Issuu on Google+


Part One


 What is ‘dynamic range’? Wh t i  ‘d i   ’?  The ratio between the maximum and minimum values 

of a physical measurement f    h i l  t  In photography, dynamic range is expressed in terms  of f‐stop or exposure value (EV) f f t       l  (EV)


Media

Dynamic Range  (approximately)

Sunlit Scene with Shadow

> 20 EV

The Human Eye

14 ‐ 24 EV

Negative Film

10.5 EV

Slide Film/DSLR

7 EV

Compact DC

6.6 EV

LCD Monitor

9 EV

Glossy Paper

7 6 EV 7.6 EV

Matte Paper

5.6 EV


 What is ‘dynamic range’? Wh t i  ‘d i   ’?  The ratio between the maximum and minimum values 

of a physical measurement f    h i l  t  In photography, dynamic range is expressed in terms  of f‐stop or exposure value (EV) f f t       l  (EV)  What is ‘high’ dynamic range?  A light and dark ratio than goes beyond the coverage  of our camera/monitor/printer (a relative term)


 Quit shooting Q it  h ti  Wait for light condition to change  Sacrifice either highlight or shadow  Change composition (in camera or post‐processing) or 

angle of shooting  Reduce the dynamic range by using fill‐in flash,  reflector, GND filter, etc  Manual exposure blending/fusion  Dodging and burning


 Quit shooting  Wait for light condition to change  Sacrifice either highlight or shadow S ifi   ith  hi hli ht    h d  Change composition (in camera or post‐processing) or     

angle of shooting l   f  h ti Reduce the dynamic range by using fill flash, reflector,  fil   filter, etc Manual exposure blending/fusion Dodging and burning The ‘HDR revolution’


HDR Software

A Single HDR File


HDR File

HDR Software

Tone Mapping


 To scale down or compress the dynamic range of an 

HDR image so that the resulting image can be  presented on a monitor


Tone mapping/compression often creates visible artefacts like halo, glow and strong local contrast


 To scale down and compress the dynamic range of an 

HDR image so that the resulting image can be  presented on a monitor  Tone mapping often create visible artefacts like halo,  glow and strong local contrast  A brief history of HDR processing  Tone mapping vs. exposure blending/fusion pp g p g


The idea of HDR is evolving‌. evolving


Stylistic

Realistic

* The idea of single image HDR processing


Part Two


 Goal: Capture same image with different exposure G l  C t    i   ith diff t   Factors affecting exposure  Aperture  Shutter Speed  ISO


 Tripod Ti d  Auto‐bracketing


 Photomatix Ph t ti  Nik HDR Efex Pro  Photoshop


 Background movement B k d  t  Moving object


 HDR is more suitable for static scenes (but technology      

keeps improving) HDR output is seldom the end of editing There is more than one way to tone map an image  within a single program Each HDR program has its own character The artefacts created are considered good or bad  depends on intention of the photographer There is no right or wrong about HDR but there is  g good or bad use of the technique q


‘New technology does not automatically produce better images. HDR is simply a new tool that we can exploit and use to create images that were harder to achieve hi i the in h past’’ Uwe Steinmueller


HDR Handout