Page 1

Jewellery Historian HO RS - SÉR IE VOL U ME 1

SPECIAL ISSUE

HAU T E JOA IL L E R IE


Jewellery Historian SPECIAL ISSUE

H AUT E J OA IL LER IE VOLUME 1

1


Jewellery Historian

INSIDE THIS ISSUE 11 LONDON BY DE BEERS

41 LA NATURE DE CHAUMET

85 BLOSSOM BY LOUIS VUITTON

117 DIOR À VERSAILLES

2


Jewellery Historian Editor-in-Chief Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Creative director-at-large Panayiotis Simopoulos Gemology Department Editor Eva Kountouraki Haute Joaillerie Department Editor Olivier Dupon --Founder Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier --Columnists Eva Kountouraki ( Breathtaking beauty of Gems) Olivier Dupon ( The art of creativity / Haute Joaillerie) --Contributors Martin Huynh , Christina Rodopoulou, Catherine Varoucha --Creative Jewellery Historian Production Jewellery Historian --Photo agencies Shutterstock, Pixabay, Freepik, The stocks --Cover Photo courtesy of Boucheron © BOUCHERON --Advertising info@jewelleryhistorian.com Website www.jewelleryhistorian.com E-mail info@jewelleryhistorian.com --FREE DIGITAL COPY / NOT FOR SALE JEWELLERY HISTORIAN © 2016

All material published in this e-magazine and at www.jewelleryhistorian.com is published with permission of the brands and designers. Unless otherwise authorized in writing by the Jewellery Historian, it is strictly prohibited to reproduce, in whole or in part, and by any way, the content of this e-magazine. While precautions have been take to ensure the accuracy of the contents of our magazine and digital brands, neither the editors, publishers or its agents can accept responsibility for damages or injury which may arise there from. The information on this e-magazine is for information purposes only. Jewellery Historian assumes no liability or responsibility for any inaccurate, delayed or incomplete information. The information contained has been provided by individual brands, event organizers, brands, press offices or organizations without verification by us. The opinions expressed in articles and/or advertorials, are the author's and/or brand’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Jewellery Historian, the owner, the publisher, the editor-in-chief and team of the magazine, or of any part related to the magazine. The name “Jewellery Historian” and/or logo, may not be reproduced without prior written consent of the founder of magazine. Partial or entire reproduction of the material of this magazine is strictly prohibited.The content, entire edition, graphics, design, lay-out and other matters related to this issue are protected under applicable copyrights and other proprietary laws, including but not limited to intellectual property laws. The copying, reproduction, use, modification or publication by you of any such matters or any part of the material is strictly prohibited, without our express prior written permission.All trade names, trademarks or distinctive signs of any kind contained in the Web pages of the company

are the property of their owners and are protected by law. The same is valid also for all Links (links) .The presence of third-part links (links) in the Jewellery Historian Web pages & e-magazine is for informational purposes only. Our articles may contain photos/texts/graphics/designs that belong to third parties. They are published for information purposes only and with permission of the brands. Image(s) or Footage (as applicable), used under license from photo agencies. The Jewellery Historian is publishing articles about jewellery, auctions, jewellery designers, gemology, gemstones, etc. All trademarks mentioned in the Jewellery Historian’s website and/or magazine belong to their owners, third party brands, product names, trade names, corporate names and company names mentioned may be trademarks of their respective owners or registered trademarks of other companies and are used for purposes of explanation & information and to the owner's benefit, without implying a violation of copyright law. Photos used in articles belong to their owners, third party brands, product names, trade names, corporate names and company names mentioned may be trademarks of their respective owners or registered trademarks of other companies and are used for purposes of explanation and to the owner's benefit, without implying a violation of copyright law.


Jewellery Historian

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

173 SUNNY SIDE OF LIFE by PIAGET

221 LES BLÉS DE CHANEL

265 26 VENDÔME by BOUCHERON

4


I N S I D E T H E J E W E L L E RY H I S TO R I A N

CONTRIBUTORS

As long as he could remember, Olivier Dupon has always been passionate about how ideas can translate into designs, and as a result, he is fascinated by the umpteen creative approaches taken by many independent practitioners. He is now an expert in the fields of lifestyle and fashion, reveling in exposing these talents to a wider audience. While he began his career at Christian Dior, and then worked as a buyer and project manager for several large retail companies before running his own lifestyle boutique for several years, now based in London, he scouts international markets in search of exciting names in Art & Craft, with a focus on jewellery makers and splendid precious designs. His previous books include The New Artisans (2011), The New Jewelers (2012), The New Pâtissiers (2013), Floral Contemporary (2014), Encore! The New Artisans (2015), and Shoe: Contemporary Footwear by Inspiring Designers (2015) all published by Thames & Hudson. His new book on luxury jewellery will be published in Autumn 2016. For the Jewellery Historian, in his The Art of Creativity column, Olivier Dupon exposes inspiring, intriguing at time, and captivating stories through the presentation of talents or the exposé of current topics, all centered around creativity in today’s high-end fine jewelry.

Eva Kountouraki was born and raised in a family of goldsmiths and jewelers. From a very young age she expressed her keen interest in gems, jewelry and design, a passion that led her to devote her studies and her career in this field. She started her first collection of polished and rough gemstones at a very early age and realized that this would be her profession in the future. After studying gemology books in various languages, she attended gemological seminars in Greece and Europe and developed practical skills to analyze gems, Eva decided to accredit those skills choosing the best gemological institute in the world, GIA (Gemological Institute of America), for her studies. Succeeding unprecedented results in the practice and theory of gemology, analyzing and identifying thousands of gemstones and diamonds, she graduated and acquired the prestigious certificate GIA Graduate Gemologist Diploma, which includes specific studies in diamond grading (GIA Graduate Diamonds Diploma) and colored gemstones (GIA Graduate Colored Stones Diploma). Her studies in the jewelry field continued and Eva got her Jewelry Business Management Diploma, gaining specialized knowledge about all the aspects of the jewelry industry. Her training continued with jewelry design and computer aided design. Eva’s brilliant path in the field of gemology was crowned by her collaboration with the Italian branch of GIA. Eva received special training from professional and experienced gemologists of GIA Italy, New York and California, US, and for more than a decade she teaches gemology and jewelry design in GIA, transferring her experience, knowledge and passion for diamonds, gems and jewelry to her students-famous professionals from around world. Eve is proud to be the only Greek woman who has ever accomplished such a distinction in the field of diamonds and precious stones. Alongside her work as a gemology instructor, Eva is a jewelry and gemstone buyer and consultant for privates and companies, advising and helping her clients to make successful buys and investments in gemstones. She also organizes and teaches seminars for the training of gemstone and jewelry merchants, salespeople and gem-passionates. For the Jewellery Historian, in her The breathtaking beauty of gems column, she introduces you to a breathtaking gemstone in every issue.

5


I N S I D E T H E J E W E L L E RY H I S TO R I A N

CONTRIBUTORS

Panayiotis Simopoulos is the creative director-atlarge of the Jewellery Historian. In his role, he contributes to special projects and serves as roving ambassador with links to all creative areas of the magazine. With a successful world career as a fashion top model and as a  talented fashion photographer, he is the rarest kind of creative artist, one who creates extraordinary images. With a unique creative vision, whilst maintaining a clear vision of delivering a message that speaks directly to the reader, he ultimately creates an exciting and balanced visual experience. For the Jewellery Historian, Panayiotis creates the exceptional visual of each issue. Together with many of the most talented young photographers, he  definitely delivers, the most memorable, exciting and unique images and fashion editorials that the magazine has ever published. In close collaboration with the founder & editor-in-chief of the magazine and with the creative team, he is responsible for the uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to  a minimal and clean design offers to readers from around the globe a unique reading experience.

Catherine Varoucha joined recently the Jewellery Historian. Art has always been her true passion, and every forms of art has captivated her since early childhood. With a desire to explore how science and technology can be used to change skylines that form our cities and to improve the performance of buildings both socially and environmentally, she studied architecture which allowed her to engage both creatively and scientifically with the aesthetic and functional aspects of design. Christopher Wren once said, 'Architecture aims at eternity' and Catherine can think of no better way to achieve eternity than to help create buildings of tomorrow that preserve the ideas of today. Ultimately, we are judged by what we leave behind. Inspired by minimal architecture of the Cyclades in Greece and in particular of Naxos, Catherine works in close collaboration with the editor-in-chief and with the creative director-at-large, to create the uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to a minimal and clean design offers to our precious readers from around the globe a unique reading experience. Periodically she will also introduce us exceptional interiors around the globe.

6


Pugovica88 / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

Jewellery Historian

| EDITOR’S LETTER


EDITOR’S LETTER Founded in 2014, the Jewellery Historian is today considered by many decision makers & connoisseurs as the "Best kept secret  in the world of luxury", the Jewellery Historian has definitely a uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to a minimal and clean design offers to readers from around the globe a unique reading experience.   Our readers are high-end professionals, a connected community of decision makers, connoisseurs with enhanced refinement.   Our readership, has until now been accumulated only by word-of-mouth and in short time reached an international audience due to the professional knowledge, the high quality content and exceptional aesthetics of our team. To satisfy our unique and important audience around the globe that loves creativity, innovation and exceptional jewellery and timepieces, we focus on aesthetics and to the creativity of the designers, we choose to showcase, by letting their creations to speak for themselves, rather that surrounding them with distractions and other imagery.  Today the jewellery industry is as dynamic as it is fast growing. Consequential changes are under way, both in consumer behavior as well as in the industry itself. Jewellery players can’t simply do business as usual and expect to thrive; they must be alert and responsive to important trends and developments or else risk being left behind by more agile competitors. In this competitive industry, every jewellery brand needs to strengthen and differentiate its brands through unique, distinctive designs. This is hard especially for young designers and brands that don't have the marketing muscle of others. At the Jewellery Historian we work with all brands, from the small artisan to the large jewellery group, because we believe that if we work united, we can raise awareness of jewellery design as a form of creative expression.  The Jewellery Historian offers one of the highest-quality content for free on the internet, while keeping access to our e-magazine & website free to all users worldwide.   We are passionate about what we do and we are doing our best to promote young designers and brands.  We love to work together, support each other and make the jewellery industry a true global community.  Our main mission is to educate, inspire and to promote jewellery & timepieces designers ( and designers in general),  the expertise and vision of famous international maisons and talented young designers with the goal of raising the awareness of design as a form of creative expression. In this first “Special Edition”, we invite you to discover the very best of Haute Joaillerie, to discover the work of artists and brands that share the fundamental values of creativity, excellence and expertise. I would like to publicly thanks Olivier Dupon for his amazing report and all the JH team for their exceptional work.   After all, luxury is not only an industry, but also a language of passion.

Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Founder & Editor-in-Chief

8


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

H AU T E J OA I L L E R I E

PARIS JULY 2016 by Olivier Dupon

Each year in July, coinciding with Haute Couture week, high-end jewellery houses unveil their haute joaillerie collections in Paris. It goes without saying that this is an important week in the calendar of the super rich, where collectors can renew their wardrobes and invest in the exclusive jewels that go with it. It is also generally a time when one can hear a lot of “wows!” and “ohs!” as the collections tantalise while their mise-en-scène mesmerises. This year does not disappoint offering an exciting array of creative approaches. Some collections celebrate naturalistic designs, notably in the recurrence of one symbol in particular, the wheat motif, in the collections of three Houses. There was as ever the focus on rare and exceptional gemstones (Louis Vuitton had a few surprises in store) and of course superlative craftsmanship with some eye-catching results. That said, each brand provided very distinct visions: Chanel, De Beers and Van Cleef & Arpels have all managed to successfully create excitement with a mono-theme (respectively, all about wheat, London landmarks viewed through white diamonds, and a symphony of emeralds) while other brands opted for a traditional umbrella concept which they then interpreted with varied sub-collections. It is interesting to note that the likes of Bulgari and Boucheron delved into their own histories – a form of re-assurance in times of uncertainty – to revive some of their iconic symbols. Others, like Piaget and Alexandre Reza, experimented with a more modern vision of Haute Joaillerie, while Dior perfectly combined past, present and future in their homage to Versailles. Overall the 2016 edition was as always spectacular and it is my pleasure to describe the exceptional offering of the following seventeen haute or high jewellers in more detail and not in alphabetical order: De Beers, Chaumet, Louis Vuitton, Chanel, Dior, Piaget, Van Cleef & Arpels, Boucheron, Bulgari, Cartier, Buccellati, Alexandre Reza, Messika, de Grisogono, Sylvie Corbelin, Giampiero Bodino and Suzanne Syz.

9


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

10

Photo courtesy of CARNET © CARNET

Jewellery Historian


11


DE BEERS

12


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

London by De Beers by Olivier Dupon

Befittingly named London by De Beers, this high jewellery collection invites us to look at some of London’s best-known past and present architecture and landscapes through the prism of high jewellery.

13


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

14


De Beers pays tribute to their hometown through the ‘feminisation’ of those landmarks; a project epitomised by the exclusive collaboration with artist and photographer Mary McCartney, whom De Beers commissioned to create five diptychs on the theme of a ‘daydream stroll along the banks of the Thames’.

“We wanted to bring London to Paris”, says François Delage, De Beers Chief Executive Officer. To achieve that they literally re-created an English garden, a stroll along the Thames in their rue de la Paix offices, inside a large room complete with stone paved floor, real grass and walls of roses and hydrangeas. Light boxes projecting London landmarks – each a direct inspiration for the five main jewellery suites – screened the windows, diffusing a glowing light and gently enhancing the scintillation of the white diamonds on display. Befittingly named London by De Beers, this high jewellery collection invites us to look at some of London’s best-known past and present architecture and landscapes through the prism of high jewellery. It is also a way for De Beers to pay tribute to their hometown through the ‘feminisation’ of those landmarks; a project epitomised by the exclusive collaboration with artist and photographer Mary McCartney, whom De Beers commissioned to create five diptychs on the theme of a ‘daydream stroll along the banks of the Thames’. The series follows the journey of a fictional female dancer whose graceful poses are double exposed over the five chosen London monuments. ”We gave Mary creative license to blend the spirit of London and that of our London muse”, Jennie Farmer, Brand Director, adds. These ethereal images accompany the five high jewellery sets created for the occasion. In a separate room, De Beers presented the ‘1888 White Master Diamonds’, based on their core mission of unearthing rare and previously unseen diamonds over 10 carats in the M to X colour range (white diamonds that look almost yellowish due to their high content of nitrogen but are squarely on the white scale), and spectacular diamonds such as a 17 carat D colour pear-cut. “At De Beers, we see beauty in all diamonds and we have never been constrained by colours as such”, Jeannie Farmer explains. In the evocative English garden setting, the poetic ‘Thames Path’ parure displays fluid lines that eventually cross and spread at an intersection evoking the trail of an estuary: two rows on each side of the necklace, one with round-cut and the other with marquise-cut diamonds, unite when the marquise-cut strand passes over the round-cut lines, triggering the diamond flow to extend into three strands, each punctuated by three pearshaped diamonds (in three different sizes but with the same proportion). Behind the deceptive simplicity is a painstaking graduation of each diamond size and cut. The same organic approach is applied to both the matching earrings – set as symmetrical clusters with the pear-cut diamond dropping like water – and the ring. At some point while strolling along the Thames, one would stumble upon the Art Deco theatre of Battersea Power Station with its towering chimneys. In ‘Battersea Light’, the designers have precisely opted for more angular cuts while framing each main diamond with a setting of smaller round diamonds, so as to offset the soft intensity of emerald cuts. The pendant necklace is further magnified by a stunning detachable 10.92 carat D colour emerald-cut diamond drop.

15


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

1888 WHITE MASTER DIAMONDS Platinum Diamond: Emerald H SI1 Total carat weight: 10.18cts

16


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

17


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

LONDON VIEW

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

White Gold Centre Diamond: Pear G VVS1 3.15cts & F VS1 2.01cts

18


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

19


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

The London View set design pays homage to the rhythmic movement of the London Eye through the “Toi & Moi� style. Meticulously selected pear-cut diamonds, matching in shape and characteristics are showcased throughout the pieces of this set.

20


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

1888 WHITE MASTER DIAMONDS White Gold with Pear diamond D VS2 Total carat weight: 17.23cts

21


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

Battersea Light White Gold rign with Centre Diamond, Emerald cut, E VS2 3.01cts

22


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

23


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

24


The round-brilliants in particular evoke the twinkling lights at night-time, while the ovals conjure the reflections in the water. A gentle undulation (rendered by increasing sizes on each side of the necklace) recalls the flexibility of the bridge’s cables, and an outstanding detachable 10.38 carat E colour oval-cut diamond presides over the ensemble.

Pursuing this unique London ballade, we stroll to the ‘Albert Bridge’ and admire its suspension details. There the structural layout of oval-, marquise-, emerald- and round brilliant-cuts artfully resembles the majestic aerial lines of the said bridge. The round-brilliants in particular evoke the twinkling lights at night-time, while the ovals conjure the reflections in the water. A gentle undulation (rendered by increasing sizes on each side of the necklace) recalls the flexibility of the bridge’s cables, and an outstanding detachable 10.38 carat E colour oval-cut diamond presides over the ensemble. A few blocks away you would come upon possibly the most iconic building in London, the one that no matter where you are you associate with Britishness and its centre of power: ‘Elizabeth Tower’. Very much inspired by the clock face which houses the famous Big Ben bell, the superbly crafted medallion has calibrated round brilliant, twelve baguette and pearcut diamonds in a dial formation with a sun-like core of a 3 carat diamond. Suspended on a flexible and ornate chain, the central motif is detachable and can be worn as a brooch. Just opposite Westminster Abbey, one would be dazzled by the slow rotation of the London Eye, a continuous projection of circles and ellipses in the London sky. The Eye and its capsules is also a favourite romantic destination, and this is incorporated in the ‘London View’ suite by toi et moi pairings. More than anything, this suite with its delicately intertwining lines and pear-cut diamond drops is a nod to love, underlining that after all London – through De Beers’ invitation to wander – is on a par with Paris or Rome when it comes to romance. www.debeers.com

25


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

ALBERT BRIDGE An array of diamond cuts including ovals, marquise, emerald and round brilliants are individually selected and have been artfully set to resemble the majestic aerial lines of the Albert bridge. This linear necklace is crowned by an outstanding detach- able 10.38 carat E colour oval cut diamond.

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS Š DE BEERS

White Gold Centre Diamond: Oval E SI1 10.38cts

26


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

Albert Bridge White Gold Approximate total carat weight: 25.06cts

27


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

Albert Bridge White Gold Centre Diamond: Round G VVS2 1.28ct & 1.25ct

28


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

29


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

30


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Battersea Light echoes the Art Deco theatre of Battersea Power Station through a selection of angular cuts. The necklace makes use of a highly demanding setting style and can be worn in multiple ways. This truly wondrous design is further complimented by a magnificent detachable 10.92 carat D colour Emerald cut diamond drop.

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS Š DE BEERS

White Gold Centre Diamond: Emerald D SI1 10.92cts

31


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

Battersea Light White Gold Centre Diamond: Emerald E VS2 2.01cts & 2.01cts

32


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

1888 WHITE MASTER DIAMONDS Yellow Gold ring with Pear diamond M SI1 Total carat weight: 24.71cts

33


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

1888 WHITE MASTER DIAMONDS Ring in Platinum with Cushion X VS2 Total carat weight: 14.28cts

34


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

35


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

THAMES PATH The Thames Path set embodies the winding movement of the river and its neighbouring path with intersecting diamond lines. The crossover of round and marquise cut diamonds at the heart of the necklace has been expertly designed to maximise the diamonds brilliance. The Pear-cut diamond drops of the necklace were carefully Photo courtesy of DE BEERS Š DE BEERS

selected to perfectly match in shape and graduating carat weight. White Gold Centre Diamond: pear G VS1 5.06cts & F VS2 3.18cts & F VVS2 2.15cts

36


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

37


Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

THAMES PATH White Gold Centre Diamond: Pear F VVS2 2.21cts & F VS1 2.19cts

THAMES PATH White Gold Centre Diamond: Pear G VS2 4.01cts

38


Photo courtesy of DE BEERS © DE BEERS

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

39


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

40


41


CHAUMET

42


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

La nature de Chaumet by Olivier Dupon

Chaumet proposed a different kind of stroll. This time we were invited on a pastoral escape towards four floral emblems that are key to Chaumet’s heritage: le Laurier (laurel), le Chêne (oak), le Lys (Lily) and l’Épi de Blé (wheat).

43


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Firmament Appollinien’ necklace in white gold, set with five cushion-cut sapphires from Ceylon weighting 10.69, 8.71, 5.62, 4.69 and 4.36 carats, thirty-four brilliant-cut DE-VVS diamonds weighting 14.72 carats, moonstone motifs, cabochon-cut and beads of sapphires, and brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Laurier collection.The lower part of the necklace can be removed, so that the necklace can be worn in another way.

44

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


One of these in-house fundamentals is naturalism, which was recently celebrated in the Promenade Bucolique exhibition at the Chaumet Musée Éphémère. Among many fauna and flora designs, a wheat motif ring and brooch were displayed, and it could be said that these two pieces drew from the same inspirational wellspring as the new haute joaillerie collection today.

Chaumet proposed a different kind of stroll. This time we were invited on a pastoral escape towards four floral emblems that are key to Chaumet’s heritage: le Laurier (laurel), le Chêne (oak), le Lys (Lily) and l’Épi de Blé (wheat). Bringing back Chaumet’s fundamentals as central to the company’s future is indeed Jean-Marc Mansvelt’s mission, the recently appointed new CEO. One of these in-house fundamentals is naturalism, which was recently celebrated in the Promenade Bucolique exhibition at the Chaumet Musée Éphémère. Among many fauna and flora designs, a wheat motif ring and brooch were displayed, and it could be said that these two pieces drew from the same inspirational wellspring as the new haute joaillerie collection today. Right from the entrance – a long mirrored corridor whose walls and ceiling were ornate with paper flowers representing the four elements – one was immediately transported Alice-like to a virtual prairie. The paper installation throughout the presentation was a creation from none other than Marianne Guély, the French designer who famously morphs paper into mesmerizing fairy-tales. The far end of the corridor opened onto Le Grand Salon, which has been a listed historical monument since 1927 (the salon was commissioned to architect Belanger by the then treasurer of the navy under Louis XVI. The many references to the maritime world can still be seen in the woodwork, parquetry and paintings. It is also there that Frédéric Chopin composed and played his last Mazurka Opus 68 n° 4). It is in this highly prestigious place that the four episodes of La Nature de Chaumet were exhibited, each one with its own paper flower theme on display, and sixty-four jewels in total. Part of the Lys story is inspired by red lilies in the Passion incarnat parure: a feast of crimson and incandescent red spinels and rhodolite garnets that contrast with the vivid tones of mint-green tourmalines. The pièce de résistance is a majestic transformable tiara, one of Chaumet’s historical signatures. Another memorable set, the Étoiles boréales, celebrates the generosity of nature with buds and full bloom lilies. Magnificent black opal cabochons, Paraiba tourmalines, and yellow and violet sapphires successfully render the symbolic exquisiteness and purity of the flower. In a side room, oak leaves made of silvery paper nestled the glass cabinets of the ‘Chêne’ collection. A sacred tree and the emblem for Zeus, oak has here been romanticised in the Racines célestes suite: a highly feminine characterisation with rosy pearls, violet sapphires, pink and mauve spinels offset by scintillating diamonds. The cluster of gem-paved acorns form a chain, while the curvaceous oak leaves are in a naturalistic style. Presiding over this ravishing ensemble, the transformable long necklace is a versatile masterpiece: it can be a sautoir or become two distinct shorter necklaces. Further cementing the graceful approach, the Promesse de l’Aube series (images are not available) delivers on its name: an auspicious array of bright hues of pink, Paraïba and indicolite tourmalines, spessartites, mandarin garnets and pink sapphires. It is luscious and delightfully detailed like couture embroidery.

45


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

‘Firmament Appollinien’ ring in white gold, set with a cushion-cut sapphire from Ceylon weighting 10.25 carats, moonstone motifs and brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Laurier collection.

46


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

47


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Passion Incarnat’ transformable tiara in white and pink gold, set with six pear-shaped red spinels from Tanzania weighting 11.13, 5.55, 4.48, 3.37, 2.95 and 2.77 carats, a marquise-cut rhodolite garnet weighting 5.48 carats and six other marquise-cut rhodolite garnets, two green pear-shaped tourmalines, one weighting 2.37 carats, the other 1.30 carats, round green tourmalines, special-cut round rhodolite garnets and red spinels, and brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Lys collection. The tiara’s two main motifs can be detached and worn as two brooches. The largest motif can be worn on a necklace of red spinel beads and green tourmalines.

48


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

‘Firmament Appollinien’ ring in white gold, set with a cushion-cut sapphire from Ceylon weighting 10.25 carats, moonstone motifs and brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Laurier collection.

49


Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Firmament Appollinien’ ring in white gold, set with a cushion-cut Burmese sapphire weighting 10.48 carats, moonstone motifs, fancy-shaped sapphires, and brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Laurier collection.

50


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

51

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Offrandes d’Été’ ring in white gold, set with a DFL Type II-A pear-cut diamond of 3.03 carats, and brilliant-cut diamonds, L’Épi de Blé collection.

‘Offrandes d’Été’ brooch in white gold, set with a D-VVS1 pear-cut diamond of 2.21 carats (not diamonds, L’Épi de Blé collection.

52

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

mounted yet, on this image), and brilliant-cut


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Tajikistan and weighting 2.72, 1.96, 1.88, 1.86 and 1.83 carats, and brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Laurier collection.

53

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Métamorphose de Daphné’ brooch in white gold, set with five oval-cut pink spinels from


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Firmament Appollinien’ transformable long earrings in white gold, set with two cushion-cut sapphires from Ceylon (respectively 6.57 and 6.26 carats), two E-VVS2 brilliant-cut diamonds, moonstone motifs, cabochon-cut and more brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Laurier collection.

54

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

55

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Étoiles Boréales’ transformable necklace in white and yellow gold, set with nine oval black opals from Australia, yellow and violet round-cut sapphires, six fancy-cut Paraiba tourmalines for a total weight of 3.21 carats, one pear-cut Paraiba tourmaline of 0.81 carat, one Paraiba tourmaline of 1.80 carats, and brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Lys collection.

56

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

Sketch for ‘Firmament Appollinien’ transformable tiara in white gold, set with a cushion-cut sapphire from Ceylon weighting 14.55 carats, a brilliant-cut E-VVS2 diamond weighting 1.45 carats, six DE-VVS brilliant-cut diamonds weighting a total of 3.02 carats, cabochon-cut and beads of sapphires, and brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Laurier collection.

57


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Firmament Appollinien’ necklace in white gold, set with a cushion-cut Burmese sapphire weighting 34.36 carats, moonstone motifs, fancy-shaped sapphires, brilliant- and marquise-cut diamonds, Le Laurier collection.

58

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

59

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

‘Offrandes d’Été’ earrings in white gold, set with two D-VVS2 pear-cut diamonds (respectively 2.03 and 2.01 carats), and brilliant-cut diamonds, L’Épi de Blé collection.

60


The most emblematic creation is certainly the white gold necklace with diamonds, sculpted moonstones (cut right in their heart to expose the blue hues) and an exceptional 34.36 carats Burmese sapphire, the most expensive piece of the entire collection.

The Laurier and Épi de Blé collections were presented in another connected salon, each with its own paper flower scenography. The Laurier story comprises two suites evoking Apollo and Daphné’s love chase: one is centred on cushion-cut Burmese and Ceylon sapphires and is called Firmament Apollinien, while the other, Métamorphoses de Daphné, embraces oval-cut pink spinels from Tajikistan. The most emblematic creation is certainly the white gold necklace with diamonds, sculpted moonstones (cut right in their heart to expose the blue hues) and an exceptional 34.36 carats Burmese sapphire, the most expensive piece of the entire collection. Accents of black gold serve to underline the reverse of laurel leaves, hereby providing depth and volume. The sapphires on the leaves have been re-cut in the shape of rice grains, i.e. taille suiffée. It has to be said that the systematic re-cutting, paired with the utmost quality of the stones, is a testament to the superb expertise found across the entire collection. The latter motif (ear of wheat) can be found as early as 1811 in Chaumet’s collections and in the form of an aigrette with tied ears of wheat. In the modern version, Offrandes d’Été is a charming all white diamond affair. The movement of wheat as if caught in a light breeze, the natural knots and even the dead tips of spikelet, are lifelike details represented and are testament to the great craftsmanship on show. My favourite piece is the crew necklace with three ears of wheat tied in a bunch and slightly elevated above the necklace ring. A DFL Type II-A diamond weighing 5.64 carats hangs from the bow. Let’s not forget that the above four naturalistic emblems are often associated with a deity or myth, and as a result, they bear a strong symbolic meaning and positive virtues, which in turn make these high jewellery creations even more desirable to wear, beyond their beauty, for their alleged protective powers. www.chaumet.com

61


Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

62


Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

63


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Offrandes d’Été’ tiara in white gold, set with a D-VVS2 pear-cut diamond weighting 3.10 carats, and brilliant-cut diamonds, L’Épi de Blé collection.

64


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

65

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

‘Étoiles Boréales’ ring in white and yellow gold, set with an oval black opal from Australia weighting 12.62 carats, yellow and violet round-cut sapphires, Paraiba tourmalines, and brilliantcut diamonds, Le Lys collection.

66


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

67


Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Offrandes d’Été’ necklace in white gold, set with a DFL Type II-A pear-cut diamond of 5.64 carats, and brilliant-cut diamonds, L’Épi de Blé collection.

68


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

69


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Racines Célestes’ ring in white gold, set with a pink oval-cut spinel of 8.25 carats, pink round-cut sapphires, and brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Chêne collection.

70

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

71


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Racines Célestes’ transformable sautoir in white gold, set with seven violet and pink oval-cut spinels (total weight 46.64 carats), natural freshwater pearls, pink oval- and round-cut spinels, pink round-cut sapphires, and brilliantcut diamonds, Le Chêne collection.

72

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

This sautoir can be transformed into two shorter necklaces.


Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Champs de Lumière’ ring in white gold, set with a cushion-cut Padparadscha sapphire from Madagascar of 5.86 carats, and brilliant-cut diamonds, L’Épi de Blé collection.

73


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Offrandes d’Été’ ring in white gold, set with a DFL Type II-A pear-cut diamond of 10.37 carats, and brilliant-cut diamonds, L’Épi de Blé collection.

74

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

Laurel tiara, circa 1885

75


Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

Aigrette tiara with tied ears of wheat, circa 1900

Oak brooch, circa 1890

76


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Ear of wheat tiara, circa 1905-1910

Lily flower and reed branch tiara, 1910

77


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

Lily flower with buds brooch, circa 1900

78


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

seven violet and pink oval-cut spinels (total weight 46.64 carats), natural freshwater pearls, pink oval- and round-cut spinels, pink round-cut sapphires, and brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Chêne collection.

79

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Shorter version of the ‘Racines Célestes’ transformable sautoir in white gold, set with


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

80

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian

81


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

carats, and brilliant-cut diamonds, L’Épi de Blé collection.

82

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Offrandes d’Été’ ring in white gold, set with a DFL Type II-A pear-cut diamond of 3.03


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

‘Racines Célestes’ earrings in white gold, set with two pink oval-cut spinels (respectively 3.27 and 2.81 carats), pink oval- and round-cut sapphires, and brilliant-cut diamonds, Le Chêne collection.

83

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

84

Photo courtesy of CHAUMET © CHAUMET

Jewellery Historian


85


LOUIS VUITTON

86


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Blossom by Louis Vuitton by Olivier Dupon

The new haute joaillerie collection delves right into the graphic potential of the Louis Vuitton flower, and as its name suggests, it explores its strength in numbers.

87


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

Blossom pendant necklace in white gold set with a central 43.05 carats blue beryl, blue chalcedony beads and cabochons, and diamonds.

88


After all, it is the same in Nature, where flowers often use one strong visual element to attract the pollinating insects. Some of the gemstones are as big as they are rare, elevating the “wow” factor of each rendition.

In terms of floral pattern, one is particularly famous in the world of luxury: it is the Louis Vuitton Japanese-inspired four-leaf monogram flower. So recognizable, it has become the perfect symbol for the House to interpret in all their areas of design. The new haute joaillerie collection delves right into the graphic potential of the Louis Vuitton flower, and as its name suggests, it explores its strength in numbers. Nothing was off limits when it came to reinterpreting the floral motif: at times deconstructed, layered, miniaturized, or splintered into two sections, the permutations achieved by the workshop are endless. Central to the abstract flowers, is the systematic presence of vivid gemstones in each set. Flowers and colours, a perfect marriage: Blossom delivers the best of both worlds in seven necklaces and some sixty new rings, bracelets and sets of earrings. The monochrome colour accents in each jewel are what draw the eyes first. After all, it is the same in Nature, where flowers often use one strong visual element to attract the pollinating insects. Some of the gemstones are as big as they are rare, elevating the “wow” factor of each rendition. The range is wide: a bright 7.13-carat mandarin garnet displaying its flamboyancy against black onyx; a 53.01-carat black opal with its kaleidoscopic reflections mirroring a scrying depth in the manner of crystal balls; a 29.75-carat tsavorite, whose rarely-seen bright sage green originates from a mine recently discovered in Merelani, Tanzania, and whose fluorescence evokes the unique glow-in-the-dark blue of Paraiba tourmalines; or on a sautoir, a majestic 43.05-carat beryl in an evocative blue-green shade reminiscent of southern oceans, crowning a flower-shaped pendant where three petals feature baguette-cut diamonds and chalcedonies. Most of the time the near fluoro hue of the starring gemstone is supported by a softer colour palette made of moonstones, white opals, white diamonds or chalcedony, which contributes to the create an augmented reality impression. A successful contrast between vibrancy and delicacy, matt and gloss, opaque and crystalline, angular and curvy is core to Blossom’s seductiveness. There are several stars of the show in this collection (how can one forget the incredible solitaire with a 24.34-carat Ceylon sapphire whose deep velvety colour could pass for a Kashmir gem?) but one set in particular made a strong impression and it deserves first place: a white opal and diamond neckpiece with pendant and matching earrings. At the core are three spinels, whose rarity is multi-leveled. For a start they were cut from the same rough, but later separated. It is thus quite a miracle that they have ultimately been re-united in Blossom. Then the colour: an intense raspberryred tone that is quite unique for red spinels, and oh, so mesmerizing. www.louisvuitton.com

89


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

90

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

91


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

92


Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

93


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

Blossom ring in white gold with a Merelani tsavorite, onyx and diamonds.

94


Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

95


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

96


Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

97


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

98


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

99


Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

100


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

Blossom earrings in white gold set with two pear- shaped Merelani tsavorites, onyx and brilliant-cut diamonds.

101


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

Blossom bracelet in set white gold with a Merelani tsavorite, onyx and diamonds.

102


Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

103


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

Blossom earrings in white gold set with two pear- shaped spinels (respectively 12.47 and 12.29 carats), opals and

104


Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

105


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

106


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

Blossom ring in white gold set with diamonds and a 6.59 carats black opal. brilliant-cut diamonds.

107


Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

108


Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

109


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

Blossom sautoir in white gold set with mandarin garnets, onyx and diamonds.

110


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

Blossom pendant earrings in white gold set with mandarin garnet, onyx and diamonds.

111


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

Blossom ring in white gold set with mandarin garnet, onyx and diamonds.

112


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

Blossom bracelet in white gold set with tsavorite, moonstones and diamonds.

113


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

114


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

115

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of LOUIS VUITTON © LOUIS VUITTON

Jewellery Historian

Blossom ring in white gold set with tsavorite, moonstones and diamonds.

116


117


DIOR

118


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Dior à Versailles by Olivier Dupon

Modern high jewellery that is equally a throwback to the classical baroque era – through the revival of oxidized silver inspired by 18th century jewellery making techniques, the use of period cuts, and that of rococo garlands – as much as a leap forward into the present and future.

119


© RMN-GRAND PALAIS (CHÂTEAU DE VERSAILLES) MICHEL URTADO

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

120


During Louis XIV’s reign, fashion underwent drastic change, especially in women’s fashion, which became less restrictive. The plunging neckline, called the décolletage, became fashionable and it was often adorned with wide lace collars. Jewellery was very subtle during this period, pared down to single strings of pearls or diamonds or a ribbon around the neck.

At any moment, one almost expected to hear harpsichord music and the soft swishing of a passing silk dress adorned with an abundance of lace, pearls, ribbons, and gold embroidery. This is the Dior à Versailles effect: modern high jewellery that is equally a throwback to the classical baroque era – through the revival of oxidized silver inspired by 18th century jewellery making techniques, the use of period cuts (namely rose- and briolettecuts), and that of rococo garlands – as much as a leap forward into the present and future (baguette-cut and white diamonds, geometrical construction and a visionary woman in charge). The mise-en-scène also set the mood. The presentation took place in a private hôtel particulier, where one had to climb a sprawling marble staircase and then be directed to a landing with a door lined with black curtains to one side. Episodically a stylish woman, also in black, would appear while discreetly spraying some Dior perfume around. As we were about to see, the Dior presentation was foremost a multi-sensory experience. Inside the salon, it took a few minutes to become accustomed to the candlelit obscurity. Rows of crystal chandeliers hung from the ceiling, each with flickering lights, while all the walls were dressed in black and the display windows glowed at eye level. It is quite an experience to view jewellery the way Louis XIV’s court would have seen them. For me this was the stroke of genius that helped us become fully immersed in Victoire de Castellane’s vision. It is indeed a brave undertaking to update the past as it demands both utter respect for the heritage and a vision of how to transmute it, how to establish a deceptive authenticity: jewellery anchored in the present, yet looking like it stems straight from the past. In order to achieve this special effect, the workshops have incorporated past and present techniques within each piece, blurring our perception and creating haute joaillerie brimming with illusions. Furthermore, there is something to be said about the scale of the jewels in this collection. First let’s travel back in time. During Louis XIV’s reign, fashion underwent drastic change, especially in women’s fashion, which became less restrictive. The plunging neckline, called the décolletage, became fashionable and it was often adorned with wide lace collars. Jewellery was very subtle during this period, pared down to single strings of pearls or diamonds or a ribbon around the neck. So in Dior à Versailles, it seems Victoire de Castellane intentionally scaled back the creations to re-capture the more demure accessorising of that time; unlike traditional contemporary high jewellery that tends to be lavish in terms of proportions, the Dior pieces have reasonable, yet refreshing dimensions. Whilst pared-down in scale, the lavishness resides within the multitude of fine details. Of course Versailles was the main source of inspiration for the collection, and the above-mentioned attention to detail is an indicator of what captured de Castellane’s interest: ”details seen in her creations evoke the woodwork in the Hall of Mirrors, candelabras and mirror frames, the mascaron on a door, or the graphic arrangement of parquetry. In playfully recasting

121


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

APPARTEMENTS DE MESDAMES RINCEAU RING 750/1000 white, yellow and pink gold, darkened silver, diamonds and pink sapphire

122


Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

123


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

124


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

125


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

GALERIE DES GLACES NECKLACE

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

750/1000 white and pink gold, 950/1000 platinum, darkened silver and diamonds

126


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

127


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

128

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

129


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

130

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

131


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

GALERIE DES GLACES NECKLACE 750/1000 white and pink gold, 950/1000 platinum, darkened silver and diamonds

132


Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

133


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

GALERIE DES GLACES NECKLACE 750/1000 white and pink gold, 950/1000 platinum, darkened silver and diamonds

134


Dior à Versailles consists of seventeen ‘stories’, whose names invoke a private tour of the rooms of the châteaux, and within each story, each piece of jewellery bears the name of a detail of the room.

these elements, Victoire de Castellane invites us to revisit Versailles, magnifying glass in hand, to better appreciate its graphic and ornamental aspects”, the house of Dior explains. Dior à Versailles consists of seventeen ‘stories’, whose names invoke a private tour of the rooms of the châteaux, and within each story, each piece of jewellery bears the name of a detail of the room. In Appartements de Mesdames for instance, there are only rings, each named after an ornamental feature of the room (The ‘Alcôve’ ring, the ‘Cassette’ ring, etc.). Their construction of platinum, yellow and pink gold, intertwined with darkened silver, peppered with diamonds and crowned by vivid gemstones (pink or blue sapphire, or ruby or emerald) is so intricate that it recalls the level of craftsmanship found in carved balustrades, decorative mouldings or rinceaux (foliages), complete with feather, bow and marquetry motifs. The same can be said for all the suites, as Victoire de Castellane sheds light on the umpteen decorative details rather than the châteaux architecture itself. The Salon de L’Abondance is a virtuosic celebration of bows and ribbons almost in the manner of rosettes. The visual suppleness and graceful movement of the pieces are astonishing when one knows that all the components are in fact rigid (a farandole of baguette- and brilliant-cut diamonds in pretty colours). The Salon de Mars is a treasure trove of chandelier earrings, miniature labyrinthine versions of the real fixture. As the royal setting intended, and despite the fact that all the pieces are truly showstoppers, both the Chambre de la Reine and Chambre du Roi necklaces are worthy of particular mention. Both orchestrate strands of rose-cut diamonds set on oxidized silver along with strands of baguette- and brilliant-cut diamonds, so that within the compass of one piece the past and present can be seen combined. For the queen, a circle of round-cut diamonds frames an oval-cut pink sapphire solitaire like an antique pendant, while for the king an oval-cut blue sapphire is nestled among a knot of diamond-paved ribbons. For the entire collection, asymmetry, fluidity and grace prevail, with the piquancy of playful randomness creating an impression that sets our heart aflutter. www.dior.com

135


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

CHAMBRE DU ROI NECKLACE 750/1000 white, pink and yellow gold, darkened silver, diamonds and sapphire

136


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

APPARTEMENTS DE MESDAMES ALCÔVE RING 750/1000 yellow gold, darkened silver, 750/1000 white and pink gold, diamonds and sapphire

137


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

APPARTEMENTS DE MESDAMES BALUSTRADE RING 750/1000 white, pink and yellow gold, darkened silver, diamonds and ruby

138


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

139


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

GALERIE DES GLACES EARRINGS 750/1000 white and pink gold, 950/1000 platinum, darkened silver and diamonds

140


Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

141


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

CHAMBRE DE LA REINE NECKLACE

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

750/1000 white and pink gold, darkened silver, diamonds and pink sapphire

142


Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

143


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

SALON DE VÉNUS SAPHIR ROSE RING 750/1000 pink gold, darkened silver, diamonds and pink sapphire

144


Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

145


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

DOUBLE PANACHE SAPHIR RING 750/1000 white and pink gold, diamonds, sapphire and emerald

146


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

147


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

SALON DE MERCURE BRACELET 750/1000 pink gold, 950/1000 platinum, darkened silver diamonds and ruby

148


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

SALON D’APOLLON NECKLACE 750/1000 white, pink and yellow gold, darkened silver, diamonds and yellow diamonds

149


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

SALON D’APOLLON BRACELET Darkened silver, 750/1000 pink, yellow and white gold, diamonds and yellow diamonds

150


Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

151


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

SALON DE L’ABONDANCE DIAMANT RING 750/1000 white and pink gold, darkened silver and diamonds

152


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

ACANTHE DIAMANT RING

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR


 750/1000 white and pink gold, darkened silver and diamonds

153


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

BOISERIE DIAMANT JAUNE RING 750/1000 yellow gold, 950/1000 platinum, 750/1000 pink gold, darkened silver, diamonds and yellow diamond

154


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

155


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

SALON D’APOLLON BROOCH 750/1000 white and pink gold, darkened silver and diamonds

156


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

APPARTEMENTS DE MESDAMES CASSETTE RING 750/1000 yellow gold, 950/1000 platinum, 750/1000 pink gold, darkened silver and diamonds

157


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

158


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

159


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

SALON DE DIANE BRACELET 750/1000 white gold, darkened silver, 750/1000 pink and yellow gold, diamonds and emerald

160


Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

161


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

SALON DE L’ABONDANCE BRACELET 750/1000 pink, yellow and white gold, diamonds, orange and yellow diamonds and pink sapphires

162


Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

163


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

SALON DE MARS BAGUETTE EARRINGS 750/1000 white and pink gold, darkened silver, 750/1000 yellow gold, 950/1000 platinum, diamonds and emeralds

164


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

165


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

SALON DE MARS BAGUETTE EARRINGS 750/1000 white and pink gold, darkened silver, 750/1000 yellow gold, 950/1000 platinum, diamonds and emeralds

166


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

SALON DE MARS BRIOLETTE EARRINGS 750/1000 white and pink gold, darkened silver, diamonds and pink sapphires

167


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

FONTANGE SAPHIR ROSE RING 750/1000 white gold, diamonds and pink sapphire

168


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

SALON DE MARS GLACE EARRINGS 750/1000 white gold, darkened silver, 950/1000 platinum and diamonds

169


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

SALON DE DIANE RING 750/1000 white gold, darkened silver, 750/1000 pink and yellow gold, diamonds and emerald

170


Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

171


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of DIOR © DIOR

SALON DE VÉNUS DIAMANT JAUNE RING 750/1000 white gold, darkened silver, 750/1000 yellow gold, diamonds and yellow diamond

172


173


PIAGET

174


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Sunny side of life by PIAGET by Olivier Dupon As much a tribute to summertime as an uplifting message, this sprawling collection of high jewellery pieces and fine watches is a glamorous and colourful affair that redefines what contemporary haute joaillerie is about.

175


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K pink gold necklace set with 1 oval-cut Paraiba tourmaline from Mozambique (approx. 7.84 cts), 16 marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 1.84 cts), 8 marquise-cut pink sapphires (approx. 1.64 cts) and 6 marquise-

176

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

cut blue tourmalines (approx. 0.96 ct)


Gold is central in this new collection. Mostly yellow (and representing the sun), it has been treated in countless different ways by the Swiss workshops. Mesh-woven, finely chased, hammered, decorated, cabled, interpreted in leaf or wire shape, gold is the malleable canvas revealed in many forms.

It is time to stargaze over cocktails, ideally somewhere warm: the Amalfi coast would be a good choice. Or venture through shaded streets in Monaco, unless you feel like partying with friends beside a swimming pool in Palm Springs. In all cases Piaget wants to evoke those joyful memories or future holiday plans for you when admiring their new high jewellery collection, Sunny Side of Life. As much a tribute to summertime as an uplifting message, this sprawling collection of high jewellery pieces and fine watches is a glamorous and colourful affair that redefines what contemporary haute joaillerie is about. The presentation took place in Hotel Potocki in Paris, a prime example of French classical architecture, replete with grand marble staircases, superb parquet floors and antique tapestries hanging on the walls. For the occasion, Piaget subtly adapted the premises by injecting tropical accents (bountiful bouquet of palm leaves, fuchsia peonies, turquoise mock parrots), a teaser for the precious revelry to come. The jewellery and watches were exhibited in a large salon, one big enough to accommodate 122 new resplendent creations (The full collection of 150 pieces will complete in September). Each story was displayed in a distinct booth that was dressed with large background posters relevant to each theme (Sunlight, Poolside and Lush Nature). Beside these images were blow-up renditions of some of the pages from the Sunny Side of Life book, all styled and photographed by the very talented French jewellery photography studio, AlmaKarina (www.almakarina.com). Gold is central in this new collection. Mostly yellow (and representing the sun), it has been treated in countless different ways by the Swiss workshops. Mesh-woven, finely chased, hammered, decorated, cabled, interpreted in leaf or wire shape, gold is the malleable canvas revealed in many forms. Two particular techniques are worth mentioning: the hand-guilloché work that renders the distinctive effect of raw silk fibres with a surface of irregular strokes (as seen in the ‘Summer Crush’ necklace with a 7.84-carat oval Paraiba tourmaline from Mozambique); and The Palace décor, which reconstitutes the texture and dynamics of plant fibre or other patterns (as in a palm leaf in the ‘Palm Eldorado’ series or the mosaic of a swimming pool in the ‘Deep Blue’ cuff with lapis lazuli). Embodying superbly complex and brightly gleaming workmanship, there is also a re-edited and exclusively Piaget type of mesh that is composed of round gold elements adorned with pin-mounted marquise-cut diamonds. The equilibrium achieved offers both suppleness and grace as seen in a sautoir necklace and a watch bracelet. Versatility is also key to many pieces. The most impressive example is seen in a diamond and emerald necklace. A row of seven cushion-cut emeralds is grouped on one side of the necklace, except for one extra pearshaped emerald that is a drop at the lower point of the neckpiece. The rest of the design is made of dazzling marquise-cut diamonds. Unbeknownst to the onlooker, the emerald row can be detached and worn as a stunning bracelet.

177


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold watch
 Case and secret cover set with 13 marquise-cut emeralds (approx. 4.65 cts), 57 brilliantcut diamonds (approx. 3.26 cts) and 8 baguette-cut diamonds (approx. 0.46 cts)
 Dial in white mother-of-pearl
 56P Piaget Manufacture Quartz Movement
 Numbered edition


178

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

18K white gold palace decoration bracelet



Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

179


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

180

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

181


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold watch
 Case set with 22 marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 3.30 cts) and 22 marquise-cut emeralds (approx. 2.64 cts)
 Dial in white mother-of-pearl
 18K white gold palace decoration bracelet
 Numbered edition


182

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

56P Piaget Manufacture Quartz Movement



Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

183


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

184


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

185


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold manchette (cuff bracelet) set with 22 marquise- cut blue sapphires (approx.

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

23.54 cts), 10 princess-cut diamonds (approx. 0.80 ct), and 2 triangle-cut diamonds (approx. 0.08 ct). Feathers marquetry Unique piece

186


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold earrings set with 2 cushion-cut emerald from Colombia, 1 brilliant-cut diamond, 1 brilliant-cut diamond, marquise-cut diamonds and

Photo courtesy of PIAGET Š PIAGET

brilliant-cut diamonds


187


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

188


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

189

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold watch
 Case set with 2 oval-cut unheated pink sapphires from Madagascar (approx. 3.42 cts), 14 marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 2.64 cts) and 32 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 2.10 cts)
 Dial in white mother-of-pearl. Buckle in 18K white gold set with 12 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 0.05 ct). White satin strap. Additional black satin strap available Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

through Customer Service. 56P Piaget Manufacture Quartz Movement.
 Numbered edition


190


Piaget has historically been a watchmaker and this is why each high jewellery story comes with a marvellous timepiece.

A new Piaget high jewellery collection would not be complete without some new feathered cuffs, which have become the house’s jewellery signature ever since they were first presented to the world. Cornerstone to their appeal is the brilliant use of natural exotic feathers. Plumasserie is a very delicate art that demands expertise, and this is the reason why Piaget has again collaborated with French artist Nelly Saunier (award recipient of the ‘Prix Liliane Bettencourt pour l’Intelligence de la Main’, a prestigious award for best artisans). In the ‘Party cuff’ bracelet, a cerulean wonder, a plumage of blue diamonds and sapphires enhances the feather marquetry, while in another cuff on yellow gold, multi-coloured feather marquetry echoes the accompanying vibrant gemstones. Of course, Piaget has historically been a watchmaker and this is why each high jewellery story comes with a marvellous timepiece. I fell head over heels for the ‘Green Oasis’ cuff watch epitomising the Piaget style through a flurry of marquise-cut emeralds and diamonds. In addition to having new watches delivering their own story and being featured alongside high jewellery, they are eminently able to stand alone in their own right. This is precisely the case of the four Horlogerie models featuring gold dials, which are adorned by a motif created with Grand Feu enamelling. Piaget’s Sunny Side of Life is not only about joy and bliss but also knowledge, so it seems only fitting to end on an educational note. www.piaget.com

Grand Feu technique ‘The gold is first hand-guilloché using “basketweave” motifs of which the depth effects are accentuated by a coating of translucent enamel. The coloured powder is then meticulously applied to the dial thus prepared. An initial firing at 800°C progressively intensifies the pigments, followed by successive firing and cooling phases required to achieve a shiny glazed effect featuring the transparency of the most refined enamels. The dial is then carefully lapped and then fired one last time. The final “glazing” fire reveals the full beauty of the guilloché motif. Grand Feu enamelling involves a delicate alchemy. The enamellers’ skill consists in estimating the precise quantity of enamel powder used. They must also successfully estimate the appropriate intensity and firing time needed to achieve the desired colour, which thus becomes stable and fade-resistant. A few seconds too long, and the enamel could crack. It is all a matter of degrees and seconds, testifying to a skill fully mastered over time.’ Piaget workshop

191


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K pink gold ring set with 1 cushion-cut unheated pink sapphires from Madagascar (approx. 5.31 cts), 210 round-cut pink sapphires (approx. 5.66 cts), and 75 brilliant-cut

192

Photo courtesy of PIAGET Š PIAGET

diamonds (approx. 1.39 cts)


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold ring, set with 1 pear-shaped emerald from Colombia (approx. 12.06 cts), 47 marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 7.08 cts) and 88 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 0.17 ct) Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Unique Piece

193


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold necklace set with 1 pear-shaped emerald from Zambia (approx. 5.31 cts), 1 pear-shaped emerald from Zambia (approx. 2.28 cts), 223 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 25.68 cts), 37 round-cut demantoid garnets (approx. 12.64 cts), 53 round-cut green tourmalines (approx. 9.39 cts), 16 round-cut emeralds (approx. 3.26 cts), 8 triangle-cut diamonds (approx. 0.80 cts), 2 triangle-cut demantoid garnets (approx. 0.60 cts), 1 triangle-cut emeralds (approx. 0.20 ct) and 1 triangle-cut green tourmaline

Photo courtesy of PIAGET Š PIAGET

(approx. 0.20 cts)

194


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

195


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K pink gold watch
 Case set with 69 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 0.50 ct) Dial in palace decorated pink gold
 18K pink gold palace decorated bracelet set with 19 marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 4.37 cts) and 9 brilliant- cut diamonds (approx. 0.37 ct)
 Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

56P Piaget Manufacture Quartz Movement
 Numbered edition


196


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

197


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold earrings set with 1 radiant-cut yellow diamond (FVY-VS1, approx. 1.53 cts), 1 radiant-cut yellow diamond (FVY-VS1, approx. 1.46 cts), 38 marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 7.70 cts), 30 brilliant-cut Photo courtesy of PIAGET Š PIAGET

diamonds (approx. 3.73 cts), 6 pear-shaped diamonds (approx. 2.78 cts), 18 baguette-cut diamonds (approx. 1.82 cts) and 2 princess-cut diamonds (approx. 0.42 ct)

198


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

199


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

200

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold earrings set with 460 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 13.12 cts), 2 pearshaped diamonds (approx. 0.64 ct) and 2 triangle-cut diamonds (approx. 0.18 ct)


201


Photo courtesy of PIAGET Š PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold manchette (cuff bracelet) set with 547 brilliant- cut diamonds (approx. 26.38 cts) , 3 pear-shaped diamonds (approx. 1.26 cts), 4 triangle-cut diamonds (approx. 0.80 ct)

202


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

203


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold necklace set with 1 pear-shaped emerald from Colombia (approx. 7.17 cts), 1 pear-shaped emerald from Columbia (approx. 4.35 cts), 219 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 20.36 cts), 54 marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 8.62 cts) and 95 baguette-cut diamonds (approx. 8.58 cts) Transformable Piece

Photo courtesy of PIAGET Š PIAGET

Unique Piece

204


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

205


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

From sketch to masterpiece: completed Piaget Altiplano High Jewellery watch with its handengraved pink gold dial, alongside the corresponding original sketch.

206


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

207


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold watch
 Case set with 24 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 1.80 cts) Dial in white mother-of-pearl
 Bracelet set with 32 marquise-cut emeralds (approx. 12.80 cts) and 260 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 11.28 cts)
 56P Piaget Manufacture Quartz Movement
 Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Unique Piece


208


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold ring set with 1 cushion-cut yellow diamond (FVY-VS2, approx. 5.85 cts), 20 Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 2.80 cts), 76 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 1.35 cts) and 4 princess-cut diamonds (approx. 0.04 cts)

209


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

210

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

211


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold necklace set with 1 oval-cut unheated pink sapphire from Madagascar (approx. 5.96

Photo courtesy of PIAGET Š PIAGET

cts), 128 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 18.62 cts), 42 marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 16.80cts), and 1 pear-shaped diamond (D-VVS1, approx. 1.50 cts) . Transformable Piece

212


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

213


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold ring set with 1 cushion-cut unheated pink sapphire from Ceylon (approx. 4.09 cts) Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

and 58 marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 6.73 cts)


214


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

215


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold necklace set with 361 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 28.14 cts), 17

Photo courtesy of PIAGET Š PIAGET

marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 4.15 cts) and 3 pear-shaped diamonds (approx. 2.29 cts) Transformable piece

216


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

217


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold cuff earring set with 1 oval-cut unheated pink sapphire from Madagascar (approx.

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

4.58 cts), 9 pear-shaped pink tourmalines (approx. 5.54 cts), 18 marquise-cut diamonds (approx. 5.41 cts), 33 brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 0.98 cts) and 1 marquise-cut pink sapphire (approx. 0.50 cts) 


218


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

18K white gold manchette (cuff bracelet) set with 72 baguette- cut blue sapphires ( approx. Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

17.95 cts) and 40 baguette-cut diamonds (approx. 6.25 cts)


219


Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

220


221


CHANEL

222


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Les Blés de Chanel by Olivier Dupon

The 62 high jewellery pieces of the collection form a botanical chronicle as much as a tribute: ‘Premiers Brins’, ‘Brins de Printemps’ and ‘Brins de Diamants’ all pay homage to the tender wheat shoots of early spring with diamonds, peridots and aquamarines being used.

223


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

224

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

Jewellery Historian


Such an abundance of wheat reminded us how strongly Coco Chanel was fond of the ear of wheat motif as one of her preferred talismanic symbols, present in all its forms, be it in her designs as well as in her residences.

In ancient Rome, people would shower newlyweds with wheat seeds to secure the couple’s prosperity. A source of nourishment, wheat growing with its cycle of ploughing, seeding and harvesting, has through the rotation of the seasons fundamentally helped to define people’s concept of time. So when it comes to encompassing the many benefits of this universal symbol, Chanel set the bar high this year. Having commissioned Gad Weil, an artist who specialises in outdoor installations, to transform the portion of Place Vendôme in front of the Ritz hotel into a 2800sqm wheat field, Chanel chose the most arresting way to introduce their new haute joaillerie collection to the world. Sixteen years after having covered the ChampsElysées with almost 2 hectares of wheat, Gad Weil was this time asked to reiterate the performance in the Parisian epicentre of haute or high jewellery, transforming it into arable land, with the softness of the wheat’s movement contrasting with the symmetry of the site’s architecture. In keeping with the occasion – the unveiling of a precious collection – the wheat was covered with nothing less than the type of metallic paint that was used for the rich illuminations of the Middle Ages. To complete the event, Chanel’s new collection was unveiled in the Coco suite (named for Coco Chanel who used it as her residence year round) of the recently renovated Ritz Hotel. The two-bedroom suite is located on the second floor, in the centre of the Ritz building. For the occasion, wheat bunches were installed to delineate a path around the rooms, occasionally sprouting in odd places like inside the bathroom’s porcelain bath. Moreover the suite faces the Vendôme column, so when the main room double doors open, the view offers a front row seat onto one of the most prestigious squares in the world. Such an abundance of wheat reminded us how strongly Coco Chanel was fond of the ear of wheat motif as one of her preferred talismanic symbols, present in all its forms, be it in her designs (a vintage haute couture shift dress with an all over ear of wheat embroidery motif was displayed in the suite for the presentation) as well as in her residences (a painting by Salvador Dali of a single ear of wheat was also brought to the suite; the artist himself offered this painting to Coco). Did you also know that Coco Chanel’s birthday, August 19th, fell during the harvest festival ? It was then only a matter of time before the house of Chanel chose to make ear of wheat the star in a haute joaillerie collection, and there was no better way than to feature the single ear of wheat motif. What could have been a rather monotone story, turned out in fact to be a captivating narrative about the lifecycle of wheat, and as a result an ode to vitality, abundance, luck and better days. The 62 high jewellery pieces of the collection form a botanical chronicle as much as a tribute: ‘Premiers Brins’, ‘Brins de Printemps’ and ‘Brins de Diamants’ all pay homage to the tender wheat shoots of early spring with diamonds, peridots and aquamarines being used. As the wheat grows, golden hues appear. This variation is portrayed in the ‘Impression de Blé’, and ‘Champ de Blé’ suites. Then comes the summer months and harvest time, here evoked by ‘Moisson Ensoleillée’, ‘Bouquet de Moisson’ and

225


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"L’Épi" brooch in platinum and 18K yellow gold set with baguette-cut, marquise-cut

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

226

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

and brilliant-cut diamonds, coloured stones, coloured paving.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Premiers Brins" brooch in 18K white gold set with 227 brilliant-cut diamonds for a

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

227

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

total weight of 4.5 carats.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Moisson d’Or" watch in 18K white and yellow gold set with 13 marquise-cut dia-monds for a total weight total weight of 1.4 carat and 119 yellow sapphire beads for a total weight of 48 carats. CHANEL Fine Jewelry

228

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

of 2.1 carats, 365 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3.5 carats, 7 brilliant-cut yellow sapphires for a


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Épi d’Été" necklace in platinum and 18K white and yellow gold set with a 4.7-carat pear- cut emerald, 8 marquise-cut yellow sapphires for a total weight of 5.1 carats, 3 marquise- cut aquamarines for a total weight of 1.5 carat, 17 brilliantcut emeralds, 12 brilliant-cut Paraiba tourmalines, 43 brilliant-cut fancy vivid yellow diamonds, 13 brilliant-cut cognac diamonds, 5 rose-cut brown diamonds, 8 rose-cut diamonds for a total weight of 12 carats, 5 fancy-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2.9 carats, 25 rose-cut oval diamonds for a total weight of 14.1 carats, 68 rose-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3.7 carats and 164 brilliantcut diamonds for a total weight of 1.8 carats. CHANEL Fine Jewelry

229

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

230

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

Jewellery Historian


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Brins de Diamants" necklace in 18K white gold set with 40 fancy-cut diamonds for a total weight of 9.8 carats, 191 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 7.7 carats and 2 pear- cut diamonds. CHANEL Fine Jewelry

231


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

232

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Moisson de Perles" necklace in 18K white gold set with 13 pear-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.9 carat, 474 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 4.2 carats, an Indonesian cultured pearl and 297 Japanese cultured pearls.

233

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

Photo courtesy of CHANEL Š CHANEL

Jewellery Historian


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Moisson d’Or" brooch in 18K white and yellow gold set with an 11.8-carat marquise-cut yellow sapphire, 12 brilliant-cut yellow sapphires for a total weight of 1.8 carat, 31 marquise-cut diamonds

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

234

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

for a total weight of 3.3 carats and 400 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 8 carats.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"FĂŞte des Moissons" necklace in 18K white and yellow gold set with a 25carat cut- cornered rectangular-modified brilliant-cut fancy intense yellow diamond, 121 fancy-cut multicoloured diamonds for a total weight of 46.7 carats, 932 brilliant-cut yellow diamonds for a total weight of 40.4 carats, 10 marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3.1 carats, fancycut brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.4 carat and 151 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3.3 carats.

235

Photo courtesy of CHANEL Š CHANEL

CHANEL Fine Jewelry


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Épi Vendôme" ring in 18K yellow gold set with an 18.2-carat emerald, 8 marquise-cut multicoloured diamonds for a total weight of 2.1 carats, 84 brilliant-cut fancy intense orange diamonds for a total weight of 1.5 carat, 92 brilliant-

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

236

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.1 carat and 4 fancy-cut diamonds.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Brins de Diamants" ring in 18K white gold set with a 3-carat marquise-cut diamond, 12 fancy-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.7 carat and 66 brilliant-cut diamonds. (left)

weight of 1.6 carat and 26 brilliant-cut diamonds. (right) CHANEL Fine Jewelry

237

Photo courtesy of CHANEL Š CHANEL

"Brins de Diamants" ring in 18K white gold set with a 1.5-carat pear-cut diamond, 4 fancy- cut diamonds for a total


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Brins de Diamants" bracelet in 18K white gold set with 82 fancy-cut diamonds for a total weight of 18 carats, 216

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

238

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 6.2 carats and a marquise-cut diamond.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Impression de Blé" earrings in 18K white and yellow gold set with 2 pear-cut fancy intense yellow diamonds for a total weight of 5

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

239

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

carats, 14 fancycut multicoloured diamonds for a total weight of 3.4 carats and 398 brilliantcut diamonds for a total weight of 4.5 carats.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Impression de BlĂŠ" bracelet in 18K white and yellow gold set with 3 fancy-cut intense/vivid yellow diamonds for a total weight of 2.7 carats, 2639 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 37.9 carats, 2 marquise-cut fancy intense/vivid yellow diamonds for

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

240

Photo courtesy of CHANEL Š CHANEL

a total weight of 1.1 carat and 12 fancy-cut multicoloured diamonds for a total weight of 4.5 carats.


The glorious conclusion of this bucolic journey is found in the ‘Fêtes des Moissons’ and ‘Moisson d’Or’ series. The ‘Fêtes des Moisssons’ neckpiece in 18K white and yellow gold is the star of the show.

‘Moisson de Perles’, where diamonds, yellow sapphires, Japanese and Indonesian cultured pearls conjure up the golden warmth of summer sun. The glorious conclusion of this bucolic journey is found in the ‘Fêtes des Moissons’ and ‘Moisson d’Or’ series. The ‘Fêtes des Moisssons’ neckpiece in 18K white and yellow gold is the star of the show. It is set with a 25-carat cut-cornered rectangularmodified brilliant-cut fancy intense yellow diamond, 121 fancy-cut multi-coloured diamonds for a total weight of 46.7 carats, 932 brilliant-cut yellow diamonds for a total weight of 40.4 carats, 10 marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3.1 carats, fancycut brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.4 carat and 151 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3.3 carats. The ‘Moisson d’Or’ necklace is a spectacular sheaf of wheat tied by a yellow sapphire of 16.8 carats. The bountifulness of the piece is compounded by the sheer opulence of the carats. ”This spray of diamonds and sapphires is the central motif of a long necklace made of 977 yellow sapphires for a total weight of 477.5 carats”, the house of Chanel adds. www.chanel.com

241


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

242

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

Jewellery Historian


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Brins de Printemps" earrings in 18K white gold set with 2 marquise-cut peridots for a total weight of 10.4 carats, 4 marquise-cut peridots for a total weight of 1 carat, 20 brilliant-cut peridots, 6 marquise-cut green tourmalines for a total weight of 1.4 carat, 4 pear-cut aquamarines and 146 brilliant-cut diamonds. "Brins de Printemps" ring in 18K white gold set with a 5.7-carat marquise-cut peridot, 59 brilliant-cut diamonds, 2 pear-cut

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

243

Photo courtesy of CHANEL Š CHANEL

aquamarines, 2 fancy-cut green tourmalines, 10 brilliant-cut peridots and a marquise-cut peridot.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Premiers Brins" bracelet in 18K white gold set with 240 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 6.4 carats

244

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

CHANEL Fine Jewelry


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Brins de Printemps" necklace in 18K white gold set with 20 marquise-cut peridots for a total weight of 18.3 carats, 14 pear-cut aquamarines for a total weight of 2.5 carats, 21 marquise-cut green tourmalines for a total weight of 5.1 carats, 7 pear-cut green tourmalines for a total weight of 1.4 carat and 795 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 9.8 carats. CHANEL Fine Jewelry

245

Photo courtesy of CHANEL Š CHANEL

Jewellery Historian


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Moisson d’Or" earrings in 18K white and yellow gold set with 2 marquise-cut yellow sapphires for a total weight of 5.7 carats, 10 brilliant-cut yellow sapphires for a total weight of 1.6 carat, 26 marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3.4 carats, 172 brilliant- cut diamonds for a total weight

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

246

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

of 3.6 carats and 182 yellow sapphire beads for a total weight of 48.4 carats.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Champ de Blé" earrings in 18K yellow gold set with 176 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3.1 carats.

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

247

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

"Champ de Blé" ring in 18K yellow gold set with 143 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2.9 carats and 3 marquise-cut diamonds.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

248

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

"Champ de Blé" cuff in 18K yellow gold set with 869 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 29.6 carats.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Épi d’Été" ring in platinum and 18K yellow gold set with a pearcut emerald and 5 rose-cut diamonds.

249

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

CHANEL Fine Jewelry


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Épi Solaire" bracelet in platinum and 18K yellow gold set with a 6.2-carat fancy intense yellow

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

250

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

diamond, yellow diamonds, fancy-cut diamonds and coloured paving.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

251


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

252

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

Jewellery Historian


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Légende de Blé" brooch in 18K white gold set with 9 marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 4.1 carats and 537 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 5

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

253

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

carats.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Moisson d’Or" bracelet in 18K white and yellow gold set with a 5.1-carat marquisecut yellow sapphire, 14 marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.7 carat, 115 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2.4 carats, 4 brilliant-cut

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

254

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

yellow sapphires and 283 yellow sapphire beads for a total weight of 211.5 carats.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Moisson d’Or" ring in 18K white and yellow gold set with a 17.1-carat cushion-cut yellow sapphire, 14 marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.7 carat and 132

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

255

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.6 carat.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Légende de Blé" necklace in 18K white gold set with a 5-carat marquise-cut diamond, 12 marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 10.4 carats and 839

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

256

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 17.6 carats.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Légende de Blé" earrings in 18K white gold set with 2 marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2.1 carats, 12 marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 5.1 carats

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

257

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

and 380 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3.1 carats.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Moisson de Perles" bracelet in 18K white gold set with 239 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

258

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

weight of 7.2 carats, 4 pear-cut diamonds and 32 Japanese cultured pearls.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Premiers Brins" necklace in 18K white gold set with 350 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 12.5 carats.

259

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

CHANEL Fine Jewelry


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Premiers Brins" ring in 18K white gold set with a 1.5-carat brilliant-cut

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

260

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

diamond and 93 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.4 carat.


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"FĂŞte des Moissons" bracelet in 18K white and yellow gold set with an 11.1-carat cut- cornered rectangular-modified brilliant-cut fancy intense yellow diamond, 45 fancy-cut multicolour diamonds for a total weight of 21.2 carats, 564 brilliant-cut yellow diamonds for a total weight of 20.5 carats, 3 pear-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.5 carat, 9 marquise-cut fancy intense yellow diamonds. CHANEL Fine Jewelry

261

Photo courtesy of CHANEL Š CHANEL

marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2.9 carats, 17 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.3 carat and 2


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Moisson d’Or" necklace in 18K white and yellow gold set with a 16.8-carat oval-cut yellow sapphire, 27 marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3 carats, 329 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 6.7 carats, 11 brilliant-cut yellow sapphires for a total weight of 1.9 carat and 977 yellow sapphire beads for a total weight of 477.5 carats. CHANEL Fine Jewelry

262

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

Jewellery Historian


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Premiers Brins" earrings in 18K white gold set with 152 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2.7 carats.

"Premiers Brins" ring in 18K white gold set with a 1-carat brilliant-cut diamond and 60 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.3 carat.

263

CHANEL Fine Jewelry

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

CHANEL Fine Jewelry


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

"Premiers Brins" necklace in 18K white gold set with a 1.5-carat brilliant-cut diamond, 5 marquise-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1.3 carat and 484 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 15.9 carats.

264

Photo courtesy of CHANEL © CHANEL

CHANEL Fine Jewelry


265


BOUCHERON

266


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

26 Vendôme, Le Style en Héritage by Boucheron by Olivier Dupon

The new haute joaillerie collection of Boucheron is as much an artful and artistic exercise as it is a re-affirmation of the House’s fundamentals.

267


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

268

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


Claire Choisne, the Director of Design, indeed delved not only into Boucheron’s archives but also the house’s culture by presenting three sub-collections very distinct from each other: Nature Triomphante, Architecture Inspirée and Porté Couture.

The new haute joaillerie collection of Boucheron is as much an artful and artistic exercise as it is a re-affirmation of the House’s fundamentals. On one hand, most of the creations are absolute works of art and the stroke of genius was to present them first to a selected audience via a conceptual performance, which took place in a gilded salon on the third floor of the 26 Vendôme flagship store, a floor exclusively opened for the occasion. The elegant choreography, designed by Olivier Saillard, Director of the Palais Galliera, Musée de la Mode in Paris, saw male and female models, all dressed in black with the women wearing the high jewels, silently interact in the most sensual way, creating tableaux vivant. For instance, a man would stand behind his female companion, as she would lean her head back in a seductive entente; while some other poses were more dramatic: what had just happened between two presumed lovers, for the woman to close her eyes with such intensity? However the actors were the supporting cast and the jewels the stars in this Parisian chic-at-its-height event. On the other hand, it is a collection anchored in Boucheron’s history. For one, its name is a back-to-where-it-all-started proclamation. 26 Vendôme sits on the most luminous corner of the eponymous square, and to this day is the symbol of a jeweller who got there first. In 1893, Frédéric Boucheron was indeed the first to set up on what would become the World’s haute joaillerie epicentre. Fundamentally Le Style en Heritage is an exploration of the house’s archetypal inspirations, an exercise in design pared down to a simple message: ‘Here is the spirit of our remarkable house’. Claire Choisne, the Director of Design, indeed delved not only into Boucheron’s archives but also the house’s culture by presenting three subcollections very distinct from each other: Nature Triomphante, Architecture Inspirée and Porté Couture. The first of these, Nature Triomphante, is an ode to naturalism, a theme embedded in the house since the very early creations of the house. Flora and fauna here take many forms. As a lily-inspired jewellery parure, ‘Lys Radiant’ is a sublimely delicate neckpiece composed of six rock crystal petals (each inlaid with diamonds) that are wide open to reveal a spectacular 20.08-carat yellow pearshaped diamond in their centre. Scintillating pistils that are terminated by more yellow diamonds surround the heart of the majestic flower. The next incarnation of nature is the ear of wheat in ‘Blé d’Été’. In French folklore, seven ears of wheat are a lucky charm, and therefore the main piece, a ‘question mark’ necklace (a Boucheron staple dating back to 1889), bears seven diamond-paved ears of wheat. The avian world is also part of Boucheron’s naturalistic repertoire, and their most iconic creation, the ‘Plume de Paon’ (peacock feather) necklace, has been re-visited this time in white gold with white diamonds, and the addition of a cocktail ring with a 24.37-carat morganite and feathershaped shanks, among other pieces.

269


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Vendôme chromatique Ring set with a18,03 cts morganite & rock crystal, on pink gold

270

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

271


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Hôtel Particulier necklace, set with a 21,80 cts yellow sapphire, rock crystal, mother-of-pearl and moon stones, paved with yellow sapphires and diamond, with black lacquer, on white gold.

272

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Vendôme Chromatique necklace, paved with diamonds, yellow sapphires, white agate, white mother-of-pearl, on white and yellow gold.

273

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Hôtel Particulier earrings, set with diamonds and yellow sapphires, paved with diamonds and yellow sapphires, with black lacquer, on white and yellow gold.

274

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Lys Radiant ring, set with a 3,00 cts pear diamond, rock crystal, paved with diamonds, on white gold.

275

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Lys Radiant necklace, set with a 20,08 cts yellow pear diamond, rock crystal, paved with

276

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

diamonds, on white gold. Necklace in the tradition of the multiwear.


Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

277


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Plume de Paon ring, set with a 24,37 cts morganite, paved with diamonds, on white and pink gold.

278

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Cabochon ring, set with a 3,99 cts Colombian emerald cabochon, onyx, paved with diamonds, on white gold.

279

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Ruban Graphique ring, set with a 3,70 cts Colombian emerald, black lacquer, paved with diamonds and emeralds, on white gold.

280

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


“The starting point for this journey through time and Parisian style begins in that very special hôtel particulier – or private residence – near the Palais Royal at 152 Galerie de Valois, where Frédéric and Gabrielle Boucheron first set up as jewellers.

Last but not least, the ever expanding family of Collection of Animals, has welcomed the arrival of two new members, a pairing that could not be more risky: the sweet ‘Nara’ deer with its curves and onyx yeux de biche, and the more sculptural and angular ‘Wolf’ ring. Architecture Inspirée draws on Boucheron’s admiration for abstraction, whether in geometrical perfection or the pure lines of Art deco. “The starting point for this journey through time and Parisian style begins in that very special hôtel particulier – or private residence – near the Palais Royal at 152 Galerie de Valois, where Frédéric and Gabrielle Boucheron first set up as jewellers. Then comes a reflection on the Place Vendôme’s columns and arches, ending with a chequerboard transformed into a tumult of onyx and diamonds”, the Boucheron House explains. The pièces de résistance of this story are without doubt the ‘Hôtel Particulier’ necklace and the ‘Vendôme Chromatique’ bracelet. The former is a statement piece and a testament to the workshop’s outstanding expertise. The neckline is a complex parquetry of white mother-of-pearl, moonstones, black lacquer, and diamond and yellow sapphire paving. A 21.80-carat yellow sapphire is mounted horizontally at the central point of the neckline. The technical and creative audacity goes a step further with the addition of four rock crystal medallions in different sizes (three at the front and one at the back). Miniature landscapes of deer in a forest and flocks of birds are encased in the rock crystal medallions, which then become portals to other dimensions. The ‘Vendôme Chromatique’ is a rock crystal bracelet, whose profile recalls the surrounding arcades of the Vendôme Square. A Vendôme column is engraved into the emerald-cut beryl of 94.15-carats. Finally Porté Couture evokes Frédéric Boucheron’s own childhood as the son of two drapers by trade. The boundaries between Haute Joaillerie and Haute Couture are blurred only to remind us that both worlds take their cue from the same philosophy: the best in technique, material and imagination. Two creations in particular are the ultimate hybrids between these two realms: firstly the ‘Plissé Diamants’ necklace, a subtle two-colour variation on black and white, that captures the pleating of fabric. Playing with the genre (masculine versus feminine), the necklace sits around the cleavage like a bejewelled scarf. The two sides come together around a 7.8-carat diamond with the the jet-black spinels creating the reverse of the ‘folds’. It is a feat in trompe l’oeil. Secondly, the ‘Cape de Lumière’ (mantle of light) is an all-yellow-gold proper garment made of a succession of stylised peacock feathers that create a scalloped line at the bottom edge of the cape. In the outline of each fan shape, strings of fine gold are soldered on opposite ends so that they create a delicate mesh. Under the touch, each ray of gold vibrates like the strings of a harp, or the silk threads of precious lace. The broader strips of the two front panels are unevenly paved with white diamonds, while a 81.61-carat citrine hangs from the front clasp. As much a glamorous armour fit for a queen as an updated roaring twenties accessory, the cape if not entirely haute couture nor haute joaillerie is emphatically wearable art. www.boucheron.com

281


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

282

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Blé d’été necklace, paved with diamonds, on white gold


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

283

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Ruban Graphique ring, set with a 3,04 cts ruby from Mozambique, black lacquer, paved with diamonds and rubies, on white gold.

284

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Nara the Deer ring, paved with diamonds, brown diamonds and black sapphires, on pink gold.

285

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

286

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Plume de Paon necklace, set with a rose-cut diamond, paved with diamonds, on white gold.


Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

287


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Cape de Lumière, yellow gold-woven, set with a 81,61 cts citrine, and paved with diamonds.

288

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian

Ruban Graphique necklace, set with a 4,45 cts Colombian emerald, emeralds, diamonds, onyx, black lacquer, paved with diamonds, on white gold.

289


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian

Plissé Diamants necklace, set with a 7,81 cts diamond, paved with diamonds, black spinels, and onyx, on white gold.

290


Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

291


Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Plissé Diamants necklace, set with a 7,81 cts diamond, paved with diamonds, black spinels,

292

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

and onyx, on white gold.


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Ruban Graphique necklace, set with a 4,45 cts Colombian emerald, emeralds, diamonds, onyx, black lacquer, paved with diamonds, on white gold.

293

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian

| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

294


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Plissé Diamants brooch, paved with diamonds and black spinels, on white gold.

295

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


| HAUTE JOAILLERIE | paris july 2016

Plissé Diamants earrings, paved with diamonds and black spinels, on white gold.

296

Photo courtesy of BOUCHERON © BOUCHERON

Jewellery Historian


297


VOLUME 2

298


299

JEWELLERY HISTORIAN, HJ vol1  

The "HAUTE JOAILLERIE" supplement (vol.1) of the JEWELLERY HISTORIAN. www.jewelleryhistorian.com

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you