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6. Every Subject a Creative Subject Malbank School and Sixth Form Centre in Cheshire has been identified as one of a number of vastly improving schools. The headteacher attributes their success to creative and cultural education: ÒVisitors are invariably struck by a range of creative, purposeful activity taking place throughout the school. They see evidence of a lively cultural life, which values creative and cultural education for its own sake, for what it contributes to young peopleÕs achievements and to the success of a school. Virtually everyone gains good GCSE and four good A levels is the norm at the sixth form of some 400. We regard every subject as a creative subject, in which youngsters are encouraged to think creatively and work creatively. They create aesthetically pleasing, useful ÔthingsÕ alongside interesting and stimulating images and ideas; they tackle problems requiring imaginative solutions; they participate in events and celebrations which enhance the schoolÕs Ôlearning cultureÕ and they experience something of the traditions and cultures of people in other times and in other societies. This ÔsortÕ of education, institutionalised through agreed curriculum principles and entitlements, monitoring, review and development, develops studentsÕ key skills and motivates them to participate actively, to take pride in their work, to want to learn more. Creative and cultural education contributes to their having the means and the will to achieve success. OFSTED found that Ôteaching, learning and academic standards are of a very high orderÕ; Ôquality standardsÕ, Ôhigh achievementÕ in a Ôgood school which is determined to become even betterÕ. This is not despite our putting thought, time and energy into the creative and cultural dimensions of the curriculum. It is a product of our doing so.Ó Allan Kettleday, Headteacher, Malbank School

Advice and Materials 193.

The QCA is developing non-statutory guidance for schools in a number of National Curriculum subjects. The case we have presented for creative and cultural education, and the approaches to teaching, learning and assessment that are required, call for careful programmes of curriculum and staff development. The QCA should support this process with guidance for all areas of the National Curriculum. Such guidance should be supported by training opportunities provided through the Standards Fund and other sources. We will return to this in Chapter Ten.

The education system should be aware of different ways of thinking and not be restrictive.

Teaching and Learning

NACCCE report

Professor Sir Harold Kroto, University of Sussex and Nobel Prize-winning chemist


ken robinson et al 1999_all our futures  
ken robinson et al 1999_all our futures  

All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and Education Report to the Secretary of State for Education and Employment the Secretary of State for...