Page 1

Laurie Ayres – Herbalist, Acupuncturist, Tui Na Practitioner Lic OHM, Lic Ac, Lic Tui Na, BSc (hons), MRCHM, MBAcC

Chinese Medicine & Endometriosis If there is flow, there is no pain, if there is pain, there is no flow This oft quoted saying in Chinese medicine refers to the pathology behind any type of bodily pain, and is especially true of endometriosis. The pathology of endometriosis from a Chinese medical perspective is relatively simple and easy to understand. In a state of health there is free flow of Qi (energy), blood and body fluids, keeping all of the bodies tissues nourished and warm, disease is the result of disruption of this flow. The most common pathology behind endometriosis from a Chinese medical view is one of ‘blood stasis’. This is a condition where the flow of blood has been disrupted and the blood has become stuck, producing stabbing and/or cramping pain. The causes of blood stasis are numerous, and beyond the scope of this article. Treatment When treating endometriosis with Chinese medicine the aim is not to cover up the pain with the herbal equivalent of a painkiller, but rather to remove the source of pain, the stuck blood. In fact the aim of any Chinese medical treatment is merely to restore the proper functioning of the body, thereby relieving the symptoms. In a case of the above mentioned blood stasis, herbs are used to break up the stuck blood, and encourage healthy circulation, removing the source of the pain. Herbs are rarely used alone in Chinese medicine, but rather combined into formulas, designed to match the correct functioning of the body. Herbal medicine can be administered in many different forms, including loose herbs, which require boiling, granules or powders which are mixed with hot water and drank, or capsules. Length of Treatment There is no definite answer to the question of how much treatment is needed, as everyone is so different in the severity and length of time they have suffered from endometriosis. The treatment of endometriosis is usually a long term affair, and depending on the length of time the person has been suffering, and is rarely less than 6 months to 1 year, but to steal a quote from a teacher of mine ‘long-term herbs are an investment in longevity’. But do not be disheartened by this, as Chinese medicine is not slow in taking affect and one is often likely to start to see a reduction in pain much before this time. One commonly used standard in Chinese medicine is three of the patients menstrual cycles for a good improvement in pain to be seen. If this still seems like a long time then remember two things, firstly compare the above figures to the length of time you have been feeling the effects of endometriosis or even the time it took just to get a diagnosis, secondly quick results rarely last. Length and Cost of a Single Treatment The length of an initial consultation will range from 30 minutes to 1hr, allowing the practitioner to take a full case history. Follow-up consultations will usually be shorter. Many herbalists also practice acupuncture, and may combine herbal medicine with acupuncture. Continued.

07787 508 378 • laurie@easternhealingarts.co.uk • www.easternhealingarts.co.uk


Laurie Ayres – Herbalist, Acupuncturist, Tui Na Practitioner Lic OHM, Lic Ac, Lic Tui Na, BSc (hons), MRCHM, MBAcC

Cost of treatment varies greatly between practitioners, from £140-£25 for an initial consultation, and £80-£20 for follow-up consultations. The price of herbs is much more uniform, at around £10-£20 for a weeks supply, depending upon the form in which the herbs are used, and the daily dosage prescribed. How to Find a Herbalist When choosing a herbalist it is advised to look for a member of the Register of Chinese Herbal Medicine (RCHM), they will have the letters MRCHM after their name. This will ensure a good standard of training and competence, that is not to say that herbalists who are not members will not be competent or safe, but membership of the RCHM is a sure way to know that they are. A list of RCHM members can be found on their website, just visit www.rchm.co.uk and go to ‘find a member’.

About the Author Laurie Ayres is a practicing Chinese herbalist and acupuncturist, and a member of both the Register of Chinese Herbal Medicine (RCHM) and British Acupuncture Council (BAcC). He practices at the Self Centre in Bury St Edmunds, and in north London. Laurie can be contacted for appointments and enquiries by phone on 07787 508 378, email at laurie@easternhealingarts.co.uk, and his website can be viewed at www.easternhealingarts.co.uk. Enquiries can also be made via Self Centre reception.

07787 508 378 • laurie@easternhealingarts.co.uk • www.easternhealingarts.co.uk

Chinese Medicine and Endometriosis  

When treating endometriosis with Chinese medicine the aim is not to cover up the pain with the herbal equivalent of a painkiller, but rather...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you