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W New Culture, For People Looking To Adopt 5/2010

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Stories 8 | Dr. Corrupt Medical Mayhem 10 | Mexican Hot Spots Hot Spots/ Bar guide 12 | Containing Hubris Containing Ego 14 | Copyright Laws & You New Artist guide 18 | Director Director A Kubrick or Jarmusch? 20 | “W” Book Review Summer Reading 22 | Miss. Monae Signed To Diddy, a good move? 26 | Girls: Good Idea, Bad Idea Avoid the Jersey Shore! 28 | “Taking The Plunge” Weighing In on Marriage (For Groom) 30 | Free Speech When Enough is Enough 32 | Rosario! Not a KID anymore! 34 | Demolition Derby Twisted Metal at 60mph 36 | Me & My Van The Love of Story Features 38 | Health Care Reform: Truth of The Matter 44 | Basquiat / Kruger: 2 Sides of The Same Coin 58 | David Lynch: Vague With A Chance of Ambiguity 68 | Cover Story Marlon Brando: Leader of The Pack

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Luke Derivan

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BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ANALYST Maryann Magnanamous DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELATIONS Janet Orswell COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR Kaye Wommack Finance CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER Carl Ridge CONTROLLER Adam Sowland CREDIT AND COLLECTION MANAGER Chris Jenkins SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Kris Pain ACCOUNT SUPERVISOR Roger Kogan ACCOUNTS PAYABLE ANALYST Janet Orswell STAFF ACCOUNTANT David Herkoff

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W p.8

Health

The Wild Wild East

The doctors in the east are becoming Indistinguishable from outlaws back west ward. By Tim Wellers

A

L a r g o urologist who spent several years as head of the Iraqi Red Crescent Society is suing the Washington Post, alleging he was defamed in a 2008 article that implied he was corrupt and had obtained the job partly because of contributions to Republican candidates and organizations In a suit filed in Pinellas Circuit Court, Dr. Said Hakki claims the Post story contained factual errors and knowingly cast him in a “bad light’’ that has damaged him personally and professionally.A Post spokeswoman said it would “not be appropriate’’ to comment on a pending lawsuit. The reporters, Amit R. Paley and Ernesto Londono, could not be reached. A former adviser to Saddam Hussein, Hakki fled Iraq in 1983 and became a U.S. citizen. He

The Good The Bad & The Ugly: Outlaw Doctors

was working at the Bay Pines VA Medical Center in 2003 when the Bush administration asked him to return to his native country to help rebuild the war-torn health care tem. Two years later, Hakki was elected president of the Red Crescent, the Muslim equivalent of the Red Cross, and oversaw its growth to a $100 million annual operation with more than 100,000 workers in all 18 Iraqi provinces. But in 2008 he was fired in what he claims was a move by the government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to seize control of a rich, powerful organization.A Largo urologist who spent several years as head of the Iraqi Red Crescent Society is suing the Washington Post, alleging he was defamed in a 2008 article that implied he was corrupt and had obtained the job partly because of contributions to Republican candidates and organization In a suit filed in Pinellas Circuit Court, Dr. Said Hakki claims the Post story contained factual errors and knowingly cast in


W p.10

Travel

The Mexican Connection Why is Mexico claiming to be the hottest spot to be on Spring Break? Get those plans ready.

A

By Tim Wellers

L a r g o urologist who spent several years as head of the Iraqi Red Crescent Society is suing the Washington Post, alleging he was defamed in a 2008 article that implied he was corrupt and had obtained the job partly because of contributions to Republican candidates and organizations. In a suit filed in Pinellas Circuit Court, Dr. Said Hakki claims the Post story contained factual errors and knowingly cast him in a “bad light’’ that has damaged him personally and professionally.A Post spokeswoman said it would “not be appropriate’’ to comment on a pending lawsuit. The reporters, Amit R. Paley and Ernesto Londono, could not be reached. A former adviser to Saddam Hussein, Hakki fled Iraq in 1983 and became

a U.S. citizen. He was working at the Bay Pines VA Medical Center in 2003 when the Bush administration asked him to return to his native country to help rebuild the war-torn health care system. Two years later, Hakki was elected president of the Red Crescent, the Muslim equivalent of the Red Cross, and oversaw its growth to a $100 million annual operation with more than 100,000 workers in all 18 Iraqi provinces. But in 2008 he was fired in what he claims was a move by the government of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki to seize control of a rich, powerful organization.A Largo urologist who spent several years as head of the Iraqi Red Crescent Society is suing the Washington Post, alleging he was defamed in a 2008 article that implied he was corrupt and had obtained the job partly because of contributions to Republican candidates and organization in a “bad light’’ that has damaged him personally and professionally.

HOT SPOTS The Tiki Bar & Grill Bar $$$ La Cavalina Bar $$ Jose’s Chili Pepper No Bar $$$$

AP® studios


W p.12

LifeStyle

Hubris Five Ways To Deflate count to 100

(using only prime numbers)

Think your head might be getting too plump? You may need to deflate your ego before it pops.

remember, you’re going to die think about real issues

(ie Haiti, “underwear bomber”)

read some Marx

(don’t turn commie though)

assess your value

(in the world as a whole)

L

By Tim Wellers

argo urologist who spent several years as head of the Iraqi Red Crescent Society is suing the Washington Post, alleging he was defamed in a 2008 article that implied he was corrupt and had obtained the job partly because of contributiondidates and In a suit filed in Pinellas Circuit Court, Dr. Said Hakki claims the Post story contained factual errors and knowingly cast him in a “bad light’’ that has damaged him personally and professionally.A Post spokeswoman said it would “not be appropriate’’ to comment on a pending lawsuit. The reporters, Amit R. Paley and Ernesto Londono, could not be reached. A former adviser to Saddam Hussein, Hakki fled Iraq in 1983 and became a U.S. citizen. He was working at the Bay Pines VA Medical Center in 2003 when the Bush administration asked him to return to his native country to help rebuild the war-torn health care system. Two years later, Hakki was elected president of the Red Crescent, the Muslim equivalent of the Red Cross, and oversaw its growth to a $100 million annual operation with

“Ego” elexdee 2009

more than 100,000 workers in all 18 Iraqi provinces. But in 2008 he was fired in what he claims was a move by the government of Prime Minister Nouri alMaliki to seize control of a rich, powerful organization.

“If the youths of today don’t realize they’re not as special as they thought, all is lost.” A Largo urologist who spent several years as head of the Iraqi Red Crescent Society is suing the Washington Post, alleging he was defamed in a 2008 article that implied he was corrupt and had obtained the job partly because of contributions to Republican candidates and organization In a suit filed in Pinellas Circuit Court, Dr. Said Hakki claims the Post story contained factual errors and knowingly cast him in a “bad light’’ that has damaged him personally and professionally.


W p.14

Politics

Smell Out Your ‘

(The events, characters or claims depicted in this article are not fictitious, any similarity to actual persons, living or dead, or to actual events or or claims is purely truthful)

P

By Tim Wellers

n a forhe modern concept of a copyright originates with the Statute of Anne (1710) in Great Britain, although the earliest recorded ruling on basic copyright in literature derives over a thousand years before then from the ancient Brehon laws of Ireland. An example of the intent of modern copyright, as expressed in the United States Constitution, is “To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.”[1] Copyright has been internationally standardized, lasting between fifty and one hundred years from the author’s death, or a shorter period for anonymous or corporate authorship. Some jurisdictions have required formalities to establish copyright, but most recognize copyright in any completed work, without formal registration. Generally, copyright is enforced as a civil matter, though some jurisdictions do apply criminal sanctions. Copyright has been internationally standardized, lasting between fifty and one hundred years from the author’s death, or a shorter period for anonymous or corporate authorshi p. Some jurisdictions have required formalities to establish

The modern concept of copyright originates with the Statute of Anne (1710) in Great Britain, although the earliest recorded ruling on basic copyright in literature derives over a thousand years before then from the ancient Brehon laws of Ireland. An example of the intent of modern copyright, as expressed in the United States Constitution, is “To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.”[1] Copyright has been internationally standardized, lasting between fifty and one hundred years from the author’s death, or a shorter period for anonymous or corporate authorship. Some jurisdictions have required formalities to establish copyright, but most recognize copyright in any completed work.

The US Patent office is quoted as “the worst agency for artists’ rights” and as the law states, as soon as the art hits the public domain the “rights become more liquid.”

“Maze”elexdee2009

©


W p.16

Film

Critiquing Ol’ Town (The cigars, the slick hair, sequins; and all the things you wish you knew about the silver age but didn’t.) By Tim Wellers

F

n idea for the modern concept of a copyright originates with the Statute of Anne (1710) in Great Britain, although the earliest recorded ruling on basic copyright in literature derives over a thousand years before then from the ancient Brehon laws of Ireland. An example of the intent of modern copyright, as expressed in the United States Constitution, is “To promote the Progress of

Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.” Copyright has been internationally standardized, lasting between fifty and one hundred years from the author’s death, or a shorter period for anonymous or corporate authorship. Some jurisdictions have required formalities to establish copyright, but most recognize copyright in any completed work, without formal registration. Generally, copyright is enforced as a civil matter, though some jurisdictions do apply criminal sanctions. Copyright has been

Clockwise from the left: Frank Sinatra, James internationally standardized, lasting between fifty Gagney and ..., Humphrey and one hundred years from the author’s death, Bogart. or a shorter period for anonymous or corporate authorshi p. Some jurisdictions have required formalities to establish copyright, criminal sanctions. authorship. Some jurisdictions have required formalities to establish copyright, but most recognize copyright in any completed work, without formal registration. Generally, copyright is enforced as a civil matter, though some jurisdictions do apply.


W p.18

Film

Who are your favorite Directors? DECEASED

NEITHER

ON THEIR WAY

Have you been to the UK in the 70s?

No

Made a movie about Nazis Are you Irish and /or Italian?

Yes Like Transvestites and /or evil lawyers?

By Jean Kilner

Irish Do you like milk and violence?

Neither Like films you don’t understand?

Italian

No Way

No

another with a failed caper

Totally! Samurai version of Macbeth?

Vidy well Little Brother Nope

Story about gangsters, or about a cop?

Like sex, murder and mystery?

Cop

another with a killer bride Yes

Gangsters

Hai Do you like Ex-Western Outlaws?

Shot by Charlton Heston as a Mexican (film)

Sydney Pollack

Martin Scorsese

Tootsie, The Firm

Clockwork Orange, 2001: A Space Odyssey

Stuck with the last pick... anti-climactic

Yes

Lost Highway, Blue Velvet, Eraserhead Clint Eastwood High Plains Drifter, Mystic River

Orson Welles Touch of Evil, Moby Dick

ists of directors that have not made our W’s choice list are as follows. This means not that they have achieved less. The chosen nine directors were chosen based on our reader polls. Also, the nine, will be the next subjects of our newest “Directors” column.

The one with Pam Grier

David Lynch

Stanley Kubrick

Throne of Blood, Seven Samurai

L

Not a chance

Goodfellas, The Departed, Casino

Akira Kurosawa

One where this woman overdosed

Jim Jarmusch Down By Law, Broken Flowers, Dead Man

Close Seconds Joel & Ethan Coen Steven Soderbergh Richard Linklater Wes Anderson Takashi Miike Lars Von Trier David Fincher

Spike Jonze Alexander Payne Francis Ford Coppola Sergio Leone Brian De Palma David Cronenberg Errol Morris

Largo urologist who spent several years as head of the Iraqi Red Crescent Society is suing the Washington Post.

Quentin Tarantino


W p.20

Books

What you Reading? What you should be reading... By Jean Kilner

Juxtapoz: Poster Art Presents work from 15 artists showcased in Dirtypilot.com’s monthly online exhibitions during its inaugural year of 2007. These works embrace a range of movements and techniques. In these pages you’ll find graffiti, street and urban art, as well as pop and outsider art, rendered in diverse media — from spray paint, oil, acrylic, watercolor and mixed media, to simple pen and ink, graphic, silkscreen, and other transfer methods. $19.95 80 pages Full Color 8” x 10” Hardcover 978-0-86719-712-9

Todd Schorr: American Surreal Presents work from 15 artists showcased in Dirtypilot.com’s monthly online exhibitions during its inaugural year of 2007. These works embrace a range of movements and techniques. In these pages you’ll find graffiti, street and urban art, as well as pop and outsider art, rendered in diverse media — from spray paint, oil, acrylic, watercolor and mixed media, to simple pen and ink, graphic, silkscreen, and other transfer methods. $19.95 / 80 pages / Full Color / 8” x 10” Hardcover 978-0-86719-712-9

Year One Rewind Presents work from 15 artists showcased in Dirtypilot.com’s monthly online exhibitions during its inaugural year of 2007. These works embrace a range of movements and techniques. In these pages you’ll find graffiti, street and urban art, as well as pop and outsider art, rendered in diverse media — from spray paint, oil, acrylic, watercolor and mixed media, to simple pen and ink, graphic, silkscreen, and other transfer methods.

$19.95 80 pages Full Color 8” x 10” Hardcover 978-0-86719-712-9


W p.22

Music

“You Just Smile”

Why you’ll be hearing more of Janelle Monae within the coming months. By Detroit Ralley

K Janelle Monae as her android alter ego and songstress Cindy Mayweather. photography: Daniel Jackson

anelle Monáe, a Kansas City, Kansas native, moved to New York to study theatre at the American Musical Academy. Her original plan was to pursue a career on Broadway, but she soon changed her mind and returned to her love for music, an art form which, according to her, has the potential to change the world. Moving to Atlanta, GA, where she met OutKast’s Big Boi, Monáe founded the Wondaland Arts Society with likeminded young artists and made a couple of appearances on Idlewild, where she is featured on the songs “Call The Law” and “In Your Dreams.” By mid2007, Monáe was ready to release her first solo album, entitled Metropolis. It was originally conceived as a concept album in four parts, or “suites,” which were to be released only through her website and mp3 download sites. These plans were altered upon her signing with Sean “Diddy” Combs’ label, Bad Boy Records, in late 2007. The label gave an official and material release to Metropolis: The Chase Suite (Special Edition) in August 2008. The album was generally well-received by critics, garnering Monáe a 2009

Grammy nomination in the Best Urban/ Alternative Performance for her song “Many Moons”, festival appearances and opening slots for the indie pop band Of Montreal. Monáe also toured as the opening act for band No Doubt on their summer tour.

“I imagined many moons in the sky lighting my way to freedom.” Her latest single, “Open Happiness,” was featured in the 2009 season finale of American Idol. In a November 2009 interview, Monáe revealed the title and concept behind her upcoming album, The Arch Android. The second and third suites of “Metropolis” will be combined into this full-length release, in which Cindi Mayweather—also the protagonist of Metropolis: The Chase Suite—will become a messiah-esque figure to the android community of Metropolis.


W p.24

Grads

Eric Drooker’s painting depicting “Good vs. Evil”

“The Up Side of Down”

Where you, as an artist, fit into the global economy. All the answers you need for confidence “in the field.” By Jean Kilner

R

ob he wanted ti show the fact that he was the same person as ever Sparno recently did something that 12.5 milliomAmericans would kill to do. He did something that has never been attempted by this many people at once in the 60 years the government has been keeping records. He did something that’s getting only more difficult with every day. He got a job. A really good job. A ‘pay the mortgage and still be able to pay your kid’s private college tuition’ kind of job. When Sparno, 55, a longtime salesman, lost his position at Oracle (ORCL, Fortune 500), he knew the search wasn’t going to be easy. He

had friends who were out of work and struggling to find jobs. He knew that getting back in the game would require every skill he’d spent his career honing. Methodical by nature, Sparno made a trip to Staples, where he bought a black hardcover lined notebook. He vowed to record every day what he did, whom he talked to, how he felt, how many miles he ran. He even wrote down what he ate. To keep his spirits up (another must if you’re in the persuasion business), he organized a group of seven other executives. back in the game would require every skill he’d spent his dream. notebook. He vowed to record every day what he did, whom he talked to, how he felt, how many miles he ran. He even wrote down what he ate. To keep his spirits up (another must if you’re in the persuasion business), he organized a group of seven other executives.


W p.26

Advice

Don’t Settle For Sun-dried

You don’t want to go out searching for an extra on Jersey Shore. Stay away from those 555 numbers with mysterious sirens and get ‘real.’

I

By Jean Kilner

n Woody Allen’s classic “Annie Hall,” Alvy Singer laments, “Everything our parents said was good is bad.” He lists whole milk, red meat - and the sun. Obviously, the sun is not “bad,” but the truth about sun exposure is much more complex than believed a generation ago. Ever since Coco Chanel declared tanning “in” in the 1920s, a suntan was seen as symbol of health, youth and status. However, recent studies on the relationship between the sun’s ultraviolet rays (UVR) and our skin are changing the way we view that “healthy” glow. What is tanning? Tanning is the skin’s reaction to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. When skin is exposed to UV rays, cells called melanocytes produce the brown pigment melanin, which darkens the cells of the epidermis. This darkening of the skin cells is the skin’s natural – if imperfect – defense against further damage from UV radiation. Is tanning bad for you? The sun’s UV rays damage the DNA of the skin’s epidermal cells, triggering enzymes that race to repair the damage. However, these enzymes do not always repair the DNA successfully, and all this unrepaired damage can lead to mutations that increase the risk of skin cancer. Also, repeated unprotected sun exposure can cause photoaging – wrinkles, sagging skin, and spots associated with sun damage. Does all UV radiation harm my skin? Scientists divide the solar UV spectrum into three wavelengths - UVA, UVB and UVC. Once, UVA and UVC were thought harmless, and only UVB was believed dangerous. UVC is still deemed no threat, since it is absorbed by the ozone layer. But UVA accounts for up to 95 percent of solar UVR reaching Earth. Though far less capable of causing sunburn than UVB, UVA is present during all daylight hours year round, while the amount of UVB in sunlight varies by season, location and time of day.

Bitmap Personals as her android alter ego and songstress Cindy Mayweather. photography: Daniel Jackson


W p.28

Advice

Taking That Plunge? Pros and Cons for deciding whether or not to accept the ball & chain. (For Men)

Cons

Falling Businessman www.Art-Depot.com

Pros

Based on national polls in the United States, 72% of men took over 2 minutes to come up with 5 pros for marriage. That same 72% percent though, took under 45 seconds to come up with 1 to 6 cons about marriage. The age group for these men were 22-45.

• Through the late 1980’s and early 1990’s many woman strived for the independency in the working fields as well as in their relationships.The thought of marriage was starting to seem unimportant to many,while there is that constant need for companionship the idea to still have that freedom seemed to be just as appealing.Why get married,would it ruin a good thing? • I spoke with several of my friends and a few family members about this issue and their thoughts on it. • “I believe the benefits of living together is a cheaper and a more independent way for many.It doesn’t mean that you don’t love the person that you are with just because you don’t choose to marry them,you shouldn’t have to have legal documents to prove how you feel about one another” • “Marriage is strictly a choice of the individuals,marriage takes alot of give and take,I hope to eventually get married and make that commitment and if I am able to do that sensibly then I should be able to accept anything else that might occur in the relationship sensibly and whatever

By Jean Kilner

Verdict Question 1: What percentage of our income are we prepared to spend to purchase and maintain our home on a monthly or annual basis?Question 2: Who is responsible for keeping our house and yard cared for and organized? Are we different in our needs for cleanliness and organization? Question 3: How much money do we earn together? Now? In one year? In five years? Ten? Who is responsible for which portion? Now? In one year? Five? Ten? Question 4: What is our ultimate financial goal regarding annual income, and when do we anticipate achieving it? By what means and through what efforts? Question 5: What are our categories of expense (rent, clothing, insurance, travel)? How much do we spend monthly, annually, in each category? How much do we want to be able to spend? Question 6: How much time will each of us spend at work, and during what hours? Do we begin work early? Will we prefer to work into the evening?


W Advice

p.30

Your Freedoms!

Don’t say fire in a movie theater, bomb on a plane, or pass-the-roll in a public toilet. Have we been guarding ourselves? By Jean Kilner

A

Bar r Yay! ed Desi gn Tu

ccording to the Freedom Forum Organization, legal systems, and society at large, recognize limits on the freedom of speech, particularly when freedom of speech conflicts with other values or rights. Limitations to freedom of speech may follow the “harm principle” or the “offense principle”, for example in the case of pornography or “hate speech”.[Limitations to freedom of speech may occur through legal sanction and/or social disapprobation. ••Members of Westboro Baptist Church have been specifically banned from entering Canada for hate speech. In “On Liberty” (1859) John Stuart Mill argued that “...there ought to exist the fullest liberty of professing and discussing, as a matter of ethical conviction, any doctrine, however immoral it may be considered.” Mill argues that the fullest liberty of expression is required to push arguments to their logical limits, rather than the limits of social embarrassment. However, Mill also introduced what is known as the harm principle, in placing the following limitation on free expression: “the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others. In 1985 Joel Feinberg introduced what is known as the “offence principle”, arguing that Mill’s harm principle does not provide sufficient protection against the wrongful behaviours of others. Feinberg wrote “It is always a good reason in support of a proposed criminal prohibition that it would probably be an effective way of preventing serious offense (as opposed to injury or harm) to persons other than the actor, and that it is probably a necessary means to that end.”[30] Hence Feinberg argues that the harm principle sets the bar too high and that some forms of expression can be legitimately prohibited by law because they are very offensive. But, as offending someone is less serious than harming someone, the penalties imposed should be higher for causing harm.

mblr .


W p.32

Girls Girls Girls

How’d you become the ‘Everymans Fantasy’? By Rodney Skully

A

s a small child, Rosario made a brief appearance on Sesame Street. She was subsequently “discovered” on her front porch step by photographer Larry Clark and Harmony Korine, where Harmony lauded her with praise as being perfect for a part he had written in his screenplay that would become the controversial 1995 film Kids. She went on to star in varied roles, ranging from independent films to big-budget blockbusters including Rent, He Got Game, and Men in Black II. In 1999, Dawson teamed up with Prince for the rerelease of his 1980s hit “1999”. The new remixed version featured the actress in an introductory voice over, offering commentary on the state of the world in the year before the new millennium.

“We have to do our best impression of Sam Jackson pimp-laughing! ” The same year, she appeared in The Chemical Brothers’ video for the song “Out of Control” from the album Surrender.She is also featured on the track “She Lives In My Lap” from the second disc of the OutKast album Speakerboxxx/The Love Below, in which she speaks the intro and a brief interlude towards the end. Dawson starred as “Naturelle,” the love interest of a convicted drug dealer played by Edward Norton, in the 2002 Spike Lee film drama, 25th Hour. In the 2004 Oliver Stone film Alexander, she played the bride of Alexander the Great, which featured her in a fully nude sex scene. In the autumn of 2005, Dawson appeared on stage as Julia in the Public Theater’s “Shakespeare in the Park” revival of Two Gentlemen of Verona. In the film adaptation of the popular musical Rent in 2005, she played the exotic dancer Mimi Marquez, replacing the original Mimi, Daphne Rubin-Vega, who was pregnant and unable to play the part. She also appeared in the adaptation of the graphic novel Sin City, co-directed by Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller where she played Gail, a prostitute-dominatrix. Also in that year, she appeared in a graphically violent scene in the Rob Zombie film The Devil’s Rejects. Though the scene was cut from the final film, it is available in the deleted scenes on the DVD release in July of 2005.


W p.34

Kulture

By Jean Kilner

D

emolition derby is a motorsport usually presented at county fairs and festivals. While rules vary from event to event, the typical demolition derby event consists of five or more drivers competing by deliberately ramming their vehicles into one another.[1] The last driver whose vehicle is still operational is awarded the victory. Demolition derbies originated in the United States and quickly spread to other western nations. In Europe, this type of event is called banger racing, albeit in a demolition derby racers do not race against each other, instead aiming specifically to destroy the other cars. Demolition derbies can be very dangerous. Although serious injuries are rare, occasionally they do happen. Drivers are typically required to sign a waiver to release the promoter of an event from liability. To make the event safer, all glass is removed from the vehicle, and deliberately ramming the driver’s-side door area is forbidden. The driver’s door is often required to

Start your engines, and prepare for an insight into destruction derbies down in the rural midwest.

be painted white with black numbers or blaze orange, or with contrasting colors, for visibility. Most demolition derbies are held on dirt tracks, or in open fields, that are usually soaked with water. This causes the competition area to become muddy, which in turn helps to further slow the vehicles. Some drivers use both the front and rear of the vehicle to ram the other competitors. Others tend to use only the rear end of the vehicle, to help protect the engine compartment from damage. Demolition derbies can be very dangerous. Although serious injuries are rare, occasionally they do happen. Drivers are typically required to sign a waiver to release the promoter of an event from liability.

The Jist

Most demolition derbies are held on dirt tracks, or in open fields, that are usually soaked with water. This causes the competition area to become muddy, which in turn helps to further slow the vehicles. Some drivers use both the front and rear of the vehicle to ram the other competitors. Others tend to use only the rear end of the vehicle, to help protect engine compartment damage.


W p.36

Kulture

Me & My Van

Its the newly reincarnated style of the rolling pad on wheels. Comfort and culture unite again to birth the Astros and Economy Vans in 2010.

V

The Classic Chevy Van Led Neelson.

By Jean Kilner

an Nuys Boulevard runs approximately ten miles from the Santa Monica Mountains in Sherman Oaks at its southern terminus to the foothills of the Verdugo Mountains in Lake View Terrace at its northern terminus. It passes through the affluent community of Sherman Oaks, then continues through the community of Van Nuys, passing the numerous automobile dealerships in southern Van Nuys, then passing through the Van Nuys Municipal Center, the government center of the San Fernando Valley, then continuing north through Panorama City, past the old General Motors plant now converted into a shopping plaza called “The Plant,� before veering north east through the communities of Arleta and Pacoima, passing the San Fernando Gardens housing project, and ending in the foothills of the Verdugo Mountains. With its wide expanse through the heart of the San Fernando Valley, Van Nuys Boulevard became known from the 1950s through the 1970s as a center of teenage cruising. Its car culture was celebrated in several motion pictures, including Van Nuys Boulevard. Cruising became a thing of the past as police cracked down on the practice, but the car culture still lives on through the numerous automobile dealerships that line both sides of Van Nuys

Boulevard in northern Sherman Oaks and southern Van Nuys. Despite its reputation as the center of car culture, Van Nuys Boulevard has several bus routes running on it, including two Metro routes with heavy ridership, Metro Rapid line 761 & Metro Local line 233. Van

Nuys Boulevard runs approximately ten miles from the Santa Monica Mountains in Sherman Oaks at its southern terminus to the foothills of the Verdugo Mountains in Lake View Terrace at its northern terminus.

Do the Astro Carol Chang.


The Big Health Scare

Debunking the myths shrouding the infamous Health Care reform, as told by the Glen Becks and Bill O’reillys of the media. Are these politicas harming the way people discuss conflicting ideas. By Jean Kilner

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The Misrepresentation

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hat’s really in Obama’s health care reform bill? Almost no one knows, and here’s why: It’s 1,017 pages long and written in an alien form of bureaucratic English that can barely be decoded by earthlings. And yet, astonishingly, a U.S. Army translator has been found who speaks “Washington Doublespeak” and he was kind enough to decode the bill and post his plain-language findings over at FreeRepublic.com. Below, we reprint what he found in the health care reform bill. As you read this, keep in mind that some of these translations are a bit loose with the interpretations, but I’ve personally spot-checked these points, and they are indeed all contained in the bill in one form or another (shrouded in Doublespeak language, of course). Editor’s note: I don’t personally agree with every interpretation listed here, and some of the bill’s provisions are actually good ideas (like banning doctors from owning stock in health care companies). But overall, this interpretation points out many alarming provisions in the proposed health care reform bill... From CMS at FreeRepublic.com: The term “credit period” means the 2-consecutive-taxable year period beginning with the first taxable year in which the employer offers one or more qualified health plans to employees through an Exchange. “Eligible small employer” means an employer with no more than 25 fulltime equivalent employees for the taxable year, the average annual wages of which do not exceed twice a specified dollar amount in effect for that year. The specified dollar amount for 2011, 2012, and 2013 will be $20,000 and for subsequent years will be $20,000 multiplied by a cost-of-living adjustment. No credit period will be required in 2011, 2012, and 2013. The credit shall be determined without regard to whether the taxable year is in a credit period and using different specified percentages. No deduction will be allowed for the portion of the premiums for qualified health plans or for health insurance coverage in years beginning in 2011, 2012, or 2013, paid by an employer which is equal to the amount of the credit. This credit will be allowed against the alternative minimum tax for businesses and will be effective as of December 31, 2010. Health is the general condition of a person in all aspects. It is also a level of functional and/or metabolic efficiency of an organism, often implicitly human. At the time of the creation of the World Health Organization (WHO), in 1948, health was defined as being “a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity”. Only a handful of publications have focused specifically on the definition of health and its evolution in the first 6 decades. Some of them highlight its lack of operational value and the problem created by use of the word “complete.” Others declare the definition, which has not been modified since 1948, “simply a bad one.” In 1986, the WHO, in the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion, said that health is “a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living. Health is a positive concept emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities.” Classification systems such as the WHO Family of International Classifications (WHO-FIC), which is composed of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) also define health. Overall health is achieved through a combination of physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being, which, together is commonly referred to as the Health Triangle.

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“U su ned fa sce uca lse pti te pr ble d p op o eo ag f b pl an eli e a da evi re .� ng mo in re


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By Jean Kilner

Style, Luke D. 2010

A brief affair with the woman whose statements and imagery, when combined, influence the way we think.


Vs.

The difference between two icons.


The Gaze, Barbara Kruger. 1981-83


“Although my art work was heavily informed by my design work on a formal and visual level, as regards meaning and content the two practices parted ways.”

I

f power within cultures is a recurring motif in Kruger’s work. The text in her works of the 1980s includes such phrases as “Your comfort is my silence” (1981), “You invest in the divinity of the masterpiece” (1982), and “I shop therefore I am” (1987). She has said that “I work with pictures and words because they have the ability to determine who we are and who we aren’t.” photography in her work is the impulse of artists using this kind of appropriation as its own focus: someone who pulls from the works of others and the worlds they depict to create their own work. Appropriation art became popular in the late 70’s although its tendency can be traced from the early Modernist works specifically using collage. Other appropriation artists such as Louise Lawler, Vikky Alexander, Sherrie Levine and Mike Bidlo all came into prominence in New York’s East Village in the 1980s. The importance of appropriation art in contemporary culture lay in its ability to fuse broad cultural images as a whole and place them toward narrower signs of personal interpretation. In 1980 she had her first solo exhibition at P.S. 1, Long Island City, New York. In 1985 she joined the prominent contemporary art gallery of Mary Boone, and has had eight solo shows there since. In 2005 Kruger was honored at the 51st Venice Biennale with the “Golden Lion” for Lifetime Achievement. Kruger is currently a professor at the University of California at Los Angeles. In 2007, Kruger was one of the many artists to be a part of South Korea’s Incheon Women Artists’ Biennale in Seoul. This marked South Korea’s first women’s biennial. [2] In September 2009, Kruger’s “Between Being Born and Dying”, a major installation commissioned by the Lever House Art Collection, opened at the New York City architectural landmark Lever House. Kruger’s words and pictures have been displayed in both galleries and public spaces, as well as framed and unframed photographs, posters, postcards, t-shirts, electronic signboards, billboards and on a train station platform in Strasbourg, France. For the past decade Kruger has created installations of video, film, audio and projection. Enveloping the viewer with the seductions of direct address, her work is consistently about the kindnesses and brutalities of social life: about how we are to one another.


Barbara on Basquiat

SAMO project ended with the epitaph “SAMO IS DEAD” written on the walls of SoHo buildings. Unlike the average graffiti artist, Jean-Michel Basquiat came to personify the art scene of the 80s, with its merging of youth culture, money, hype, excess, and self-destruction. And then there was the work, which the public image tended to overshadow: paintings and drawings that conjured up marginal urban black culture and black history, as well as the artist’s own conflicted sense of identity. Basquiat’s ploy was to write anti-

50

gh School and City as a School in New York. In 1978, Basquiat dropped out of high school and left home, a year before graduating. He move d into the city and lived with friends, surviving orking in the Unique Clothing Warehouse on Broadway. By 1979, however, Basquiat had gained a certain celebrity status amidst the thriving art scene of Manhattan’s East Village through his regular appearances on Glenn O’Brien’s live public-access cable show, TV Party. Basquiat attended Edward R. Murrow High School and City as a School in New York.

SAMO project ended with the epitaph “SAMO IS DEAD” written on the walls of SoHo buildings. Unlike the average graffiti artist, Jean-Michel Basquiat came to personify the art scene of the 80s, with its merging of youth culture, money, hype, excess, and self-destruction. And then there was the work, which the public image tended to overshadow: paintings and drawings that conjured up marginal urban black culture and black history, as well as the artist’s own conflicted sense of identityaround. This was only a key to his


51

Satire Magazine - Travel

51


Basquiat attended Edward R. Murrow High School and City as a School in New York. In 1978, Basquiat dropped out of high school and left home, a year before graduating. He moved into the city and lived with friends, surviving by selling T-shirts and postcards on the street, and working in the Unique Clothing Warehouse on Broadway. By 1979, however, Basquiat had gained a certain celebrity status amidst the thriving art scene of Manhattan’s East Village through his regular appearances on Glenn O’Brien’s live public-access cable show, TV Party. Won’t want to have Basquiat.

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By 1982, Basquiat was showing regularly, and alongside Julian Schnabel, David Salle, Francesco Clemente and Enzo Cucchi, became part of what was called the Neo-expressionist movement. He started dating an aspiring and then-unknown performer named Madonna in the fall of 1982. That same year, Basquiat met Andy Warhol, with whom he collaborated extensively in 1984-6, forging a close, if strained, friendship. He was also briefly involved with artist David Bowes. Since he had an enormous appetite for drugs, expensive clothing, fancy restaurants and first-class travel, this meant that he was tempted

to work around the clock. Stoked by cocaine and marijuana, he’d often paint 18 hours in a row and then use heroin to get to sleep. When he awoke, he’d start off where he left off. As a modernday equivalent of the Nibelungen, Basquiat labored away in the windowless basement of an upscale gallery run by an Italian woman named Annina Nosei who saw herself as an “ex-hippie”. If he was a slave, he was certainly a well-dressed one. He is considered one of the most interesting. He will become imortalized in memories and work he has left behind.


I think people have to set up little battles.

They have to demonize people whom they disagree with or feel threatened by.

But it’s the ideological framing of the debate that scares me.

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The Work

By 1982, Basquiat was showing regularly, and alongside Julian Schnabel, David Salle, Francesco Clemente and Enzo Cucchi, became part of what was called the Neo-expressionist movement. He started dating an aspiring and thenunknown performer named Madonna in the fall of 1982. That same year, Basquiat met Andy Warhol, with whom he collaborated extensively in 19846, forging a close, if strained, friendship. He was also briefly involved with artist David Bowes. Since he had an enormous appetite for drugs, expensive clothing, fancy restaurants and first-class travel, this meant that he was tempted to work around the clock. Stoked by cocaine and marijuana, he’d often paint 18 hours in a row and then use heroin to get to sleep. When he awoke, he’d start off where he left off. He was influential.

54

By 1982, Basquiat was showing regularly, and alongside Julian Schnabel, David Salle, Francesco Clemente and Enzo Cucchi, became part of what was called the Neo-expressionist movement. He started dating an aspiring and then-unknown performer named Madonna in the fall of 1982. That same year, Basquiat met Andy Warhol, with whom he collaborated extensively in 1984-6, forging a close, if strained, friendship. He was also briefly involved with artist David Bowes. Since he had an enormous appetite for drugs, expensive clothing, fancy restaurants and first-class travel, this meant that he was tempted to work around the clock. Stoked by cocaine and marijuana, he’d often paint 18 hours in a row and then use heroin to get to sleep. When he awoke, he’d start off where he left off. He was influential.


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E

raserhead brought Lynch to the attention of producer Mel Brooks, who hired him to direct 1980’s The Elephant Man, a biopic of deformed Victorian era figure Joseph Merrick (John Hurt). Lynch brought his own distinct surrealist approach to the film, filming it in black and white, although it has still been described as “one of the most conventional” of his films.[17] The Elephant Man was a huge commercial success, and earned eight Academy Award nominations, including Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay nods for Lynch. It also established his place as a commercially viable, if somewhat dark and unconventional, Hollywood director. George Lucas, a fan of Eraserhead, offered Lynch the opportunity to direct Star Wars: Return of the Jedi, which he refused, feeling that it would be more Lucas’ vision than his own.[13] Meanwhile in 1983 he began the writing and drawing of a comic strip, The Angriest Dog in the World, which featured unchanging graphics alongside cryptic philosophical references.

“The concept of absurdity is something I’m attracted to.” It ran from 1983 until 1992 in the Village Voice, Creative Loafing and other tabloid and alternative publications. Afterwards, Lynch agreed to direct a bigbudget adaptation of Frank Herbert’s science fiction novel Dune for Italian producer Dino De Laurentiis’s De Laurentiis Entertainment Group, on the condition that DEG release a second Lynch project, over which the director would have complete creative control. Although De Laurentiis hoped it would be the next Star Wars, Lynch’s Dune (1984) was a critical and commercial dud; it cost $45 million to make, and grossed a mere $27.4 million domestically. Later on, Universal Studios released an “extended cut” of the film for syndicated television; this contained almost an hour of cutting-roomfloor footage and new narration. Such was not representative of Lynch’s intentions, but the studio considered it more comprehensible than the original two hour version. Lynch objected to these changes and had his name struck from the extended cut, which has “Alan Smithee” credited as the director and “Judas Booth” (a pseudonym which Lynch himself invented, inspired by his own feelings of betrayal) as the screenwriter. The three hour version has since been released on video worldwide over the course of a year.

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David Lynch

Exploring the details will not shed light on the enigmatic secrecy found in such a talents kaleidoscopic obstrusiveness. By Jean Kilner


I

n 1966, Lynch relocated to the Fairmount neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he attended the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts (PAFA) and made a series of complex mosaics in geometric shapes which he called Industrial Symphonies. At this time, he also began working in film. His first short film Six Men Getting Sick (1966), which he described as “57 seconds of growth and fire, and three seconds of vomit”, was played on a loop at an art exhibit. It won the Academy’s annual film contest.

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J

effrey Beaumont (Kyle MacLachlan) returns to his logging home town of Lumberton from Oak Lake College after his father (Jack Harvey) suffers a near fatal stroke. While walking home from the hospital, he cuts through a vacant lot and discovers a severed ear. Jeffrey takes the ear to Police Detective John Williams (George Dickerson), through whom he meets the detective’s daughter, Sandy (Laura Dern). She tells him details about the ear case and a suspicious woman, Dorothy Vallens (Isabella Rossellini) who may be connected to the case. Increasingly curious, Jeffrey enters Dorothy’s apartment by posing as an exterminator, and while Dorothy is distracted by a man (Fred Pickler) dressed in a yellow suit at her door, and steals her spare key. Jeffrey and Sandy attend Dorothy’s nightclub act at the Slow Club and leave early so Jeffrey can sneak into her apartment to snoop. He hurriedly hides in a closet when she returns home. However, Dorothy, wielding a knife, finds him and threatens to hurt him. Thinking his curiosity is merely sexual and aroused by his voyeurism, Dorothy makes Jeffrey undress at knifepoint and fellates him. Their encounter is interrupted by a knock at the door, and Dorothy hides Jeffrey in the closet. From there, he witnesses the visitor, Frank Booth (Dennis Hopper), inflict his bizarre sexual proclivities — which include Inhaling Nitrous Oxide, dry humping, and sadomasochism — upon Dorothy. Frank is an extremely foul-mouthed, violent sociopath whose orgasmic climax is a fit of both pleasure and rage. Frank has kidnapped Dorothy’s husband and son to force her to

perform sexual favors. When Frank leaves, a sad and desperate Dorothy tries to seduce Jeffrey again and demands that he hit her, but when he refuses, she loses interest in sex and asks to be left alone. While attending another of Dorothy’s performances at the Slow Club, where she sings the song “Blue Velvet”, Jeffrey spots Frank in the audience fondling a piece of blue-velvet fabric he cut from Dorothy’s robe. Later, in the car park, Jeffrey watches Frank and his cohorts drive away before going to Dorothy’s apartment again. Jeffrey spends the next few days spying on Frank, whom he sees entering a building. Shortly afterwards, a well-dressed man and the Yellow Man exit the building.

The concept of absurdity is something I’m attracted to.”

He concludes the men are criminal associates of Frank. Jeffrey again visits Dorothy, who seduces him and asks him to strike her. When he refuses, she pressures him, becoming more emotional. In a blind rage he knocks her backwards and is instantly horrified, but Dorothy, as a result of Frank’s constant beatings, derives pleasure from it. Afterwards, Frank catches Dorothy and Jeffrey together and forces them both to accompany him to the apartment of Ben (Dean Stockwell), a suave dandy and partner in crime (Ben is holding Dorothy’s son) and drug dealer. In a bizarre but now iconic scene, Ben lip-

syncs a performance of Roy Orbison’s “In Dreams”, sending Frank into maudlin sadness, then rage. Frank takes Jeffrey to a lumber yard and savagely beats him to the overture of “In Dreams”. Jeffrey wakes the next day and goes home, where he is overcome with guilt and despair. He goes to the police station, where he notices that Sandy’s father’s partner is Gordon — the Yellow Man. Later at Sandy’s home, her father is amazed by Jeffrey’s story, but warns Jeffrey to stop his amateur sleuthing lest he endanger himself and the investigation. After attending a dance party where they profess their love for each other, Jeffrey and Sandy are tailed on their way home. Fearing the follower is Frank, Jeffrey is relieved to discover that it is only Sandy’s jealous ex-boyfriend. A confrontation is averted when the group finds a naked and distressed Dorothy on Jeffrey’s front lawn. Barely conscious, Dorothy reveals that she slept with Jeffrey, causing an upset Sandy to slap Jeffrey, although she later forgives him. Jeffrey insists on returning to Dorothy’s apartment and tells Sandy to send her father there immediately. At Dorothy’s apartment, Jeffrey finds the crudely lobotomized Yellow Man and the dead body of Dorothy’s husband, with a missing ear. When he tries to leave, he sees the welldressed man coming up the stairs and recognizes him as Frank in disguise. Jeffrey talks to Detective Williams over the Yellow Man’s police radio, but lies about his location inside the apartment.


T

here are several recurring themes within Lynch’s work, leading Le Blanc and Odell to state that “his films are so packed with motifs, recurrent characters, images, compositions and techniques that you could view his entire output as one large jigsaw puzzle of ideas”.[33] One of the key themes that they noted was the usage of dreams and dreamlike imagery within his works, something they related to the “surrealist ethos” of relying “on the subconscious to provide visual drive”. This can be seen in John Merrick’s dream of his mother in The Elephant Man, Agent Cooper’s dreams of the red room in Twin Peaks and the “dreamlike logic” of the narrative found in Eraserhead, Mulholland Drive and Inland Empire.[34] Other themes include industry, with repeated imagery of “the clunk of machinery, the power of pistons, shadows of oil drills pumping, screaming woodmills and smoke billowing factories”, as can be seen with the industrial wasteland in Eraserhead, the factories in The Elephant Man, the sawmill in Twin Peaks and the lawn mower in The Straight Story. Another theme is the idea of a “dark underbelly” of violent criminal activity within a society, such as with Frank’s gang in Blue Velvet and the cocaine smugglers in Twin Peaks. The idea of deformity is also found in several

64

of Lynch’s films, from the protagonist in The Elephant Man, to the deformed baby in Eraserhead, as is the idea of death from a head wound, found in most of Lynch’s films. Other imagery commonly used within Lynch’s works are flickering electrictity or lights, as well as fire and the idea of a stage upon which a singer performs, often surrounded by drapery. Lynch also tends to feature his leading female actors in multiple or “split” roles, so that many of his female characters have multiple, fractured identities. This practice began with his choice to cast Sheryl Lee as both Laura Palmer and her cousin Maddy Ferguson in Twin Peaks and continued in his later works. In Lost Highway, Patricia Arquette plays the dual role of Renee Madison/Alice Wakefield, whilst in Mulholland Drive, Naomi Watts plays Diane Selwyn/Betty Elms and Laura Harring plays Camilla Rhodes/Rita and in Inland Empire, Laura Dern plays Nikki Grace/Susan Blue. By contrast, Lynch rarely creates multi-character roles for his male actors. Lynch is also widely noted for his collaborations with various production artists and composers on his films and multiple different productions. He frequently works with Angelo Badalamenti to compose music for his productions, former wife Mary Sweeney as a film editor, casting director Johanna Ray, and cast members Harry Dean Stanton, Jack Nance, Kyle MacLachlan, Naomi Watts, Isabella Rossellini, Grace Zabriskie, and Laura Dern.


The Story of A Modern Rebel. Marlon Brando. By Henry Fuselage


Early Start rando used his Stanislavski System skills for his first summerstock roles in Sayville, New York on Long Island. His behavior got him kicked out of the cast of the New School’s production in Sayville, but he was discovered in a locally produced play there and then made it to Broadway in the bittersweet drama I Remember Mama in 1944. Critics voted him “Broadway’s Most Promising Actor” for his role as an anguished veteran in Truckline Café, although the play was a commercial failure. In 1946 he appeared on Broadway as the young hero in the political drama A Flag is Born, refusing to accept wages above the Actor’s Equity rate because of his commitment to the cause of Israeli independence.[9][10] In that same year, Brando played the role of Marchbanks with Katharine Cornell in her production’s revival of Candida one of her signature roles. [11] Brando achieved stardom, however, as Stanley Kowalski in Tennessee Williams’s 1947 play A Streetcar Named Desire, directed by Elia Kazan. Brando sought out that role,[12] driving out to Provincetown, Massachusetts, where Williams was spending the summer, to audition for the part. Williams recalled that he opened the screen door and knew, instantly, that he had his Stanley Kowalski. Brando’s performance revolutionized acting technique and set the model for the American form of method acting. Afterward, Brando was asked to do a screen test for Warner Brothers studio for the film Rebel Without A Cause,[13] which James Dean was later cast in. The screen test appears as an extra in the 2006 DVD release of A Streetcar Named Desire. Brando’s first screen role was as the bitter paraplegic veteran in The Men in 1950. True to his method, Brando spent a month in bed at a veterans’ hospital to prepare for the role. Brando became well known for his crusades for civil rights, Native American rights, and other political causes. He also earned a “bad boy” reputation for his public outbursts and antics. On June 12, 1973, Brando broke paparazzo Ron Galella’s jaw. Galella had followed Brando, who was accompanied by talk show host Dick Cavett, after a taping

of the Dick Cavett Show in New York City. He reportedly paid a $40,000 out-of-court settlement and suffered an infected hand as a result. Galella wore a football helmet the next time he photographed Brando at a gala benefiting the American Indians Development Association. In Songs My Mother Taught Me, Brando claimed he met Marilyn Monroe at a party as she played piano, unnoticed by anybody else there, and they started an affair that lasted many years until her death, receiving a telephone call from her several days before she died. He also claimed numerous other romances, although he did not discuss his marriages, his wives, or his children in his autobiography. Brando married actress Anna Kashfi in 1957. Kashfi was born in Calcutta and moved to Wales at the end of British rule in India in 1947. She is said to have been the daughter of a Welsh steel worker of Irish descent, William O’Callaghan, who had been superintendent on the Indian State railways. However, in her book, Brando for Breakfast, she claimed that she really is half Indian and that the press incorrectly thought that her stepfather, O’Callaghan, was her real father. She said her real father was Indian and that she was the result of an “unregistered alliance” between her parents.

n 1959, Brando and Kashfi divorced after the birth of their son, Christian Brando, on May 11, 1958. In 1960, Brando married Movita Castaneda, a Mexican actress seven years his senior; they were divorced in 1962. Castaneda had appeared in the first Mutiny on the Bounty film in 1935, some 27 years before the 1962 remake with Brando as Fletcher Christian. Brando’s behavior during the filming of Bounty seemed to bolster his reputation as a difficult star. He was blamed for a change in director and a runaway budget, though he disclaimed responsibility for either. The Bounty experience affected Brando’s life in a profound way. He fell in love with Tahiti and its people. He bought a twelve

-island atoll, Tetiaroa, which he intended to make partly an environmental laboratory and partly a resort. Tahitian beauty Tarita Teriipia, who played Fletcher Christian’s love interest, became Brando’s third wife on August 10, 1962. She was 20 years old, 18 years younger than Brando. A 1961 article on Teriipia in the fan magazine Motion Picture described Brando’s delight at how naïve and unsophisticated she was. Because Teriipia was a native French speaker, Brando became fluent in the language and gave numerous interviews in French. Teriipia became the mother of two of his children. They divorced in July 1972. Brando eventually had a hotel built on Tetiaroa. It went through many redesigns as a result of changes demanded by Brando over the years. It is now closed. A new hotel, consisting of thirty deluxe villas, was due to open in 2008. In an interview with Gary Carey, for his 1976 biography The Only Contender, Brando said, “Homosexuality is so much in fashion it no longer makes news. Like a large number of men, I, too, have had homosexual experiences and I am not ashamed. I have never paid much attention to what people think about me. But if there is someone who is convinced that Jack Nicholson and I are lovers, may they continue to do so. I find it amusing.” On his death in 2004, the ashes of his childhood friend Wally Cox, which Brando had kept with him since 1973, were mingled and scattered together with Brando’s own ashes in Tahiti and Death Valley.


“

To grasp the full significance of life is the actor`s duty, to

interpret it is his problem, and to express it his dedication.�


Most Famous Roles As Sheriff Calder In The Chase

As Valentine ‘Snakeskin’ Xavier In The Fugitive Kind


As Don Vito Corleone In The Godfather pt.1

As Peter Quint In The Nightcomers


omic Relief


By Audrey Tierney


W Magazine  

This is a prototype magazine for a class aimed at editorial. 2010

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