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Jewellery Historian

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

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Contributors

Artistar Jewels 2017

Extremely PIAGET

Discover our amazing team that create each issue of the Jewellery Historian

We go to Milan, Italy and discover new talents

Olivier Dupon introduces us the latest collection of the famous maison

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Editor’s Letter

INNOVISION 2

Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier welcomes you and invites you to discover this new issue

Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier introduces us an exceptional timepiece made by Ulysse Nardin

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Our news

Victor Veylan

From auctions to new collections, all you need to know is in our news

Olivier Dupon introduces us to the amazing universe of Victor Veylan

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Judy Geib

Dina Kamal

Olivier Dupon introduces us an amazing artist

Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier meets a talented designer for an exclusive interview

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Jewellery Historian Editor-in-Chief Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Creative director-at-large Panayiotis Simopoulos Gemology Department Editor Eva Kountouraki Haute Joaillerie Department Editor Olivier Dupon --Founder Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier --Columnists Eva Kountouraki ( Breathtaking beauty of Gems) Olivier Dupon ( The art of creativity / Haute Joaillerie) --Contributors Martin Huynh, Christina Rodopoulou, Catherine Varoucha --Creative Jewellery Historian Production Jewellery Historian Made in the European Union --Photo agencies Shutterstock, iStock, Pixabay, Unsplash, Freepik, The stocks Cover photo iStock.com / CoffeeAndMilk --Advertising info@jewelleryhistorian.com Website www.jewelleryhistorian.com E-mail info@jewelleryhistorian.com --FREE DIGITAL COPY / NOT FOR SALE JEWELLERY HISTORIAN © 2016

All material published in this e-magazine and at www.jewelleryhistorian.com is published with permission of the brands and designers. Unless otherwise authorized in writing by the Jewellery Historian, it is strictly prohibited to reproduce, in whole or in part, and by any way, the content of this e-magazine. While precautions have been take to ensure the accuracy of the contents of our magazine and digital brands, neither the editors, publishers or its agents can accept responsibility for damages or injury which may arise there from. The information on this e-magazine is for information purposes only. Jewellery Historian assumes no liability or responsibility for any inaccurate, delayed or incomplete information. The information contained has been provided by individual brands, event organizers, brands, press offices or organizations without verification by us. The opinions expressed in articles and/or advertorials, are the author's and/or brand’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Jewellery Historian, the owner, the publisher, the editor-in-chief and team of the magazine, or of any part related to the magazine. The name “Jewellery Historian” and/or logo, may not be reproduced without prior written consent of the founder of magazine. Partial or entire reproduction of the material of this magazine is strictly prohibited.The content, entire edition, graphics, design, lay-out and other matters related to this issue are protected under applicable copyrights and other proprietary laws, including but not limited to intellectual property laws. The copying, reproduction, use, modification or publication by you of any such matters or any part of the material is strictly prohibited, without our express prior written permission.All trade names, trademarks or distinctive signs of any kind contained in the Web pages of the company

are the property of their owners and are protected by law. The same is valid also for all Links (links) .The presence of third-part links (links) in the Jewellery Historian Web pages & e-magazine is for informational purposes only. Our articles may contain photos/texts/graphics/designs that belong to third parties. They are published for information purposes only and with permission of the brands. Image(s) or Footage (as applicable), used under license from photo agencies. The Jewellery Historian is publishing articles about jewellery, auctions, jewellery designers, gemology, gemstones, etc. All trademarks mentioned in the Jewellery Historian’s website and/or magazine belong to their owners, third party brands, product names, trade names, corporate names and company names mentioned may be trademarks of their respective owners or registered trademarks of other companies and are used for purposes of explanation & information and to the owner's benefit, without implying a violation of copyright law. Photos used in articles belong to their owners, third party brands, product names, trade names, corporate names and company names mentioned may be trademarks of their respective owners or registered trademarks of other companies and are used for purposes of explanation and to the owner's benefit, without implying a violation of copyright law.


Jewellery Historian

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

103 The perfume bottle auction Olivier Dupon introduces us to a unique perfumed universe

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152 BLUE VELVET BY VHERNIER Olivier Dupon introduces us the latest magical collection of this famous Italian brand

COCO AVANT CHANEL Olivier Dupon invites you to discover the latest collection of CHANEL

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The garden of Kalahari

THE BEAUTY OF GEMS

Olivier Dupon introduces us the latest collection of CHOPARD

Eva Kountouraki introduces us to the breathtaking beauty of tanzanite.

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186

LATREÏA

ESTHÈTE

Olivier Dupon discovers about the collaboration from Mana Matsuzaki’s perspective

The personal choice of our editor-in-chief

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210

IRVING PENN CENTENNIAL

Jewels we love

The Jewellery Historian supports arts and invites you to discover an amazing exhibition at the Met

Our favorite jewellery

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CONTRIBUTORS

Eva Kountouraki was born and raised in a family of goldsmiths and jewelers. From a very young age she expressed her keen interest in gems, jewelry and design, a passion that led her to devote her studies and her career in this field. She started her first collection of polished and rough gemstones at a very early age and realized that this would be her profession in the future. After studying gemology books in various languages, she attended gemological seminars in Greece and Europe and developed practical skills to analyze gems, Eva decided to accredit those skills choosing the best gemological institute in the world, GIA (Gemological Institute of America), for her studies. Succeeding unprecedented results in the practice and theory of gemology, analyzing and identifying thousands of gemstones and diamonds, she graduated and acquired the prestigious certificate GIA Graduate Gemologist Diploma, which includes specific studies in diamond grading (GIA Graduate Diamonds Diploma) and colored gemstones (GIA Graduate Colored Stones Diploma). Her studies in the jewelry field continued and Eva got her Jewelry Business Management Diploma, gaining specialized knowledge about all the aspects of

the jewelry industry. Her training continued with jewelry design and computer aided design. Eva’s brilliant path in the field of gemology was crowned by her collaboration with the Italian branch of GIA. Eva received special training from professional and experienced gemologists of GIA Italy, New York and California, US, and for more than a decade she teaches gemology and jewelry design in GIA, transferring her experience, knowledge and passion for diamonds, gems and jewelry to her students-famous professionals from around world.

As long as he could remember, Olivier Dupon has always been passionate about how ideas can translate into designs, and as a result, he is fascinated by the umpteen creative approaches taken by many independent practitioners. He is now an expert in the fields of lifestyle and fashion, reveling in exposing these talents to a wider audience. While he began his career at Christian Dior, and then worked as a buyer and project manager for several large retail companies before running his own lifestyle boutique for several years, now based in London, he scouts international markets in search of exciting names in Art & Craft, with a focus on jewellery makers and splendid precious designs. His previous books include The New Artisans (2011), The New Jewelers (2012), The New Pâtissiers (2013), Floral Contemporary (2014), Encore! The New Artisans (2015), and Shoe: Contemporary Footwear by Inspiring Designers (2015) all published by Thames & Hudson. His new book on luxury jewellery was published in Autumn 2016. For the Jewellery Historian, in his The Art of Creativity column, Olivier Dupon exposes inspiring, intriguing at time, and captivating stories through the presentation of talents or the exposé of current topics, all centered around creativity in today’s high-end fine jewelry.

Eve is proud to be the only Greek woman who has ever accomplished such a distinction in the field of diamonds and precious stones. Alongside her work as a gemology instructor, Eva is a jewelry and gemstone buyer and consultant for privates and companies, advising and helping her clients to make successful buys and investments in gemstones. She also organizes and teaches seminars for the training of gemstone and jewelry merchants, salespeople and gempassionates. For the Jewellery Historian, in her The breathtaking beauty of gems column, she introduces you to a breathtaking gemstone in every issue.

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CONTRIBUTORS

Panayiotis Simopoulos is the creative director-at-large  of the Jewellery Historian. In his role, he contributes to special projects and serves as roving ambassador with links to all creative areas of the magazine.

For Catherine Varoucha art has always been her true passion, and every forms of art has captivated her since early childhood. With a desire to explore how science and technology can be used to change skylines that form our cities and to improve the performance of buildings both socially and environmentally, she studied architecture which allowed her to engage both creatively and scientifically with the aesthetic and functional aspects of design.

With a successful world career as a fashion top model and as a talented fashion photographer, he is the rarest kind of creative artist, one who creates extraordinary images. With a unique creative vision, whilst maintaining a clear vision of delivering a message that speaks directly to the reader, he ultimately creates an exciting and balanced visual experience.

Christopher Wren once said, 'Architecture aims at eternity' and Catherine can think of no better way to achieve eternity than to help create buildings of tomorrow that preserve the ideas of today. Ultimately, we are judged by what we leave behind.

For the Jewellery Historian, Panayiotis creates the exceptional visual of each issue. Together with many of the most talented young photographers, he definitely delivers, the most memorable, exciting and unique images and fashion editorials that the magazine has ever published.

Inspired by minimal architecture of the Cyclades in Greece and in particular of Naxos, Catherine works in close collaboration with the editor-in-chief and with the creative director-at-large, to create the uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to a minimal and clean design offers to our precious readers from around the globe a unique reading experience.

In close collaboration with the founder & editor-in-chief of the magazine and with the creative team, he is responsible for the uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to a minimal and clean design offers to readers from around the globe a unique reading experience.

Periodically she will also introduce us exceptional interiors around the globe. In each issue of the Jewellery Historian, with the editor-in-chief, she will share their “inspirations” with us all.

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© Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

Jewellery Historian

| EDITOR’S LETTER

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EDITOR’S LETTER Many people cannot see the differences inside solitude.

ity, joy, preparation for love. But to find this luxurious silence

While for many solitude is a deliberate choice, for others is

that solitude offers you, you don’t have to go in nature like I

caused by other situations.People tend to confuse solitude

do.

and loneliness. In this sense, these two words refer, respectively, to the joy and the pain of being alone.

The last twenty years I had the opportunity to meet people to share this solitude together. I know that this may sound

I never considered solitude as a synonym of being alone. Soli-

strange to you, but this desired isolation doesn’t always trans-

tude is to love being in the singular moment, not caught in

lates to the lack of contact with people. As a graduate gem-

the past, not carried away by the future, and most of all not

ologist I had the privilege to share the beauty of seclusion

carried away by the crowd. Maybe because I wanted to do

with amazing artists. We travelled around the world to find

what C.P. Cafavy, wrote in his famous poem “Try not to de-

the best wind, the perfect breeze for the desired privacy.

grade it by dragging it along, taking it around and exposing

Those exceptional artists, with their silence invited me to join

it so often to the daily silliness of social events and parties,

them in an amazing world, the one of creativity.

until it comes to seem a boring hanger-on.” Probably because I am comfortable in solitude I can also be comfortable

Thanks to this silence, I could hear the wind in the trees, to

with the rest of the world. I feel connected to you all because

stand on the beach and taste the salty smell of the wind that

I am feeling myself. It's simple: to really relate to the world, I

comes from the ocean, and inside me to feel the warmth of

have first to go back and relate to myself.

never ending freedom. We shared our solitude and discovered our freedom, our serenity, our relaxation, the beauty of

As a Swiss I love solitude. During long walks in Swiss nature I

life and of creativity. After all as Pablo Picasso said “Without

always find the solitude I need. The beauty of Switzerland is

great solitude no serious work is possible”.

found in the works of Mother Nature herself as she magnificently blessed this country with the most amazing mountains

As you gaze across the endless sands, the sun begins to rise.

and lakes ever known to man. I also found it in the literature

Waves lap against the shoreline creating an intricate pattern

of Charles Ferdinand Ramuz, in the poetry of Philippe Jac-

along the smooth sand. Innumerable milky puffy clouds float

cottet. This silence gave me inner tranquility that Ramuz once

over the blue skies; some shaped like castles or mountains

perfectly described “I have accepted all and I am free. The

and others looking like white silky sheep. You can hear the

inner chains are broken, as well as those outside.” I always

palm trees waving along the wind as if whispering to each

considered its silence as a form of freedom, especially since

other in a hush. Dolphins leap and call at the glorious sunset

mine is a deliberate choice. Short-term solitude is often val-

before them. As you ran across the beach, the wind whips

ued as a time when I can work, rest, think, without being dis-

your face. The salty breeze makes your eyes water and your

turbed. Arthur Schopenhauer would agree with me, cause as

feet tingle. You inhale deeply as you lie down and you slowly

he once said “A man can be himself alone so long as he is

fell into a profound sleep.

alone… if he does not love solitude, he will not love freedom; for it is only when he is alone that he is really free”.

I invite you to discover this issue within this silence of solitude, because this will allow you to discover the beauty of

Since early childhood I understood that there is a sort of ele-

the gifts all the artists featured in our issues give us through

gance in independent solitude. The tranquility of this desired

their work. As Barbara was singing “Elle fut longue la route,

solitude is for me a prerequisite to living a considered life

mais je l´ai faite, la route, celle-là, qui menait jusqu´à vous... je

without being disturbed. Solitude helps me be the person I

suis venue pour vous dire, ma plus belle histoire d'amour,

want to be. With solitude I discover all the beauty hidden in

c'est vous”.

our lives, such as sensitivity, vulnerability, love, hope, creativ-


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Jewellery Historian

NEWS Everything you need to know, from major art events and auctions to events and news from the most prestigious maisons.

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GUCCI

GUCCI TIMEPIECES & JEWELRY EXTENDS GUCCI DIVE RANGE The new Gucci Dive extensions offer an eccentric twist to Gucci’s most sporty timepiece. The traditionally rugged feel of this performance timepiece has been enhanced with contemporary House motifs such as the tiger and bee designs found on the dials. The extra-large 45mm variants are fitted with a Gucci web nylon strap in blueand-red or green-and-red, overlaid with the woven “L’Aveugle par Amour” expression. The watch teems with detail, from the fine honeybee or tiger embroidery on the dial to the racer web stripes, black PVD case with unidirectional rotating bezel, and luminous hands. The mood then changes with two 40mm yellow or all-black variants worked with rubber. A sporty rubberized finish is seen on the stainless steel case and crown matching the chunky rubber straps boldly stamped with the Gucci logo. To finish, an unique 3D effect brings relief to the rubber dial, emblazoned with a brightly colored roaring tiger’s head. All Gucci Dive watches contain a Swiss Made Ronda quartz movement and are water resistant to 200 meters. About Gucci Timepieces & Jewelry Gucci Timepieces, one of the most reliable and consistent fashion watch brands, with a clear design approach and positioning, has been designing, developing and manufacturing iconic Gucci watches since the early 1970s.
 Rigorously made in Switzerland, Gucci watches are recognized for their innovative and contemporary design, quality and craftsmanship and are distributed worldwide through the exclusive network of directly operated Gucci boutiques and selected watch distributors. Since January 2010, Gucci Timepieces has also been distributing the Gucci Jewelry collections, capitalizing on the expertise gained in the watch sector and leveraging the synergies between the watch and jewelry industries. For more information about Gucci Timepieces & Jewelry, please visit www.gucci.com. Gucci is part of the Kering Group, a world leader in apparel and accessories, which develops an ensemble of powerful Luxury and Sport and Lifestyle brands.

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Photo courtesy of GUCCI © GUCCI

Jewellery Historian

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| NEWS


DINA KAMAL

DINA KAMAL UNVEILS LIMITED EDITION COLLECTION FOR COLETTE’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY Dina Kamal trained as an architect and as a result her jewellery has a uniquely intense relationship with proportion and form. Her signature pieces are powerful and minimal pinky rings. To mark the 20th anniversary of the iconic Parisian department store Colette, Dina Kamal was asked to design an exclusive limited edition series. Limited to only 20 pieces, the Colette Pinky Ring is handcrafted in the brand’s distinctive 18K beige brushed gold. It is offered in plain form, or embedded with natural white diamonds. The ring is available in two different proportions, for both women and men. The Limited Edition rings go on sale exclusively at Colette on 23rd January 2017. DINAKAMAL DK01 is a small independent brand that has made a strong international impact by creating objects of fascination. The aesthetic is about ideas executed in their most essential and potent form. ABOUT DINAKAMAL DK01 Dina Kamal launched her Beirut-based design practice, DK01, in 2010, focusing on unique ideas for precious objects and architectural projects. She trained and practiced as an architect in Washington DC before moving to Beirut in 1998, where she continued to practice architecture. Passionate about her work, Kamal is inspired by the details that makes design timeless, and by simple forms created using intense materials. Her first jewellery collection: The PNKYRNG Collection, redefines the shape of the signet ring through a contemporary and architecturally informed aesthetic, and sets its revival inspired by an elaborate history.

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Photo courtesy of DINA KAMAL © DINA KAMAL

Jewellery Historian

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| NEWS


SAQQARA EXQUISITE ENGAGEMENT RINGS

Dare to dream this Valentine’s Day with an array of exquisite diamond rings by fine jeweller SAQQARA. Step away from the solitaire and the more traditional cuts and settings and allow yourself to be seduced by SAQQARA’s dazzling range of rings crafted exclusively from sliced diamonds, ice diamonds and nuggets. SAQQARA’s unique vision showcases the individual diamond’s defined 3C’s of Charisma, Character and Cachet. Exquisite settings in 18kt gold combined with cascades of pave serve to compliment and enhance the natural majesty and serenity of the individual diamond. The perfect celebration of eternal love and commitment, SAQQARA’s hand selected diamond slices allow you to see into the very heart of the stone and the wild beauty and sense of eternity found within. SAQQARA’s latest collection is available exclusively from www.saqqarajewels.com and from Browns Bond Street and Browns Sloane Street plus online at www.brownsfashion.com. Bespoke commissions are also available on request. ABOUT SAQQARA All SAQQARA’s diamonds are ethically sourced, purchased from legitimate sources not involved in funding conflict and in compliance with UN resolutions. SAQQARA only partner with the world’s most respected diamond suppliers to ensure all their diamonds have been sourced in accordance with the Kimberley Process. The integrity of the diamonds is the most important foundation to SAQQARA’s creations.

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Photo courtesy of SAQQARA © SAQQARA

Jewellery Historian

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| NEWS


EDGY A NEW CREATIVE PARTNER The Jewellery Historian, in the end of 2016,

There are numerous reasons for collabora-

announced a new addition and a new creative part-

tion, from a way to push yourself or brand beyond

ner, EDGY magazine.

your own imagination to reaching a wider audi-

EDGY means to be at  the forefront of a

ence by  offering a new creative vision.  By doing

trend; experimental or avant-garde. Chic, elegant,

this we all recognise how critical diversity, intercon-

but also daring, provocative, avant-garde or trend-

nection, and exchange are to the endeavor.

setting, EDGY is   definitely a magazine made by

Founded in 2016, by Lucas Samaltanos-

people and for people who think out of the box. 

Ferrier and Shon Balaish, EDGY was made to offer

The main goal of this new quarterly publica-

a new creative vision and to promote creative peo-

tion is to be a celebration of innovation and creativ-

ple who think out of the box, everything that is

ity, a publication about people making a living

avant-garde and at the forefront of trends.

from their passions, and a look at activities that offer inspiration. Each issue invites

With an international core team, based be-

readers to ex-

tween Tel Aviv, Athens, New York, Tokyo, and

plore the stories of passionate people and the mo-

Paris, each issue comes together with the help of a

tivations behind their inspirational lifestyles. EDGY

talented group of creative people, graphic design-

is a publication with  a memorable look into the

ers, photographers and writers who embrace all

lives of its subjects via long-form interviews and

submissions EDGY receives from friends and part-

short features, all these, wrapped up in beautiful

ners from all over the world. Their creativity, exper-

words, illustration and photography, and collected

tise, and enthusiasm are evident in each single is-

into a beautifully designed print artifact.

sue. At EDGY they believe in diversity since an in-

Founded and managed by a skilled team of

clusive culture is good for business, fostering the

professionals from the fashion and model industry,

creativity and innovation, and invite all creative

EDGY  portrays unique style stories with a primary

people to join them.

focus on international design in all its forms. EDGY

Digital editions are the future — but for

portrays today the young designers that will be the

many readers, nothing beats the romance of the

world's top designers of tomorrow.

fragrance, the look and the feel of a high-quality

The concept of EDGY is based on mutual

print. It’s unforgettable. For this reason EDGY

support and on collaboration between creative

magazine is exclusively available as a limited edi-

people, which we call the EDGY Concept. The

tion Print on demand  (POD)  magazine. A digital

EDGY concept is a way of approaching

preview will be available online.

creativity with a collaborative perspective. Collabo-

The first issue of EDGY will be available

ration comes in numerous forms, from matching

soon.

designers with other designers, or other creative

Learn more about EDGY, submit your ideas

people such as photographers and artists, but also

and join a creative international community at the

fashion models to fashion photographers and fash-

official website at www.edgymag.com .

ion designers or even writers to photographers.

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Photo courtesy of Karina Carvalho

Jewellery Historian

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| NEWS


T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y BY OLIVIER DUPON

Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

JH

Judy Geib 19


Judy Geib If you could create anything in jewellery, what you would do? When a lot of fine jewellery on the market today is repetitive and formulaic, it is important to advocate for free spirited practitioners whose sole drive is to enjoy hand-making unique pieces. Judy Geib is one of them, and she goes even further by insinuating that she may just be bringing to life jewels that are meant to exist. In other words, Geib’s mind could be a portal for preternatural jewellery pieces, which are destined to become reality through her hands. In that sense, it is very similar to how some artists describe the urge to create their art - the mind channelling the concept - and it is why Geib’s work can be seen above all as an intimate endeavour. Each piece comes with a backstory of why the piece was meant to be. “I like to imagine big collections of jewellery, in the way that Jorge Luis Borges might have. To paraphrase, imagine a fabulous collection of jewels that already exists, and then make it”, Geib observes. “I read a description by Pearl Buck of the Dowager Empress’s jewellery collection: it was a giant wall of small mahogany drawers, each numbered. When she was deciding what to wear, she called a servant and read off a number from a detailed accounting of her jewels: sapphire parure, trembling hair ornaments, and ruby brooch! I could imagine what these pieces might have been, and set about making them. Or, I imagine stumbling upon a fabulous cache of forgotten jewels in a flea market. Or what would be in a treasure chest. This works to prompt my imagination of what incredible things I would find.” This same explorer mind explains why Geib always needs to try something adventurous, something wild, something beyond what she already knows (“always looking for the unexpected”, she ponders), not unlike scientists and researchers. However, her adventurer streak runs parallel with a predisposition for repetitive work. “That might sound like ‘patience’, but actually doing repetitive things allows your mind to wander and dream and imagine. Also, I hate mediocre jewellery”, she points out. Is this also why her creative approach is so holistic? Each jewellery creation indeed becomes the source of inspiration for poems or ‘jewellery poetry’. The same way one can look at a painting and daydream, each Geib rendition is an invitation to express thoughts in the most harmonious way. She might be considered a hybrid between artist and craftswoman, with her work testament to the idea that opposites attract - “a mix of humbleness and extravagance”, she says - despite the fact that she says she struggles with this notion. “I have always thought an artist is a more privileged being than a craftsperson. I always wanted to be an artist, but I think I am a craftsperson. I don’t think making jewellery as a business, using precious materials, is art. I think making something from nothing, including just an idea, can be art. But making something from precious materials can be fascinating and beautiful, but it has a purpose beyond the idea.”

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ŠDirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

Flower earrings in 22K gold and silver with opals and diamonds

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ŠDirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

Flower earrings in 22K gold and silver with opals and diamonds

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Jewellery Historian

| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

She loves to use gold and silver together, in the manner of antique jewellery, and in order to achieve a “softer look”. Her favourite gemstones are opals, emeralds, pink tourmalines, moonstones and dendritic agates. And although she is very well acquainted with the vast varieties of gemstones, this ‘preferred’ group has not evolved much since she started twenty years ago. “My process is completely different for every series. Sometimes ideas come in a flash. A parcel of pear-shaped opals immediately yielded a collection of wildflower earrings. For the neo-geo series various ideas were floating around in my head for weeks: spinning tops, finials, the Bauhaus mascot, cupcake holders. There is always a lot of experimentation”, she adds, “and the pieces end up being a compromise between the idea and the reality of how materials can be manipulated”. For the recent ‘Wise Sweet Wild Silly’ necklace, Geib spent weeks thinking about whether she wanted to say something specific with a piece of jewellery and if she did, what did she want it to be like. “In a way it was like trying to write a novel in a haiku” she says, “I settled on the four words, and then devised letterforms that were halfway between a legible alphabet and glyphs.” Unbeknownst to her until she reached 40, jewellery making appeared to be Geib’s calling from the start. Upon moving to New York once she graduated from college, she fulfilled her desire to be an artist by getting her own studio, where she would work at nights and during weekends for twenty years, all the while supporting herself by working in graphic design for an architect. “It was by chance that I made myself a pair of earrings with a plumbers torch - that was a sort of epiphany - I loved it and knew I had finally found what I wanted to do”, she recalls. “Still, it did take me quite a while to gain the confidence that I could actually make jewellery my way and offer it to be sold.” If Geib’s jewels are meant to be, then naturally it did not take long for them to find collectors. The pieces are notable for their extreme femininity and gentility. Geib is the mastermind behind a sumptuous array of joyful earrings and necklaces that could pass for metal embroidery, whose overall apparent randomness of assemblage is deceptive. It is jewellery that is the antithesis of symmetry, an ode to improbable equilibrium. They have the free flow of watercolour drawings, the beauty of hand-made artefacts, and the playfulness of edible delights. “I try to free flow at all times. There is an advantage for me in never having learned the ‘proper’ way to make jewellery, which means that I make up my own methods and can just go for it, with a hammer or torch or saw or nails, and see what suggests itself”, the self-taught designer explains. “I always try to look for something new, every time. In that sense, every project is a leap into the unknown, the opportunity to explore the imperfection that comes with experimentation.”

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ŠDirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

Pins in 22K gold set with dendritric agates as centre stones, and various peripheral gemstones (peridot, emerald, blue topaz, tourmaline, moonstone, carnelian, amethyst).

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

“Squashed” earrings in 18K gold

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

Extremely fine erewhon filigree bracelet in 18K yellow gold

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ŠDirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

Kaleidoscope pin brooch in gold and silver set with various gemstones

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ŠDirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

Kaleidoscope pin brooch in gold and silver set with various gemstones

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Jewellery Historian

| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

On that philosophical note, let’s ask Judy Geib a few more questions. Olivier Dupon - What sets your heart aflutter regarding jewellery design? Judy Geib - I am passionate about the making part of jewellery – I love handmade-ness – and I love that making provides chance after chance to experiment with big ideas, small ideas, silly ideas, over-the-top ideas. I think working with gold is almost like approaching a blank canvas, it is your opportunity to bring everything to it, starting from scratch. You try to invent something out of nothing, and it is always a challenge to try to find something new and interesting. OD - What would have been your Plan B, had you not pursued a career in jewellery design? JG - I sometimes think about what else I could have, would have, might have done or will do in the future. But I don’t really think there is any plan B’s for me. I have always loved making things; it is just something inside me. Perhaps I could shift to making leatherwear or clothing or drawing – I love all sorts of materials – but in general my forte is making. It would be great if I could be an advocate for prison reform or invent a solution to burning fossil fuels, but for now, I think there is only one course I can follow. OD - What is the best memory you associate with jewellery in your own life? JG - I think it is sentimental: my grandmother’s (modest) moonstone jewellery, and my mother’s even more modest (costume) jewellery. They always made my eyes sparkle. Now it has to do with digging into a mound of my own deliciously scrumptious jewellery, and realising I have made, by myself, something that is like Aladdin or Fafner’s treasure, that seemingly impossibly unattainable treasure chest. It is not about possessing, because I want to sell it, but it is appreciating the amazing diversity, and my surprise, at all of the beautiful things I made myself. OD - What would be the one most important piece of advice you could now tell your younger self, (when it comes to a career in jewellery that is)? JG - Because I think I am succeeding, to some extent, I don’t know how I could have succeeded differently. It is certainly not easy, and it is definitely a combination of a big dose of luck, passion, and trusting yourself. I guess my advice would be to trust

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Photo courtesy of ŠDirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

Kaleidoscope pin brooch in gold and silver set with various gemstones

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Jewellery Historian

| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

yourself (because you can only succeed by being true to yourself), although it is so very hard to do. OD - Is there anything in your designs that make them quintessentially ‘American’? JG - I think there is an undeniable confidence about being brought up in a land of freedom and opportunity, although of course there are nuances to every story. But free speech and living in a country that has historically welcomed people (!!!) from all over is a great thing. OD - What is your vision of the jewellery field at the moment? JD - How to take an overall view? I am very lucky to be able to make and show and sell jewellery that is playful and humble and luxurious. Branding is a complicated question to me. Am I doing it or not, I don’t know. Does one have to do it in today’s retail environment? I think so. OD - What is your pet peeve list when it comes to the fine jewellery industry? JG - Recycled gold being called “eco-friendly” in an attempt to sell more products. Fair-mined gold is better than recycled, but jewellery, as with many things in modners). We can, of course, always try to improve the sourcing of our materials and our practices. But claiming eco-friendliness to try to sell more jewellery seems very deceptive to me. "All images, including headshot, courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk" www.judygeibplusalpha.com

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Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

ern life, is not “eco-friendly” (except from a very few very dedicated small practitio-


| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

Ginko brooch in silver, 18K and 24K gold with opals

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

“Dancing Cosmos” necklace in gold and silver set with opals, moonstones and diamonds

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

“Starry Night” earrings in gold and silver set with opals, moonstones and diamonds

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

Full Flowery erewhon filigree necklace in 18K yellow gold

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Jewellery Historian

| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

“Amorphous” earrings in 18K gold set with rubies and diamonds

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

“Swoosh” earrings in 18K gold set with diamonds

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of ©Dirk Vandenberk

Jewellery Historian

“The Charm of the Unexpected” transformable necklace in 18K, 24K and silver set with dendritic agate and aquamarines (centre becomes a brooch).

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Photo courtesy of ARTISTAR JEWELS © ARTISTAR JEWELS 2017

AR T I S TAR J E W E LS

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Jewellery Historian

| ARTISTAR JEWELS 2017

Artistar Jewels is the unmissable date for all the contemporary jewel lovers. From the 23rd to the 26th of February 2017 142 international designers from all over the world will take part in the fourth edition of the project. 400 creations, mostly never seen before, from over 30 different countries. For the first time the event will take place in the prestigious Giureconsulti Palace in Milan during the fashion week of February. The next edition, that has a rise of the participants of 40% compared to the previous edition of 2016, increase the illustrious names and will host the amazing creations of Gillo Dorfles for San Lorenzo, GianCarlo Montebello and Philip Sajet. Artistar Jewels is the event founded in 2012 by the designer Enzo Carbone and is now a benchmark in the contemporary jewelry scenario. An international showcase for well-known artists and springboard for emerging creative talents. The participants present their works, unique pieces or small series, selected for the high artistic value, for the technical sperimentation and the stylistic research. Evocative body ornaments, very different for the materials and the techniques but linked by the fil rouge of the narration of a story, always present in each creation. Artistar Jewels is a project born with the aim of spreading the culture of contemporary jewelry and designed to anticipate the market trends, one of the first italian realities which has exploited all the potentiality of the web to implement the commercialization of contemporary jewelry. It’s the only contest in Italy, and one of the few in the world, that offers a never given before and across-the-board reading on the latest evolution of contemporay jewels and offer all the selected participants the extraordinary possiblity of taking part in a prestigious show, collaborating with experts in the sectors, taking part in a contest, selling the creations through the online shop platform www.artistarjewels.com and seeing the works in a publication distributed on the international scale. Even for this edition the participants will see published in the volume Artistar Jewels 2017 the photos of the shooting organized by Artistar that for this edition will be curated the photographer Federico Barbieri. The book, edited by the publishing house Logo Fausto Lupetti, will be available on a nationally and internationally level: sold in all the bookstores in Italy and in all the major European capitals, and shipped to over 5,000 Left page : “Fan Ring” by Gianni De Benedittis

operators of the sector. The introductive texts will be written by Eugenia

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Jewellery Historian

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Gadaleta, expert of contemporary jewelry, who, apart

“I’m very proud of the results we achieved in these

from being the Marketing & Communication Manager of

four years and we’re happy to announce the new edition

Artistar, will curate the special contents of the volume

of Artistar Jewels, improved in the contents and in the col-

Artistar Jewels 2017 together with Selene Oliva – fashion

laborations. The contemporary jewelry scenario is growing

and jewels freelance journalist

and we are investing in the scouting activities and in the

The jury is made of new personalities: Elisabetta

communication sector and this efforts are giving great re-

Barracchia – Editor of Vogue Accessory and Creative Direc-

sults. Artistar is a one-of-kind project that offers visibility

tor of the Fashion Department of Vanity Fair – Mariastella

at all the levels and business opportunities. Milan is a stra-

Campi – fashion journalist – Bianca Cappello – historian

tegic city – said Enzo Carbone, founder of Artistar – From

and critic of jewelry – Gianni De Liguoro – founder and

Artistar we embrace all the market’s needs and we work to

stylis of the De Liguoro brand and also protagonist of a

give the maximum emphasis on all the sector’s protago-

special exhibition in a special area – Guido Solari – foun-

nists. The fashion week is a fundamental occasion to pre-

der and owner of the Scuola orafa Ambrosiana of Milan

sent the the most prominent sector’s workers all the inter-

via Savona, 20 – Liza Urla – one of the top jewelry blogger

national excellences of the

and founder of GEMOLOGUE.

nario and will also be one of the few events of that week

contemporary jewelry sce-

to be open to public and with free entrance. Spreading The three winners will have the chance to partici-

the contemporary jewelry culture that goes from art, fash-

pate for free in Artistar Jewels 2018 and will be included

ion and design, characterized but a strong narrative

as special contents in the 2018 book. Other significant

power, able to demolished the rules of the traditional jew-

news is the chance for one of the participant to collabo-

elry, still not very well known in Italy, is for Artistar not an

rate with the bijoux brand De Liguoro. Selected by the

exclusive luxury but a inclusive obligation.

founder and juror Giovanni De Liguoro who in the eighties collaborated with the top brands of the fashion Made

On Febraury 24th in Palazzo Giureconsulti the win-

in Italy, from Trussardi to Alberta Ferretti, the artists will

ners of the contest will be announced during an invita-

help in the personalization of a maison’s jewels which will

tional event.

then be produced. A idea born to create new synergies and that is the perfect summary between tradition and

Artistar Jewel 2017 ( 23-26 February 2017)

innovation. To an under 27 designer, Scuola Orafa Ambro-

Palazzo Giureconsulti, Milano

siana of Milan will offer the free participation to the Profes-

Via Mercanti, 2

sional Goldsmithing course to learn all the most important

Hours: 9:30 – 18:00 (open to public)

laboratory techniques, with the realization of several goldsmithing jewels designed by the School. Finally, for the

FREE ENTRANCE

very first tim, a selection of the artworks will be hosted by eminent galleries: Spazio Espositivo Adiacenze of Amerigo Mariotti and Daniela Tozzi in Bologna, Creativity Oggetti of Susanna Maffini in Turin.

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| ARTISTAR JEWELS 2017

All photos courtesy of ARTISTAR JEWELS © ARTISTAR JEWELS 2017

Jewellery Historian

From top to bottom, from left to right : Serpentine Necklace by B.Dodi, FuturoRemoto ring by Gianni De Benedittis, Nefertiti necklace by B.Dodi, Necklace “PianoPiano” by Reem Jano Jewelry

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Jewellery Historian

| ARTISTAR JEWELS 2017

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS "U", Adiacenze, Alas Arte, Alberto Longo, Alessandra Casoli, Alessandro Pagani, Algares di Alba Gallizia, Alina Simion, Ana Hagopian, Andrea Barrera Velásquez, Andreia Gabriela Popescu, Angela Malhües Torres, Anita Sondore, Anna Ben Ruby Jewelry Design, Anna Maria Pitt Jewellery Art Ltd, Anne Poon, Antoaneta Stereva Design, Apuania Gioielli, Arianna Celentano, ARIEL.C by Sihua Ariel Chen, ArteFatto, ArtisticaLmente di Leonardi Emanuele, Atelier Jamais, Aurum by Gudbjörg, AvetaBiagiDesign, B etoile, B_Dodi design, Birgit Damer, Boltestern, Catalin Ungureanu, Cecile van Eeden jewellery, Chevalley Cedric, Cindy Poole, Claudia Oddi, Clireu, Collezione dei calanchi, comivi di Ivana Comandini, Comotto Gioielli, Cristiana Turano Campello, Daniela Coppolino, Dashi Namdakov, Deberitz, Diana Sokolic for Diana'S, Donata Mapelli DonyOro, Dorothée Loustalot, Elèna Paolini Creazioni, Evgeniia Balashova, Faeber Studio by Aliza Guttman, Fiamma Tortoli, Fior di Loto, Fulvia Notari Antares Venezia, Futuroremoto Gioielli di De Benedittis Gianni, Gabrielle Friedman Jewelry, Giorgia Iachizzi, Harriet Morris, Haven Design by Hagit Abenheimer, IngranArt by Simona Della Bella, Isabella Nurigiani, Iva Stojkovic Jewelry, Ivan Tobias Pettersson, Jane Swensen Jewelry, Jennie Sherwin, Jenny Lawlor, Jessica Marni Winchcombe, Ji Young Kim, K. Brunini Jewels, Kaja Gjedebo, Kate Bajic, Labros & Semeli, Liesbeth Busman, Linn Sigrid Bratland, Look at the cat atelier, Lorella Verrillo, Lutezia, Macratecna, Make Me by Alisa Čaber and Adi Rahić, Manuale Jewelry, Maria Azzurra Caridi, Mariana Rogoz, MarinaMa, Maschalina, MAUKE V Jewelry Amsterdam, Max Sytnikov, MetalTorks / Maayan Yablochnik, Michelle Chang, midzo, mimìétoile, Mohanna Mona, Monotip, MORPHḖ LONDON, Nahiot Hernández, Nassrin Vessalian, Neha Joyas S de RL de CV, Olga Zielińska, ONE OFF SRL – Emotional Hardware, Orietta Sacchi - Quezzo Design, Paola C. Gioielli, Paola Marchesi - FILARETE JEWELS, Paola Oregioni, Paolo Ricchiuti, Parme Marin, Patsa di Patrizia Santamaria, Pauletta Brooks Wearable Art, Peggy Creazioni by Rosa De Nicolo, Piera Legnaghi, Reem Jano Jewelry, Reje di Renata Rosa, Richard Tang, Roberto Intorre Gioielleria Contemporanea, Rocks for the Myst, Ruta Naujalyte, Sabrina Facchetti, Sally Vanderpump, SAMANTA FIORENZA / GODI FIORENZA, Samokish, Sandra von Rubenwil, Sara Barroccu_BARSA design, Sebastian Schildt AB, Sheida Farrokhi, Simona Girelli, Simona Lomurno, Simona Stangalini, Sion Antique Treasures di Andrea Benvenuti, Siria Eco Design, Slast by Alena Willroth, Snem Yildirim, Susan Lenart Kazmer, Tagua organic art by Ofry Fridman, Theodora, Thya Bijoux di Lidia Sanna, Tisor gioielli, Touch by Olga Chernyshova, Ugualimai di Cristiana Del Bello, Valerie Ostenak, VetroGioielli di Sara Talso Morandotti, Vitalba Canino Gioielli, Werner Altinger, Wood&cut, XAPA’CREAZIONI, Ying Chen

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| ARTISTAR JEWELS 2017

All photos courtesy of ARTISTAR JEWELS © ARTISTAR JEWELS 2017

Jewellery Historian

From top to bottom, from left to right : Necklace “Lost found lost” by Andreia Gabriela Popescu, Cone Ring by Sheida Farrokhi, “Bull Ring” by Sheida Farrokhi, Necklace “Five In A Row” by Snem Yildirim

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T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y BY OLIVIER DUPON

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

JH

Extremely Piaget 47


Extremely Piaget In the Sunny Side of Life high jewellery collection that Piaget unveiled last summer, the French house celebrated summertime and outdoor revelries, with the stupendous collection evoking glamorous destinations where sea meets sun. The latest edition of the Extremely Piaget ever-expanding fine jewellery series is squarely embracing the same theme and more specifically California. If there was ever one emblem that captures the imagination when it comes to the ‘Golden State’, it should be palm trees (first seen in the ‘Palm Eldorado’ series from the Sunny Side of Life). So on 25th February 2017, Piaget will make its annual appearance (as premier sponsor of the event for the past 10 years) at the 32nd Independent Spirit Awards in Santa Monica, an important event on the film industry calendar, and launch its latest Extremely Piaget creations featuring exotic foliage. This year Piaget has centred the new fine jewellery collection on a distinctive palm leaf motif, whose fibrous character has been achieved by means of the ‘Palace Décor’, the art of engraving that here reproduces the textures of plant fibre. Yet this new Extremely Piaget chapter is obviously less ‘couture’ and more ‘cool luxury’ than its high jewellery cousin. There is indeed something effortlessly chic about the jewellery suite comprising a pair of earrings, a ring, a cuff, a long sautoir and a stunning torque neckpiece. For the necklace and cuff, by cleverly overlapping fully diamond-paved leaves (with smooth gold midribs and veins) with chiselled gold leaves (with diamond-paved midribs and diamond-rendered veins), the craftsmen have created a mirroring effect that conjures light glinting on and off the leaves. Then when it comes to the simpler ring and earrings, one can easily imagine how to style them: an embroidered kaftan and loose bracelets on one arm during the day; and a flowing strappy dress with bejewelled sandals at night…or anyway you like it! After all Extremely Piaget is about eschewing excess and cherishing contemporary keepsakes that befit a casual, chic attitude. You own it, and you know it!

www.piaget.com

Left page : Extremely Piaget, 18K white gold Palm tree ring, brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 3.2 cts)

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Jewellery Historian

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Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Extremely Piaget, 18K pink gold Palm tree sautoir, brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 5.6 cts)

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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

Extremely Piaget, 18K pink gold Palm tree necklace, brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 8.95 cts)


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Jewellery Historian

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Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Original drawing of the Extremely Piaget, 18K white gold Palm tree bracelet, brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 13 cts)

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Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

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Jewellery Historian

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Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

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Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

Extremely Piaget, 18K pink gold Palm tree bracelet, brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 5.35 cts)

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Jewellery Historian

| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Extremely Piaget, 18K pink gold Palm tree earrings, green tourmaline, brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 2.44 cts)


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| THE ART OF CREATIVITY

Photo courtesy of PIAGET © PIAGET

Jewellery Historian

Extremely Piaget, 18K pink gold Palm tree ring, brilliant-cut diamonds (approx. 0.65 ct)

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57

TRULY EXCEPTIONAL TIMEPIECES

EDITOR’S CHOICE

Photo courtesy of ULYSSE NARDIN © ULYSSE NARDIN

HORLOGERIE


INNOVISION 2 ULYSSE NARDIN

EXCEPTIONAL TIMEPIECES

Without Rolf W. Schnyder in the early 1980s, who

watches. By this we mean the tiny but absolutely essen-

knows what would have become of Ulysse Nardin ? Fol-

tial balance spring. This made Ulysse Nadin the silicon

lowing the quartz crisis, which also had serious repercus-

pioneer of mechanical watchmaking.

sions for our competitors, there were difficult times for

Of course, the research did not stop with the

the traditional brand. A visionary entrepreneur, Schny-

introduction of the legendary “Freak”. Quite the oppo-

der’s purchase of the Ulysse Nardin brand heralded a

site. The development team felt particularly invigorated

new sense of innovation which pervaded Ulysse Nardin

by the challenge and went on to discover the benefits of

after 1983. Clear evidence of this can be seen in the As-

using diamonds in watch movements. 2005 saw the

trolabium Galileo Galilei in 1985, the Planetarium Nico-

launch of the “Freak Diamond heart” and with it the first

laus Copernicus 1988, the Tellurium Johannes Kepler

components made from the hardest material currently

1992 or the Per- petual Ludwig 1996, a hitherto unparal-

known to man. Because of the immense costs this en-

leled perpetual calendar. These pieces are accepted as

tailed, the significantly more affordable “DIAMonSIL”

milestones in watchmaking.

was brought out in 2007. In this watch, the silicium es-

Ludwig Oechslin was the driving force behind this

capement parts are covered in a synthetic nanocrystalline

and other exceptional timepieces which put Ulysse Nar-

diamond film which has the same hardness and consis-

din back at the very center of the horological world fol-

tency as pure diamond.

lowing long years of absence. At the start of the 21st cen-

In the same year, Ulysse Nardin made a splash

tury, he was also the decisive influence behind the first

again with the “InnoVision 1”. Ten different features in

use of a material which had only been known for its use

total, this watch was made to stand out. For several hun-

in electronic components up to then: silicium. This was

dred years, brass, steel and artificial rubies had played a

not the only reason why “Freak”, launched in 2001, was

crucial role in the manufacture of mechanical movements.

the embodiment of a real revolution. Its innovative “Dual

But now Ulysse Nardin has demonstrated that the time

Direct escapement” made anchors and escapement

was right for a whole new range of materials and produc-

wheels as unnecessary as rubies for friction reduction or

tion technologies to be used in watchmaking. Selective

oil for lubrication. Energy is transferred directly to the bal-

photolithography technology had a large role to play in

ance wheel by two drive wheels made of hard but highly

the manufacturer’s innovations. This features “DRIE”

flexible and entirely non-magnetic silicium with extremely

(Deep Reactive Ion Etching) and LIGA (the German acro-

smooth surfaces. There is no other way of saying it: this

nym for Lithography, Electroplating and Molding). This

watch heralded an unprecedented new era in mechanical

was the first time that these had been combined in one

watchmaking. Ulysse Nardin was subsequently the first

technique, with each technology offering unforeseen pos-

watch manufacturer in the world to use thermally stabi-

sibilities for the design of movement components. This

lized silicium for the core of all its conventionally ticking

signaled the start of a long road towards new horizons in

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Jewellery Historian

| HORLOGERIE

timekeeping for Ulysse Nardin. At the Geneva Watch Fair

they are not dependent on the tension of the mainspring.

SIHH 2017, under the aegis of CEO Patrik Hoffmann, the

This is made possible by a complex silicium structure with

“InnoVision 2” marks an important milestone for the

locking elements, which interacts with silicium escape-

watch manufacturer, with its ten unrivaled, sensational

ments which are as cleverly designed in this movement

innovations.

as they were in the “Dual Direct”. The key feature is the flexible silicium blades,

InnoVision 2

which are initially pre-tensioned by the mechanism for each half-oscillation of the balance wheel. This means

There is no doubt the current essence of the

that they absorb around 150 nanojoules of energy. 60

Ulysse Nardin Research and Development team’s compre-

nanojoules of this is released rapidly and highly accu-

hensive expertise is captured by the InnoVision 2. On

rately to the oscillation system during the subsequent

one hand, this can be seen in the fundamental design

shift from a stable to a metastable state. And this contin-

features, such as the self-winding mechanism, the oscilla-

ues until the power of the watch is drained. The special

tor, the escapement and the time display. On the other

feature of the blocking lever which catches hold of the

hand, there is the use of ground-breaking materials and

escapement wheels is that it is held by the flexible

state-of-the-art production technologies. In all, this excep-

blades. This removes the need for a bearing shaft; an ad-

tional watch boasts ten innovations which are being pre-

vantage, as this would inevitably reduce friction. There-

sented at the Geneva Watch Exhibition SIHH 2017 -

fore, the constant-force escapement, which is pending

Ulysse Nardin’s first time attending the exhibition in the

patent, has a very positive effect on isochronism. By this,

company’s history.

watchmakers mean that every half-oscillation of the balance wheel lasts exactly the same length of time, inde-

Innovation 1: Dual Constant escapement

pendent of the balance wheel’s amplitude. Of course, it goes without saying that the accuracy of this thoroughly

The escapement carries out two fundamental

extraordinary timepiece is second to none. (2 patents is-

tasks in mechanical watches.

sued, 1 patent pending).

Firstly, it prevents unrestricted unloading of the

Innovation 2: Direct silicium bonding

spring mechanism. Secondly, the escapement transfers regular pulses to the oscillation system to maintain the

DRIE (Deep Reactive Ion Etching) is the name of

oscillations from the balance wheel and the balance

the photolithography deep etching process used by

spring. With the Dual Direct escapement that was

Ulysse Nardin to produce the escapement element from

launched in 2001, Ulysse Nardin had already set new stan-

monocrystalline silicium. A two-part production process is

dards in efficiency. In a traditional Swiss escapement, a

required, owing to the extreme complexity and three-

large amount of the energy supplied actually needs to be

dimensional structure. The two parts must then be con-

used by the escapement. What is more, and this was also

nected together. Bonding is used to achieve this, a proc-

typical of Dual Direct, the force of the impulses relayed

ess which dates back to 1986. However, Ulysse Nardin

to the escapement decreases with the decreasing torque

now uses it to manufacture relatively small watch compo-

of the main spring. As a result, this reduces the ampli-

nents for the first time. The sealed bond is created by

tude of the balance wheel which in turn has a negative

compressing hydrophobic surfaces at process tempera-

effect on accuracy. This is exactly what the “Dual Con-

tures of between 1800 and 2200 degrees Fahrenheit

stant” counteracts. It is a sophisticated constant force es-

(1000 to 1200 degrees Celsius) with the addition of oxy-

capement. The small pulses that are transmitted to the

gen. What is novel here is that the process creates stable

balance wheel and hairspring are always equal because

“silicium oxide” joins, which spread in all directions from

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Photo courtesy of ULYSSE NARDIN © ULYSSE NARDIN

Jewellery Historian

60

| HORLOGERIE


Jewellery Historian

| HORLOGERIE

the first contact point on the vertical surfaces. In this way,

the balance wheel and spring without the need for more

what was originally two becomes one. (1 patent pend-

energy. With a view to gearing control, at 8 mg cm2, the

ing).

balance wheel’s remarkably high. The moment of inertia Innovation 3: Silicium balance wheel with gold

can be adjusted with small gold elements included in the

mass elements and stabilizing micro paddles.

outer mass sectors in order to adjust the chronometrical precision. All in all, the entire balance wheel’s mass is sig-

Anyone who wishes to measure the constant pass-

nificantly lower than that of conventionally constructed

ing of time must firstly divide it into equal segments and

examples. This is what watchmaking progress looks like.

then count them meticulously. Whether electronic or me-

(1 patent pending).

chanical, this is exactly what watches do. In conventional timepieces, the escapement is responsible for this: in

Innovation 4: “Grinder”

other words, the balance wheel and the balance spring working in unison.

Wearable timepieces have had automatic winding

In the InnoVision 2, Ulysse Nardin uses silicium for

since around 1770. This was devised to eliminate the

both of these components as a matter of course, owing

need for a key to tighten the mainspring. Self-winding

to the material’s wide-ranging beneficial properties. It has

found its way to the wrist in the 1920s. 1932 brought

a density which is 3.6 times lower than the Glucydur used

about the single-direction rotor with unlimited rotation.

to make conventional balance wheels. Furthermore, silicium has a high degree of homogeneity, making it very

It was another ten years before the oscillating

conducive to facilitating equal mass distribution. In addi-

weight delivered energy to the barrel in both rotational

tion, the raw material is non-magnetic, corrosion- and

directions for the first time. Since then, engineers, techni-

shock-resistant and highly flexible despite its great hard-

cians and watchmakers have been focused on finding

ness.

ways to optimize the function and efficiency of the autoNow we come to the balance wheel: For engi-

matic winding mechanism. In particular, systems polariz-

neers and watchmakers, a balance wheel must fulfill pre-

ing the movements of the rotor have offered and con-

cisely de- fined criteria. Its center must have the lowest

tinue to offer, great potential. A part of the convention-

possible mass yet a high moment of inertia.

ally constructed transmission shows a noticeable loss of

The InnoVision 2’s new balance wheel possesses

friction and a notable degree of inefficient idling. This

precisely these apparently contradictory characteristics.

was reason enough for Ulysse Nardin to radically redes-

The part that might loosely be described as the body is a

ign the InnoVision 2’s self-winding mechanism, following

real flyweight at only seven milligrams. Ulysse Nardin

a thorough analysis. At the start of the chain of automatic

uses the DRIE process to form it from silicium wafers. Oxi-

energy generation there is a centrally located ball-

dizing the surface creates the required thermo and

bearing rotor. Underneath it has three further small ball-

mechan- ical stability. Moreover, the oxidization process

bearings, which operate on two pairs of leaf springs in a

results in slightly rounded edges. The unusual shape of

filigree-shaped structure. The ring attached to this has a

the regulator lever, which looks like a paddle, is no coinci-

total of four springy ratchets. Its small, hook-shaped free

dence. It maintains constant oscillation by smoothing air

end engages with the angular serrated winding wheel

turbulence within the casing. In addition, and even more

centered above the barrel. Each rotation of the oscillat-

importantly, in this watch, the different amplitudes

ing weight makes the structure and the ring oscillate. This

caused by switching between horizontal and vertical posi-

makes one or two of the four ratchets move the winding

tions are equalized. Ultimately, this means that the quality

wheel in the clockwise direction, as viewed from the rear.

factor is not compromised whatever its position. This is

Finally an elaborate, two-stage satellite-reduction

calculated by the number of oscillations performed by

gear is needed. This transforms the relatively quick but

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low- energy actions of the innovative excenter changer

developed an innovative and therefore patented method

into slow and therefore more powerful actions capable of

for coating silicium with a thin film of sapphire. Obviously,

tightening the centered mainspring.

the thickness of the coating of around one micrometer

“Grinder,” which is the name of the innovative

(μm) must be taken into account during construction. The

self-winding mechanism, justifiably makes one think of

InnoVision 2’s elongated center wheel bridge is made

high- performance yachting, with which Ulysse Nardin is

from this innovative combination of materials. The entire

closely associated through

component has harder sur-

the Swedish Artemis team.

faces and a higher me-

This automatic winding

chanical stability as a con-

system embodies the effi-

sequence. (1 patent is-

ciency that is necessary

sued).

when setting sail on a fastpaced yacht. It transforms

Innovation 6: 24-Karat

even the tiniest amounts

hard gold wheels.

of kinetic energy into potential. There is virtually no

Gear wheels in mechanical

idling. If necessary, the

movements are conven-

mainspring can of course

tionally made of brass.

be tightened by turning

This is not so in the InnoVi-

the rear bezel, as is also

sion 2. Ulys- se Nardin

the case for “Freak”. (1

very purposefully chose

patent issued, 1 patent

hard gold for these compo-

pending).

nents. If the gear wheels

Innovation 5:

that are conventionally

Sapphire-coated silicium

used in time-keeping gear

bridge

trains interact with steel

Photo courtesy of ULYSSE NARDIN © ULYSSE NARDIN

pinions then friction will The various advan-

occur. Using gold ensures

tages of silicium in me-

a better and therefore

chanical movements are

more efficient transfer of

now sufficiently well-

force. This has a positive

known. As early as 2007,

effect on the energy con-

Ulysse Nardin proved that

sumption of the whole

there is always room for

mechanism and ultimately

improvement by coating

on the power reserve of

silicon components with a

the watch. Once the gold

synthetic, nanocrystalline

gear wheels have been

d i a m o n d f i l m .


manufactured using the

With ten Mohs or 10,600 Vickers, the most precious raw

photolithographic LIGA process, it is possible to create

material is also the hardest available. In second place

an attractive outer surface with delicate and stable struc-

come sapphire or corundum with nine Mohs or 2,200

tures.

Vickers. This is why Ulysse Nardin, in collaboration with the EPFL High School of Lausanne and Sigatec, has now

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Innovation 7: Glass bridge with integrated shock

It is generally known that a whole day is com-

protection for the balance wheel.

prised of 24 hours, which are conventionally divided into two times twelve. When it comes to ways displaying ex-

Nowadays, a movement without shock protection

actly what the time is, there are some examples of hands

would be unthinkable. Classic designs, such as the “In-

which only rotate around their axis once every 24 hours

cabloc” comprise a total of five micro elements. These

or additional day-night indicators. Looking at what the

include the bearings, the fixed bearing jewel and the end-

market currently offers, Ulysse Nardin has taken an inno-

stone jewel, and a spring. The ring jewel, which may

vative, if not entirely new step with the InnoVision 2. The

move in its bearing if there is a large impact, is pushed

display represents the hours 1 to 11 first and then those

back into its central position by the spring. As a result,

from 13 to 23 digitally. The digits can be read through

frictional resistance must be overcome. This is not the

appropriately shaped apertures. The corresponding

case with the InnoVision 2’s innovative system. Ulysse Nar-

printed ring is moved directly by the large barrel. The re-

din manufactures the balance cock itself and the entire

spective mechanism requires 15 minutes each time it

integrated shock protection system from glass. The sys-

switches between midday and midnight. (The hours be-

tem consists of a coil spring held in place by resiliently

fore (AM) and after (PM) midday appear in the windows

suspended balance shaft bearings and a height-restricted

in different colors.) Ulysse Nardin has applied for a patent

cover. The bearing returns to its original position without

for this extraordinary time display. (1 patent pending).

being slowed by friction thanks to this innovative monobloc construction method, as the glass spring simply

Innovation 10: Three-dimensional glass minute

moves back to its rest position. In addition to flexibility

hands.

and strength, glass exhibits extraordinarily good frictional behavior. In contrast to silicium, which the 2007 InnoVi-

In the course of a day, many individuals look at

sion 1’s balance wheel bridge and shock protection were

their watch more often than they look in the mirror. Along-

made from, glass is completely transparent and is no-

side the exceptional digital time display, the InnoVision 2

where near as fragile as it might appear to be at first

also has a minute hand which is unrivaled on the market.

glance. Ulysse Nardin has relevant expertise in this field,

In truth, it is a three-dimensional glass sculpture, manufac-

thanks to its previous experiments with glass.

tured using precision laser cutting. The resolution that can be achieved through this process is in the range of

Innovation 8: Super-LumiNova filled channels in-

three to five micrometers. To ensure that the delicate

tegrated into the glass balance wheel bridge.

glass creation is not damaged by violent impacts, it sits on a fine metal plate.

Manufacturing the InnoVision 2’s balance cock from transparent glass offered unforeseen opportunities to the en- gineers and material scientists. During the production of this component, they were able to create delicate channels within it. When it is dark, impressive light effects are created thanks to the use of Super-LumiNova to fill in the channels. The manufacturer has a patent pending for this sophisticated process. (1 patent pending). Innovation 9: Eye-catching 1 – 11 and 13 – 23 time display.

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T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y BY OLIVIER DUPON

Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

JH

Victor Veylan 65


Victor Veylan Could Victor Velyan be the Indiana Jones of the jewellery world? After all he is as independent and adventurous as the legendary movie hero, yet with a rocker demeanour and the talent of a maestro. An avid explorer of open spaces and an advocate for conservation of the animal kingdom, Victor Velyan likes to ride horses, swim with hammerhead sharks and run photographic safaris. A dedicated animal lover, he is involved with the ASPCA. “Having spent so much time in Africa, I have done a great deal of work with animal conservation efforts involving anti-poacher campaigns and projects”, he points out. It is almost as if Velyan is embracing a life dedicated with gratitude to nature and how it fundamentally contributes to his art in the form of inspiration and gemstones. No wonder then that his creations exude character and soul; part totemic, part organic, the pieces all trigger instant wow-factor allure. We are in glamazon territory here, with unique statement jewels that refer almost fetishistically to flora and fauna, and with a few dark innuendos thrown in for good measure (e.g. the bespoke cuff featuring a large scorpion which has a stinger that pops out when one touches the pincers). Phantasmagorical and mystical figures also appear in bespoke designs – think archangels and dragons – as well as powerful tributes to nature’s grandeur – the striking jellyfish pendant, featuring diamonds, opals, sapphires, and moonstones, an ode to Velyan’s love for the ocean and all the creatures within it. And, as if to cement the talismanic and protective attributes of all those creations, a gold dagger symbol systematically seals each design. Apart from being part of Victor Velyan logo, it also “symbolises a technique that I use to harden the pure metals, which originated from ancient sword makers”, he says. Paradoxically the strong referential backdrop to Velyan’s collections does not intimidate, rather, it comforts. The underlying feminine quality guarantees effortless wearability and style. “Having a huge passion and appreciation for natural gemstones and metals, I love combining them in the form of fine jewellery to adorn some of my most selective clients. I am passionate about creating unique pieces that make the wearer feel special”, Velyan says. “When it comes to jewellery making, craftsmanship and artistry go hand in hand. Making jewellery is such a creative process, which is where the artistry comes in. However, there are also mechanics involved where certain steps need to be taken to complete a piece, which is the craftsmanship of creating jewellery. My process is always artistry first, then craftsmanship during the creation process”, he adds. It is fascinating how each piece bears the touch of its master; the gold on the edges of a cuff or a ring is chiselled to add texture, gems are embedded within the same opulent, yet rough / pure metal setting, and it is all enhanced by varied hues of patinas for the backgrounds. For instance dark brown patina represents branches with blooms on a pair of earrings; or again the green patina appearing to be the core sur-

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

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Ring with Mexican Clear Fire Opal & Diamonds, 24K gold and silver, in green patina

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

Jewellery Historian

Scorpio Cuff with black diamonds, rubies, and 18K gold

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face unveiled after scratching away the poured gold of a ring. Patina is probably the

As a young man, I was exposed to the world of jewellery making and was immediately drawn to the creative aspects of jewellery design and craftsmanship. I have been in business and making jewellery since the early 80’s, and Victor Velyan was launched 11 years ago in 2006

most unusual component Velyan uses and it has even become a sort of signature. “I spent years developing the patina colours that I work with. Each batch of self-made patina that I curate ends up giving me an entirely different result in terms of colour, which makes each piece that I create completely one-of-a-kind and unduplicatable”, he explains. Over the years, Velyan has developed new patina colours, and designed new tools that have enabled him to create more sophisticated design concepts in the collections. “My aesthetics have changed tremendously over the years as my work is an ever-evolving process. Lately I have also incorporated new textures to create an interesting, animal-like quality to some of my designs”, he notes. In Velyan’s hands, precious metals seem to have a life of their own, as if morphed into a permanent melting state. They create luxurious receptacles for magnificent stones, which come in a myriad colourways, and the outcome – partly thanks to the patina - evokes museum-like, ancient artefacts. This is all down to the fact that Velyan is first and foremost a benchman, who puts his heart and soul into every single rendition. “Being a benchman and multi-faceted jeweller, I often do not sketch my designs. Instead I grab some of my favourite gemstones and a hunk of metal and get to work at the bench. That initial step helps to create the overall concept of the piece. From that point,” he shares, “the piece circulates in my shop through the different phases, where my very skilled craftsmen each contribute their various touches such as stone setting, polishing, fabrication.” As a result, every Victor Velyan piece is handmade from start to finish. Interestingly, yet not surprisingly, Velyan relates to songwriter and artist Johnny Cash. “He was such an individual and never allowed the industry to dictate what and how he did it. Through so much challenge and tragedy”, Velyan says, “he stuck to his roots and passions and continued to create music and perform for people that gave him drive and inspired him.” This is a resilience that the jewellery maestro shares with his idol for the main personality trait that he attributes to his success in jewellery is stubbornness and never giving up on his ideas and dreams. “I have been blessed with creativity and am extremely passionate and dedicated to anything that I commit to”, he adds. “As a young man, I was exposed to the world of jewellery making and was immediately drawn to the creative aspects of jewellery design and craftsmanship. I have been in business and making jewellery since the early 80’s, and Victor Velyan was launched 11 years ago in 2006.” Ever since, Victor Velyan’s jewellery has amassed a loyal following of dedicated aficionados, who would not choose anything else given a choice. “Once I ran into the husband of a collector of my jewellery. He told me that ever since his wife began wearing my jewellery, she plans her entire wardrobe around my pieces, always picking her jewellery, and then buying outfits that match and showcase the jewellery”, the designer recalls. Now that is a sign of allegiance, and possibly a symptom of addiction: Victor Velyan’s creations deserve no less. www.victorvelyan.com

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Ring with Paraiba Tourmalines & Diamonds, 18K and 24K gold

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

Jewellery Historian

Bracelet with Spessartites & Diamonds, 24K gold and silver, in green patina

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

Jewellery Historian

Jellyfish Necklace with round diamonds, diamond briolettes, white sapphire briolettes, cabochon moonstones, blue fire opal, jelly opal, 18K and 14K gold chain

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

Jewellery Historian

Ring with Black Opal, moonstones, diamonds & tsavorites, 18K and 24K gold

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

Jewellery Historian

Earrings with Pear shape Paraiba Tourmalines (8.78 carats), diamonds (1.40 carats), 18K and 24K gold

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

Jewellery Historian

Earrings with Turquoise Drops (53.33 carats), 24k gold and silver, in brown patina

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

Jewellery Historian

Bracelet with Turquoise & Diamonds, 24K gold and silver, in antique white patina

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

Jewellery Historian

Butterfly Pendant with fire opals, black and white diamonds, and 18K gold

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

Jewellery Historian

Cross Necklace with Peridot & Rubies, lock clasp, key charms, 24K & 18K gold, silver, in brown patina

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

Jewellery Historian

Earrings with Cabochon Peridots (52.90 carats), diamonds (0.86 carat), 24K &14K gold, silver, in antique white patina

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Photo courtesy of VICTOR VEYLAN © VICTOR VEYLAN

Jewellery Historian

Bracelet with Peridots & Diamonds, 24K gold & silver, in green patina

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EDITOR’S CHOICE

Dina Kamal launche DINAKAMAL DK01, precious objects and

She trained and pra and moved to Beiru architecture along w 2010. Passionate about he that make design tim

Her first jewellery co defines the shape o architecturally inform an elaborate history.

Her approach to jew informed by everyth precious materials a Her understanding o

M E E T I N G

DINA KAMAL by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Talented designer Dina Kamal trained as an architect and as a result her jewellery has a uniquely intense relationship with proportion and form. Her signature pieces are powerful and minimal pinky rings. To mark the 20th anniversary of the iconic Parisian department store colette, Dina Kamal was asked to design an exclusive limited edition series. The Jewellery Historian met her for an exclusive interview.

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Dina Kamal launched her Beirut-based design practice, DINAKAMAL DK01, in June 2010, focusing on unique ideas for precious objects and architectural projects. Passionate about her work, Dina Kamal is inspired by the details that make design timeless, and by simple redefined forms. She trained and practiced as an architect in Washington DC and moved to Beirut in 1998, where she continued to practice architecture along with the launching of her jewellery brand in 2010. With her first jewellery collection, the PNKYRNG Collection, she redefined the shape of the signet ring through a contemporary and architecturally informed aesthetic; and sets its revival inspired by an elaborate history. Her Flower series, were inspired by the sensual and the systematic flower motifs of Georgian jewellery, while the amazing Open ring series, were inspired by the sensual curves of ancient jewellery and a study of an imperfect luscious circle. Her approach to jewellery is truly unique. The pieces are informed by everything. Her affinity to history. Her love of precious materials and objects. Her devotion to craftsmanship. Her understanding of design. Her training as an architect. I had the pleasure and honor to meet her for an exclusive interview for the Jewellery Historian. Dina how did you decided to become a jewellery designer ? I am an architect. I got into jewelry about six years ago because of an interest in the history of wearing rings around the little finger. The significance of wearing it for men and women, its association with style and attitude, from the tradition of the signet ring to the 1920s iconic women’s cocktail pinky rings, to hip-hop and rap. It has edge and purpose. What was the first piece of jewelry you ever made? How have your designs evolved? The flat Plate Pinky Ring was the first piece I designed and it has become iconic to the brand. I designed it in different proportions depending on the size of the finger. Proportion and detail are key to my work. Very fine subtleties change the design and feel of each piece, all my work is based on how this idea is explored and developed. What was the motivation / inspiration for your very first collection? The history of the signet ring and how women of the 20s adopted it as a sign of style and attitude. A piece that allowed them to make a strong statement.

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D D p

S a a 2 P t

H d a a

Photo courtesy of DINA KAMAL © DINA KAMAL

H in p H

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Tell us about your design style. What makes your col-

Are there any persons in art, fashion, architecture and

lections unique in the industry?

design that inspire you with their work?

Jewelry is often approached as ornament; I like to think

Yes, I admire many architects, mostly Carlo Scarpa, Mies

of it within the context it is used. Proportion and feel be-

Van der Rohe, Eileen Gray, and Tadoa Ando. I also ad-

comes very important for each piece. We are always look-

mire Rene Boivin and Andrew Grima but also artists as

ing to understand and better create in relation to use and

Soulages, Serra and Sugimoto.

effect. Could you please tell us about your latest collection? How does work take place in your atelier when you

It’s an extension of the Twin Series that I started last year

design a new collection?

and have created several variations and proportions to it.

Each idea has to go through the process. To be explored

I love how small subtleties can greatly change a piece. It

and developed. After which we decide if it should con-

is called the Twin Tube Series.

tinue or be shelved. It is not only technical aspects that determine the validity of a piece; it has to feel ‘right’.

Do you think that there is a relation between fashion and jewellery design?

What according to you contributed to your success?

Yes both adorn the body. Both can be a form of expres-

I think success is part of a process. Our process is set to

sion, serve a function and a purpose.

be sacred in every phase. From idea inception to development and execution. It is important for ideas to come

Which fashion designers inspire you with their work?

from strong foundations and be developed with utmost

All the ones that combine craft and design and try to cre-

commitment. I believe this is the basis for success or

ate an impact.

credibility. Another very import factor is for each piece to have soul. Which is also part of the process I just men-

If you could choose one fashion designer to collabo-

tioned.

rate with, who would it be? There are several. They have to value craft and design

Where do you get your inspiration?

equally and be subtle and discrete in their approach.

From anything, depending on my state of mind different triggers can help me start new designs and ideas. I love

What do you like most about being a jewelry de-

stories and how they connect to us. They fascinate and

signer?

inspire me.

I love detail. Jewelry design allows me to go into intricate details that sometimes we need to overlook in architec-

Your jewellery is inspired from architecture. Could you

ture.

name some of th architects that inspire you?

If, you could live the life of another designer or crea-

Yes. Architecture is my base and passion. I am trained to

tive, for a day, who would it be, and why?

think of design in relation context, function, proportion,

It would be great to try and be Wayne McGregor for a

material, and detail. All these factors guide my work.

day!

Which is the artistic or historical period you consider a

If you could change one thing about your career to

great source of inspiration?

date, what would it be?

The 1920s and 30s I feel is the most significant in all as-

Nothing you learn from it all! I tend to go with things that

pects of design and design theory. It holds the strongest

come my way. I try to create as many opportunities so I

ideas and beliefs that helped create some of the most

can make better choices.

beautiful works in jewelry, furniture, architecture…

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You like to challenge yourself. Which piece would you

a great way to make sure that everything we do has

say was the most difficult to create?

power and impact. It has to feel right, not just look right.

In jewelry the V ring with the bridge technique I created to hold the yellow diamonds. It allows the diamond to be

What were your aspirations as a young woman?

held yet feel floating and more part of the structure of

To imagine space and create things in endless emptiness.

the ring.

What is your idea of elegance? Being comfortable in what you wear. It has to feel part of

Which are your favorite materials? Which materials

you.

and techniques your favor? I love metals; steel, gold, bronze, all metal inspire me.

Are you a realist or fantasist?

Although I love all materials depending on the design,

Both. I flip from one to the other every minute!

metal is present in every design I do. How would you define success? Which material you believe that you will never stop

It’s an ongoing process. It ends when we do.

using in your collections? Beige gold, which is 18K gold without copper. It has be-

How you would define luxury?

come one of our trademarks and I think it is one of the

As a concept luxury is our ability to value something or

most beautiful and subtle gold colors. It is the whitest

someone. As an object a luxury object must entice emo-

18K gold can be. It is used sometimes for watches but

tion. Be worth cherishing.

very rarely for jewelry. What kind of person wears your jewelry? What is your favorite piece you’ve ever created – and

One that is interested in how the piece makes them feel

what made it so special?

rather how others perceive it.

It’s usually the piece being prototyped. The piece we are finalizing! Maybe because it needs my love most!

Who is your “customer”? Anyone and Everyone that feels good in it.

The most valuable lesson you have learned until today?

Do you believe that a man should wear jewellery?

Do your part in this world. Stick with what you believe.

Yes men have always worn jewellery through out ancient

Trust your instinct.

history. Men’s jewelry though should have different proportions and considerations than women’s.

Are you a visual thinker? Yes I need to see my ideas in my mind if that is what you

Are men more open-minded about wearing jewellery

mean.

than they used to be? Yes definitely – when we launched 6 years ago there

What’s your greatest accomplishment?

wasn’t as much interest in men jewelry especially gold –

Being part of transforming ideas into reality.

now there is much more interest.

What’s your greatest weakness?

Which piece of jewellery every person should wear?

I tend to believe that if it feels wrong then something is

A ring. Our pinky ring!

wrong. I tend to redo projects all over again because they just don’t feel right! Can be illusive or tricky but it is

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What’s it like to see someone on the street wearing

Find what truly inspires you so that you can create some-

one of your creations?

thing unique to you – your work has to be an expression

Is great! I always look at them to see how they are wear-

of you and what you believe.

ing it. How it is part of them. Your favorite quote? I have a dream! Which is the destination that you find the most inspiring? Cities in general inspire me. Which is your favorite destination for summer holidays

www.dinakamal.com

and which is your favorite for winter? Special thanks to Sally Keeble for her precious support

Anywhere by the sea for both summer and winter. Your favorite capital? London. Your favorite addresses? My home. Which is your favorite author (and / or book)? The Labyrinths by Jorge Luis Borges Your heroes in real life? People who do what they love and do it wholeheartedly and thoughtfully / considerately. What we should expect from you in the future? To keep evolving! Could you tell us about your upcoming projects? I am working on several private jewelry commissions, furniture commissions, and some collaborations. Once they are ready we would love to share them with you. Your favorite motto? Stay fascinated. Just focus on anything long enough for it to be fascinating again. Which is your advice to young and aspiring jewellery designers?

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JH

The Perfume Bottles Auction 103


The Perfume Bottles Auction Throughout history perfume bottles have retained their appeal and this is especially true today given that the art of the perfume bottle has now all but disappeared thanks to the rise of mass consumption. Yet nothing reconciles functionality and indulgence better than a beautiful perfume bottle. Such vessels can hold the wearer’s favourite perfume, or one can imagine the emotional impact of filling an exquisite flask with your lover’s preferred perfume instead. Perfume and pheromones – love is indeed never far away. There was indeed a time when perfume bottles were more objet d’art than practical containers, and this is precisely why vintage and antique bottles are all the more valuable and covetable, so much so that an auction is nowadays dedicated to them. ‘Per Fumus’ or ‘through smoke’ is the Latin origin of the word ‘perfume’. The art of making perfume goes back thousands of years with Egypt and Mesopotamia the birthplaces of perfumery. Fast forward centuries and the early Europeans were then the first ones to create perfume containers that could be worn as jewellery, as much a practical option as a decorative one (status symbol). During the late 1800s, the Art Nouveau style was all the rage and the style and art of perfume bottles changed dramatically, incorporating floral motifs and boxes. Then in 1910, perfume bottles started taking on naturalistic and unusual shapes.  Each year The Perfume Bottles Auction, the longest running specialty auction of perfume bottles worldwide (organised by director Ken Leach a.k.a. Kenneth James Collection) is held at the perfume bottle collectors’ annual convention in the USA, and is a g r e a t s o u r c e o f e x c e p t i o n a l p e r f u m e b o t t l e s f r o m t h a t p e r i o d .
 These auctions are always packed with extraordinary examples. In previous editions, one could have collected a continental figural perfume bottle brooch circa 1900 in enamelled sterling silver (a rose encapsulates a trigger-release bottle); an Art Nouveau pendant scent bottle by Boucheron circa 1900, previously owned by Loulou de la Falaise, that is made of a sterling silver amphora with three applied birds, mesh tassels, hinged cap with four opals, gilt interior, crystal vessel and stopper, and hung from silver chains joined by a fire opal; or a finger ring scent bottle by Tiffany and Co circa 1900, comprising a rock crystal with 18k gold mount set with ruby and rose cut diamonds. They are all incredible testament of old world craft and one-of-a-kind intimate heirlooms. The 2017 event will take place on May 5th at 5.00 pm at the Hyatt Regency in Princeton, New Jersey, during the 29th annual International Perfume Bottles Association convention, and already it has been heralded as one of the most riveting to date.

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DeVilbiss

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Lalique

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PBottles erfume

Auction

Photo courtesy of Ken LEACH © KEN LEACH

directed by Ken Leach

IPBA Annual Convention Princeton, New Jersey Friday, May 5, 2017 beginning precisely at 5:00 pm

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Lalique

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Leach has indeed sourced some jaw-dropping pieces that will definitely excite experienced collectors’ appetites, whilst igniting the interest of collectors to be. “This is going to be the best auction ever put on. There is a curated catalogue of 250 lots, culled from over 2,000 potential consignments,” Leach says, “offering items that have never been seen at auction, fitting every wallet and taste, featuring various categories, ages, and manufacturers. We have also redesigned the catalogue for visual pleasure.” For example, consider these three magnificent lots: an enchanting “French 1820s Charles X Palais Royal perfume carousel made of gilt bronze mounted on an abalone shell with Baccarat cut crystal bottles”; a rare 1920 “Bouchon Mures” tiara stopper perfume bottle by Rene Lalique that comes with a magnificent pale blue stopper; and an antique glass scent bottle wrapped in 18k gold leaves and vines with silver cherubs and birds, circa 1850 and signed Froment-Meurice. I would assume that the way to collect these delightful objects is to be alert to their pedigree, rarity and condition, yet I can’t help feeling that one may just follow one’s instinct and go for what sets the heart aflutter. After all, perfume bottle collecting may be the ultimate financial cum emotional investment. But let's find out more from the founder of the auction himself, Mr Ken Leach who, by the way, did not shy from revealing some exclusive information in the Q&A below. Olivier Dupon - Where does your passion for perfume bottles come from? Ken Leach - While owning an antiques shop in 1960s Hollywood, I often found myself in the home of a deceased director or movie star where there were always perfume bottles on the vanity. I was attracted to their shapes, colors and diversity, and perhaps from the “do not touch” warnings of childhood now I could touch! OD - What was the epiphany that prompted you to dedicate your career to this subject? KL - I had an understanding of the historical impulse to create an attractive container to transport, store, and dispense perfume, but I became fascinated by the 20th century commercial bottle’s subliminal purpose – to sell perfume. It had to catch the eye and invite the hand, even before the scent was released.   OD - Do you yourself collect perfume bottles? KL - Yes, for 40 years I have collected bottles for fun, documentation and scholarship, as well as the sheer appreciation of the art form. Bottles reflect the culture and society of their time. Perfumers employed the talents of the finest glass houses such as Bacca-

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Froment Maurice

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rat and Lalique, and popular artists like Salvador Dali and Ferdinand Léger to create little masterpieces that anyone could own. OD - Assuming that you wear perfume, do you use the original bottle or do you transfer it to one of your antique vessels? KL - I would never be tempted to use an old container, plus most men’s fragrance is sold in a convenient spray bottle today. Also, ironically – and I’ve never revealed this – I am allergic to perfume! OD - Have any of the bottles you have come across still contained the original perfume? KL - Yes, very often I find a bottle that was kept untouched and cherished as a memento of love or friendship. OD - What is your favorite ever perfume bottle presented at auction? KL - Perhaps not only for the bottle, but the story attached: in 1939 a woman waited for a $100 bottle to go on sale for 1/2 price as a keepsake of her trip to New York. A few years ago I brought it to auction and it sold for $216,000. This was a Lalique bottle made in limited edition for Saks 5th Ave, of which I have sold the only two known to exist in complete presentation. OD - What is the most valuable attribute (age, craftsmanship, signature…) for an antique perfume bottle at auction? KL - Condition is key for any age or type of bottle. The collector is looking for the best possible example they can find. Especially if it is a commercial bottle – those sold filled, as opposed to those bought to be decorative - you want the bottle, label, content and box in as original condition as possible. OD - Who typically are the collectors / buyers at a perfume bottle auction? KL - I find men and women collect equally, and it’s most often a shared interest enjoyed by couples. We currently have clients in 40 countries and these also include museums, companies and institutions. OD - Do some of these collectors put the perfume bottle back in use (fill them with their preferred scent)? KL - As far as I know, never. They are displayed and admired.

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Godet

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Tiffany

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Tiffany detail

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KPM

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Lalique

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OD - Is there a specific type of collector (or group) for perfume bottles as jewellery? KL - This is a category that you may find is more appealing to a woman, since the object was originally designed to be worn or carried in a purse, and could be utilised again as an accessory. OD - Where and how do you source the perfume bottles put to auction? KL - We are the only dedicated perfume bottles auction in this country; therefore estate lawyers and other auction houses will direct potential consignors to us. We also source privately, having represented the properties of opera singers, ballerinas, socialites and other lifelong collectors. OD - Are perfume bottles ‘functional art’? KL - Yes, attractive bottle design was intended for double function - both to merchandise a scent, and then to display beautifully on a vanity. OD - When it comes to the design, is it possible to identify historical trends? KL - Yes, the bottle and packaging very often mirrors its time. The first three decades of the 20th century are typically identified individually by Art Nouveau, Art Deco, and Modernist styles. Themes of fashion, invention, war, interior decoration, travel and movies, can all be found in bottles. OD – In your opinion, who are the best perfume bottle designers of all time? KL - The innovators and masters of the art include René Lalique, Chevalier for Baccarat, André Jollivet, and Julien Viard, who was initially a bronze artist who became fascinated with glass and created bottles as pedestals for his sculptural stoppers. For Czechoslovakian crystal, Heinrich Hoffmann reigns supreme. OD - What is the holy grail of perfume bottles? KL - Every collection wants/needs to have Elsa Schiaparelli’s sunburst bottle “Le Roy Soleil” known to collectors as the “Royal Sun.” Designed in 1949 by surrealist Salvador Dali, and manufactured by Baccarat. OD - Which perfume bottle should a first time collector buy to start his/her collection? KL - It should be the bottle that will make them smile each time they see it on a shelf or table in their home. www.perfumebottlesauction.com

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Lalique

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Nude Czech

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HAUTE JOAILLERIE

T H E G A R D E N O F K A L A H A R I B Y C H O PA R D BY OLIVIER DUPON

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In Paris last January, the talk of the town was an exceptional unveiling. It all started when Caroline Scheufele, co-president of Chopard, acquired the “Queen of Kalahari” diamond, an ultra-rare 342-carat rough diamond of perfect colour (D) and absolute purity (flawless) from the Karowe mine in Botswana, born of the volcanic rock known as kimberlite. Let’s pause here for a second as this information and what follows make the “Queen of Kalahari” an even more impressive occurrence. “As a pioneer of sustainable development in jewellery, Caroline Scheufele actively encouraged the Karowe mine to join the growing number of Chopard’s suppliers - covering gold, coloured gemstones and diamonds - to engage with EcoAge’s independent Green Carpet Challenge validation criteria, which mirrors best international practices in environmental and social justice”, the Chopard team says. “Caroline and the owners of the Karowe mine agreed to the visit of the Eco-Age team to independently assess all elements of its mining activities. The Karowe mine is continuing in its own journey to sustainability by moving towards the fulfilment of the standards necessary to achieve the RJC certification.” When it came to plan what to make out of the rough, Caroline Scheufele knew one thing: “This is a truly exceptional stone, but we did not wish to treat it as a mere trophy, but instead to prepare it for a destiny worthy of its stature.” The “Queen” has now given birth to a set of 23 diamonds, “The Garden of Kalahari” of which five weigh over 20 carats and were cut as cushion, brilliant, heart emerald and pear, all with absolute colour and purity. Through her eyes, the cut gemstones have embarked on a floral fantastic odyssey: “the radiant 50-carat brilliant cut becomes a sunflower, the 26-carat heart shape a delicate pansy, and the 25-carat pear shape a majestic banana blossom”, she shares. “As for the perfect 20-carat cushion cut, it indulges in a gentle tête-àtête with the flaming poppy, while the 21-carat emerald cut floats idly alongside a water lily. Shapes, echoes, reflections and colours entwine in an enchanting scene, an extraordinary garden where poetry, light and radiance are the only rules.” Nonetheless it must be said that beyond the floral inspiration, there is also a ‘textile’ quality to the pieces. The Garden of Kalahari collection is indeed entirely built around the idea of a jewellery lacework, like diamond guipure lace with a luminous cut-out motif. The centrepiece is the regal chocker neckpiece that can be transformed by adding phenomenal pendants (each with one of the biggest diamonds – respectively 50-carat brilliant-cut, 26-carat heart-shaped and 25-carat pear-cut diamonds). Needless to say this is the most precious jewellery set ever created by Chopard. www.chopard.com

Left : Ring in 18K white ‘Fairmined’ gold adorned with an exceptional D-flawless cushion-cut diamond of 20 carats and fully set with brilliant-cut (3.9 carats) and pear-shaped (3 carats) diamonds; The Garden of Kalahari collection.

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Caroline Scheulele with some of the “Garden of Kalahari” creations

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Earrings in 18K white ‘Fairmined’ gold adorned with two exceptional D-flawless 25-carat pear-shaped and 26carat heart-shaped diamonds and fully set with pear-shaped (4.55 carats) and brilliant-cut diamonds (4.35 carats); The Garden of Kalahari collection.

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Secret watch in 18K white ‘Fairmined’ gold set with two exceptional D-flawless pear-shaped and brilliant-cut diamonds and fully set with brilliant-cut and pear-shaped diamonds. Equipped with a Haute Horlogerie L.U.C 96.17-L caliber; micro-rotor in platinum set with diamonds; The Garden of Kalahari collection.

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Transformable necklace in 18K white ‘Fairmined’ gold adorned with three exceptional D-flawless 50-carat brilliant-cut, 26-carat heart-shaped and 25 carat pear-shaped diamonds, a D-flawless 6.41-carat brilliant-cut diamond and fully set with pear-shaped (98 carats), brilliant cut (40 carats) and marquise-cut (2 carats) diamonds; The Garden of Kalahari collection.

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A composite display of the “Queen of Kalahari” rough and the subsequent five exceptional cut diamonds, base for the “Garden of Kalahari” collection.

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T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y BY OLIVIER DUPON

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Latreïa 131


Latreïa The Japanese excel at coupling their traditional arts and craft with innovation. A recent collaboration between fashion designer Yoshiki Hishinuma, and jewellery designer Mana Matsuzaki (a.k.a Latreia) perfectly illustrates that adage. When the former decided to create a fashion collection that would be presented at the Autumn Haute Couture week in Paris last year, he went on searching for a Japanese counterpart, who could envision and render jewellery to match. Mana Matsuzaki was the one chosen, and looking at the outcome, it could not have been anyone else. Yoshiki Hishinuma insisted, however, on two pre-requisites before the teamwork could start: one was to incorporate his brand logo mark ‘Hanabishi’ (originally from a traditional Japanese family crest called Kamon), the other to use ‘Kyoto Opal’ in the jewellery designs. And so the past and present would have to be at the core of the pieces. ‘Kyoto Opal’ is the name given to the man-made coloured opal-like material that the Japanese company Kyocera has developed. Mana Matsuzaki explains that they artificially create an environment to crystallize opal in an efficient way, and cultivate it with a quartz-grain structure that is identical to naturally occurring opal. “That’s why the Kyoto Opal material has a unique aesthetic quality that cannot be duplicated with molded resin-based products”, she adds. Due to special staining techniques, they have also been able to realise a variety of rich and subtle hues and tints. Furthermore, by surmounting the inherently brittle characteristics of naturally occurring opals, which tend to split and crack, it is possible to cut the Kyoto Opal into diverse shapes. “Kyocera decided on the name ‘Kyoto Opal’ in part because the material was created in Kyoto, Japan, as well as to familiarise people around the world with the opal by associating it with the internationally known, historically rich city”, Matsuzaki points out. This unique composite, whose aesthetic properties make it ideal to accompany Yoshiki Hishinuma’s colourful garments, and which references the specific crest emblem, makes for bold and vibrant jewellery. The rainbow array of beads, which echo the curvaceous shape of the crest pattern, would in other hands make the composition all too ‘girly’ were it not for the sharp details, Latreia’s usual signature symbols (claws, fangs and bones). The result is costume jewellery that is part shield-like, part kawaii-manga; this is jewellery that could transport anyone into a Japanese anime. After all Yoshiki Hishinuma is the same man who designed the ‘Mayupo’ robot (as seen in his portrait shot) that was presented at Salone del Mobile, Milan, a few years ago.

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Yoshiki Hishinuma

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Mana Matsuzaki

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Here is some more information about the collaboration from Mana Mat-

OD - What are its limitations and advantages?

suzaki’s perspective. MM - Just like natural opals, it’s Olivier Dupon - How did your collaboration come about?

delicate to heat. However, Kyoto Opal is much lighter and stronger, and ideal for casual use. Also, it allows us to design a

Mana Matsuzaki - Mr Hishinuma contacted me to ask about designing

wide range of shapes, and I think it’s really fun.

some new costume jewellery for him. From his research on the Internet to find a desirable jewellery designer, I was the

OD - Are any colourways possible when it comes to Kyoto Opals?

one he picked. When he saw pictures of my work, he thought my jewellery was

MM - Yes, Kyocera says that they

unique and different, and of the finest

can create any colour you want. Their

quality among younger jewellery design-

colour variation can be infinite. However,

ers in Japan.

if there were no limitation, consumers would be at a loss to decide which col-

OD - What prompted you to say yes when asked you to design this jewel-

our they want. Therefore, Kyocera has their own specified 12 basic colours.

lery collection? OD - Did you design the jewelMM - Because he mentioned pre-

lery while Mr Hishinuma was designing

senting this new jewellery with his latest

the garments, or once he had com-

collection in Paris Haute Couture Week, I

pleted the collection?

had no reason to refuse. I was really excited about the possibility of joining the

MM - I was working on this new

fashion week in Paris! Also, the two con-

collection while he was making his new

ditions he proposed – to use Kyoto

designs. Before I start to design, he

Opal, and to use his brand logo mark

showed me his sketches and samples of

‘Hanabishi’ – intrigued me.

his original fabrics, which are so colourful.

OD - Is it a difficult material to work with?

OD - How many preparatory meetings with Mr Hishinuma did you

MM - For me, it is much easier to

have?

work with, compared to natural opal, which is delicate and very expensive.

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“Mitsu Hanabishi” (ӣϑᜰ៍) Long Necklace in Silver 925 set with Kyoto Opals

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“Ikka” (Ӟᜰ)
 Necklace with chain in Silver925 set with Kyoto Opals

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MM - I guess we met at least 5 or

tions with his own new collections. For

6 times and by e-mail, too many to

me, his choice of colours seem to be

count.

both unique and bold. If I had done that, I think maybe I would have chosen very OD - Was it important for you to

ordinary and boring combinations!

keep elements of the Latreia signature (e.g. bones, spikes) in these colourful pieces?

OD - Is this going to become a long-term collaboration between your two businesses?

MM - Yes, I tried to design something that could be identified as mine at

MM - I hope it will, and I believe

first glance. Because I had to use his

that this project includes a variety of pos-

logo ‘Hanabishi’ , I wondered how to

sibilities. It was my first experience with

combine the different elements… ‘Hana-

these Kyoto Opal materials, but I con-

bishi’ originates from botanical elements;

sider the resulting collection to be very

Hana = flower, Bishi (Hishi) = water chest-

nice. Considering our preparation time

nut. On the other hand, my signature ele-

was limited, I did my best learning by

ments are derived from claws or fangs.

trial and error. For a start, I would like to

I didn’t want to design something

introduce the new collection as it is to as

too cute or too girly, so I immediately

many people as possible. There may still

decide to include my signature dangling

be some aspects that I could improve in

motif named ‘Kerkos’. ‘Kerkos’ comes

the next step, all the more as I have

from the Greek for “tail”. When I stared

gained more knowledge about how to

at the long tails of dinosaur fossils in a

use Kyoto Opal while going through the

museum, I was totally amazed by the

production process. That is the reason

beauty of their delicate and precise struc-

why I want to keep working on this

ture. Their sharp shape also looked like

unique project with a long-term perspec-

swords to protect themselves. I got inspi-

tive.

ration from those, and designed ‘Kerkos’ to express ‘a simple form that protects you’.

www.manamatsuzaki.jp By using this sharp motif, I

thought that I could add a cool and stylish feel to the elegance of ‘Hanabishi’. I designed only the shapes and left choice of colour of the Kyoto Opals to Mr Hishimuma, because he seemed to have strong preferences for colour combina-

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“Nanatsu Hanabishi” (Ӡϑᜰ៍) Long Necklace in Silver925 set with Kyoto Opals

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“Hanaemi” (ᜰᒞ) Detachable pendant head in Silver925 set with Kyoto Opals with Kyoto Opal beads necklace

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“Kaei” (ᜰ୽)
 Rings in Silver925 set with Kyoto Opals

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“Sanrenka” (ӣ昧ᜰ) Necklace in Silver925 set with Kyoto Opals

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ART

IRVING PENN : CENTENNIAL The METROPOLITAN MUSEUM

Irving Penn (American, 1917–2009) Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes, 1957 Platinum-palladium print, 1985
 18 5⁄8 × 18 5⁄8 in. (47.3 × 47.3 cm)
 Promised Gift of The Irving Penn Foundation to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York © The Irving Penn Foundation

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The Metropolitan Museum of Art will present

The catalogue is made possible by the Samuel

a major retrospective of the photographs of

I. Newhouse Foundation, Inc., the Mary C. and

Irving Penn to mark the centennial of the

James W. Fosburgh Publications Fund, and the

artist’s birth. Over the course of his nearly 70-

Roswell L. Gilpatric Publications Fund.

year career, Irving Penn (1917–2009) mastered a pared-down aesthetic of studio photography

History of Irving Penn in The Met Collection

that is distinguished for its meticulous attention to composition, nuance, and detail. Opening

The Met’s collection of works by Irving Penn

April 24, 2017, Irving Penn: Centennial will be

currently consists of some 145 photographs.

the most comprehensive exhibition to date of

These include a suite of 65 nude studies from

the work of the great American photographer.

1949–50 donated by the artist in 2002 and featured that same year in The Met’s exhibition

The exhibition follows the 2015 announcement

Earthly Bodies: Irving Penn’s Nudes, 1949-50

of the landmark promised gift from The Irving

and its publication. In 2014, with funds from an

Penn Foundation to The Met of more than 150

anonymous benefactor, the Museum acquired

photographs by Penn, representing every

f ro m T h e I r v i n g P e n n F o u n d a t i o n a n

period of the artist’s dynamic career with the

extraordinary group of 64 platinum prints from

camera. The gift will form the core of the

the artist's celebrated Small Trades series from

exhibition, which will feature more than 200

1950–51 depicting laborers in Paris, London,

photographs by Penn, including iconic fashion

and New York with the tools of their trades. The

studies of Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn, the artist's

portraits of workers (as well as the nudes and

wife; exquisite still-lifes; Quechua children in

other photographs in the Museum's collection)

Cuzco, Peru; portraits of urban laborers; female

will be a key component of the centennial

nudes; tribesmen in New Guinea; and color

exhibition.

flower studies. The artist's beloved portraits of

The Museum began to acquire photographs by

cultural figures from Truman Capote, Picasso,

Irving Penn in 1959. It has presented two

and Colette to Ingmar Bergman and Issey

monographic shows on the artist to date: in

Miyake will also be featured. Rounding out the

1977, Irving Penn: Street Material. Photographs

exhibition will be photographs by Penn that

in Platinum Metals, 1975–1976, and, in 2002,

entered The Met collection prior to the

the aforementioned Earthly Bodies: Irving

promised gift.

Penn’s Nudes.

The exhibition is made possible by the Terra

Exhibition Dates: April 24–July 30, 2017  

Foundation for American Art, the Enterprise

Exhibition Location: The Met Fifth Avenue,

Holdings Endowment, and The Peter Jay Sharp

Gallery 199

Foundation. It is organized by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in collaboration with The Irving Penn Foundation.

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Irving Penn (American, 1917–2009) Naomi Sims in Scarf, New York, ca. 1969 Gelatin silver print, 1985
 10 1⁄2 × 10 3⁄8 in. (26.7 × 26.4 cm)
 Promised Gift of The Irving Penn Foundation to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York © The Irving Penn Foundation

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Irving Penn (American, 1917–2009) 
 Marlene Dietrich, New York, 1948
 Gelatin silver print, 2000
 10 × 8 1/8 in. (25.4 × 20.6 cm)
 Promised Gift of The Irving Penn Foundation to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 
 © The Irving Penn Foundation 


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Irving Penn (American, 1917–2009) Truman Capote, New York, 1948
 Platinum-palladium print, 1968
 15 7/8 × 15 3/8 in. (40.3 × 39.1 cm)
 The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York,
 Purchase, The Horace W. Goldsmith
 Foundation Gift, through Joyce and Robert Menschel, 1986 © The Irving Penn Foundation

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Irving Penn (American, 1917–2009) Two Miyake Warriors, New York, 1998 Platinum-palladium print, 1999
 21 × 19 5⁄8 in. (53.5 × 49.8 cm)
 Promised Gift of The Irving Penn Foundation to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York © The Irving Penn Foundation

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Blue Velvet by Vhernier 153


Blue Velvet by Vhernier In the spirit of the ruffle collars of the Italian Renaissance, the Blue Velvet jewellery line by Italian maestro Vhernier offers that same sensual appeal of a flowing piece of silky fabric, and the same flattering framing of the face when it comes to the neckpiece. Like a precious corolla, the organic sinuosity is compounded by the symmetrical distribution of the waves. In addition, a deep indigo blue lines the crevasses in-between each fold so that images of the deep ocean come to mind. Further confirming the sea reference, the rim of each ruffle is paved with white diamonds to create the foaming tops of waves. The mesmerising cerulean depth has been achieved by anodizing the titanium, which is the real star of the collection. The way this ultra-hard yet light metal has been shaped and coloured is testament to Vhernier Valenza atelier’s expertise. As much as the front is undeniably feminine and graceful, the back of the necklace and bracelets has a ‘futuristic spine’ appearance. Each section, or ruffle, is a vertebra that works in unison with the others, giving these Blue Velvet pieces kinetic properties similar to those found in the reptilian world. The perfection of the design is testament to the two years of experimentation and research required to achieve this unique effect. The collection comprises a necklace (the first piece to be completed), a pair of earrings, a ring and two bracelets (one more bulbous than the other) as the serpentine design easily lends itself to various ways of wearability. At centre stage of the Blue Velvet collection is the necklace, the most ‘luxurious’ piece with 2,262 diamonds totaling 14.45 carats, which took nearly two hundred hours to be crafted. In addition, the whole collection is supremely tactile – tempting one to brush the diamond-paved rims with your fingers and caress the glossy titanium planes with a prolonged touch. Yes, the Blue Velvet collection has all the attributes of a smooth operator. www.vhernier.it

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Photo courtesy of VHERNIER © VHERNIER

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Photo courtesy of VHERNIER Š VHERNIER

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Blue Velvet necklace in titanium and diamonds The necklace was the first piece of the Blue Velvet line to be completed. The body is entirely made of titanium and features 2,262 diamonds totalling 14.45 carats.

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Photo courtesy of VHERNIER © VHERNIER

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Blue Velvet ring in titanium and diamonds

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Photo courtesy of VHERNIER © VHERNIER

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Blue Velvet bracelet in titanium and diamonds

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Photo courtesy of VHERNIER © VHERNIER

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Blue Velvet bracelet in titanium and diamonds

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Photo courtesy of VHERNIER © VHERNIER

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Blue Velvet earrings in titanium and diamonds

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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE © CHANEL JOAILLERIE

HAUTE JOAILLERIE

C O C O AVA N T C H A N E L BY OLIVIER DUPON

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Who’s that Girl? Coco avant Chanel is a swing back to the beginning of the century, a tribute to female kinship and above all an immersion what triggered the rise of Coco Chanel and her ability to reinvent herself like a chameleon. By far the biggest new high jewellery collection of any other houses this January, it comprises eleven new jewellery suites (48 jewels), each bearing the name of an elegant woman who had accompanied, marked or influenced the life of Gabrielle Chanel before 1920. We meet Jeanne, Lucienne, Emilienne, Marthe, Maud, Suzanne, Zina and of course Gabrielle, in a succession of highly feminine proposals. The style is rounder and more delicate than what Chanel usually embraces for their high jewellery. In addition, the overall colour palette is a muted play on soft pinks (Padparadscha and pink sapphires, Japanese cultured pearls), greys (Tahitian pearls, grey spinels, moonstones) and white (diamonds, white gold). The eleven sets are all inspired by the two founding elements of her style: lace and ribbon, which decorated her boater hats at the racecourses (and probably also a nod to Coco Chanel’s early career as a milliner). “In gold and precious gemstones, lace and ribbon appear in subtle gradations of rose and grey. The jeweled ribbon moves in complete freedom : loose, draped, wound or knotted in ethereal loops; its edges somet i m e s s h a r p a n d a t o t h e r t i m e s f r a y e d w i t h d i a m o n d s .
 Refined, simplified and stylized, lace appears as though it is printed with camellias, flowers and birds. Recalling Gabrielle Chanel’s bold scissor cuts and the splendor of her creative stroke, lace is rendered in asymmetrical silhouettes, falling perfectly on the body”, the Chanel team says. It is all very elegant and alluring. As much a safe financial investment as an emotional one, this seminal collection might the most intimate tribute to Gabrielle Chanel’s avant-garde, for she was the ultimate modern feminist. www.chanel.com

Left page : "Suzanne" necklace in 18K white gold set with 10 oval-cut Padparadscha sapphires for a total weight of 28,02 carats, 17 cabochon-cut moonstones and 1054 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 25,45 carats. Worn with "Suzanne" bracelet in 18K white gold set with 9 oval-cut Padparascha sapphires for a total weight of 17,62 carats, 10 cabochon-cut moonstones and 513 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 9,63 carats.

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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE © CHANEL JOAILLERIE

"Suzanne" ring in 18K white gold set with an oval-cut Padparadscha sapphire of 6.09 carats, 4 oval-cut Padparadscha sapphires for a total weight of 3.31 carats, 2 cabochon-cut moonstones and 192 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3,02 carats.

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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE © CHANEL JOAILLERIE

Jewellery Historian

"Suzanne" earrings in 18K white gold set with 10 oval-cut Padparadscha sapphires for a total weight of 18,02 carats, 10 cabochon-cut moonstones and 106 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2,65 carats.

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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE © CHANEL JOAILLERIE

"Suzanne" earrings in 18K white gold set with 4 oval-cut pink sapphires for a total weight of 5,44 carats, 8 Tahitian cultured pearls, 6 cabochon-cut moonstones and 144 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2,68 carats.

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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE Š CHANEL JOAILLERIE

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"Suzanne" necklace in 18K white gold set with 8 oval-cut pink sapphires for a total weight of 13,53 carats, 139 Tahitian cultured pearls, 11 cabochon-cut moonstones and 274 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 6,90 carats. Worn with "Suzanne" bracelet in 18K white gold set with 6 oval-cut pink sapphires for a total weight of 6,48 carats, 53 Tahitian cultured pearls, 6 cabochon-cut moonstones and 251 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 9,63 carats.

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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE © CHANEL JOAILLERIE

"Jeanne" brooch in 18K white gold set with a cushion-cut pink spinel of 10,07 carats, 6 fancy-cut pink sapphires for a total weight of 3,91 carats, 2 pear-cut grey spinels of 1,38 carat, 64 round-cut grey spinels for a total weight of 2,40 carats, 135 round-cut pink sapphires for a total weight of 2,76 carats and 84 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3,20 carats.

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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE Š CHANEL JOAILLERIE

Jewellery Historian

"Jeanne" necklace in 18K white gold set with 11 fancy-cut pink sapphires for a total weight of 10,32 carats, 11 fancy-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2,33 carats, 94 round-cut pink sapphires for a total weight of 1,72 carat, 82 round-cut grey spinels for a total weight of 3,01 carats and 633 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 33,77 carats. Worn with "Jeanne" bracelet in 18K white gold set with 7 fancy-cut pink sapphires for a total weight of 5,23 carats, 6 fancy-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1,13 carat, 80 round-cut pink sapphires for a total weight of 1,67 carat, 60 round-cut grey spinels for a total weight of 1,83 carat and 303 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 12,75 carats.


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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE © CHANEL JOAILLERIE

"Jeanne" earrings in 18K white gold set with 10 fancy-cut pink sapphires for a total weight of 8,65 carats, 6 fancy-cut diamonds for a total weight of 0,91 carat, 58 round-cut pink sapphires for a total weight of 0,64 carat, 56 round-cut grey spinels for a total weight of 1,53 carat and 132 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3,78 carats.

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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE © CHANEL JOAILLERIE

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"Marthe" ring in 18K white gold set with a round-cut diamond of 1,55 carat, 51 brilliant-cut grey spinels for a total weight of 0,72 carat and 47 brillant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 0,84 carat.

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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE © CHANEL JOAILLERIE

"Marthe" bracelet in 18K white gold set with 65 Japanese cultured pearls, 76 round-cut grey spinels for a total weight of 1,07 carat and 121 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 1,94 carat.

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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE Š CHANEL JOAILLERIE

Jewellery Historian

"Marthe" necklace in 18K white gold set with 220 Japanese cultured pearls, 76 round-cut grey spinels for a total weight of 1,42 carat and 114 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2,38 carats. Worn with "Marthe" earrings in 18K white gold set with 28 Japanese cultured pearls, 82 round-cut grey spinels for a total weight of 1,43 carat and 152 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2,42 carats.

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Making-of image of the “Gabrielle Chanel” necklace

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Photo courtesy of CHANEL JOAILLERIE © CHANEL JOAILLERIE

"Gabrielle Chanel" ring in 18K white gold set with a pear-cut diamond of 3,03 carats, 1 round-cut diamond of 0,35 carat and 122 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 2,63 carats.

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"Gabrielle Chanel" necklace in 18K white gold set with a pear-cut diamond for a total weight of 10,02 carats, 2 roundcut diamonds for a total weight of 0,71 carat and 1581 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 51,22 carats.

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Making-of image of the “Gabrielle Chanel” necklace

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"Gabrielle Chanel" bracelet in 18K white gold set with a pear-cut diamond of 5,02 carats, 3 round-cut diamonds for a total weigth of 0,95 carat and 535 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 20,25 carats.

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"Gabrielle Chanel" earring (part of a pair) in white gold set with 2 pear-cut diamonds for a total weight of 3,10 carats, 2 round-cut diamonds for a total weight of 0,56 carat and 192 brilliant-cut diamonds for a total weight of 4,62 carats.

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GEMOLOGY

T A N Z A N I T E THE BREATHTAKING BEAUTY OF GEMS BY EVA KOUNTOURAKI

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Every gemstone has at least one very particular feature. Some have their history, some their colour, others the variety of possible aspects, their rarity, their value, what they symbolize.. But there is one gemstone that is unique in almost all its characteristics. Found only in one place in the world, extravagant colour, limited quantities, rarity, mysterious discovery, branded christening.. Tanzanite is all these, plus an aspect that can only be described as magical. It was fairly recently, in 1967, when a Maasai tribesman stumbled upon a blue crystal while feeding his cattle herd in the plains of north Tanzania. Intrigued by the beauty of his find, he contacted a local gem prospector and fortune hunter who immediately claimed various spots around the area of the newly found crystal, convinced that he was presented with the opportunity of his life with a new sapphire deposit. Soon, many others followed him, setting up mining tents, hoping to partake in the profits of the new treasure’s sale as soon as it would hit the markets. Eventually, when gemologically analyzed, the blue crystal was proven to be a completely new gem, nothing similar to the sapphire, if not for its colour. It was a beautiful variety of the mineral species zoisite, which is usually found brown and not very interesting. In fact, it is said that these crystals turned blue due to the elevated temperature which was released when a lightning stroke some exposed brown zoisite crystals and altered their colour from brown to a magnificent violet - blue. It is also true, that essentially all tanzanite that reaches the world’s markets, has undergone thermal treatment which unlocks and reveals its colour. Tanzanite, being mined only in a limited area of the planet, is doomed to become extinct (at least for this lifetime of ours) relatively soon. Once we exhaust the mines that are operating now, and if no new sources are discovered and developed, this exotic material will become rarer and rarer until its production finishes. Some estimate that the tanzanite mines will be depleted in the next twenty years or so. To this, we have to add the fact that the deeper a mine gets, the more difficult and costly it becomes to recover gem material, so the mining companies will have to take the decision whether to continue mining under more challenging conditions and increased costs, or cease production. Both decisions will have a direct and tremendous impact to the pricing of new tanzanite as well as to the value of the already purchased specimens. Tanzanite has become very popular and coveted, really soon after its discovery. It is an amazingly attractive gem that most people cherish. To safeguard its national An exceptional creation by Ornella Iannuzzi Photo from the book “Tanzanite – Born From Lightning.”Photo used with permission

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An exceptional CARTIER bangle bracelet Photo from the book “Tanzanite – Born From Lightning” Photo used with permission

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An exceptional VAN CLEEF & ARPELS ring Photo from the book “Tanzanite – Born From Lightning” Photo used with permission

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treasure, in 2010, the government of Tanzania has decided to ban FU RT H E R REA DIN G

all export of rough tanzanite over 5ct, as an attempt to create employment, boost its local cutting industry, enhance Tanzanian entrepreneurship and benefit the gemstone’s country of origin. Before this, in 2003, the government of Tanzania together with a group of miners, dealers, manufacturers, wholesalers, retailers as well as major industry associations, created the so-called Tucson Tanzanite Protocol (TTP). The TTP ensures the ethical and rightful path of the material from the mine to the consumer, and all the members agree to operate under strict legal standards.

Tanzanite: Born from Lightning

Tanzanite was given its name by Mr. Henry Platt, great

by authors Didier Brodbeck and Hayley Henning,

grandson of Louis Comfort Tiffany. In his position as president and

under the art direction of Icaro Carlos

chairman of Tiffany & Co, he introduced tanzanite to the world in

Upon the discovery of Tanzanite in Tanzania a specimen was entrusted to the stonecutter Manuel de Souza, who shared some samples with distinguished gemologists. While the prospector thought that he had found some sapphires, he was astonished to learn that he had unearthed something altogether extraordinary. The

1968, with strong promotion and publicity campaigns which declared the gem to be “the most beautiful blue stone to be discovered in 2,000 years.” Tanzanite has a property which allows it to exhibit different colours depending along which viewing angle you are looking at

new gem immediately caught the eye of Tiffany & Co.

it. Its hue is a breathtaking combination of blue and violet with

Since 1968, the New York-based jeweler has pushed the

purple flashes, and these colours magically dance across the

stone into the spotlight. It launched a campaign that was successful enough to earn tanzanite the noble title of

stone as you rock and tilt it. The highest quality tanzanites have

'gem of the 20th century'. Tanzanite gained further

vivid hue and medium/dark tone, although tanzanite can be found

renown when in 2002 the American Gem Trade

even in a light purple hue when of commercial quality. This pleo-

Association (AGTA) named tanzanite, together with turquoise, the birthstones for December. Tanzanite's transformations have ultimately placed it alongside the most precious of precious gems. In short, tanzanite's age of glory has finally dawned. Needless to say, tanzanite's allure has attracted

chroic attitude, together with the beauty and intensity of its colours, give this gem its mythical character. At the foothills of the great Mount Kilimanjaro, in a majestic setting that has been metamorphosed by nature’s forces, tan-

the attention of a list of famous designers: Lorenz Bäumer

zanite is being born. And this is the only place that one could con-

(France), Ruth Grieco (Brazil), Catherine Sauvage

sider worthy of being home to such a treasure. Next time you are

(Germany), MVee (Hong Kong) and TTF (China). In Asia and elsewhere, tanzanite is seen as the source of

lucky enough to lay your eyes on a beautiful tanzanite, feel the

happiness for the happy few. Tanzanite: Born from

freedom its vibrant colour inspires, let yourself be carried away to

Lightning showcases hundreds of beautiful pieces of

a beautiful land; and breathe.

tanzanite jewelry, including superb creations made by Boucheron, Bulgari, Cartier, Chanel, Chaumet, Chopard, Dior, Boucheron, Louis Vuitton, Piaget, Van Cleef & Arpels, Wallace Chan and more. Book available on amazon

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Exceptional CHOPARD earrings Photo from the book “Tanzanite – Born From Lightning” Photo used with permission

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EDITOR’S CHOICE

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esthète by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

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esthète by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

a person who has or professes to have refined sensitivity toward the beauties of art or nature

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Photo courtesy of MATTIA CIELO © MATTIA CIELO

Jewellery Historian

A unique bracelet by Mattia Cielo

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AS Inc / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM / Signed model release filed with Shutterstock, Inc. Poem in public domain.

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L’aube est moins claire poeme : victor hugo

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L’aube est moins claire, l’air moins chaud, le ciel moins pur ; Le soir brumeux ternit les astres de l’azur. Les longs jours sont passés ; les mois charmants finissent. Hélas ! voici déjà les arbres qui jaunissent ! Comme le temps s’en va d’un pas précipité ! Il semble que nos yeux, qu’éblouissait l’été, Ont à peine eu le temps de voir les feuilles vertes.

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Pour qui vit comme moi les fenêtres ouvertes, L’automne est triste avec sa bise et son brouillard, Et l’été qui s’enfuit est un ami qui part. Adieu, dit cette voix qui dans notre âme pleure, Adieu, ciel bleu ! beau ciel qu’un souffle tiède effleure ! Voluptés du grand air, bruit d’ailes dans les bois, Promenades, ravins pleins de lointaines voix, Fleurs, bonheur innocent des âmes apaisées, Adieu, rayonnements ! aubes ! chansons ! rosées !

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Puis tout bas on ajoute : ô jours bénis et doux ! Hélas ! vous reviendrez ! me retrouverez-vous ?

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Jewellery Historian

| Jewels we Love

Jewels we

Love Svyatoslava Vladzimirska / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

In every issue we handpick the finest jewellery for you to choose, enabling you to add a sophisticated, elegant touch to the most important times of your life. Previously known as “Our Faves�, this new column introduces you to our favorite jewellery, designed by the most talented jewellery designers.

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BUTANI

MAXIOR

PASQUALE BRUNI

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LYDIA COURTEILLE

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GILAN

Doves by Doron Paloma

HARRY KOTLAR

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MAXIOR

LE VIAN

PASQUALE BRUNI

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BUTANI

Doves by Doron Paloma

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YVEL

NOUDAR

YOKO LONDON

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MATTIA CIELO

Doves by Doron Paloma

YVEL

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YOKO LONDON

HARRY KOTLAR

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Doves by Doron Paloma

YOKO LONDON

DINA KAMAL

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MAXIOR

GILAN

YVEL

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| Jewels we Love

HARRY KOTLAR

MAXIOR

Doves by Doron Paloma

YVEL

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MATTIA CIELO

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L I M

| MILLEFEUILLES

U E F E L

S E L L I rier

ucas L y b n electio

Fer s o n a t Samal

S

Arrête avec tes mensonges Philippe Besson À travers le récit autobiographique d'un amour de jeunesse, Philippe Besson met en scène un combat implacable entre vérité et mensonge. Quand j'étais enfant, ma mère ne cessait de me répéter : « Arrête avec tes mensonges. » J'inventais si bien les histoires, paraît-il, qu'elle ne savait plus démêler le vrai du faux. J'ai fini par en faire un métier, je suis devenu romancier. Aujourd'hui, voilà que j'obéis enfin à ma mère : je dis la vérité. Pour la première fois. Dans ce livre. Autant prévenir d'emblée : pas de règlement de comptes, pas de violence, pas de névrose familiale. Mais un amour, quand même. Un amour immense et tenu secret. Qui a fini par me rattraper. 198 pages, Julliard

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Guide des égarés Jean D’Ormesson Nous ne savons ni pourquoi nous sommes nés ni ce que nous devenons après la mort. Nous sommes tous des égarés. C’est à la question : «Qu’est-ce que je fais là?» que s’efforce de répondre ce manuel de poche qui n’a pas d’autre ambition que de décrire avec audace, avec naïveté, avec gaieté ce monde peu vraisemblable où nous avons été jetés malgré nous et de fournir vaille que vaille quelques brèves indications sur les moyens d’en tirer à la fois un peu de plaisir et, s’il se peut, de hauteur. 128 pages, Gallimard

Lonely Child Pascale Roze Odile Mour tier a tra versé presq ue t out e l’épopée du vingtième siècle. À la fin de sa vie, cette riche héritière sans enfant  désire risquer sa fortune. Le hasard s’en mêle, qui fait revenir à sa mémoire le petit Amazouz recueilli par son grand-père. Quelle relation s’est nouée entre l’enfant des montagnes de l’Atlas et l’officier engagé dans la « pacification » du Maroc ? Pour le com prendre, elle par t à la rec herc he des descendants d’Amazouz. Dans ce roman vif et intense, Pascale Roze convie le lecteur à suivre la pensée d’une femme que tourmente son héritage affectif et moral et qui décide pourtant, à sa dernière heure, de miser sur lui. 144 pages, Stock

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Kiselev Andrey Valerevich / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

ADDRESS BOOK

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ARTISTAR JEWELLERY 2017

MATTIA CIELO

www.artistarjewels.com

www.mattiacielo.com

BUTANI

MAXIOR

www.butani.com

www.maxior.com.br

CARATELL

NOUDAR

www.caratell.com

www.noudar.com

CHANEL

PASQUALE BRUNI

www.chanel.com

www.pasqualebruni.com

CHOPARD

PERFUME BOTTLE AUCTION

www.chopard.com

www.perfumebottlesauction.com

DINA KAMAL

PIAGET

www.dinakamal.com

www.piaget.com

DOVES BY DORON PALOMA

SAQQARA

www.dovesjewelry.com

www.saqqarajewels.com

GILAN

ULYSSE NARDIN

www.gilan.com

www.ulysse-nardin.com

GUCCI Jewelry & Timespieces

VHERNIER

www.guccitimeless.com

www.vhernier.it

HARRY KOTLAR

VICTOR VEYLAN

www.harrykotlar.com

www.victorvelyan.com

JUDY GEIB

YOKO LONDON

www.judygeibplusalpha.com

www.yokolondon.com

LE VIAN

YOSHIKI HISHINUMA

www.levian.com

www.yoshikihishinuma.co.jp

LYDIA COURTEILLE

YVEL

www.lydiacourteille.com

www.yvel.com

MANA MATZUZAKI www.manamatsuzaki.jp

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JEWELLERY HISTORIAN, #23  

Discover the issue #23 of the Jewellery Historian, the "Best kept secret in the world of luxury". Order a limited edition print at www.jewel...

JEWELLERY HISTORIAN, #23  

Discover the issue #23 of the Jewellery Historian, the "Best kept secret in the world of luxury". Order a limited edition print at www.jewel...