns, often behind fences. The people who live in this area are not the residents of pre-settlement times however. They should be given agency over what plants are brought back to the area. By lining the Hiawatha trail with planters displaying over 100 plant species, with information on the species, and localizing seed bomb distribution sites, residents can learn about the plants that used to reside here, and choose what and where to re-introduce to the area. The visualizations for this project were done through Sketchup, Illustator, and photography


TWIN CITIES

Walker

COMO

Lowest income regions & Public Conservatories western wheat grass agropyron smithii prairie onion allium stellatum lead plant amorpha canescens big bluestern andropogon gerardi carolina anemone anemone caroliniana thimble flower a. cylindrica pussy toes antennaria neglecta lyre-leaved rockcress arabis lyrata beach wormwood artemisia caudata prairie sage a. ludoviciana blunt-leaved milkweed asclepias amplexicaulis green milkweed a. hirtella oval-leaved milkweed a. ovalifolia butterfly flower a. tuberosa whorled milkweed a. verticillata short-green milkweed a. viridiflora heath aster aster ericoides smooth aster a. laevis aromatic aster a. oblongifolius sky blue aster a. oolentangiensis syn. [aster azureus] silky aster a. sericeus ground plum astragalus crassicarpus downy wood mint blephilia ciliata sideoats grama bouteloua curtipendula blue grama b. gracilis hairy grama b. hirsuta buffalo grass buchloe dactyloides sand reed grass calamovilfa longifolia harebell campanula rotundifolia pennsylvania sedge carex pensylvanica yellow paint brush castilleja sessiliflora partridge pea chamaecrista fasciculata coreopsis coreopsis palmata white prairie clover dalea candidum syn. [petalostemum candidum] purple prairie clover d. purpereum syn. [petalostemum purpureum] silky prairie clover d. villosum syn. [petalostemum villosum] prairie larkspur delphinium virescens illinois tick-trefoil desmodium illinoense pale purple coneflower echinacea angustifolia canada wildrye elymus canadensis purple love grass eragrostis spectabilis rattlesnake master eryngium yuccifolium flowering spurge euphorbia corollata downy gentian gentiana puberula prairie smoke geum triflorum mock pennyroyal hedeoma hispida longleaf bluet hedyotis longifolia syn. [houstonia longifolia] showy sunflower helianthus laetiflorus downy sunflower h. mollis oxeye heliopsis helianthoides golden aster heterothera villosa syn. [chrysopsis villosa] alumroot heuchera richardsonii hairy hawkweed hieracium longipilum false heather hudsonia tomentosa path rush juncus tenuis junegrass koeleria macrantha syn. [koeleria cristata] false boneset kuhnia eupatoricoides rough blazing star liatris aspera cylindric blazing star l. cylindrica dotted blazing star l. punctata hoary puccoon lithospermum canescens carolina puccoon l. caroliana pale spiked lobelia lobelia spicata wild lupine lupinus perennis wild bergamot monarda fistulosa dotted mint m. punctata muhly grass muhlunbergia sp. primrose oenothera rhomiboides prairie primrose o. rhomiboides brittle prickly pear opuntia fragilis prickly pear o. humifusa

white penstemon penstemon albidus smooth penstemon p. digitalis slender penstemon p. gracilis showy penstemon p. grandiflorus pale penstemon p. pallidus seneca snakeroot polygala senega prairie cinquefoil potentilla arguta scurf pea p. tenuiflora pasque flower pulsatilla patens syn. [anemone patens] prairie buttercup ranunculus rhomboideus upright coneflower ratibida columnifera wild petunia ruellia humilis little bluestem schizachyrium scoparium syn. [andropogon scoparius] small skullcap scutellaria parvula common blue-eyed grass sisyrinchium albidum blue-eyed grass s. campestre gray goldenrod solidago nemoralis white upland aster s. ptarmicoides syn. [aster ptarmicoides] rigid goldenrod s. rigida rough dropseed sporobolus asper prairie dropseed s. heterolepis porcupine grass stipa spartea prairie spiderwort tradescantia ohiensis hoary vervain verbena stricta american vetch vicia americana bird's foot violet viola pedata arrow-leaved violet v. sagittata


WABASHA OFFICE BUILDING

The St. Paul riverfront has recently been cleared for almost an entire block. The former buildings rose only a couple stories over Kellogg, but descended several down to the river level. The city of St. Paul is planning a new river balcony walk, akin to the high line, and new developments must incorporate the river balcony into their design. For my spec office building, I ran the river balcony through a cut in my building, creating a transparent plane at the Kellogg level. This cut frames views to the river valley, and visually connects to the valley through the building. In the building, a large atrium creates more real estate for views of the river from the office layouts. Clad in more contemporary metal panels, the coloration hearkens back to the former brick buildings of the site while positioning the tower as something truly new to downtown St. Paul.


The visualizations for this project were done through a mixture of hand and digital representation. Hand modeling with paper and cardboard developed a quick way to mix and match potential forms, while Rhino served as a way to visualize the potential forms in perspective, while using watercolor to render atmosphere.


HAT CHANNEL

C CHANNEL

PERFORATED SOFFIT


All floors above Kellogg

Kellogg level plan

All floors below Kellogg


BRICK SKYWAY

In this seminar on facade design, we were first tasked with replicating an existing skyway in Revit. In our final assignment, we were tasked with redesigning the facade. Using Grasshopper I modeled a facade system using super lightweight bricks on a system of rods, which would allow them to spin under wind load. This design would connect the two brick buildings the skyway bridges, while conveying a paradoxically light weight feeling.


SY

SY

2 A104

4 T.O.S. Bottom Chord AT S2 859' - 0 1/2" 5 T.O. BEAM 871' - 0"

2

5 T.O. BEAM 871' - 0"

Parapet Revit Model 3" = 1'-0"

3

3 Top of Pylon at S2 856' - 10"

Parapet Revit Detail Model 3" = 1'-0"

Existing design by KKE Architects (now part of DLR group) 1 1/8" ALUMINUM PANEL

0' - 7"

7/8" HAT CHANNEL RIGID INSULATION

1' - 4"

ROD AND SEALANT

CLEAR ANOD ALUM SHT MET COUNTER FLASHING

1/2" PLY WD 0' - 9"

0' - 9 1/2"

1' - 0"

0' - 1/2"

SY

FULLY ADHERED SINGLE PLY MEMBRANE 1/2" FIBERBD

0' - 4"

RIGID INSULATION 1/2" GYP BD 1 1/2" METAL DECK

0' - 2"

0' - 0 1/2"

0' - 0 1/2"

5/8" / 1'-0"

5 T.O. BEAM 871' - 0"

3 1/2" x 2 1/2" x 1/4" x CONT DECK SUPPORT

1/8" ALUM PANEL 1" DEEP 7/8" HAT CHANNEL 1/8" SHIM

4

Original Detail

Original KKE parapet detail, compared to my detail produced in Revit.

Parapet Detail Lines 3" = 1'-0"

#15 BUILDING PAPER

1/2" GYP SHEATING

3 5/8" MET. STUD w/ BATT INSULATION

1/2" GYP SHEATING

Short Section 3/16" = 1'-0"


1/2” STEEL ROD

PLASTIC SPACER

NYLON BUSHING

Leaving bricks free to rotate under wind load

MODULAR BRICK

COMPONENT DETAIL


STEEL BRACKETS FROM STRUCTURE CROSS BRACING IN BRICK GRID FLAT GRAY ALUMINUM PANEL VISION GLASS


ECO-VILLAGE ASSEMBLAGE

This project is a multi family housing project for the Eco-Village in Minneapolis. As part of a net-positive studio, the goal was net-zero energy, and a positive program. To this goal, I incorporated a 5 person grouphome for adults with special needs, so that parents of adults who need care can have the option of living in the same building as their child. I also focused on leaving half the site as green space, and ended up with 30 units in an 8,400 square foot footprint. The building tested net positive for energy in modeling, and was also able to hold several community gathering spaces, as well as event spaces for the residents to reserve.


GROUP HOME

30 UNITS

8,400 ft² FOOTPRINT

STUDIOS: 5 AT 1 BEDROOMS: 4 AT 2 BEDROOMS: 16 AT 3 BEDROOMS: 4 AT 5 PERSON GROUPHOME AT

GYMNASIUM AND EXERCISE

STORAGE MECHANICAL

MECHANICAL

356 ft² 446 ft² 585 ft² 892 ft² 2063 ft²


FABRICATION WORK

Chinatown Library, Chicago. SOM

At the Chinatown Library in Chicago, I installed the stair and balustrades, and cleaned the welded joints through grinding and body filling, to sculpt a clean joint.


At the Children’s Museum of Southern Minnesota, I fabricated the exhibit spaces, working off of conceptual plans. I was also part of a class in my undergraduate course, in which we created a permanent installation for the center piece of the museum, the tree of forts.

This fort proved to be challenging with every rib coming down to the frame in a unique compound angle. My partner and I were able to figure out a system in which only 3 measurements were needed for each rib member to be fully cut.


Hermes, Miami. RDAI Accueil This project involved the installation of a wooden handrail on three flights of curving stairs, filling and sanding the joints to create a seamless look. When I first installed the railing, the enclosure of the building was not installed. In the Miami climate, the joints expanded dramatically. I was called back to smooth out the joints, and also to cut a new hand groove in the railing. I was sent an offset router and custom bits to do the cutting, with the railing in place. There was not enough room between the railing and the wall even for the offset router, so the drywall would need to be removed, and patched later. There was also no way to ensure a square cut off of the rounded profile of the railing. Finally, the custom router bits were not long enough to seat the shaft in the router properly, and the mass of the cutters bent the shaft as soon as the router was turned on. After exhausting all options to fix the railing in place, I let my client know that they would need to put in a change order request with the architects.


SCULPTURE WORK


This sculpture is a work of multiple ceramic modules. The process for making the modules involved making a plywood form to make a large plaster positive. The positive was cut at a compound angle, and the opposing pieces were used to make plaster molds for slip casting. Slip casting uses liquid ceramic, which is poured into a plaster mold. The plaster draws moisture out of the ceramic liquid, creating a wall of plastic clay over time. The excess slip is poured out, and the casting is taken out of the mold. The castings are all hand trimmed, and sanded after drying, before finally being glazed and fired. Through the course of all of these steps, about half of all castings were lost to crack from drying, handling, or firing. The resulting work displays the inherent flaws in seemingly precise works, creating an organic effect out of rigid geometry. This was a part of a greater body of work I did in my Bachelor’s of Fine Arts program.


ECHOES IN THE FUTURE

Bricolage is the act of using diverse items available from the immediate environment to create solutions or objects of desire. People bricolage nostalgic objects together in their space to create a personally authentic environment that connects them to a historical narrative. The resulting texture of objects results in uniquely personal spaces, that cannot be designed by an outside agent, but have an allure related to a collective nostalgia, unique to the observer. Our existing building stock serves as objects of nostalgia, and the amateur adaptations of these spaces are frequently more interesting than typical architectural interventions. When designing for adaptive reuse, there are lessons to be learned from the amateur bricoleur, and the way they respond to existing space. What architectural elements are co-opted by the bricoleur? How can architecture encourage occupants to bricolage, personalize, and invest in their space in existing buildings?


Luke McCann mccann8806@gmail.com 2019

@lukemccannworks

Profile for LukeMcCann

Luke McCann Architecture Portfolio 2019  

Luke McCann Architecture Portfolio 2019  

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