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Jewellery Historian

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Contributors

Yannis Sergakis

Buddha Mama

Discover our amazing team that create each issue of the Jewellery Historian

We discover the new collection of Greek designer Yannis Sergakis, exclusively in Athens

Olivier Dupon introduces us to Buddha Mama

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Editor’s Letter

The poet of design

Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier invites you to discover this new issue

Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier introduces us to Frédéric Mané

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Our news

Alma Karina

From auctions to new collections, all you need to know is in our news

Olivier Dupon introduces us to the amazing universe of Alma Karina

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Book review

Breathtaking beauty of gems

Our editor-in-chief reviews the exceptional “Fine Jewelry Couture”

Eva Kountouraki introduces us Coral

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Jewellery Historian Editor-in-Chief Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Creative director-at-large Panayiotis Simopoulos Gemology Department Editor Eva Kountouraki Haute Joaillerie Department Editor Olivier Dupon --Founder Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier --Columnists Eva Kountouraki ( Breathtaking beauty of Gems) Olivier Dupon ( The art of creativity / Haute Joaillerie) --Contributors Martin Huynh , Christina Rodopoulou, Catherine Varoucha --Creative Jewellery Historian Production Jewellery Historian Made in the European Union --Photo agencies Shutterstock, Pixabay, Freepik, The stocks Cover Halay Alex / Shutterstock. com --Advertising info@jewelleryhistorian.com Website www.jewelleryhistorian.com E-mail info@jewelleryhistorian.com --FREE DIGITAL COPY / NOT FOR SALE JEWELLERY HISTORIAN © 2016

All material published in this e-magazine and at www.jewelleryhistorian.com is published with permission of the brands and designers. Unless otherwise authorized in writing by the Jewellery Historian, it is strictly prohibited to reproduce, in whole or in part, and by any way, the content of this e-magazine. While precautions have been take to ensure the accuracy of the contents of our magazine and digital brands, neither the editors, publishers or its agents can accept responsibility for damages or injury which may arise there from. The information on this e-magazine is for information purposes only. Jewellery Historian assumes no liability or responsibility for any inaccurate, delayed or incomplete information. The information contained has been provided by individual brands, event organizers, brands, press offices or organizations without verification by us. The opinions expressed in articles and/or advertorials, are the author's and/or brand’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Jewellery Historian, the owner, the publisher, the editor-in-chief and team of the magazine, or of any part related to the magazine. The name “Jewellery Historian” and/or logo, may not be reproduced without prior written consent of the founder of magazine. Partial or entire reproduction of the material of this magazine is strictly prohibited.The content, entire edition, graphics, design, lay-out and other matters related to this issue are protected under applicable copyrights and other proprietary laws, including but not limited to intellectual property laws. The copying, reproduction, use, modification or publication by you of any such matters or any part of the material is strictly prohibited, without our express prior written permission.All trade names, trademarks or distinctive signs of any kind contained in the Web pages of the company

are the property of their owners and are protected by law. The same is valid also for all Links (links) .The presence of third-part links (links) in the Jewellery Historian Web pages & e-magazine is for informational purposes only. Our articles may contain photos/texts/graphics/designs that belong to third parties. They are published for information purposes only and with permission of the brands. Image(s) or Footage (as applicable), used under license from photo agencies. The Jewellery Historian is publishing articles about jewellery, auctions, jewellery designers, gemology, gemstones, etc. All trademarks mentioned in the Jewellery Historian’s website and/or magazine belong to their owners, third party brands, product names, trade names, corporate names and company names mentioned may be trademarks of their respective owners or registered trademarks of other companies and are used for purposes of explanation & information and to the owner's benefit, without implying a violation of copyright law. Photos used in articles belong to their owners, third party brands, product names, trade names, corporate names and company names mentioned may be trademarks of their respective owners or registered trademarks of other companies and are used for purposes of explanation and to the owner's benefit, without implying a violation of copyright law.


Jewellery Historian

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

123 Damiani Olivier Dupon introduces us to the new collections of the prestigious maison

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Biennale des Antiquaires

YEWN Olivier Dupon meets an amazing artist for an exclusive interview

Olivier Dupon visits the prestigious event for a special report

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SICIS

Esthète

Olivier Dupon introduces us to SICIS

A person who has or professes to have refined sensitivity toward the beauties of art or nature.

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VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Fashion

Discover the “Arche de Noé” new collection

Two fashion editorial to welcome the new season

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Caratell

Jewels we love

Olivier Dupon meets Michael Koh for an exclusive interview

Special trends

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CONTRIBUTORS

As long as he could remember, Olivier Dupon has always been passionate about how ideas can translate into designs, and as a result, he is fascinated by the umpteen creative approaches taken by many independent practitioners. He is now an expert in the fields of lifestyle and fashion, reveling in exposing these talents to a wider audience. While he began his career at Christian Dior, and then worked as a buyer and project manager for several large retail companies before running his own lifestyle boutique for several years, now based in London, he scouts international markets in search of exciting names in Art & Craft, with a focus on jewellery makers and splendid precious designs. His previous books include The New Artisans (2011), The New Jewelers (2012), The New Pâtissiers (2013), Floral Contemporary (2014), Encore! The New Artisans (2015), and Shoe: Contemporary Footwear by Inspiring Designers (2015) all published by Thames & Hudson. His new book on luxury jewellery was published in Autumn 2016. For the Jewellery Historian, in his The Art of Creativity column, Olivier Dupon exposes inspiring, intriguing at time, and captivating stories through the presentation of talents or the exposé of current topics, all centered around creativity in today’s high-end fine jewelry.

Eva Kountouraki was born and raised in a family of goldsmiths and jewelers. From a very young age she expressed her keen interest in gems, jewelry and design, a passion that led her to devote her studies and her career in this field. She started her first collection of polished and rough gemstones at a very early age and realized that this would be her profession in the future. After studying gemology books in various languages, she attended gemological seminars in Greece and Europe and developed practical skills to analyze gems, Eva decided to accredit those skills choosing the best gemological institute in the world, GIA (Gemological Institute of America), for her studies. Succeeding unprecedented results in the practice and theory of gemology, analyzing and identifying thousands of gemstones and diamonds, she graduated and acquired the prestigious certificate GIA Graduate Gemologist Diploma, which includes specific studies in diamond grading (GIA Graduate Diamonds Diploma) and colored gemstones (GIA Graduate Colored Stones Diploma). Her studies in the jewelry field continued and Eva got her Jewelry Business Management Diploma, gaining specialized knowledge about all the aspects of the jewelry industry. Her training continued with jewelry design and computer aided design. Eva’s brilliant path in the field of gemology was crowned by her collaboration with the Italian branch of GIA. Eva received special training from professional and experienced gemologists of GIA Italy, New York and California, US, and for more than a decade she teaches gemology and jewelry design in GIA, transferring her experience, knowledge and passion for diamonds, gems and jewelry to her students-famous professionals from around world. Eve is proud to be the only Greek woman who has ever accomplished such a distinction in the field of diamonds and precious stones. Alongside her work as a gemology instructor, Eva is a jewelry and gemstone buyer and consultant for privates and companies, advising and helping her clients to make successful buys and investments in gemstones. She also organizes and teaches seminars for the training of gemstone and jewelry merchants, salespeople and gem-passionates. For the Jewellery Historian, in her The breathtaking beauty of gems column, she introduces you to a breathtaking gemstone in every issue.

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CONTRIBUTORS

Panayiotis Simopoulos is the creative director-atlarge of the Jewellery Historian. In his role, he contributes to special projects and serves as roving ambassador with links to all creative areas of the magazine. With a successful world career as a fashion top model and as a  talented fashion photographer, he is the rarest kind of creative artist, one who creates extraordinary images. With a unique creative vision, whilst maintaining a clear vision of delivering a message that speaks directly to the reader, he ultimately creates an exciting and balanced visual experience.

For Catherine Varoucha art has always been her true passion, and every forms of art has captivated her since early childhood. With a desire to explore how science and technology can be used to change skylines that form our cities and to improve the performance of buildings both socially and environmentally, she studied architecture which allowed her to engage both creatively and scientifically with the aesthetic and functional aspects of design.

For the Jewellery Historian, Panayiotis creates the exceptional visual of each issue. Together with many of the most talented young photographers, he definitely delivers, the most memorable, exciting and unique images and fashion editorials that the magazine has ever published.

Christopher Wren once said, 'Architecture aims at eternity' and Catherine can think of no better way to achieve eternity than to help create buildings of tomorrow that preserve the ideas of today. Ultimately, we are judged by what we leave behind.

In close collaboration with the founder & editor-in-chief of the magazine and with the creative team, he is responsible for the uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to  a minimal and clean design offers to readers from around the globe a unique reading experience.

Inspired by minimal architecture of the Cyclades in Greece and in particular of Naxos, Catherine works in close collaboration with the editor-in-chief and with the creative director-at-large, to create the uniquely powerful visual and textual storytelling, which combined to a minimal and clean design offers to our precious readers from around the globe a unique reading experience. Periodically she will also introduce us exceptional interiors around the globe. In each issue of the Jewellery Historian, with the editor-in-chief, she will share their “inspirations” with us all.

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© Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

Jewellery Historian

| EDITOR’S LETTER


EDITOR’S LETTER Many people cannot see the differences inside solitude. While for many solitude is a deliberate choice, for others is caused by other situations.People tend to confuse solitude and loneliness. In this sense, these two words refer, respectively, to the joy and the pain of being alone. I never considered solitude as a synonym of being alone. Solitude is to love being in the singular moment, not caught in the past, not carried away by the future, and most of all not carried away by the crowd. It is because I am comfortable in solitude that I can be comfortable with the rest of the world. I feel connected to you all because I am feeling myself. It's simple: to really relate to the world I have to go back and relate to myself. As a Swiss I love solitude. During long walks in Swiss nature I found it. I also found it in the literature of Charles Ferdinand Ramuz, in the poetry of Philippe Jaccottet. This silence gave me inner tranquility that Ramuz once perfectly described “I have accepted all and I am free. The inner chains are broken, as well as those outside.” I always considered its silence as a form of freedom, especially since mine is a deliberate choice. Short-term solitude is often valued as a time when I can work, rest, think, without being disturbed. Arthur Schopenhauer would agree with me, cause as he once said “A man can be himself alone so long as he is alone… if he does not love solitude, he will not love freedom; for it is only when he is alone that he is really free”. Since early childhood I understood that there is a sort of elegance in independent solitude. The tranquility of this desired solitude is for me a prerequisite to living a considered life without being disturbed. Solitude helps me be the person I want to be. With solitude I discover all the beauty hidden in our lives, such as sensitivity, vulnerability, love, hope, creativity, joy, preparation for love. But to find this luxurious silence that solitude offers you, you don’t have to go in nature like I did. The last twenty years I had the opportunity to meet people to share this solitude together. I know that this may sound strange to you, but this desired isolation doesn’t always translates to the lack of contact with people. I had the privilege to share the beauty of seclusion with amazing artists. We travelled around the world to find the best wind, the perfect breeze for the desired privacy. Those exceptional artists, with their silence invited me to join them in an amazing world, the one of creativity. Thanks to this silence, I could hear the wind in the trees, to stand on the beach and taste the salty smell of the wind that comes from the ocean, and inside me to feel the warmth of never ending freedom. We shared our solitude and discovered our freedom, our serenity, our relaxation, the beauty of life and of creativity. After all as Pablo Picasso said “Without great solitude no serious work is possible”. As you gaze across the endless sands, the sun begins to rise. Waves lap against the shoreline creating an intricate pattern along the smooth sand. Innumerable milky puffy clouds float over the blue skies; some shaped like castles or mountains and others looking like white silky sheep. You can hear the palm trees waving along the wind as if whispering to each other in a hush. Dolphins leap and call at the glorious sunset before them. As you ran across the beach, the wind whips your face. The salty breeze makes your eyes water and your feet tingle. You inhale deeply as you lie down and you slowly fell into a profound sleep. I invite you to discover this issue within this silence of solitude, because this will allow you to discover the beauty of the gifts all the artists featured in our issues give us through their work.

Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier Founder & Editor-in-Chief

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Jewellery Historian

NEWS


ENTICE Altered ceremonial statement

To make the wedding spell more memorable, Entice, the fine jewellery brand by the renowned KGK group, presents a magnificent assortment of chandeliers, danglers and waterfall statement earrings. Add an extra glint to the occasion of wedding with these finely crafted diamond stunners in white and yellow gold, with a whiff of colours in rubies, emeralds & sapphires.

These dazzling, lightweight statement earrings are a perfect choice for the brides and their bridesmaids to adorn themselves in the most gorgeous ways. Pair these elaborate earrings with a cuff or a cocktail ring to make an altered ceremonial statement.   Mrs. Manju Kothari, Creative Director, Entice says, “This assortment of statement earrings is the most sort after style by today’s modern bride. They dazzle just enough to make a statement and eliminate the necessity of adorning multiple jewellery pieces just to make an impact; the way what every bride needs in her trousseau for pre and post wedding occasions.”   About Entice Jewellery: Enhancing the rich Indian jewellery heritage with a contemporary twist, Entice Jewellery offers traditional yet contemporary and elegant designs, which cater to the discerning taste of its customers. 'Entice' was launched by KGK group at the turn of the millennium in 2004 in Hong Kong. Following a huge success in Hong Kong, KGK launched its first India boutique of ‘Entice’ in Jaipur in 2009. Entice today has 5 standalone boutiques in Hong Kong and India. (Jaipur, Mumbai, Bengaluru and New Delhi). Entice  designs meet the burgeoning demand for an internationally aesthetic look, lending a unique artistic blend to their pieces. Backed by the strength and prestige of KGK, Entice aims to create an unparalleled reputation of credible leadership by providing unmatched customer delight and exceeding customer expectations at every opportunity.   About Parent Group KGK: The KGK group, established in 1905 by the Kothari family of Jaipur, is a global corporation with fully integrated operations in the Gems & Jewellery industry, and a presence across 17 countries. A pioneer in the world of precious stones, KGK Group has been sourcing, manufacturing and distributing diamonds, colored stones and jewellery for decades. Being a The status of De Beers Sightholder, Alrosa Alliance and Rio Tinto Select Diamantaire speaks volumes about the credibility and efficiency of our diamond operations ensuring nothing but the finest diamonds and at the most reasonable prices. The strength of KGK is vast, resulting in unmatchable benefits to the end consumer.   For more information on the brand and group: www.entice.in

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Photo courtesy of ENTICE © ENTICE

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Photo courtesy of ENTICE © ENTICE

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GUCCI NEW ADDITIONS TO THE GUCCI FLORA FINE JEWELRY COLLECTION

Gucci Timepieces & Jewelry is pleased to present new additions to the Gucci Flora Fine Jewelry range. Each piece is worked in 18kt pink gold and sees the flora motif captured in a 3-D multi-petalled starburst flower scattered with delicate diamonds. The collection includes a feminine necklace featuring the flower pendant in 18kt pink gold and a fine gold chain enhanced with small cut-away hearts and Gucci’s interlocking “G”. Matching pink gold stud earrings in the 3-D flora style continue this very contemporary floral design. A slim pink gold bangle and a ring introduce the iconic horsebit motif into the designs, showing a discreet horsebit clasp on the back of the ring and as an extra Gucci accent on the bangle. As a final touch, the ring features artistic etchings around the band, adding texture and visual detail. For any occasion, these pieces can be matched with other items in the Gucci Flora range to create an eclectic look. About Gucci Jewelry All Gucci jewelry is handcrafted by highly skilled Italian goldsmiths and the high end jewelry collection is the epitome of impeccable craftsmanship. Luxury is defined by the choice of precious materials, the uniqueness of each design and the meticulous attention to detail. Gucci Jewelry offers Italian made designs that can be worn everyday and treasured forever. For more information about Gucci Timepieces & Jewelry, please visit www.guccijewelry.com. Gucci is part of the Kering Group, a world leader in apparel and accessories which develops an ensemble of powerful Luxury and Sport & Lifestyle brands.

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Photo courtesy of GUCCI © GUCCI

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S OT H E BY ’ S Two superb jewels of Imperial Russian Heritage linked to two of the Greatest Rulers of Russian History - Peter the Great & Catherine the Great This autumn in Geneva, Sotheby’s auction rooms will be lit up by the grandeur and elegance of the Russian Imperial Court: our sale on 16 November will feature two exceptional jewels of extraordinary historical importance. The first is a magnificent diamond necklace with a stunning and delicate bowknot clasp, thought to have been commissioned as two separate pieces by Empress Catherine II, known as Catherine the Great (1729 – 1796). It has survived centuries of upheaval and was preserved throughout the First World War in a strong room of the Kremlin. The jewel will be offered at auction with an estimate of $3- 5 million. The second piece is one of the most important parures of antique coloured diamond jewels to appear at auction in the last 50 years. This superb suite contains stones which may have formed part of a gift by Empress Catherine I of Russia (1684-1727), wife of Peter the Great to Sultan Ahmed III to negotiate the end of the Siege of Pruth in 1711. By tradition, these extraordinarily rare jewels were then used by the Sultan Abdul Hamid II (1842 – 1918) for the present necklace, which he offered to the wife of Teufik of Egypt, possibly for the birth of the last Khedive of Egypt and Sudan in 1874. The parure will be offered in November with a pre-sale estimate of $3-5 million. “These two stunning jewels carry with them a fascinating insight into the luxury and opulence of the Russian court. It is difficult to overstate their rarity and historical importance, and I am thrilled to be able to present them side by side this autumn.“ David Bennett, Worldwide Chairman of Sotheby’s International Jewellery Division. OPULENCE AND CRAFTSMANSHIP: THE RUSSIAN CROWN JEWELS Russia’s Diamond Treasure was founded in 1719 by Tsar Peter the Great (1629 – 1725), to distinguish the vast wealth of the Romanov dynasty. He is known to have commissioned numerous elaborate jewels as gifts for his wife, Empress Catherine I (1684 – 1727). Stored in the so-called Diamond Room of the Winter Palace in St Petersburg, this breathtaking collection of state jewels and regalia was added to by successive rulers, as instructed by Peter himself. The largest contribution was made by Catherine II, known as Catherine the Great (1729 – 1796), who ruled as Empress of All Russia from 1762 to 1796. DIAMOND JEWELS “IN A CLASS OF THEIR OWN“ Thought to have been part of the Collection of Catherine the Great The jewellery collection of Catherine the Great was renowned, and never equalled before or since in Russia. Her jewels and regalia proclaimed her power and rank as Empress and displayed the most precious materials available, crafted by the most highly skilled French jewellers such as Pauzié and Duval. This piece was originally designed as two separate jewels, crafted around 1760-80. Stylistically, the two pieces are consistent with traditional designs of the late 18th century, which would have been fastened around the neck using a ribbon or stitched directly onto clothing. >

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Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

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> At the outbreak of the First World War, the decision was made to move the imperial treasure from St Petersburg to Moscow, and the jewels were stored in sealed cases in the Kremlin. A number of jewels – including the present necklace band and bow knot brooch - were taken to London and offered at auction at a sale of “The Russian State Jewels” in 1927. They have only been in two private collections since then, including that of the present owner. After the war, a commission was formed to itemize and value the jewellery collection of the Romanovs from the early 17th century onwards and a catalogue, entitled Russia’s Treasure of Diamonds and Precious Stones, was published, in Russian, English, French and German, under the supervision of Professor A.E. Fersman. This autumn’s sale will include one of the very rare surviving copies of this catalogue with an estimate of $38,000- 51,000 (The Bolshevik government recalled and destroyed most copies of this catalogue, hence its extreme rarity). A SUPERB SUITE OF IMPERIAL JEWELS : Containing stones from a jewel which may have been used by Catherine I, wife of Peter the Great to end the Siege of Pruth in 1711 Dating from the mid-19th century, this diamond parure is comprised of a necklace, a brooch and a pair of earrings. It contains stones which may have formed part of a gift presented by Empress Catherine I to the Twenty-Third Ottoman Sultan, Ahmed III (1673-1736) as part of peace negotiations with Czar Peter the Great, after the Pruth River Battles in 1711. According to an account by Voltaire in his History of the Russian Empire under Peter the Great (1759), following days of siege, Catherine urged her husband the Czar to pursue a peaceful outcome to the stalemate. Knowing the importance of the Oriental custom according to which one should never approach a sovereign or their representatives without gifts, Catherine gathered all the jewels she had brought with her, including family heirlooms and gifts from her husband. Secretly, she sent them alongside the Czar’s letter to the Grand Vizier. Sultan Ahmed II accepted the sumptuous gift and a peace treaty was agreed between Russia and the Ottoman Empire. Following their crucial role in the history of these two empires, these imperial Russian jewels are believed to have then passed into the Ottoman Treasures. By tradition, they are said to have been used by the Sultan Abdül Hamid II (1842-1918) in the commissioning of the present parure, which he presented to the wife of the Khedive Teufik of Egypt, possibly on the occasion of the birth of their son and heir Abbas II Hilmi Paşa (1874-1944). Born HH Princess Emine-Nacibe Hanimefendi, the "Valid Sultan" or "Valide Pasha" became the most powerful woman of the region, seconding her son in the conduct of the State until 1914, when Egypt became an independent Sultanate under a British protectorate. MAGNIFICENT JEWELS & NOBLE JEWELS -Sale 
 Sotheby’s Geneva, Wednesday 16 November 2016 Hôtel Beau-Rivage, 13, quai du Mont-Blanc, 1201 Geneva tel. +41 22 908 48 00

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Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

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U N S I G N E D AWA R D Anissa Kermiche wins E.C. One Unsigned Award

ANISSA KERMICHE has been unveiled as the winner of E.C. One’s annual Unsigned Award. At a ceremony held at E.C. One’s Exmouth Market store on 12th October, the four finalists were whittled down to one, after presenting their work to a panel of industry judges. Paris-born Anissa Kermiche embarked on a new path in jewellery design after relinquishing a successful career in engineering. Launching her eponymous brand earlier this year, Kermiche spent three years prior studying design, gemmology and 3D computer-aided design. Her collection blends classic materials with a modern, humorous eye to create statement pieces for women with an effortless sense of style. It’s this unique approach to production and design that caught the judges’ eyes. Jos Skeates, co-founder of E.C. One and judge said of the decision: “The judges were very impressed with the calibre of each of our finalists; the work presented by each designer was unique, intricate and showed a real eye for design expertise. We had to come to a unanimous decision, which was tough. It was Anissa Kermiche’s incredibly distinctive pieces and her business acumen which really stood out. We look forward to building a strong relationship with the brand at E.C. One.” Anissa Kermiche and the other talented finalists - Crystal Ching-I Chien, Olivia Creber and Charlotte Reichwald - were invited to submit their jewellery work to the panel, comprised of industry heavyweights Jo Newton - head buyer at Fortnum and Mason; Sam Willoughby event director at International Jewellery London; award-winning designer Tomasz Donocik; and jewellery writer Rachael Taylor. Established by husband and wife duo Alison and Jos Skeates six years ago, the Unsigned competition champions talent across the board irrespective of age, focusing on design faculties and aesthetic appeal, seeking out those who are dedicated to navigating a career as an independent jewellery designer or maker. After launching the competition on social media earlier this year, E.C. One’s followers were encouraged to vote for their favourite designer, with the four receiving the most votes then going on to face the judging panel. Previous winners of the Unsigned Award include Hoonik Chang, Clarice Price-Thomas and Flora Bhattachary, all designer-makers who have progressed to develop their collections, secure stockists at E.C. One and beyond, and achieve critical acclaim. As part of the prize package, jewellery designer Kermiche will enjoy a year’s mentoring by Alison and Jos Skeates, plus the opportunity to showcase her work within the store, as well as manufacturing advice from EC One’s team of goldsmiths. Kermiche will also receive a place on Getting Started, The Goldsmiths’ Company’s prestigious business short course, and a PR package with Push PR, who have a long-standing relationship both with E.C. One and within the jewellery industry.

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BOOK International Wedding Jewels

Crystal Art Publication is delighted to unveil its latest coffee table book ‘INTERNATIONAL WEDDING JEWELS’ - a marvelously comprehensive wedding journal that furnishes a wide array of wedding jewellery ideas collated from 47 international jewellers. Illustrating in detail the tradition of adorning oneself with exquisite jewellery on important occasions like weddings.

book has been compiled solicitously to cater to the ever growing wedding jewellery market and is gives you insights to make it memorable. It takes you inside the design studios of the most famous brands from across the globe and how they interpret wedding jewels that are adorned from head to toe. This book is complimented with beautifully shot images of jewellery that showcase the best of diamonds, gemstones and meticulous craftsmanship that these jewels come with. Turn the pages and behold the sheer immensity and variety that lie ahead for you to find aweinspiringly beautiful bejewelled pieces that enrapture- be it a pair of earrings, necklace, bangles, chain or whatever you choose.

Marriage, the most beautiful and divine unison of two hearts and souls, is also the time when families of the bride and the groom forge new bonds. Amongst all the festivities and celebrations, jewellery adds the perfect effervescence to the whole wedding. Women across the globe are fascinated by jewellery since childhood and it is their wedding when they really get to invest in their dream jewels. Gifting jewellery is also one of the most beautiful ways to express happiness for forming new relations, not only to the bride and groom but also to their loved ones. This has been a tradition across cultures, regions and times for ages.

Featured Brands: Amrapali, Anmol, Annamaria Cammilli, Autore, Bayco, Birdhichand Ghanshyamdas, Bina Goenka, Boucheron, Buccellati, Bvlgari, Carrera Y Carrera, Chopard, Comete, C. Krishniah Chetty & Sons, Damiani, De Grisogono, De Beers, Diacolor, Entice, Fabergé, Farah Khan, Forevermark, Ganjam, Garrard, Gemfields, Gem Palace, Golechas, Graff, Harry Winston, Hazoorilal Legacy, Jewellery Theatre, Jewels Emporium, Malabar, Maria Gaspari, Messika, Mirari, Piaget, Picchiotti, Poonam Soni, Schriener, Sunita Shekhawat, Sutra, The House of Rose, Utopia, Van Cleef & Arpels, Victor Mayor, Yoko London.

Right from the proposal to the bride, her trousseau to the gifts that she receives, the groom to the families on both sides, the ‘International Wedding Jewels’ book looks at various aspects where jewellery plays a crucial role at weddings from around the globe. Taking cues from global wedding jewellery trends and latest jewellery collections from various international jewellery houses, the book is a visual feast from one page to the other.

Available in selected bookstores.

With Preeta Agarwal and Pakshal R. as coeditor and their combined experience of over 15 years in the fine jewellery industry at work, this

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Photo courtesy of Crystal Art Publication © Crystal Art Publication

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S OT H E BY ’ S THE SKY BLUE DIAMOND

The centrepiece of Sotheby’s November auction of Magnificent Jewels and Noble Jewels in Geneva will be an outstanding and extremely rare Fancy Vivid Blue diamond ring by Cartier. Weighing 8.01 carats, this mesmerising stone has been named ‘The Sky Blue Diamond’, emphasising its highly sought-after hue. This most majestic of gems will be offered on 16 November with a pre-sale estimate of $ 15 - 25 million.

Sotheby’s has realised six of the past seven auction records per carat for Fancy Vivid Blue diamonds.

Describing the diamond, David Bennett, Worldwide Chairman of Sotheby’s International Jewellery Division, said, “The Sky Blue Diamond is of a wonderfully clear celestial blue, presented in an extremely elegant square emerald cut – in my view, the most flattering of all the cuts for a coloured diamond. This important gem will, I am sure, captivate all collectors of exceptional gemstones.”

T h e B l u e M o o n o f J o s e p h i n e
 Fancy Vivid Blue diamond Cushion-shaped, 12.03 carats, Internally Flawless Sotheby’s Geneva, November 2015, Sold for US$ 48,468,158.

AUCTION MILESTONES FOR BLUE DIAMONDS WORLD AUCTION RECORD PRICE PER CARAT FOR ANY DIAMOND AND ANY GEMSTONE US$ 4,028,941 per carat


U S $ 3 , 9 3 5 , 8 2 6 p e r c a r a t
 T h e O p p e n h e i m e r B l u e
 Fancy Vivid Blue diamond Step-cut, 14.62 carats, VVS1 Clarity Christie’s Geneva, May 2016 , Sold for US$ 57,541,779.

EXCEPTIONAL COLOUR AND CUT ‘The Sky Blue Diamond’ has been graded Fancy Vivid Blue by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) – the highest possible colour grading, awarded to no more than 1% of blue diamonds submitted to the GIA. It was also found to have excellent polish and to be of Type IIb, a rare category which represents less than 0.5 % of all diamonds.

U S $ 3 , 3 4 8 , 2 0 5 p e r c a r a t
 T h e Z o e D i a m o n d
 F r o m t h e M e l l o n C o l l e c t i o n
 Fancy Vivid Blue diamond Pear-shaped, 9.75 carats VS1 Clarity Sotheby’s New York, November 2014 Sold for US$ 32,645,000 U S $ 3 , 1 5 1 , 5 6 1 p e r c a r a t
 T h e M i l l e n n i u m B l u e
 F a n c y V i v i d B l u e d i a m o n d
 Oval, 10.10 carats, Internally Flawless Sotheby’s Hong Kong, April 2016 Sold for US$ 31,830,766

BLUE DIAMONDS AT SOTHEBY’S Within the past two years alone, Sotheby’s has twice set a new world record auction price for a blue diamond, most recently with the only diamond or gemstone in auction history to have exceeded $4 million per carat, the Blue Moon of Josephine (sold for $48.5 million ($4,028,941 per carat) in November 2015).

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Jewellery Historian

| BOOK REVIEW

EDITOR’S CHOICE

BOOK REVIEW by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

Fine Jewelry Couture This inspirational book by design expert Olivier Dupon features more than thirty-five master jewelry designers, hailing from across the globe. It is definitely the perfect, curated resource for both aficionados and professionals who seek to be in the know concerning the most visionary practitioners working in the field of fine jewelry today. 27


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In the 1925 Exposition des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels in Paris, all jewelry entries were required to showcase an innovative, fresh approach to jewelry making, a philosophy recaptured in Fine Jewelry Couture. Featuring more than 35 master jewelry designers, Olivier Dupon uses his keen eye and creative flair to select the most exciting of today’s high-end jewelry designers working around the globe. Design expert Olivier Dupon uses his keen eye for talent and creative flair to select the most exciting of today’s high-end jewelry designers working around the globe. Each designer is introduced by a brief biography, and hundreds of images showcase a broad range of “wearable art.” Covering designers hailing from Australia, Brazil, France, Greece, Hong Kong, India, Italy, Japan Lebanon, Russia, Turkey, the UK and USA, hundreds of images showcase a broad range of ‘wearable art’. From Aida Bergsen’s flora and fauna-inspired designs, through Anabela Chan’s exquisitely detailed laser-cut brooches to Elie Top’s yellow gold spheres that are a feat of mathematical precision, Dupon introduces highly original up-and-coming designers as well as highly established names in the industry. Red-carpet customers and fans include Beyoncé, Gwyneth Paltrow, Salma Hayek, Madonna and Michelle Obama. Designers are introduced with a biography that highlights their working practices and key sources of inspiration. Illustrations include sketches as well as images of beautiful finished designs, all of which are unique and many of which are bespoke. Few weeks ago I had the unique privilege to preview this new book of Olivier Dupon, who is also the Haute Joaillerie department editor of the Jewellery Historia, and it is difficult to find the correct words to describe this book, since it is simply exceptional.

both aficionados and professionals who are interested in some of the most visionary practitioners working in the field of fine jewelry today but also a great gift for that creative person in your life or a solid addition to any coffee table collection. Reviewing a book written by a member of our family is not the easiest thing to do, since impartiality is required and essential, but in this case the truth is that I really loved the new book. I was captivated by the beauty of the over 550 colour illustrations, by the amount of information, by the completeness of the entire book and for this reason I would like to recommend it to you all without any hesitation. For the Jewellery Historian, in his The Art of Creativity & Haute Joaillerie columns, Olivier Dupon exposes inspiring, intriguing at time, and captivating stories through the presentation of talents or the exposé of current topics, all centered around creativity in today’s high-end fine jewelry. As long as he could remember, Olivier Dupon has always been passionate about how ideas can translate into designs, and as a result, he is fascinated by the umpteen creative approaches taken by many independent practitioners. He is now an expert in the fields of lifestyle and fashion, reveling in exposing these talents to a wider audience. While he began his career at Christian Dior, and then worked as a buyer and project manager for several large retail companies before running his own lifestyle boutique for several years, now based in London, he scouts international markets in search of exciting names in Art & Craft, with a focus on jewellery makers and splendid precious designs. Design expert Olivier Dupon’s books include The New Artisans, The New Jewelers, The New Pâtissiers, Floral Contemporary, Encore! The New Artisans and Shoe. Follow Olivier on Instagram @olivierdupon.

Based on my extensive knowledge in jewellery, backed up by studies in gemology at the internationally known Gemological Institute of America (GIA), and my studies in jewellery design, I could say that I loved this new book and that I am extremely honored and proud to be among the first to review it. This inspirational book features more than thirty-five master jewelry designers, hailing from across the globe. Complete with an introduction, a useful glossary and notes of designers’ websites (some work by appointment only), Fine Jewelry Couture is the perfect, curated resource for

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Hardcover, 256 pages ISBN 9780500518601 32.00 x 23.40 cm Expected publication: October 18th 2016 Publisher : Thames & Hudson


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Photo courtesy of CARNET © CARNET

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Hardcover, 256 pages Expected publication: October 18th 2016 by Thames & Hudson

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NEW COLLECTION

YANNIS SERGAKIS

At the Yannis Sergakis Adornments flagship store in Athens, jewellery pieces made of gold and white diamonds from the Charnieres line, stand next to pendants and earrings with dominant, colorful precious stones that have come to enrich the line, the outcome of a fascinating process.We are proud to introduce you to the new pieces, colorful, dynamic & pure at the same time as all creations of Yannis Sergakis.

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This is the outcome of a fascinating process: stones are being chosen for their color and shape and then, the design is created on each individual s t o n e s ep a r a t el y, thus assembling unique narrations that maintain the geometric setting and style of the Charnieres line with white, brilliant – cut diamonds and yellow, black or rose gold 18k.

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It has been several months now, that at the Yannis Sergakis Adornments flagship store at 5, Valaoritou Street, Athens, jewellery pieces made of gold and white diamonds from the Charnieres line, stand next to pendants and earrings with dominant, colorful precious stones that have come to enrich the line. This is the outcome of a fascinating process: stones are being chosen for their color and shape and then, the design is created on each individual stone separately, thus assembling unique narrations that maintain the geometric setting and style of the Charnieres line with white, brilliant – cut diamonds and yellow, black or rose gold 18k. It seems difficult but in this case, it is a success. Emeralds, rubies and sapphires maintain their volume, shape and gravitas but, at the same time, they seem ethereal and delicate, creating unique one-off pieces of jewellery for the women that will acquire them. Yannis Sergakis is the descendant of a well-established family of Greek diamond traders. He was drawn into the alluring world of precious stones while still a child, when he spent hours observing his uncles in their showroom. Soon, Yannis began collecting and trading jewels. Much later, he realized that his true passion was not collecting but creating jewellery. Not a conventional route, but one that indicates his deep love and appreciation for the fine art of jewellery. After studying gemology and design at the Gemological Institute of America, Yannis Sergakis worked as a trader alongside his family until 2004, when he set up his own business. More interested in creating exquisite jewels than signing them, he started collaborating with renowned jewellery houses in Greece and abroad. Over thirty collections later, with the maturity of a designer who has spent a decade honing his craft and the assertiveness of someone whose sought after pieces sell at the world’s most exclusive boutiques, Yannis Sergakis has taken the most important step yet – creating his own signature line. At the Jewellery Historian, we love his work for its freshness, pure lines and exceptional craftsmanship. Discover more at www.yannissergakis.com

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T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y by Olivier Dupon

Buddha Mama Buddha Mama is an American jewellery brand that embraces the doctrines as a source of inspiration for both the designs and backstories. It is indeed completely steeped in Buddhist principles and Eastern philosophies, yet it is first and foremost a fine jewellery brand, hence welcoming jewellery lovers from every faith or none. 41


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In the third of the Four Noble Truths of Buddhism, and following the state of Nirodha (cessation of suffering) is Nirvana meaning transcendence, where extinguishing the three fires of greed, delusion and hatred enables the attainment of enlightenment. It is indeed said that: “someone who reaches nirvana does not immediately disappear to a heavenly realm. Nirvana is better understood as a state of mind that humans can reach. It is a state of profound spiritual joy, without negative emotions and fears. Someone who has attained enlightenment is filled with compassion for all living things.” (Source: BBC ‘Religions’ archives). Buddha Mama is an American jewellery brand that embraces the doctrines as a source of inspiration for both the designs and back-stories. It is indeed completely steeped in Buddhist principles and Eastern philosophies, yet it is first and foremost a fine jewellery brand, hence welcoming jewellery lovers from every faith or none. However, here is a conundrum that the designers may have not anticipated: Buddha Mama creations are so covetable that they may well entice envy and possibly greed. Expect more ‘wows!’ than ‘ah-oh-mmm’. The collections all bear names that combine positive energy and sensual moments (Auspicious, Lantern, Mandala and Havana Nights), and each heralds a core concept around which specific creative patterns grow. Overall there is a sense of benevolence; here there is homage to Indian palace geometrical motifs, there a dash of bohemian glamour, all the while universally spiritual symbols abound (crosses, stars, eyes, hands etc) and each piece becomes a talisman in the end. “We put a lot of thought and love into every piece. Many of our back grills have Mandalas, which will be familiar to anyone who knows them. To others it may just be a beautiful looking flower. We always try to input a little spirituality into every design, even if it is as small as the engraving on the side of a shank, or a back grill or the main focus of the piece; each design ultimately has a deeper meaning behind it,” Nancy Badia, the founder of Buddha Mama, explains. It all started (naturally) as a goodwill gesture. A busy mother of three (she is Buddha Mama), Nancy was looking for a way to raise funds for her local Buddhist center, Zen Village, and so she began selling bracelets in order to contribute her profits from their sale. “Buddha Mama began for the purpose of giving back. I started stringing beads in my kitchen to help raise funds for my local Buddhist center. Soon after, I had friends asking me to design custom pieces and it sort of took off from there. To this day we still donate monthly to Kristi House in Miami and Tibet House in New York”, Nancy shares.

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Buddha Mama was launched almost immediately after her youngest daughter left for college. With all her children having flown the nest, she then had the attention and time for an enterprise such as launching a costly business in a highly competitive and rather saturated market. Of course, Nancy had been a jewellery aficionado for a long time but looking after her family was a priority and it was just a question of postponing her vocation for when the time was right. “I have always had a love for jewellery. Growing up I was given family heirlooms and began collecting to create my own charm bracelet; I still own this piece and it actually has inspired a few current designs”, Nancy says. “What I love about jewellery design is the endless stream of possibilities it offers. From designs, to stones, to finishes, there are so many beautiful things that can be done. I love the creative side of it - finding new stones and putting funky colours together.” While geometrical patterns contribute angular lines, the placement of cabochons or beads from soft hued gemstones such as moonstones or chalcedony adds a tender counterbalance. Likewise the use of lace-like gold filigree, plus the intentional curving of the branches of stars for instance, supplements the overall delicacy of the pieces, which exude joyful femininity. Enamel is also a favourite and being a staple of Indian jewellery-making, Buddha Mama is able to inject some modernity in its application. “Coupled with 20-carat gold, enamel can achieve amazing colour combinations”, Nancy says. The same way Buddhism has layer upon layer of teachings and nuances, Buddha Mama jewels contain lots of details: “we are big on having every aspect of a piece filled with little cues. Even when a necklace naturally turns on a chain, the back has cut-out flowers or symbols. We like every design to be complete and intricate.” And as any mother would do, each of her creations is entrusted with an identity so that they are all remembered and cherished on their own. To date this year, Buddha Mama has brought to life 140 renditions; and it’s clearly an ever-growing family. Looking at the portrait of Buddha Mama’s head team - Dakota Badia, Nancy Badia and Leyla Torre – one is in the company of some super cool individuals. Bare feet, arty tattoos, stacked bracelets and pendants, the girls preach what they design and beyond. A portion of their profit goes to the two charities cited earlier, also known as putting your money where your mouth is. “We are fortunate enough to be able to donate consistently to two charities that are near and dear to our hearts. We truly believe that one can combine spirituality and generosity in a successful business. We attribute a great deal of our success to our commitment to maintaining a generosity of spirit; when


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Left to right : 20k rose quartz necklace (289ct), set with diamonds (2.68ct). 20k pink opal (31ct) pendant set with diamonds(1,27ct) and sapphires (17.28ct) 20k small marquise white enamel lantern set with rubellite (5,24ct), diamonds (1.12ct) and green tourmaline (0.18ct) 20 rubellite (11,61ct) cross necklace, set with pavé and baguette diamonds (1,88ct) and pink sapphires (0.72 ct).

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Left to right : 20k chalcedony drapé necklace, set with diamonds and blue sapphire marquise flowers, all set on rolo chain.( 33.39ct Chalcedony 3.49ct Diamonds 3.17ct Blue Sapphires) / 20k chalcedony oval star ring, set with diamonds (19.72ct Chalcedony, 7.56ct Diamonds)/ 20k tanzanite stud earrings set with diamonds (3.41ct Tanzanite, 1.02 ct Diamond) / 20k chalcedony bead necklace, set with three pavé flower pink sapphire beads, pavé box clasp, pink knotting ( 1.36ct Diamonds, 1.35ct Pink Sapphires)

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people respond to our work that allows us to give back in a meaningful way and the cycle of generosity perpetuates itself”, Nancy observes. No wonder then that food and cooking are also Nancy’s passions, especially ‘creating a feast’ as she puts it. After all it proceeds from the same desire to share, nurture and show one’s love through time spent combining ingredients together. A trail of white diamonds underlines the eyelashes and golden hoops adorn her ears; she must be a divinity or a queen as an emerald and diamond-studded headdress crowns her peaceful face. Is she meditating or bestowing good wishes? The pendant rests on a chain made of pebble-shaped emerald beads and filigree golden spheres, while the fastening evokes a flower-patterned bow. The ‘Green Tara’ necklace is a serene piece with glamorous accents. Would you like a stylish keepsake to help you ward off evil forces? Opt for the ‘Evil Eye’ double ring and matching earrings. In the former, a faceted London blue topaz (the eye) is framed by baguette-cut green tourmalines. Little white diamonds pave the corners of the eye and run along the shanks, whilst the depth of the topaz colour is simply hypnotic. In case you prefer a more naturalistic design, covet the blissful pair of long floral earrings; the four main flowers are composed of African Paraiba tourmalines for the center and diamond paving for the round petals. It is the perfect item to lighten one’s mood. During pharaonic times, gemstones were believed to appease the gods’ wrath, and they were also carved according to the part of the body, which had been healed, and then offered to the god in gratitude. To this day, beliefs about what induces luck and inner peace influence our most secret thoughts, so Buddha Mama’s precious heirlooms that come with a compassionate aura feel all the more essential. www.buddhamama.com

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20k rock crystal peace sign pendant, set with enamel and diamonds (1.50ct Diamonds, 94ct Rock Crystal)

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20k matte finish oval moonstone ring, set with blue sapphires and diamonds (30ct Moonstone 2.67ct Diamonds, 1.93ct Blue Sapphire)

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20k rock crystal lotus pendant, set with diamonds (1.84ct Diamonds, 42ct Rock Crystal)

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20k green tara pendant, set on tumbled emeralds, nine brown diamond pavé strip beads, diamond flower dome clasp and 20k chain. Gold wire in btw. (195.68ct Emeralds, 14.38ct Diamonds )

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20k grey moonstone oval ring, set with blue sapphires, grey and white sapphires. ( 35ct Grey Moonstone, 2.04ct Blue Sapphires, 1.93ct White Sapphires, 1.50ct Grey Sapphires)

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20k African paraiba flower drop earrings, set with diamonds (4.69ct Diamonds, 36.24ctct Paraiba)

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Left to right : 20k grey moonstone enamel studs, set with diamonds (31ct Grey Moonstone, 0.095ct Diamonds) / 20k rock crystal mandala pendant, set with enamel and diamonds (2.74ct Diamonds, 49ct Rock Crystal) / 20k moonstone skull and cross pendant, set with enamel and diamonds (48.65ct Moonstone, 0.59ct Diamonds) / 20k white enamel cross ring, set with grey moonstone and diamonds ( 26ct Moonstone, 0.78ct Diamonds )

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20k rock crystal mandala pendant, set with enamel and diamonds (2.74ct Diamonds, 49ct Rock Crystal)

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Left to right : 20k big mandala ring set with with diamonds (6.59ct) / 20k flower huggie earrings, set with diamonds (1.61.ct)

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THE POET OF DESIGN by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

Frédéric Mané Close to the Louvre and the Place Vendome, in the heart of Paris, in the mansion of the Duke of Villeroy, childhood friend of Louis XIV, is the creative studio of designer Frédéric Mané. Frédéric Mané is not just a designer, but a real poet, who like Ronsard who frequented this historical place creates a poetic universe for us all. 61


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Frédéric Mané is not just a designer, but a true poet, who like Ronsard who frequented this historical place and as one of the most talented designers of his generation creates a poetic universe of perfection.

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Close to the Louvre and the Place Vendome, in the heart of Paris, in the mansion of the Duke of Villeroy, childhood friend of Louis XIV, is the creative studio of designer Frédéric Mané. Frédéric Mané is not just a designer, but a poet, who like Ronsard who frequented this historical place. One of the most talented designers of his generation, he celebrates the bithday of his studio and the Jewellery Historian is proud to introduce you to his poetic universe. This historical place frequented by the poet Ronsard and Catherine de Medici, is steeped in an atmosphere conducive to the imagination, and its the perfect location for this design studio dedicated to the creation of luxury goods, perfume bottles, custom made jewels and high-end jewelry. A rich creative universe that incorporates all styles and inspirations, the studio is where design is transformed into concept, starting with hand drawn sketches. The studio offers its expertise both in the knowledge of rare stones and in innovative materials. It proposes the best traditional practices paired with new technology in order to create collections and exceptional pieces. From the creation of their collections to their fabrication, a spirit of collaboration assures that the specificities each design house, each marketing team and each artistic director are respected. Frédéric Mané is a consultant designer with over 14 years of experience. He collaborates with luxury groups and maintains a deep relationship with Parisian jewelers and international signature brands with a strong and broad experience in design - particularly in jewelry and the design of precious objects and accessories Frédéric Mané collaborates with signature brands and luxury workshops at Vendôme, allowing him to follow the design process - from the technical, conceptual, and creative process to the fabrication - and all its subtleties and technicalities. He exhibits his collections around the world - particularly in the the Emirates and in Asia - where he promotes the brands he works for while meeting clients and collectors for whom he creates unique custom-made pieces using a rich palette of colours and styles. Frédéric Mané was born in Perpignan in the south of France in 1982. He spent his childhood near Collioure and Cadaquès, cities known for famous the painters such as Dali and Matisse .His sources of inspiration are the Fine Arts, the famous muses of history, and antique legends, but what influences his creations the most is the observation of nature in motion.For exemple dewdrop on leaves, the beating of a dragonfly’s wings, the sudden blooming of a flower, or the flight of a bird.The final drawings translate these poetic moments into pure lines and synthetize theses movements of life into a fresh palette of colours. Every collection is designed with passion and precision and narrates a romantic story, using symbolism with a contemporary style. www.fredericmane.com

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Hj Haute joaillerie

by Olivier Dupon

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ALMA KARIMA Modus Operandi

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H AU T E J OA I L L E R I E by Olivier Dupon

ALMA KARINA Modus Operandi

Meet Tom and Karina, a.k.a Alma Karina, the Paris-based duo that offers the full package - styling, art direction and photography – with a twist: no photograph is a montage (in other words, the jewels are not superimposed on a pre-photographed background). Their work is exceptional and we are proud to meet them. 85


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Their work has a lot to do with an old masters approach, with its emphasis on creating gorgeous, sometimes chiaroscuro still lifes. Props are indeed often, but not always, based on organic materials (a lot of flora).

There is no shortage of jewellery imagery in this day and age. Let’s start with social media: Instagram is arguably the most favoured app for jewellery lovers to daily post their images and videos (I am one such). Ironically, this means that exceptional pieces, which should inherently be confidential, and whose narrative – in terms of inspiration and craftsmanship – warrants some education, appear in an instant with just a hashtagged brief description…until another jaw-dropping piece replaces it shortly after. It feels like watching a conveyor belt of things that should not be so readily available for visual consumption. On the other hand, this is undoubtedly an efficient way for emerging brands to get noticed and established names to advance their exposure. One area where it seems high jewellery is at least visually celebrated in a bespoke setting is in magazines. There, the intent is to calibrate editorials so they match the high-end dimension of high jewellery. Inevitably, there is still a degree of hit and miss, especially when a photograph is actually a Photoshop montage (sadly not only models and cover girls get to be highly retouched); so it is quite refreshing to encounter a fast emerging photography agency that has taken the world of high jewellery by storm with their ‘purist’ touch. Meet Tom and Karina, a.k.a Alma Karina, the Paris-based duo that offers the full package - styling, art direction and photography – with a twist: no photograph is a montage (in other words, the jewels are not superimposed on a pre-photographed background). This simply means that what you see on paper reflects reality. The advantages of this modus operandi are many; not least that one can understand the actual dimension of a piece of jewellery. Naturally this would not suffice if a talent for artistry were lacking; and this is where Alma Karina comes up trumps. The duo’s flair for beautiful images is sensational, with their sense of aesthetics all the more beguiling when a jewel is associated with a lowbrow or mundane prop.

(previous page) Shot for Quality magazine.

CHAUMET Necklace from Chaumet Hortensia collection in pink gold, rubies, pink sapphires, rhodolite garnets, red tourmalines, pink tourmalines. (right)Shot for Quality magazine.

CHAUMET Bracelet « Hortensia », Oval-cut and baguette-cut diamonds
 , Lapis lazuli
 -Cabochon-cut and brilliant-cut  sapphires Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

Their work has a lot to do with an old masters approach, with its emphasis on creating gorgeous, sometimes chiaroscuro still lifes. Props are indeed often, but not always, based on organic materials (a lot of flora). Although the duo duly adapts its creativity to each uniquely different brand so that the art direction can be at times modern, eerie, sleek or intriguing, yet there is one constant: a pervading sense of oneirism. And this is their tour de force. In the editorial world, photographing jewellery is a challenging task, e.g. how to feature the intricacies of construction, while igniting the radiance of the gemstones. So when a photographer excels at this technical aspect of things (check), and the art director shines at orchestrating imaginative settings (check), they end up creating magic.

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DE GRISOGONO Ring in white gold, white diamonds, brown diamonds and aquamarines. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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« Paon Decor » Van Cleef and Arpels necklace. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Shot for Quality magazine. VAN CLEEF AND ARPELS « Clelia » necklace, white gold and diamonds. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Shot for HAUTE TIME MAGAZINE. CARTIER « Crash Skeleton » Watch in white gold and diamonds. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Let’s find out exactly how. I sat down with Tom and Karina, two lovely individuals, as much charming and friendly as their work is superb. Olivier Dupon – First of all, could you briefly tell us about your respective career paths? Alma Karina - We are both self-taught, and what led us to photographing high jewellery and still life was just a natural progression. We also did a bit of fashion photography before committing to high jewellery. Fashion is not an industry that we particularly enjoyed as it is quite ephemeral and shallow. OD – When did you launch Alma Karina, and where does the name come from? AK - Alma Karina was launched about five years ago. We did not put too much thought into the name of the business since we did not anticipate it become so successful. The name refers just to Karina’s first name and her city of birth, AlmaAta in Kazakhstan. OD – I have noticed that you do not wear any jewellery. So why have you chosen to concentrate on this subject for your photography? AK - Not just accessories, high jewels are as much art pieces as a painting or a sculpture. The value and significance of a high jewellery piece increases with time, and this is an attribute that appeals to us. These are true collector’s objects, sometimes even for museums, due to their back-story and superlative craftsmanship. OD – What are the advantages in having both a male and female flair within your working duo?

“We are both self-taught, and what led us to photographing high jewellery and still life was just a natural progression.”

AK - Our duo combines technique with sensitivity. As a result, we are very complementary in our approach to photography and art direction. OD – Carte Blanche: is this a rare occurrence? AK - We often get carte blanche from our regular clients, once they trust us following a successful first commission. That said we almost always have total freedom when it comes to choosing the concept and the art direction. Often we start with a theme or a key word, and then we adapt it to suit each client’s identity and idiom. OD – What are the specific challenges when it comes to photographing high jewellery? AK - Jewels are notoriously difficult to photograph since one has to showcase the knowhow and craftsmanship behind each piece, as well as expose the gemstones’ brilliance and colours. This is the reason why, when it comes to highly complex creations, we sometimes choose to focus on one part of a piece. As it is too difficult to encompass the whole complexity in one shot, we focus on particular details instead. OD – What should emanate the most from your photos? AK - Harmony between the jewel and the decor. It is crucial that one does not overshadow the other. OD – How do you manage the balance of background / props and décor so as to avoid overshadowing the jewels? AK - It is not an exact science. It depends on so many different factors, and above all on experience. There is no rule really, as long as there is harmony between the proportions and scale, as long as the angles are correct.

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Natural pearl and emerald necklace shot for AL FARDAN JEWELLERY. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Shot for SCHON magazine. Spille D brooches in white gold and diamonds, and in white gold, diamonds and sapphires. DAMIANI. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Shot for thefrenchjewelrypost.com by Sandrine Merle Majestic Necklace in platinum set of pear-shaped diamonds 68.12 cts. Chaumet. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency / Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Realism and reality (admittedly an embellished version) are vital to us since we never resort to Photoshop editing. We are also fond of staying true to proportions, and natural props help us achieve that.

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OD – Where does your inspiration come from? AK - Our sources of inspiration are diverse: art, movies, dreams and daily life. Once we grasp an idea, we do some research to develop and expand our approach. OD – Does your work instill a desire to buy or rather a desire to dream? AK – It has to be both, and this is precisely our challenge. That said, we tend to lean towards the artistic side over the commercial aspect. It is a matter of finding a satisfactory compromise between the two. OD – For your still lifes, why do you more often than not opt for naturalistic decors (flowers, feathers, insects, stones etc)? AK - Realism and reality (admittedly an embellished version) are vital to us since we never resort to Photoshop editing. We are also fond of staying true to proportions, and natural props help us achieve that. As the jewellery pieces are often relatively small, it is important for us to incorporate them in a setting of similar scale. Besides we are fascinated by what nature can offer us, which incidentally, is also a fundamental source of inspiration for jewellers. OD – The flair with which you embrace flowers and plants is comparable to that of the most talented contemporary floral artists out there. Where does your affinity with flora stem from? AK - We have always felt a close relationship to flora, so much so that we have always tried to include it in our work. In our portfolio of photographs, flowers and plants can be seen used in all their forms: fresh, damaged, withered, pinned, frozen in an ice block, arranged, singled out with just the stem or bud, deconstructed with the petals ripped and spread out. We revel in this variety, the beauty of the textures and colours. No object can really replicate nature’s beauty. OD – Which project exhilarated you the most? AK - Each and every one of the projects we have worked on has excited us. Of course, it is also true that we make sure we only accept commissions we are interested in. No matter if it is a prestigious or niche magazine, a famous brand or lesser known designer, we fully commit to the task with all our abilities and creativity. We do not close doors, we do not discriminate. OD – Can you tell us about a nightmare scenario that has happened? AK - It was a photo shoot with model for an Italian magazine. It took place in a restaurant we had taken over for the occasion. The model we booked never showed up, so by the time the agency could find us a replacement, we had just two hours to complete the shoot. Thankfully we are quite efficient under pressure, so in the end, the outcome was good. But gosh, what a stressful day! This is also why we prefer to work on still life! OD – What would be a dream photo shoot? AK - It would have to be a still life shoot in an exceptional location: a museum or a magnificent castle; unless in a natural environment such as a lush forest, a desert or a flower meadow.

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Shot for HAUTE LIVING MAGAZINE.

Necklace in white gold, with 1 pear-cut blue sapphire (14.37 Ct), 1537 white diamonds (98.25 Ct), 1026 blue sapphires (97.66 Ct). DE GRISOGONO.

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Shot for HAUTE LIVING MAGAZINE. My Dior » earrings in white gold and diamonds DIOR FINE JEWELLERY. Camélia Ruban » earrings, 18k white, gold, black and white diamonds, CHANEL FINE JEWELRY. Contraste de Camélia » brooch, 18k white gold, white coral, onyx, grey sapphires, diamonds CHANEL FINE JEWELRY.

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Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency


We ignore what others do, and focus on our own approach. We also do not follow any rules, technical or artistic. We work hard, we practice, we are always 100% committed and we never rest on our laurels.

OD – How do you stay a step ahead of your competition? AK - It is simple: we ignore what others do, and focus on our own approach. We also do not follow any rules, technical or artistic. We work hard, we practice, we are always 100% committed and we never rest on our laurels. OD – Do you ever fall in love with some of the high jewellery you work with? AK - Yes, it actually happens quite often. We do not just photograph the jewels; we also take an interest in them. Indeed, we attend the presentations, learn about the collections and the inspiration behind them, and research the history of each house. On reflection, our favourite photographs, the ones that remain favourites with time, are always of jewels we have also fallen in love with. OD – How can a beautiful shot be as impactful as a compliment full of praise? AK - As humans we are deeply ‘visual’ in the sense that an emotion can be triggered at first sight. There is certainly a mythical dimension in seeking to create and communicate visual harmony. Each communication has its own attributes and value, yet a photograph, like the high jewels themselves, is immutable and timeless. www.almakarina.com

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Shot for HAUTE LIVING MAGAZINE. Butterfly ring from the Animal World collection, in rose gold, fancy colored diamonds, pink diamonds, yellow diamonds, white diamonds, brown diamonds. CHOPARD. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency / Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Shot for L’OFFICIEL INDONESIA magazine. Spille D brooches in white gold and diamonds, and in white gold, diamonds and sapphires. DAMIANI. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency / Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Shot for L’OFFICIEL INDONESIA magazine. CHAUMET and DIOR JOAILLERIE rings. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Shot for SCHON magazine. « MIMOSA » Ring in white gold, diamonds, multi-color sapphires DAMIANI. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Shot for Hong Kong Tatler Weddings magazine. Necklace Ricochet in white gold, with rock crystal and diamonds. BOUCHERON. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency / Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Shot for Hong Kong Tatler Weddings magazine. "Bar en Corolle" ring in white gold and diamonds. DIOR JOAILLERIE. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency / Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Photo courtesy of AlmaKarina Agency © AlmaKarina Agency

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Shot for HAUTE LIVING MAGAZINE. PIAGET necklace from Rose Exotic collection in white gold, diamonds, orange garnet, blue sapphires, yellow sapphires, aquamarines, green tourmalines, rubellites. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency / Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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ALEXANDRE REZA shot for HAUTE LIVING MAGAZINE Spirales earrings in white gold and brilliant-cut diamonds. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency / Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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Shot for thefrenchjewelrypost.com by Sandrine Merle Cuff bracelet, white and pink engraved gold and diamonds. Buccellati. Photographer : Tom Claisse @AlmaKarina Agency Art Director : Karina Rikun @AlmaKarina Agency

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B R E AT H TA K I N G B E AU T Y O F G E M S

CORAL by Eva Kountouraki

Used since prehistoric times as an ornament in the most important images of religious significance, Coral, has a lengthy history that spreads from the Romans to the Tibetans, the Chinese, the Hindus, the ancient Greeks, until today that it is still one of the most popular organic gems.

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Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

Jewellery Historian

Sotheby’s New York, Magnificent Jewels, 09 December 2015 Lot 412 Property of Another Lady 18 Karat Gold, Platinum, Coral and Diamond ' Drapé' Bracelet, Schlumberger for Tiffany & Co., France

Composed of links set with coral segments, the spacers set with round diamonds weighing approximately 6.75 carats, with seven coral beads suspended from a gold chain, gross weight approximately 48 dwts, internal circumference 6¾ inches, signed Tiffany Schlumberger, Made in France; circa 1968. With signed and fitted box. Est. $20,000 - 30,000, Sold for: $65,000

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Coral, in fact, has a lengthy history that spreads from the Romans to the Tibetans, the Chinese, the Hindus, the ancient Greeks, until today that it is still one of the most popular organic gems, found in all market segments.

| BREATHTAKING BEAUTY OF GEMS Semi-god Perseus, the unexpected son of beautiful Danae and Zeus, after having survived an adventurous trip in the Aegean Sea locked inside a wooden chest with his mother, cast out in the coast of the island of Seriphos where their chest was found by the local fishermen and taken to the king’s palace. Polydectes, one of the kings of the island, fell in love with Danae, who however had no interest in him, and wanted to get rid of her son. To this end, he sent Perseus to fulfill what seemed to be an impossible task, that is, to decapitate the Gorgon Medusa and bring back her head. With a bronze shield donated to him by goddess Athena and a sword offered by Hermes, Perseus managed to avoid Medusa’s terrible gaze that would instantly turn him into stone and beheaded her. On his way back to the island, he stopped to wash his hands and laid the head on some seaweed on the shore. Blood drops seeped onto the seaweed, turning them hard and red, and was transformed into coral. This precious material was then taken by the ocean nymphs and spread through the seas.. Coral has been used as a jewel since prehistoric times. It was used as an ornament in the most important images of religious significance, while inlays, statues carved out of coral and other adornments have been found in tombs from the Iron Age. Coral, in fact, has a lengthy history that spreads from the Romans to the Tibetans, the Chinese, the Hindus, the ancient Greeks, until today that it is still one of the most popular organic gems, found in all market segments. Coral is actually the skeletal remains of tiny marine animals, the coral polyps, which build colonies by filtering the sea water and using the calcium carbonate. With this, they form their exoskeleton and live protected within. So the material we use is actually the calcareous branch-like framework created by the accretion of the coral polyps, and although its appearance may resemble a plant, it is nothing like it. This procedure of filtration and deposition for the formation of the coral skeletons is very delicate and specific conditions are necessary. The temperature and salinity of the water must be within particular levels that are present and stable only in limited areas of the planet. The water has to be calm, clean and not polluted, free from any mud particles suspended in it. Water pollution will kill the polyps, which is the sad reality in many areas of our planet. Traditionally, the finest coral comes from the Mediterranean Sea, and is cut and polished in laboratories in south Italy, where master craftsmen, the “corallai” shape the precious material in jewels or decorative objects. Unfortunately, careless overfishing has extensively damaged the coral beds of the Mediterranean where the precious corals are now almost extinct. Other sources of coral include Japan, the Philippines, Australia and Hawaii. Coral’s colours include white, black, and various shades of pink, red, orange, brown, purple, light grayish violet, golden and

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Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

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Sotheby’s New York, Fine Jewels, 10 June 2016 Lot 111

From The Collection Of Mamdouha And Elmer Holmes Bobst 18 Karat Gold, Coral and Diamond Ring and Earclips, Van Cleef & Arpels, France

The ring and earclips composed of orange and white coral, accented by round diamonds, the earclips signed VCA, Made in France, numbered 45737, the ring size 4, signed VCA, numbered NY 45736, with French workshop and export marks. Est. $8/10,000, Sold for: $22,500

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The most desired colour is an intense and evenly distributed red, referred to as oxblood in English or “rosso scuro”, “carbonetto” or “arciscuro” in Italian.

| BREATHTAKING BEAUTY OF GEMS rarely blue (which loses its hue to a white colour when taken out of the water). The most desired colour is an intense and evenly distributed red, referred to as oxblood in English or “rosso scuro”, “carbonetto” or “arciscuro” in Italian. Because Italy is probably the most important coral trade center of the world, many of the trade terms that describe coral colour are used in Italian. Generally, the more intense the colour, the higher the value of the coral. Second in trade value to the strong red, is the so-called “pelle d’angelo” that translates as angel’s skin, which is the trade term for pink coral. Black and golden corals are composed mostly of protein rather than calcium carbonate, and are generally found in Australia, Tasmania, and Hawaii. Just like the Mediterranean coals, these too are at risk of extinction due to pollution and overharvesting, so both are protected as endangered species. The gorgon Medusa was one extremely beautiful and kind woman serving goddess Athena. Poseidon, blinded by her beauty, took advantage of her inside the goddess’s temple, fact that raged Athena who, unable to punish Poseidon, she turned Medusa in a horrible monster which no one could ever look at without dying an atrocious death. With her beheading, Medusa offered humanity the coral reefs which protect us from the rage of the sea and also provide us with a beautiful material to adorn our world with. We, reckless humans, by overharvesting and by using destructive fishing methods, exterminate the corals from our oceans leaving our land and ourselves exposed to the merciless forces of nature. Like Athena who penalized Medusa for eternity, we “punish” nature depriving it of its beauty, without realizing the harm that we cause. Coral, this ancient organic material, for centuries used as a religious talisman, symbolizes life offered through death, in a lingering circle of treason, female sacrifice, tremendous force and beauty; all in the form of a material that is coarse to touch, delightful to look at, and soft to carve only by hands of who can truly respect it.

At the Jewellery Historian we would like to express our sincere gratitude and appreciation to SOTHEBY’S for the precious support and for the exceptional jewellery illustrating this article.

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Photo courtesy of SOTHEBY’S © SOTHEBY’S

Photo in PUBLIC DOMAIN

Jewellery Historian

Sotheby’s New York, Fine Jewels, 10 June 2016 Lot 298 Property Of A Private Collector Platinum, 18 Karat Gold, Coral, Seed Pearl, Diamond and Emerald Bracelet

The multi-strand design composed of coral beads and seed pearls, the clasp designed as a lion's head set with round near colorless diamonds, accented by round diamonds of yellow hue, completed by two emerald eyes, length 8 inches, the bracelet signed VCA, numbered NY 40886, the clasp signed Trio. Est. $8/10,000, Sold for: $37,500

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H AU T E J OA I L L E R I E by Olivier Dupon

DAMIANI The exclusive co-operation between Damiani and Nicoletta Romanov was the start of an extraordinary project where history and the goldsmith’s art meet. The partnership between the Maison and actress, a descendant of the Russian Imperial family, led to the creation of a collection of jewels that evoke the majesty of the legendary dynasty of the Tsars and unite tradition and ‘Made in Italy’ excellence with perfect mastery. Unique jewelry to relive the magic and splendour of an era with innate elegance. 125


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Nicoletta Romanoff wearing Tiara Fiori d arancio

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In Italy, orange blossom flowers are a favourite for bridal bouquets and head wreaths at weddings. In nature, it takes the right temperature and a good supply of water for an orange tree to bloom, which is why it is considered so highly as an auspicious symbol. Only when, and if, the right conditions are met can one enjoy the sight of delicate white flowers and their addictive fragrance. In 1952 Nicolas Romanov, descendant of the Tsars, married Countess Sveva della Gherardesca, successor of the old Tuscan house of Longobard. On the day and loyal to the tradition, the Countess wore a tiara made up of tiny wax orange flowers, which adorned her head like a precious bouquet. Sixty-four years later, Princess Nicoletta Romanov, granddaughter of Countess Sveva, has teamed up with Italian jeweller Damiani to pay homage to her prestigious heritage and in one spectacular piece of jewellery to the grand wedding day itself. The ‘Masterpiece tiara Sveva’ as it is called, is an astonishing creation and testament to the unmatched expertise of the Valenza goldsmiths. Directly inspired by the headpiece worn by the Countess on her wedding day, Damiani spent weeks of research and more than six months of production to transform a sophisticated ornament into a masterpiece of fine jewellery. Almost 500 grams of gold in a sophisticated pale pink colour and more than 4,500 conflict-free diamonds selected for clarity and combined by size with 83 white Japanese pearls were used in its creation. The first rendition will join the Damiani’s museum and only one replication will be produced if a buyer is interested. A simpler version (not as wide and without the curled ends) has also been created in a limited edition of 10 (9 will be for sale whilst the initial one will go to the museum).

less keepsake. The pièces de résistance are the ‘Fiocco White Gold and Diamonds Masterpieces’: a neckpiece where a diamond-paved bow hangs from a cluster of white gold and diamond chains, along with a double finger ring and a pair of earrings. A scintillating love affair to say the least. It is worth saying that classicism has never been so desirable, while Princess Nicoletta is the rightful collaborator to model such enchanting creations. These new collections were presented in the newly opened Damiani’s boutique on 19 Place Vendôme. As if to enhance the personal experience, one feels a sense of being welcomed to a private home, with the shop’s entrance on the side, rather than straight out onto the famous plaza. It is delightfully discreet as one is first ushered through a large space between two glass door, a respite between two worlds (the busy outside and the peaceful elegant interiors). Once inside, curves grace most aspects (the glass cabinets, the staircase and floor plans) whilst one is embraced by the muted stone hues that adorn all the surfaces. With a simple swipe of an access card, the windows gently lift or turn to reveal the display. As everything else in Damiani’s Parisian flagship store, the mood is serene, soothing and supremely elegant.

This stunning creation is part of the Fiori D’Arancio Collection, which comprises several further pieces including a transformable necklace in white gold set with diamonds (again a floral trail that wraps around the neck), and a gorgeous cuff also in white gold with diamonds and white Japanese pearls. In this collection, some of the jewels come in yellow gold as well. Paying further tribute to royal iconography comes the Fiocco Collection, which elevates a universal symbol of love, the bow, to a new level of appeal. Perfectly mimicking the way a ribbon would fold and gently drape, the opposite rims of each bow are gracefully paved with small white diamonds. The Damiani bow comes in both pink and white gold and the stylish simplicity of the design delivers a time-

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Full pavé ring in 18K white gold set with diamonds, Fiocco Collection.

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Ring in 18K white gold set with diamonds, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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Detail shot of Transformable necklace in 18K white gold set with diamonds, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.


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Detachable brooch (from transformable necklace) in 18K white gold set with diamonds, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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Nicoletta Romanoff wearing Fiori d arancio

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Group shot of rings in 18K white and pink gold set with diamonds with Japanese pearls, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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Nicoletta Romanoff wearing Fiocco masterpiece

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Multi-strand chain necklace in 18K white gold set with diamonds, Fiocco Collection.

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Bracelet in 18K pink gold set with diamonds, satin strap, Fiocco Collection.

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Earrings in 18K pink gold set with diamonds, Fiocco Collection.

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Cuff in 18K white gold set with diamonds with Japanese pearls, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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Necklace in 18K pink gold set with diamonds, Fiocco Collection.

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Ring in 18K pink gold set with diamonds, Fiocco Collection

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Long earrings in 18K white gold set with diamonds, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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Transformable necklace in 18K white gold set with diamonds, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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‘Sveva’ Tiara in 18K pink gold set with diamonds with Japanese pearls, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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Earrings in 18K white gold set with diamonds, Fiocco Collection.

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Double finger ring in 18K white gold set with diamonds, Fiocco Collection.

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Long earrings in 18K pink gold set with diamonds with Japanese pearls, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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Ring in 18K pink gold set with diamonds with Japanese pearls, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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Bracelet in 18K white gold set with diamonds, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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Stud earrings in 18K white gold set with diamonds with Japanese pearls, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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Bracelet in 18K white gold set with diamonds with Japanese pearls, Fiori d’Arancio Collection.

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T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y by Olivier Dupon

SICIS Do you know that an “Eternal Painting� is or looks like ? The name refers to the enduring quality of the colours and the ability of a technique to replicate a pattern, design or motif. However, no brush or paint is involved, only miniature rods of gold and Venetian enamel.

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Do you know what an ‘Eternal Painting’ is or looks like?

There is breathtaking expertise behind SICIS jewellery, a project started in 2011, after many years of research, and first unveiled at Baselworld 2012 with a first collection of jewellery designs.

The name refers to the enduring quality of the colours and the ability of a technique to replicate any pattern, design or motif, no matter how intricate. However, no brush or paints are involved, instead miniature rods of gold and Venetian enamel which are obtained by melting nine base colours create an infinite palette of shades. This is what SICIS’ master mosaicists in Ravenna, Italy, use to create artful jewellery. Through their artistry and master craftsmanship they weave and set the tiny tesserae entirely by hand. There is breathtaking expertise behind SICIS jewellery, a project started in 2011, after many years of research, and first unveiled at Baselworld 2012 with a first collection of jewellery designs. “We can bring images to life with a thousand hues and three-dimensionality that only the venerable art of micro- and nano-mosaic can produce; it is a technique that guarantees imperishable constructions”, the SICIS team explains. Moreover, there is no question of any colour being more difficult to achieve than another: “the only limit is the imagination of our artists”, they say. It took quite a lot of trial and error to adapt this heritage technique (mosaic art for domestic and commercial use) to wearable art. The scale (a body versus a large surface), the aesthetics (jewellery must be desirable) and the recipients (women’s fashion sense) were all new and important to grasp. The place where one can seize the whole spectrum of SICIS’s playing field is their new London showroom on Dover Street. There, over several floors, one is truly transported into their world: living rooms are luxuriously styled with mosaic products (lamps, mirrors, table tops, etc), furniture pieces and mosaic-inspired textiles from their range, walls and ceilings are adorned with magnificent patterns, while horlogerie and jewellery are displayed side by side on the ground floor. As in traditional jewellery making, the first steps are the design concept and its rendition into sketches. “We then create the mosaic container that can be made with precious metals or other materials such as mother of pearl, for example. Lastly, the mosaic is created and placed just before the final assembly”, the SICIS team observes. “In order to create all the different shapes and colours of tesserae the mosaic master often works very long hours as every combination requires repeatedly melting different mixtures of glass.” Throughout this intricate process every piece is truly unique. The mosaic master when replicating a pattern can never place every single tessera in exactly the same shape, size and position. “In addition, you have to consider the human element of moods and emotions, which are of course reflected in their work”, they add. This means that for the ‘limited edition’ series, the design basis is identical but each rendition will have individual variations. Furthermore, most of the time the SICIS micromosaic masters do not have an exact plan of all the tesserae beforehand. “They have an idea of the pattern, colours and shades the designer wants to achieve but the actual decision on each tessera is up to the masters. This is why every single piece is unique”, the team shares.

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‘Red Carpet Earrings’ in 18K white gold with micro-mosaic, diamonds and rubies.

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‘Koi Necklace’ in 18K white gold with micro-mosaic, white diamonds, orange sapphires, deep blue aquamarines, and mother-of-pearl.

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What is the rapport between the gemstones and the mosaic work? How do they marry? Is there precedence of one over the other? “The gemstones help the customer appreciate the mosaic. Most of the time looking for a jewellery piece means looking for something sparkly and eye-catching.

The difference between micro- and nano-mosaics resides in the size of the tesserae, with micro- being slightly bigger. Besides all the sizes can have various tile shapes (round, teardrop, rectangular, jacketed and marquise). The two types are not used exclusively: generally a combination of different sizes and shapes is applied to almost all the jewels and accessories. SICIS has indeed been making full use of where the technique can be applied: eyewear, watches, cuff links…the lifestyle areas for micro-mosaic are endless. What is the rapport between the gemstones and the mosaic work? How do they marry? Is there precedence of one over the other? “The gemstones help the customer appreciate the mosaic. Most of the time looking for a jewellery piece means looking for something sparkly and eye-catching. At the same time the micro-mosaic allows us to realise patterns and colours otherwise impossible to achieve with just the gemstones”, the team notes. No better than in the ‘Bouquet’ ring can one see the communion of precious gems with mosaic. Here mosaic buds are interspaced with tiny diamond-paved flowers. The latter rise out of the mosaic surface, enhancing the lovely variegated pattern with their shapely perfection. One has just to glance at some of the SICIS jewellery creations to understand the depth of micro-mosaic’s reach. Take the ‘Arara Scarlet’ necklace inspired by one the most enchanting birds in the world, the Ara Macaw parrot. “In antiquity this animal used to be worshiped by Mayas as a symbol of strength and courage; unfortunately it is now endangered”, the SICIS team says. “The intense colour of its plumage, ranging from deep blue to green, from yellow to bright red, makes it unique and rare, and the perfect candidate for our workshop to pay homage to.” Amazingly, and testament to the mosaic technique, SICIS was able to reliably represent the bright colours of the parrot’s feathers, extolling every shade of the wings and tail with Nano-Mosaic. The piece is set in gold with more than 7-carats of diamonds and 10-carats of sapphires and rubies, in addition to beautiful inlays, and strands of carnelian beads. The ‘Koi’ necklace is another superb example, this time drawing from the Piscean world. A divine composition that combines a coral branch with a life-like carp on opposite ends, the ensemble ripples and rolls, sinuously flowing and almost seeming alive. The structure is in white gold set with micro-mosaic, 14.69- carats of white diamonds and 13.84-carats of orange sapphires. Punctuation with hints of vivid blue aquamarines perfects the tableau. Each new work seems to be more complex than the last, as the sources of inspiration keep expanding and reaching new heights. “We always strive to improve our pieces, but I would say that the “Quetzal” necklace (micro-mosaic, 18K gold, Titanium, diamonds and tanzanites) has been one of the most challenging creations we have done so far, because of the amount of colour needed to recreate the beautiful plumage of the bird and because of the shape of the necklace itself”, the SICIS team mentions. “However, keep an eye out for our work as we have many exciting works-in-progress that may surprise you!’ www.sicis.com

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‘Gardenia Black Pearl Flower Shaped Watch’ in yellow gold 18K and titanium with petals in micro-mosaic, sapphire glass, black and white diamonds, pearl strap, Swiss quartz movement, limited edition of 10 pieces.

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‘Cosmo Necklace’ in 18K gold with nano-mosaic, white diamonds, blue sapphires and cabochon-cut tanzanites.

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‘Arara Scarlet Pendant & Brooch’ in 18K white gold with nano-mosaic, black and white diamonds, orange and yellow sapphires, rubies, carnelian and onyx.

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‘Red Carpet Necklace’ in 18K white gold with micro-mosaic, diamonds and rubies.

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‘Bouquet Ring’ in 18K white gold with micro-mosaic, black & white diamonds, and pink sapphires.

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‘Fantasia Earrings’ in 18K white gold with micro-mosaic, diamonds, pink and yellow sapphires.

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‘Fantasia Necklace’ in 18K white gold with micro-mosaic, diamonds, pink and yellow sapphires.

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VAN CLEEF & ARPELS L’Arche de Noé racontée par Van Cleef & Arpels

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H AU T E J OA I L L E R I E by Olivier Dupon

Van Cleef & Arpels L’Arche de Noé racontée par Van Cleef & Arpels Van Cleef & Arpels’ new high Jewelry collection brings together the whole animal kingdom in a tribute to Noah’s ark. interpreted by artists over the centuries, this founding story has today inspired the maison to create some sixty animal couples in the form of clips. A fresh vision of Van Cleef & Arpels’ menagerie, in which creativity, poetry and savoir-faire are intertwined. 185


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Many years and a growing menagerie later, 2016 marks a new chapter in the saga with L’Arche de Noé racontée par Van Cleef & Arpels, wherein the animals may have lost in ‘cuteness’, but they have gained in dazzling refinement.

It is alleged that searches for Noah's Ark have been made from at least the time of Eusebius (c.275–339 CE) through to the present day, but always in vain. Clearly it is quite understandable since it is a story of epic proportions; however it says a lot about the power of beliefs, and the extent to which we are willing to turn a dream into reality. Recently Van Cleef & Arpels might just have done that with their precious rendition of Noah’s Ark. Among the sixty-three clip creations, there are no signs of Noah, his wife nor their three sons, as if only the most beautiful animalistic (and some) creatures on earth could board the Ark… Three clips indeed are phantasmagorical characters (the phoenix, the unicorn and Pegasus). The only ones to have a Traditional Mystery Setting, they preside rather regally over the large group of mammals and birds. American set designer, Robert Wilson, has created the dramatic scenography accompanying the jewels. On three sides of the square room, recessed glass windows were positioned at various heights on each LED-light wall. Directly opposite the entrance, at the far back was the small skeleton of the Ark suspended on clear strings. From this focal point, the viewer was fully immersed in the all-sensory experience offered by Wilson. Set on a loop, a sound and video segment transformed the space: starting with pitch black darkness, then a thundering crash, followed by light slowly returning, easing into a soothing melody while cerulean hues graced the LED screens, in the form of gently moving waves. Peace after the storm: Van Cleef & Arpels’ menagerie now shone in all their benevolent glory. The French high jeweller has a long tradition of clip making (the ballerina and fairy series being the most iconic), and notably a deep affection for the animal kingdom. As early as 1954 they launched ‘La Boutique’ collection of playful and charming animal clips. Intended as accessible day jewellery, they soon exceeded their accessory status to become adorable companions (e.g. ‘Chat malicieux’ – the mischievous Cat -, or ‘Lion ébouriffé’ - the dishevelled Lion). Many years and a growing menagerie later, 2016 marks a new chapter in the saga with L’Arche de Noé racontée par Van Cleef & Arpels, wherein the animals may have lost in ‘cuteness’, but they have gained in dazzling refinement.

(previous page) White gold, red gold, diamonds, marquise-cut emeralds, baguette-cut sapphires, turquoise, Traditional Mystery Set sapphires. (right) White gold, pink gold, red gold, round, baguette-cut and rose-cut diamonds, buff-topped marquise-cut violet sapphires, baguette-cut rubies, coral, Traditional Mystery Set rubies.

Couples (male and female, and in some instances mother and child) are either joined in an amorous embrace or separated yet communicating with each other. Some pairs act playfully (e.g. the geese, the rabbits, the monkeys, the raccoons), while some stand majestically (e.g. the lions, the peacocks, the giraffes, the toucans, the but-

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White gold, yellow gold, round and baguette-cut diamonds, onyx, cabochon-cut emeralds and sapphires.

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White gold, round and baguette-cut diamonds, emerald beads, lapis lazuli, turquoise, onyx.

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White gold, pink gold, round and pear-shaped diamonds, black spinels, spessartite garnet and pink tourmaline beads.

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White gold, yellow gold, round, baguette-cut and pear-shaped blue sapphires, violet sapphires, round and pear-shaped emeralds, mint garnets, Paraíba-like tourmalines, black spinels, cabochon-cut turquoise.

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White gold, pink gold, diamonds, coral, onyx.

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White gold, red gold, diamonds, marquise-cut emeralds, baguette-cut sapphires, turquoise, Traditional Mystery Set sapphires.

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White gold, pink gold, red gold, round, baguette-cut and rose-cut diamonds, buff-topped marquise-cut violet sapphires, baguette-cut rubies, coral, Traditional Mystery Set rubies

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White gold, round, baguette-cut, trapeze-cut and pear-shaped diamonds, cabochon-cut sapphires and emeralds, lapis lazuli, turquoise, malachite.

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White gold, pink gold, round, baguette-cut and rose-cut diamonds, pink and violet sapphires, faceted and buff-topped black spinels.

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White gold, diamonds, onyx, chrysoprase, sugilite.

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White gold, diamonds, buff-topped marquise-cut sapphires and emeralds, onyx.

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Yellow gold, pink gold, diamonds, yellow sapphires, spessartite garnets, buff-topped black spinels, red spinels, white cultured pearls.

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White gold, pink gold, diamonds, onyx, 36.26-carat cabochon-cut spessartite garnet, 12.70-carat cabochon-cut pink tourmaline.

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White gold, yellow gold, diamonds, blue and yellow sapphires, yellow and Paraíba-like tourmalines, orange and green garnets, black and red spinels, ebony.

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The list of precious gemstones coupled with prime materials (e.g. letterwood) that have been used is extensive. In a pair, both individuals are distinct, in terms of colour and/or pose, and the level of lifelike details enhances their authenticity.

terflies, the stag and its hind), yet they are all graceful and in every case, they point to enduring love. Of course, the best craftsmanship and most exquisite materials were used, but what is fascinating is how Van Cleef & Arpels have not stopped short at finding exactly the right components to render each animal’s features. As a result, the list of precious gemstones coupled with prime materials (e.g. letterwood) that have been used is extensive. In a pair, both individuals are distinct, in terms of colour and/or pose, and the level of lifelike details enhances their authenticity. Take the kangaroos portrayed jumping away; the couple shares the same ‘ingredients’ (yellow gold set with diamonds and cabochon-cut spinels – as in nature male and female have the same appearance) yet if one looks closely enough, one will spot the baby’s head poking out of the female’s stomach pouch, while the male surreptitiously glances at us. This is exactly the kind of preternatural magic Van Cleef & Arpels are famous for and expert at. After a moment in the Robert Wilsondesigned room, one’s only wish is to morph and join the sublime menagerie on-board the Ark. www.vancleefarpels.com

(Right) White gold, round and baguette-cut diamonds, emerald beads,
 lapis lazuli, turquoise, onyx.

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White gold, pink gold, red gold, round, rose-cut and obus-cut diamonds, buff-topped black spinels, golden mother-of-pearl, Traditional Mystery Set rubies.

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White gold, round, square and triangle, white and yellow diamonds, onyx, lapis lazuli.

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White gold, diamonds, buff-topped sapphires, lapis lazuli, malachite.

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Yellow gold, white gold, round and marquise-cut diamonds, round and oval yellow sapphires, round and oval spessartite garnets, onyx, letterwood.

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Yellow gold, diamonds, yellow sapphires and spessartite garnets, buff-topped black spinels, white motherof-pearl, 46.22-carat cabochon-cut white opal.

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Pink gold, white gold, round,square and baguette-cut diamonds, round, square, marquise-cut and baguette-cut colored sapphires, round, marquise-cut and baguette-cut black spinels.

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Yellow gold, diamonds, cabochon-cut black spinels.

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White gold, diamonds, onyx, chrysoprase, sugilite.

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T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y by Olivier Dupon

Caratell Being spellbound by the sheer volume of creations, each one more phenomenal than the next is indeed one of the primary reactions to Caratell’s jewellery. Olivier Dupon meets for the Jewellery Historian the maestro designer himself, Mr Michael Koh.

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Tourmaline / diamonds / tsavorite / 18k white and black gold

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When you are introduced to Caratell jewellery for the first time, your head may spin. You may find yourself torn between the pull to momentarily immerse yourself in whichever enchantment is presented before you, and the urgent desire to devour with your eyes as many pieces as possible. Being spellbound by the sheer volume of creations, each one more phenomenal than the next is indeed one of the primary reactions to Caratell’s jewellery. The maestro designer himself, Mr Michael Koh, has such an outpouring of creativity that “…after two decades in the jewellery industry, I have created many timeless pieces, however, I honestly only vaguely remember all of them. My wish would be to arrange a “reunion” of all the creations ever sold over the years, a kind of consolidated single exhibition,” he explains. Picture that! A place where one could fully absorb the creative whirlwind that is Caratell, for each encounter with a Caratell piece is like stepping into the artful court of a sumptuous wonderland. Rare, natural and very occasionally treated gemstones abound in a wide range of seductive shades, forming part of a dazzling array of bold yet ultra feminine designs, as part of two to three collections a year as well as plentiful standalone pieces. “I am a true believer in natural beauty, therefore I try not to use gems that have undergone treatment or that are synthetic. Although it is difficult at times to find untreated gems such as emeralds, I always make sure they are ones with minor oil”, the designer adds . Each of the pieces reveals layers of intricate details: the goldsmith’s ingenuity embracing the radiance of the gems; the apparent fragility of sculptural silhouettes becoming pure delicacy. Whatever Michael Koh’s imagination grasps, it becomes a piece of art, and with sources of inspiration so manifold the variety of themes in his output is impressive. From baroque symbols (e.g. angels), via architectural motifs to a riveting homage to flora, each creation is a journey. There is such a generosity in the amount of detail for such a small scale - a jewel - that it has a lot in common with the most ravishing embroidery work or miniature painting. See the ‘Lotus Flower’ ring from the Garden collection, an enthralling bouquet of four flowers towering over a carp, an immediate invitation for our mind to wander around a inviting pond. Or take the Pine Tree collection, a three-piece parure where baguette-cut diamonds artfully replicate needles whilst Type “A” imperial jadeite punctuate the foliage with a verdant depth. The 18K yellow gold is fashioned into open-shaped branches. In a lifelike twist,

we are under the impression that the pine trees have actually been pruned by Michael Koh to look so beautiful. One special cut epitomises Caratell’s virtuosic combination of splendour and expertise: it is the Chantillea cut: “a 90-facet diamond that passes through the test of Firescope; that means precise faceting with the right angle and proportions so as to achieve no light leakage. Mr Tamura invented it and it was by pure chance that we got to know him through a mutual friend,” Michael Koh recalls. “The first time he presented the cut to us was in a dimlighted restaurant, yet the fire of the diamond was amazingly beautiful and so mesmerising that we decided to be the sole agent in Asia.” Even though the feat of both craftsmanship and artistry is inherent in each Caratell jewel, it is overwhelmingly apparent in the Impressionist collection: where, and in keeping with Michael Koh’s philosophy, it is a case of paying tribute to Art by creating Art. Having elected three great artists (namely Monet, Picasso in his cubist phase, and Van Gogh), the Caratell designer has rendered in precious form an interpretation of some of their works. The result is sensational: sinuous or angular lines that recall the brush of the painter, and bursts of vivid or delicate hues like oil on canvas. Michael Koh may truly be a calligrapher of modern tales as all his jewellery bears a pictorial quality. Together with his wife and since 2002, they toyed with the idea of creating Caratell. Eventually it was launched in 2004. “At that time we felt that the Singapore market was lacking bespoke jewellery. Although it is a niche field, we fit perfectly into this category as I already had my own workshop and both of us were trained designers”, Michael Koh explains. The collections are lyrical and radiant, easy to wear, irresistible to love; and if Caratell was a figure of speech, it could well be an oxymoron: forging the extraordinary for everyday life, injecting ‘extra-ordinary’ into the ordinary. Let’s meet with the talent behind it all. Olivier Dupon – Where does your passion for jewellery design come from? Michael Koh - When I was younger, I was a non-achiever when it came to academic studies, but I loved to draw and paint. Thankfully my parents understood where my passion lay and so they sent me for “enrichment” courses at the age of 7. My passion for arts grew stronger when I reached adolescence. Being in the jewellery trade himself, my dad also wanted me to channel my talent into jewellery

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Angel collection Aquamarine / Amethyst/diamonds/ 18k white & rose gold

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Perfume bottle pendant Yellow diamond/ diamonds/ 18k rose gold

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Pine Tree collection Ever Foliage necklace, Type “A” imperial Jadeite Jade / diamonds / 18k yellow gold

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Pine Tree collection Type “A” imperial Jadeite Jade / diamonds / 18k yellow gold

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The maestro designer Mr Michael Koh

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Orchid collection Turquoise and pearls necklace, Turquoises/Paraiba/ pearls /sapphires / diamonds/ 18k white gold

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Orchid collection Orchid brooch, Ruby/ sapphires/ tsavorite/ diamonds/ 18k yellow gold

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design. As a result, I enrolled in the LASALLE College of the Arts to major in that subject. It was from there that I fell in love with the world of jewellery. I viewed it as another medium of artistic expression, yet in a 3-dimensional way rather than simply on canvas. Jewellery design gives me more satisfaction as it allows me to fully bring my own creations to life. Alongside developing my passion, and garnering awards – the first, DeBeers Diamond of Distinction Award, at age 18 – I found the confidence to eventually open up a workshop and I gradually mastered jewellery manufacturing in all its aspects. Over the years  I have loved creating designs as well as inventing new techniques, combining artistry with craftsmanship. There are so many areas one can explore in the jewellery world: the technique, the mechanics, the lapidary, etc. I consider myself as an artist cum designer cum scientist. To me jewellery design comprises all these. We get inspired then we create and fabricate which involves experimentation and technique. In fact the person that inspires me most is Leonardo da Vinci, who embodies how art and science can merge as one. People sometimes think that I am crazy but in truth I never get tired of it: my passion for jewellery-making will withstand the test of time! OD – Can you imagine a life after jewellery designing? MK - Well it would still have to be something to do with art and design. My childhood dream was to be an artist, but as I grew older, I craved trying my hand in all design fields such as handbags, shoes or even interior design.  Now I think if I was to no longer be in this business, I might start a school teaching jewellery design and fabrication. I used to be a part-time lecturer in jewellery design at the Nanyang Academy of Fine Arts and I am currently lecturing at the  Beacon International College. I would like to keep nurturing the younger generation in the art of handmade jewellery, but on a bigger, full-time scale. OD – What does jewellery design represent for you as a person? MK – Every single piece is just like my baby; each one tells a story as well as being a memento that helps me reconnect with past events.  I am a perfectionist and I love to create. I am also curious and I like problem solving. These attributes have helped

me along the way in my career. Everyday I am doing what I love, creating something new daily as a sort of challenge. I would advise a younger self to do what you love most, have a deep understanding of the industry, believe in your own creation, always be intrigued and never give up, but most importantly, always be honest and never plagiarise others’ work or try gaining credit for something that doesn't belong to you.  Olivier Dupon - Can you describe the process of how a Caratell piece comes to life? MK - There isn’t a rule in designing as beauty lies in the eye of the beholder, but do not fight with physics!  Every piece starts with a theme. Then we start researching and understanding in depth about the theme (the history, fine detail, essence, colour, form and shape, what makes it special or different from the rest, etc). From there we will select the concept to focus on. This concept will have undergone development and sketches of various ideas and how to incorporate different gemstones, playing with different colour combinations as well as defining the technical aspects. Each design must have its unique beauty that meets our satisfaction before proceeding to fabrication. During the processes of fabrication, each stage will be discussed with the master craftsman and analysed for potential further improvements in order to perfect the fluidity of the pieces.  Depending on each individual design, its intricacies and complexity, it may take a month while others may take six months to perfect. Usually upon completing a design it will not be sent immediately to execution, I let it “breathe” for some time to see if there is any room for improvement. As our mood changes every day, the things that we see one day may be different from what we notice the next. OD - How does Caratell jewellery so successfully combines romance, cinematic themes and naturalistic motifs? MK - Design is actually a form of expression of the mood of the designer; our daily lives and things around us inspire us. For example, an artist who is trying to express their feelings about the beauty of nature, will express them through drawing or painting. A musician would use rhythm or music. The same way, as we travel, we embrace the arts and architecture around us. As such I would like to express the love of art and the joy I feel while being together with the

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Garden collection Lotus flower, Pink Sapphire/ Ruby/ sapphires/ diamonds/ 18k rose gold

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Orchid collection Orchid ring, Sapphires/ diamonds/ tsavorite/18k yellow gold

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Van Gogh Iris necklace Afghanistan Emerald / Sapphires/ diamonds/ Tsavorites/ 18k white & yellow gold

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love of my life in the form of jewellery designs. When a movie leaves me with a deep impression I would like to express my emotions through a new design. Many told me that Caratell has a style of 'East meet West' and I strongly believe it is due to the mixed culture and multiracial canvas of Singapore.

diamonds exactly, nothing more, nothing less. The brooch had to be delivered in 2 weeks time with every process recorded in pictures so that we could present the brooch together with a book explaining the idea as well as the process.  OD - How are you positioning yourself in the vast world of fine jewellery?

OD - How have your aesthetics evolved over time? MK - In the beginning, we did unique creative designs that were recognisable as Caratell. However, over the course of years, we have steadily incorporated untreated “investment” gems in our unconventional designs so as to create a new wave of art jewels. We hope that our jewellery will be appealing not only to jewellery lovers but to investors as well, much as an art collector appreciates a painting for a lifetime. That said, our motto has always been: ‘be creative, be original and be inspired’. Never force yourself into designing, as ideas should pour in naturally. Also don't jump to conclusions, give yourself some time to “digest” an idea; at times you will realise that there is room for improvement. OD – Could you point out one piece of jewellery that would most encompass the Caratell’s DNA? MK - That's a tough one. I feel every piece is unique and they all have their own style, so I can't say which one represents Caratell most. It is just like asking which child is my favourite one, to which I would always answer: “they all are unique in their own way”. This applies to my creations.  For example the “Pine Tree” necklace design has won the ASEAN IPOS Creative Jewellery design award for Singapore, whereas the Cubism collection is edgy, playing with asymmetry and angles of the petals; or take the “Avatar” flower: I tried to achieve the colour combination that captivated me while watching the movie of the same name. As you can see all these designs have their own uniqueness, and reasons to be equally cherished.

MK - We are all different in one way or another; all of us have our own style and strengths. I believe we all experience the same learning curve and there is still a lot more to learn from each other in many regards. It is crucial to have a mind-set that predisposes us to improve ourselves by sharing with others. This is why plagiarism is a scourge. As a designer, one has to have dignity, originality and respect for others. We all spend lots of time and effort creating an innovative product and we should feel proud to claim it as our own. Although it is understood that as designers we are inspired by one another, the final creation should be novel and unique. With Caratell we revel in connecting Singapore's handcrafted art jewels with the world,  and nurturing the next generation’s artistic flair for handcrafted fine jewellery. Ultimately I wish to take Caratell to the next level by looking into opening flagship boutiques overseas. 

OD - Which one of your projects has given you the most satisfaction? MK - I guess it is the brooch we did for a South East Asian royalty's birthday. It was pretty rushed with very specific requirements. Within a day we had to create a brooch design and in order for us to do that we needed to read, research and understand the culture, history, symbolic motif and emblem. On top of that the brooch had to be 8cm in length and at the same time it had to fit a total of 8-carat

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Avatar ring Natural non thermal enhancement red spinel / pink spinel / fancy colour sapphires / tsavorites / diamonds / 18k rose gold

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Midnight gaze Sapphires/ diamonds/ 18k black gold & titanium

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Garden collection Stargazer flower, Colour change sapphire/ tsavorite / diamonds/ 18k yellow gold

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Oceanic “Blue ringed octopus “ Tahiti pearl/ sapphires/ diamonds/ 18k black gold

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In Europe in Love Pink diamonds/ diamonds/ 18k white & yellow gold

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In Europe in Love Pink diamonds/ diamonds/ 18k white & yellow gold

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Perfume bottle pendant Blue sapphire/ diamonds.18k yellow & white gold

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Tsavorite earring Tsavorite/ opal/ diamonds/ 18k white gold

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Pine Tree collection Type “A” imperial Jadeite Jade / diamonds / 18k yellow gold

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Garden collection Plum tree , Tourmaline flower carving / akoya pearl/ diamonds/ 18k Rose

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Oceanic “Lettuce coral” Conch pearl / coloured diamonds/ diamonds/ pink sapphire/ 18k yellow gold

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Gooseberry ring Melo pearl / diamonds / 18k rose and black gold

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Cubism collection Blue Sapphire / diamonds / 18k white gold

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T H E A R T O F C R E AT I V I T Y by Olivier Dupon

Yewn Embracing life with a unique perspective has always been Dickson Yewn’s style. An avid admirer of Lao Tzu the founder of Taoism, the designer is a free spirit who has singlehandedly put contemporary Chinese fine jewellery back on the map.

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Yewn has bravely taken his spiritual approach to fine jewellery a step further with a long-term project: the Dream and Reality collection. As its name suggests, it is about blurring the lines of perception. It is not so much about creating an illusion, but rather inviting us on a philosophical journey, a chance to discover the essence of beings.

Embracing life with a unique perspective has always been Dickson Yewn’s style. An avid admirer of Lao Tzu the founder of Taoism, the designer is a free spirit who has singlehandedly put contemporary Chinese fine jewellery back on the map. Intricate lattice patterns form the basis for gold motifs and gemstones which evoke such imperial emblems as peonies, lizards, fans and daggers, whereas geometric attributes freely borrow from the meander and key patterns that often border antique Chinese garments. Now Yewn has bravely taken his spiritual approach to fine jewellery a step further with a long-term project: the Dream and Reality collection. As its name suggests, it is about blurring the lines of perception. It is not so much about creating an illusion, but rather inviting us on a philosophical journey, a chance to discover the essence of beings. In this case, butterflies ( Húdié), an auspicious and benevolent symbol in Chinese culture, for which Yewn is planning to dedicate years of his life. According to the book ‘Hidden Meanings in Chinese Art’ by Terese Tse Bartholomew, “the first character (hu

) is pronounced fu in some Chinese

dialects, which is homophonous with the words for “blessings” (fu “riches” (fu

). The second character (die

ing “age seventy to eighty” (die

) and

) is a pun on the word mean-

) and for the verb to “accumulate” or “pile

up” (die ), as in an accumulation of blessings.” It is thus clear why butterflies have populated Chinese artifacts for centuries in the form of embroideries on dresses, carved jades or paintings. They have also inspired famous tales such as the Taoist story ‘Zhuang Zhou Becoming a Butterfly’. “Zhuang Zhou is Taoism’s earlier representative figure, and in this story, he dreamt that he had transformed into a butterfly and began to wonder whether he was a man dreaming that he was a butterfly, or if he was a butterfly dreaming that he was in fact a man,” Yewn explains. It is precisely this prophetic revelation that inspired the Dream and Reality collection. The idea that our being is transient and can morph into something else, the idea that we are not what we think we are. Like Zhuang Zhou in his time, Yewn’s vision is that of humankind becoming butterflies, which in turn get caught in the nets of butterfly-turned-human beings, and as result they become natural history specimens for study, “or being studied to become distorted replicas of butterflies used in fine jewellery”, Yewn adds. More than a tribute, Dream and Reality is a vibrant plea from a man who wants to re-establish the rightful position of butterflies in jewellery making. Yewn has set himself a complex task, one that takes great passion and artistry. So let’s learn more about this one-of-a-kind project, and if you happen to work in a Natural History museum, here is something of particular interest for you: Yewn will donate the entire last edition of the 60 pieces to your institution. Olivier Dupon - When and why have you decided to create a series of lifelike butterfly brooches? Dickson Yewn - I have resisted creating jewelled butterflies for 15 years for one simple reason: I hated most of the butterfly jewellery created now and

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Japanese Emperor, with diamond, brown diamond, sapphire, orange sapphire, wood, set in 18K blackened white gold.

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in the past. My statement might sound a bit exaggerated or arrogant since many of those butterfly jewels have been created by the biggest names in jewellery history! But it’s absolutely true: let me explain. I don’t “hate" the butterfly as a motif in jewellery in terms of the creativity and techniques being used, but the lack of acknowledgement of the butterflies’ true identity which inspired the jewels. These creatures have beautiful names like Large Tree Nymph from Indonesia, the Esmeralda from Brazil and even some royal names like the Queen Butterfly and the Japanese Emperor, yet not only are they not properly named, but their stories and appearance are neither properly told or rendered in the decorative art worlds. I am undertaking this project in justice to the butterflies, as this world seems to care more about the flower than its pollinator. OD - How many brooches will you create for this collection? DY - I will create 60 pieces, true to form, true to the nature of butterflies with proper names and their origins. They will be available in limited editions of 8 “unique pieces”, and the last edition will be donated to any Museum of Natural History who shares the same appreciation as YEWN for this beautiful species. I plan to produce an average of 10 butterflies per year, and I reckon 6 years would be enough to complete the project. Each butterfly has its own idiosyncrasies and it takes time to replicate them. For the “Brazilian Esmeralda Butterfly” alone, I have tried to interpret the almost transparent wings with mammoth tusks, white crystals and white oil pigments on wood. I estimate the prices will range from $US 12,000 to $US 40,000. OD - Are these butterflies from all over the world or just native to China? DY - This collection I’m creating has wide creative boundaries, so I'm not restricting myself to Chinese culture. These “true to form” butterflies created in the medium of fine jewellery will be from all over the world. OD - How do you choose the breed of butterfly for each brooch? DY - I tend to choose those which are less common, at least in the worlds of fine, applied and decorative art. I have a preference for brownish coloured ones, for which I can use my collection of wood from all over the world to mimic these tones. So far I have made ‘Striped Blue Crow’ from India and China, ‘Pipevine Swallowtail’, the ‘Esmeralda’, the non-migratory ‘Queen’s Butterfly’ from Argentina, ‘Psyche Butterfly’, the ‘Black Veined White Butterfly’, the deadly ‘Small Postman’ from middle and South America, the ‘Red Banded Pereute’ from Brazil, the ‘Gramer Blue Morpho’, the ‘Mother of Pearl Morpho’, the ‘Japanese Emperor’, the ‘African Giant Swallowtail’, the ‘Yamfly’, the ‘Common Blue’, the ‘Monarch Butterfly’, the ‘Blanchard Ideopsis’ and the ‘Large Tree Nymph’ from South East Asia and Taiwan. Among those, many have both male and female versions. OD - What are the challenges when crafting one of your butterfly brooches? DY - When compared to jewellers who have the freedom to create with their existing stock of market-ready stone sizes the challenge is obvious. For me to be "true to form and nature", I basically have to custom cut every element including the very precious and expensive.

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Esmeralda, with diamond, brown diamond, sapphire, pink sapphire, crystal, onyx, wood, set in 18K yellow gold.

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Queen Butterfly, with diamond, black diamond, wood, wood, set in 18K yellow and blackened white gold.

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Blanchard’s Ideopsis, with diamond, brown diamond, black diamond, yellow sapphire, wood, set in 18K blackened white gold.

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If my dream comes true, they will be exhibited in a Natural History museum, because (and correct me if I am wrong) I believe that it is the first time a jeweller or artist (however people would like to describe me) has ever done this.

I have also used three versions of en tremblant: one is called super "en tremblant" for exhibition purpose; the second is a wearable version with more stable springs and the last one is a combination of both techniques. OD - What materials do you use to replicate the iridescence of the wings? DY - I use oil pigments on wood technique, or sometimes acrylic on wood and a mixture of bespoke-cut sapphires if for example I am doing the “Cramer Blue Morpho”. A little touch of varnish always helps. OD - Are they meant to be exhibited all together as a group (cabinet of curiosity style) or can they be admired one at a time? DY - If my dream comes true, they will be exhibited in a Natural History museum, because (and correct me if I am wrong) I believe that it is the first time a jeweller or artist (however people would like to describe me) has ever done this. I envisage it as an installation with an art format since there is a big story to be told. Presenting them in a typical jewellery showcase or a cabinet of curiosities will just fall back on the old clichés. Although it might be a challenge for a museum of natural history to be “artistic” in exhibiting the donated bejewelled butterflies, I will be happy to work with any museum who could provide them a permanent home for centuries to come.

OD - How important is it for each butterfly to be lifelike? DY - The reason I am doing this is to give life to my desire to protect and speak out for the misunderstood and mistreated ones. I have embarked on similar missions, such as in my directorship of the “Save China's Tigers” organisation in Hong Kong to find corporate sponsorships. But back to the butterflies, they are one of the two most used design motifs in the world alongside flowers. Butterflies are always being reduced to one name, their genre, ‘Butterfly’, whereas flowers are always given their proper names. I want to change that. www.yewn.com

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African Giant Swallowtail, with diamond, black diamond, yellow sapphire, wood, set in 18K blackened white gold.

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Small Postman, with diamond, black diamond, orange sapphire, wood, set in 18K yellow gold.

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Female Striped Blue Crow, with diamond, brown diamond, black diamond, sapphire, wood, set in 18K blackened white gold.

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Yamfly, with diamond, brown diamond, orange diamond, wood, set in 18K blackened white gold.

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Male Striped Blue Crow, with diamond, brown diamond, black diamond, sapphire, wood, set in 18K blackened white gold.

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Red-banded Pereute, with diamond, black diamond, sapphire, orange sapphire, wood, set in 18K blackened white gold.

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Cramer Blue Morpho, with diamond, brown diamond, turquoise, set in 18K yellow and blackened white gold.

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Common Blue, with diamond, black diamond, brown diamond, onyx, wood, set in 18K yellow and blackened white gold.

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Cramer Blue Morpho, with diamond, black diamond, wood, set in 18K blackened white gold.

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Battus Philenor, Pipevine Swallowtail, with diamond, brown diamond, black diamond, sapphire, orange sapphire, yellow sapphire, wood, set in 18K yellow and blackened white gold.

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SPECIAL REPORT

BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES by Olivier Dupon

The must-attend rendezvous for antique and treasure lovers in Paris is the Biennale des Antiquaires. The XXVIIIth Biennale has just taken place and as always in one of the most magnificent locations possible, the Grand Palais, which was built for the Universal Exhibition in 1900 and whose nave was listed as a French Monument Historique in 2000.

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BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES by Olivier Dupon

The must-attend rendezvous for antique and treasure lovers in Paris is the Biennale des Antiquaires. The XXVIIIth Biennale has just taken place and as always in one of the most magnificent locations possible, the Grand Palais, which was built for the Universal Exhibition in 1900 and whose nave was listed as a French Monument Historique in 2000. It is there that this biannual art event has been held for the past half a century. In September 2016, over ten days, 125 exhibitors across 14 countries have welcomed both collectors and the public alike (a record 30,000 people), this year in a stunning scenography by talented set designer Nathalie Crinière. A play with large mirrors and tall gold-lined gates on the ground level is complemented by the glass and metal structure above; the interplay between old and new befitting the exhibition of masterpieces and exceptional works. This year is a stepping-stone in the evolution of the Biennale to an annual event from next year. It was also unique in terms of representation of jewellery houses. Just four jewellery names exhibited this year – this was a blessing in disguise for the public who could discover names not necessarily known to them. They were: de Grisogono on his second outing after a first appearance in 2008; Taiwan-born Cindy Chao and India-born Nirav Modi both chose the Biennale to make their debut on the international fair scene, and Boghossian who also debuted at the Biennale but had already been exhibiting in other art fairs (namely Masterpiece London). As you would expect, the jewels on show were spectacular, with each exhibitor vying to impress onlookers. www.biennale-paris.com

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La Maison Boghossian Under an ethereal canopy, which served as a light source, projecting tree-like shadows on the curved walls, the sensual and distinguished creations of La Maison Boghossian shone behind their elongated glass windows. The best of the jewellery house was on display at the Biennale: a combination of jaw-dropping pieces fit for a queen (a dazzling all-white-diamond chandelier necklace; an extraordinary yellow diamond suite; a magical emerald neckpiece with fifteen different diamond cuts) and the signature techniques inseparable from Boghossian’s artistry (‘Kissing gemstones’ or when one gemstone is affixed above another to create a larger gem; or the art of inlay when a gemstone is inserted inside a base material). Pairing two gemstones that eventually and flawlessly ‘embrace’ each other takes time and precision, a guarantee that the final marriage is of utmost quality. A case in point with the ‘Lozenge-shaped Diamond and Paraiba “Kissing” Ring’: the radiance of lozenge-shaped 2.01-carats D colour IF clarity diamond is almost ignited atop a cushion-shaped 27.46-carats vivid Paraiba tourmaline. In turn the ‘Diamonds Inlay into Mother-of-pearl’ necklace and earrings set is a feat of the exquisite art of inlay. The sheer carat weight of both the diamonds and mother-of-pearl is deceptive, as the pieces look effortlessly delicate. If there was still any doubt that La Maison Boghossian only deals with the best and rarest of materials, a look at their largest jade necklace known to date with seven matching evenly green Buddha head beads (27-33mm) spaced with smaller beads and diamond rondelles would quash it. The dual Lebanese-Armenian heritage of the Boghossian family paired with the longevity of their history (six generations) permeate with such creative vitality all their collections that no one does the east-meets-west / tradition-meets-experimentation better than they. For each piece is a journey through eastern-inspired motifs and ancestral techniques, all viewed through a modern prism. For Ralph Boghossian, “in order to innovate, one needs new inputs such as the realisation that a piece can be further perfected and improved.” Their commitment to “bridge the gaps between East and West” according to Ralph Boghossian is pivotal, and the Boghossian foundation in Villa Empain in Brussels is testament to this, where Art becomes the key to both cultural and philosophical rapprochements. www.bogh-art.com

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Natural Saltwater Pearls and diamonds earrings in 18K white gold

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Burma non-heated oval-shaped sapphire and diamonds ring in 18K white gold.

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Diamonds inlay into mother-of-pearl necklace and earrings set in 18K white gold.

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Diamonds inlay into mother-of-pearl necklace and earrings set in 18K white gold.

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Lozenge-shaped diamond and Paraiba ‘Kissing’ ring in 18K white gold.

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Jewellery Historian

Burma non-heated rubies and diamonds ring in 18K white gold.

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Cindy Chao Art Jewels This was the first time Cindy Chao exhibited at the Biennale and most importantly, the first time her pieces were open to a public exhibition. Creating no more than thirty-six pieces a year, Cindy Chao showed a combination of her most iconic pieces from her 12-year career (e.g. the butterfly, a growing series of brooches currently numbering six, all of which have already been collected except for the latest one unveiled at the Biennale) alongside her latest ‘Black Label Masterpiece’ jewels (the most prestigious of her creations). For people not familiar with her creative style, this selection of pieces was the perfect way to demonstrate the organic and sculptural nature of her handmade work (her father, a sculptor, and grandfather, a renowned Taiwanese temple architect, certainly influenced her). Favouring generous proportions (hence the use of titanium in some of the biggest pieces), singular high carat and rare gemstones are often nestled or suspended in settings that behave as if caught in a state of suspended movement. This contrast enhances the beauty of the stone which sits in regal splendour in a fluid paved nest. In other words, the beguiling stones appear to emerge from a precious magma. A case in point with both the ‘Emerald Drop Earrings, 2010 Masterpiece XVII’ from the Architectural Collection, where a pair of pear-shaped emeralds (respectively 46.89 and 42.48-carats – currently the largest emeralds on the market) almost float in their setting, and in the ‘2013 Masterpiece VIII’ brooch from the Aquatic Collection, whose tail alone is a sublime work of art. A round brilliant-cut vivid green Colombian emerald of 31.18-carats is the only concession to angles as the fins flow, moving like a whisper on a summer's breeze. The same gossamer attribute applies to the ruby-paved tails of the en tremblant ‘Ribbon Brooch’ from the Ribbon Collection, ‘2016 Masterpieces XV’, where the centre is a spectacular cushion-cut F VVS1 diamond of 76.91-carats. Another splendid new creation is the ‘Winter Leaf Necklace’ from the Four Season Collection, ‘2016 Masterpieces IX’. In an exercise of it-is-not-what-it-seems where the leaves vascillate between lifelike and otherworldly, this may arguably be the most precious wreath one has ever seen: 5938 pavé diamonds for 129-carats, two pearshaped D VS1 diamonds (respectively 6.88 and 5.18-carats) and one oval-shaped E VS1 diamond (6.20-carats) compose the artful rendition of frosted leaves that magically appear friable if slightly touched. Will you dare? It is worth noting that Cindy Chao’s wonders are as much masterpieces as they are opportunities to see or learn something new. This time a rare colour-changing diamond, a chameleon diamond, was to be found amongst a myriad other coloured diamonds in the full paving of the dazzling ‘Phoenix Feather Brooch, 2016 Masterpieces XVI’. The chameleon changes colour when heated from 150° Celsius to 250° Celsius. Light as a feather at 36 grams thanks to its titanium structure, a crimson fire made of a whopping 965 fancy-cut yellow diamonds (92.81-carats) hides both a pearshaped greenish yellow chameleon (2.47-carats) and a pear-shaped fancy vivid yellow diamond (2.03-carats) in its incandescence. A phoenix deserves no less. www.cindychao.com

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Photo courtesy of CINDY CHAO Š CINDY CHAO

Jewellery Historian

Cindy Chao Black Label, 2013 Masterpiece VIII, Fish Brooch in titanium and 18K white gold, with round brilliant-cut vivid green emerald (31.18carats), round brilliant-cut F/VS1 diamond, round brilliant-cut E/VS1 diamonds, triangular diamond beads, briolette-cut diamonds, cabochon sapphires, diamonds and sapphires, Aquatic Collection.

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Photo courtesy of CINDY CHAO © CINDY CHAO

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Photo courtesy of CINDY CHAO © CINDY CHAO

Jewellery Historian

Cindy Chao The Art Jewel Winter Leaf Necklace, 2016 Masterpiece IX, in titanium, with pear shaped D/VS1 diamonds (6.88-carats and 5.18carats), oval shaped E VS1 diamond (6.20-carats) and pavé diamonds (129-carats), The Four Seasons Collection.

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Photo courtesy of CINDY CHAO © CINDY CHAO

Jewellery Historian

Cindy Chao Black Label Emerald Drop, 2010 Masterpiece XVII, Earrings in 18K gold, with pear-shaped emeralds (46.89- and 42.48-carats), pear-shaped D/VS1 diamonds (1.06- and 1.01-carats), diamonds, briolette-cut diamonds, yellow and brown briolette-cut diamonds, Architectural Collection.

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Photo courtesy of CINDY CHAO © CINDY CHAO

Jewellery Historian

Cindy Chao The Art Jewel Phoenix Feather Brooch, 2016 Masterpiece XVI, in titanium, with fancy-cut diamonds, pear shaped greenish yellow chameleon diamond (2.47-carats) and pear shaped fancy vivid yellow diamonds (2.03-carats).

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Photo courtesy of CINDY CHAO © CINDY CHAO

Jewellery Historian

Cindy Chao The Art Jewel Ribbon Brooch, 2016 Masterpiece XV, in 18K white gold with one F/VVS1 cushion-cut diamond (76.91-carats), oval shaped rubies, round rubies, and composed by 4 pieces of 18K gold hidden spring structures, Ribbon Collection.

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De Grisogono For his second presence at the Biennale after 8 years, Fawaz Gruosi opened with a bang. At a press conference on the morning of the fair’s vernissage day, Nicholas Polar (International Director of Nemesis), John Leitao (Chief Executive Officer at de Grisogono) and Fawaz Gruosi (Founder and Executive Board member of de Grisogono) celebrated de Grisogono’s acquisition of the ‘world’s most valuable rough diamond’, The Constellation. An 812.77-carats type IIa diamond found by Canadian company, Lucara Diamond, at its Karowe mine in Botswana in November 2015. The rough was acquired for $63 million after intense bidding earlier this year. On the opening day of the fair, set on a black cushion, on a rotating table, inside a glass cabinet (and with numerous bodyguards around), the rough revealed why it is so special: one could immediately see how pure, transparent and clean it is. From it, they expect to yield the largest top colour D, flawless, GIA certified diamond ever put on the market, but at this stage, Mr Gruosi says that ‘his princess’, as he calls the rough, “has not revealed herself to him yet”. This means that we will have to wait for a while (prospectively until mid 2017) before knowing what the cut diamond will look like, “a simple design in any case”, he added. That would be a creative departure compared to the jewels presented on the booth during the Biennale. An array of bold and shimmering pieces, with a preeminence given to large carat diamonds in various cuts (probably in celebration of the unveiling of The Constellation) was on view: a spectacle of to-die-for solitaires. There a round-cut white diamond of 16.05-carats embraced by a ribbon of baguette-cut emeralds; here a cushion-cut white diamond of 10.23-carats raised above a snow drift of white diamonds, itself interrupted by a trail of baguette-cut sapphires; over there a snake-shaped ring with a pear-cut white diamond of 4.02-carats, and another ring where an oval-cut white diamond of 7.01-carats is nestled among a scintillating flourish of briolette-cut white diamonds (total of 33.62-carats). Necklace and earring suites were also strong with one particularly arresting in black and white: a white gold torque neckpiece with matching earrings. The main body of the necklace offered a voluptuous shawl effect (2599 white diamonds for 152.65-carats) as it generously wrapped around the neckline, with each extremity adorned with a cascade of solitaires (22 round-cut diamonds for 48.16-carats) - each embedded in a black diamond hull (5068 black diamonds for 40.49-carats) - which flow onto the upper chest. The same design idea was carried through to the earrings. As always, the de Grisogono creations are an invitation to feel glamorous and utterly noticeable. www.degrisogono.com

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Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

White gold: 12.25 Gr - 1 round-cut white diamond: 16.05 Ct - 16 baguette-cut emeralds: 3.20 Ct- 116 emeralds: 0.31 Ct - 412 white diamonds: 2.19 Ct

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Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

White gold and titanium: 32.83 Gr, 1 round-cut white diamond: 1.50 Ct - 1 round-cut white diamond: 1.30 Ct - 1 round-cut white diamond: 1.31 Ct - 1 round-cut white diamond: 2.06 Ct - 1 round-cut white diamond: 2.03 Ct - 1 round-cut white diamond: 3.51 Ct - 1 round-cut white diamond: 3.06 Ct - 2 round-cut white diamond: 1.12 Ct - 1 round-cut white diamond: 1.51 Ct - 1 round-cut white diamond: 1.23 Ct - 1 round-cut white diamond: 1.21 Ct - 727 white diamonds: 17.11 Ct - 1874 white diamonds: 17.45 Ct

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Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

White gold: 307.61 Gr, 2 round-cut white diamonds: 48.16 Ct, 2599 white diamonds: 152.65 Ct, 5068 black diamonds: 40.49 Ct

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Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

White gold: 18.15 Gr, 18 pear-cut white diamonds: 51.99 Ct , 905 white diamonds: 7.43 Ct

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Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

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Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

White gold: 27.14 Gr - 1 cushion-cut white diamond: 10.23 Ct - 18 baguette-cut blue sapphires: 5.32 Ct - 60 blue sapphires: 0.22 Ct - 319 white diamonds: 10.68 Ct

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| BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES | PARIS 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

White gold: 12.25 Gr - 1 round-cut white diamond: 16.05 Ct - 16 baguette-cut emeralds: 3.20 Ct- 116 emeralds: 0.31 Ct - 412 white diamonds: 2.19 Ct

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Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

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| BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES | PARIS 2016

Photo courtesy of DE GRISOGONO © DE GRISOGONO

Jewellery Historian

White gold: 20.04 Gr- 1 pear-cut white diamond: 4.02 Ct - 74 baguette-cut white diamonds: 5.91 Ct - 425 white diamonds: 7.09 Ct

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Nirav Modi His presence was another exciting first for the European art fair market. Moreover, a day after the Biennale 2016 closed its doors, Nirav Modi celebrated the grand opening of his first European boutique at 31, Old Bond Street in London: a double act that heralded an expansion strategy towards the European continent, after having already opened shops in Delhi, Mumbai, Hong Kong, and New York. Fashion icons, the English actress and top model, Rosie HuntingtonWhiteley, and top model, Bollywood actress and TV presenter, Lisa Haydon, both attended the opening while wearing Nirav Modi haute joaillerie. Therefore this was probably the first time most of the public at the Paris fair had ever seen Nirav Modi collections. In contrast to the three other jewellers in attendance, Nirav Modi opted for a highly poetic scenography. Where both de Grisogono and Cindy Chao favoured an all-black, almost cave-like room, Boghossian chose a more traditional layout, while Nirav Modi created a pink reverie or enchanted garden (soft pink walls were adorned with white paper birds and blossoming branches), a template used in all his boutiques worldwide. The ornamental ravishment echoed the jewellery on display: the fineness of the settings, the femininity of the cuts (the Jasmine® cut in particular, which is similar to the rose-cut in that it enhances the limpidity of diamonds), and vibrancy of the hues… it almost felt like looking at the royal paintings of Jodhpur. It’s clear Nirav Modi draws inspiration as much from his Indian heritage (traditional jewellery techniques and themes), as from the universal idea of the nature of beauty. The ‘Water Lily Necklace & Earrings’ is said to “recreate an enchanting cluster of water lilies floating on a handcrafted mesh”. It is composed of pear rose cut, oval, marquise and round brilliant cut diamonds and a multitude of coloured gemstones. The diamonds over 72-carats and coloured stones over 78-carats are set in 18K white and rose gold. Extending the theme of delicacy, the ‘Swan Cuff’ is inspired by “the swift and graceful movements of a beautiful swan”. Table-cut diamonds represent curved feathers and thanks to kinetics they lift up and down as the wrist moves. Movement is also seen in a stunning en tremblant ring that features over 4-carats of white and fancy pink diamonds (we should remember that Mirav Modi is one of the few Argyle Pink Diamonds Select Ateliers). Two exceptional neckpieces attest that Nirav Modi goes beyond a literal interpretation of Indian style by subtly modernising it. The ‘Mughal Necklace’ features a 12.62-carats portrait-cut (an antique Indian style of cut) diamond at the centre of a yellow five-petal flower. With inlaid jade for the leaves, inlaid opals for details of the flower, fancy intense yellow diamonds as drops, the flower wraps around the neck in a beautiful embrace. The ‘Emerald Maharani Necklace’ “channels the spirit of the opulent maharajah necklaces worn by Indian royals in the 19th and early 20th century”. Three strands of vivid emerald beads are complemented by oval-shaped jasmine cut and pear-shaped diamonds. There is no better evidence than in the Embrace Collection to witness the ingenuity with which Nirav Modi embraces an Indian cultural phenomenon and takes it to new heights. The story goes that Mr Modi was “intrigued by his daughters’ stretchy toy bangles”; besides who can ignore the way Indian women artfully stack bangles up each arm. At the Biennale, the way the Nirav Modi’s precious bangles can stretch open was showcased on a wall. Motorised prongs were gently opening and closing, opening and closing a bangle in a soothing rhythm. Ingenious, we said! The ‘Embrace’ bangles come in myriad options with plain diamonds or animal print (Zebra or Leopard) or feather (Flamingo) effects. www.niravmodi.com

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Photo courtesy of NIRAV MODI Š NIRAV MODI

Jewellery Historian

| BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES | PARIS 2016

A winning combination of vivid colour and expert craftsmanship, this three-strand necklace features graduated emerald beads complemented by oval shaped jasmine cut and pear shaped diamonds. The luminosity of the verdant gems is off-set by the brilliance of diamonds carefully hand-picked for quality and clarity making it a truly precious for life. This necklace emerald beads weighing over 887 carats and diamonds over 147 carats are set in 18k white gold.

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Photo courtesy of NIRAV MODI Š NIRAV MODI

Jewellery Historian

| BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES | PARIS 2016

This necklace takes pride in its enchanting exuberance comprising of a legion of GIA certified Fancy Yellow pear- shaped diamonds of VVS2-VS2 clarity of various sizes set amidst alternating white marquise and round-shaped brilliant-cut diamonds. This luxurious necklace exhibits a contemporary yet a regal demeanor. Diamonds over 112 carats are mounted in 18k yellow and white gold.

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Photo courtesy of NIRAV MODI Š NIRAV MODI

Jewellery Historian

| BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES | PARIS 2016

As part of the Jasmine Collection, inspiration is taken from an unfurling jasmine flower. A floral rhythm is infused into the collection, capturing an intuitive sense of balance. Composed of yellow and white jasmine cut diamonds, faceted round rose-cut and briolettes. Diamonds over 25 carats are mounted in 18K white and yellow gold.

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Photo courtesy of NIRAV MODI Š NIRAV MODI

Jewellery Historian

| BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES | PARIS 2016

As part of the Jasmine Collection, inspiration is taken from an unfurling jasmine flower. A floral rhythm is infused into the jewel, capturing an intuitive sense of balance. These shimmering earrings are composed of yellow and white specially developed Jasmine cutTM, faceted round shaped rose cut and briolette diamonds that enhance the lustre of the jewel. Diamonds over 12.50 carats are set in 18K white gold and yellow gold.

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Photo courtesy of NIRAV MODI Š NIRAV MODI

Jewellery Historian

| BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES | PARIS 2016

Inspired by the divine flower that rises above murky waters; this Lotus ring is composed of dreamy, intricate white and pink layers. With a center composed of a rare 6.34 cts oval orangey-pink Padparadscha sapphire, this ring is crafted with a dreamy surround of pear rose cut diamond petals accentuated by brilliant cut diamond stamens. Diamonds over 9.50 carats and colour stone over 6 carats are set in 18K white and rose gold.

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Photo courtesy of NIRAV MODI © NIRAV MODI

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| BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES | PARIS 2016

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Photo courtesy of NIRAV MODI Š NIRAV MODI

Jewellery Historian

| BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES | PARIS 2016

This spectacular ring centers upon a magnificent GIA certified 10.01 cts fancy light yellow oval diamond of VS2 clarity with an elegant surround of fancy light pink diamonds. It is further accentuated by brilliant cut diamonds framing the ring. This scintillating ring features diamonds over 14.50 carats set in 18K white, yellow and rose gold.

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Photo courtesy of NIRAV MODI Š NIRAV MODI

Jewellery Historian

| BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES | PARIS 2016

The portrait-cut diamond, named for how a miniature portrait could be seen through the slenderness and clarity of such diamonds, often features in the jewelry of Mughal Emperors. An exceptional 12.62 carat diamond cut in this antique Indian style, forms the centerpiece of a yellow five petal flower, from which a fancy intense yellow diamond dewdrop is suspended. The leaves and flower are inlaid with jade and opals that are calibrated to the curves of the floral form, conveying a sense of depth to the color. The design is distinctive with its crisp, contoured outlines set with brilliant-cut diamonds.Diamonds weighing over 65 carats, and colored stones weighing over 15 carats are set in white gold.

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Photo courtesy of NIRAV MODI Š NIRAV MODI

Jewellery Historian

| BIENNALE DES ANTIQUAIRES | PARIS 2016

Inspired by the swift and graceful movements of a beautiful swan, this cuff is encrusted with diamonds that make this jewel absolutely exceptional. Embellished with table cut, round brilliant cut and baguette diamonds, this elegant jewel exhibits enchanted, feather-like movements like that of a swan that unleashes the inherent fierce scintillation of the diamonds. This mesmerizing cuff features diamonds over 95 carats set in 18K white gold.

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EDITOR’S CHOICE

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esthète by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

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EDITOR’S CHOICE

esthète by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

a person who has or professes to have refined sensitivity toward the beauties of art or nature

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An exceptional clip by Van Cleef & Arpels

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OPEN CALL new talents

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Jewels we

Love CONRADO / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

In every issue we handpick the finest jewellery for you to choose, enabling you to add a sophisticated, elegant touch to the most important times of your life. Previously known as “Our Faves�, this new column introduces you to our favorite jewellery, designed by the most talented jewellery designers.

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PASQUALE BRUNI

BAVNA

LE VIAN

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YOKO LONDON

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TRENDS

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YOKO LONDON

GILAN CARRERA Y CARRERA

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GILAN

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TRENDS

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BORGIONI

BUTANI

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MAXIOR

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TRENDS

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NOUDAR

Necklace by GILAN

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ZOLOTAS

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GILAN

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TRENDS

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HARRY KOTLAR

YOKO LONDON

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Rentrée Littéraire 2016

mille feuilles Nejron Photo / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

by Lucas Samaltanos-Ferrier

The Jewellery Historian supports French language & literature. In each issue discover our selection of books in French language. 389


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Andreï Makine, L’archipel d’une autre vie Aux confins de l'Extrême-Orient russe, dans le souffle du Pacifique, s'étendent des terres qui paraissent échapper à l'Histoire... Qui est donc ce criminel aux multiples visages, que Pavel Gartzev et ses compagnons doivent capturer à travers l'immensité de la taïga ? C'est l'aventure de cette longue chasse à l'homme qui nous est contée dans ce puissant roman d'exploration. C'est aussi un dialogue hors du commun, presque hors du monde, entre le soldat épuisé et la proie mystérieuse qu'il poursuit. Lorsque Pavel connaîtra la véritable identité du fugitif, sa vie en sera bouleversée. La chasse prend alors une dimension exaltante, tandis qu'à l'horizon émerge l'archipel des Chantars : là où une "autre vie" devient possible, dans la fragile éternité de l'amour. Editions Seuil , 288 pages

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Mathieu Bermann, Amours sur mesure C'est une chronique de la jeunesse, de la liberté amoureuse et sexuelle. Le héros, dont on suit les aventures au jour le jour, aime à tout va : Lisa depuis des années, Valentin rencontré il y a peu dans un train, et tel autre garçon éphémère dont il ne connaît pas le prénom, peut-être davantage encore. C'est une chance d'aimer ainsi, et quoi que veuille dire aimer, pourquoi s'en priver ? Un seul verbe et une réalité à chaque fois ni tout à fait la même, ni tout à fait une autre. Il reconnaît bien sûr les nuances mais embrasse tout d'un même élan : amitié, amour, affection, plan cul, fraternité élective…Il semblerait que les entre-deux lui plaisent assez. Cependant n'est-ce pas un leurre que de voir l'amour partout ? Une défaite maquillée en victoire ? Si aimer possède un charme indéniable, être aimé n'est pas mal non plus. Un homme apparaît dans la vie de Lisa : le héros doit-il s'en inquiéter, être triste ? D'un autre côté, fait-il le bon choix en renonçant à coucher avec Valentin, qui en a peut-être envie lui aussi ? Le héros voudrait être certain de l'amour que lui portent les autres, certain aussi qu'il les aime de la bonne manière. A faire jouer les frontières, à se moquer des figures imposées, il n'est pas toujours sûr de ses émotions. Comment l'être hors des repères ordinaires ? Lorsque les mots ne recouvrent pas la réalité vécue ? Comme on peut s'y attendre, mais c'est sans cesse une épreuve que d'y être confronté, la théorie et la pratique ne s'accordent pas vraiment. De la même manière, la sexualité est au coeur des préoccupations du héros, pas forcément dans ses relations avec ceux qu'il aime le plus, est-elle d'ailleurs le signe de quoi que ce soit ? Il apprend à dissocier, et, à défaut de toujours faire ce qu'il veut, il fait du moins ce qu'il peut. C'est donc l'histoire de ce héros amoureux, qui est également le narrateur, et de ceux qu'il croise. Il sera ainsi question d'une rumeur éveillant crainte ou fantasme, d'un mariage improbable, d'un couple à ses débuts, des rencontres en ligne, de la frustration et du désir. L'écriture va vite. Légère, elle n'appesantit rien ; à l'image du héros qui cultive les non-dits, elle effleure à peine l'émotion, pourtant bel et bien là. Il résulte de ce roman et de la liberté qu'il décrit le paradoxe suivant, à savoir qu'il est facile d'aimer et, tous comptes faits, pas si facile que ça. Ce roman est très actuel, comme on le voit, très " air du temps ". Mais avec un charme, une légèreté, une grâce et une finesse d'écriture qui en font tout autre chose en fait : une réflexion, une méditation sur l'amour d'autant plus grave et profonde qu'elle joue son contraire avec beaucoup d'élégance. P.O.L, 160 pages

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Jewellery Historian

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Jean-Baptiste Del Amo, Règne animal Au cours du XXe siècle, Règne animal retrace, en deux époques, l'histoire d'une exploitation familiale vouée à devenir un élevage porcin. Dans cet environnement dominé par l'omniprésence des animaux, cinq générations traversent le cataclysme d'une guerre, les désastres économiques et le surgissement de la violence industrielle, reflet d'une violence ancestrale. Seuls territoires d'enchantement, l'enfance, celle d'Eléonore, la matriarche, celle de Jérôme, le dernier de la lignée et l'incorruptible liberté des bêtes, parviendront-elles à former un rempart contre la folie des hommes ? Règne animal est un grand roman sur la dérive d'une humanité acharnée à dominer la nature, et qui dans ce combat sans pitié révèle toute sa sauvagerie et toute sa misère. "Des images lui reviennent, surgies d'une mémoire atavique : des plaines fourragères et sauvages, des souilles établies dans les fougères, au coeur de forêts primitives, des rivières indomptables aux flots desquelles il s'abreuve, des meutes de loups qui menacent, une harde innombrable, dont il fait partie, et avec laquelle il chemine. Puis, se superposent les voix des hommes, les encouragements et les cris, les coups assenés sur le groin, dans les flancs, sur la croupe, leurs mains qui l'empoignent par l'oreille et la tordent, leurs mains qui déversent la nourriture dans l'auge, leurs mains qui font couler l'eau, leurs mains qui le guident vers la truie immobile, saisissent son sexe qui tâtonne et le guident. Enfin, le visage ovale et redoutable des hommes qui se penchent par-dessus les barrières des enclos et décident du jour et de la nuit". Gallimard, 432 pages

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INSPIRATIONS | INTERIOR DESIGN | ARCHITECTURE | DESIGN

by Catherine Varoucha

nataliakul / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

For this special issue, we visit an exceptional beach house with an amazing sea view.

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GREAT DESIGN FOR BEING TOGETHER This October IKEA presents SÄLLSKAP – a collection inspired by the Scandinavian arts and crafts tradition and by the once groundbreaking idea of rooms designed for the whole family. It’s a collection of furniture, textiles and dinnerware that brings inspiration from the past into the present in the best way we could think of – by moving things forward.

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Photo courtesy of IKEA Systems B.V.I © IKEA Systems B.V.


“SÄLLSKAP is a collection that celebrates traditions without loosing touch with modern life.”

There was a time, a century or two ago, when children were to be seen but not heard, and beautiful design was re-served for the wealthy. Then something changed. Influential Swedes such as author Ellen Key and artists Karin and Carl Larsson sowed the seed of what later became known as the “allrum”, a room for all, where the whole family could get together. But it wasn’t just about having a common space where everyone was allowed – it was also about making room for beauty and quality and promoting the idea that everyone should be able to get their hands on great design. SÄLLSKAP is about all that. “SÄLLSKAP is inspired by the Scandinavian arts and crafts movement of the late 19th and early 20th century. It’s a collection that celebrates traditions without loosing touch with modern life”, says Mette Nissen, Creative Leader at IKEA of Sweden. AT THE HEART OF SÄLLSKAP There’s nothing saying you can’t love city life but still nurse a quiet longing for rural bliss. SÄLLSKAP is made up of furniture, lamps, textiles and dinnerware that bring in a sense of Swedish tradition and country life, regardless of where your home is. Better still, SÄLLSKAP is designed to fit perfectly into every space. The furniture is smaller than its century old inspirations – and has multifunctional qualities that add to the com- pact living value. The main material is solid wood, because nothing beats sturdy when you want to make room for the whole family – given that you add as many soft cushions and blan- kets as you fancy. “At the heart of SÄLLSKAP are home textiles that are inspired by traditional patterns and techniques, such as splash painting and ikat weave”, says Mette Nissen. Discover the new collection in IKEA stores worldwide and online at www.ikea.com

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Photo courtesy of IKEA Systems B.V.I © IKEA Systems B.V.

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Photo courtesy of IKEA Systems B.V.I © IKEA Systems B.V.

Photo courtesy of IKEA Systems B.V.I © IKEA Systems B.V. Photo courtesy of IKEA Systems B.V.I © IKEA Systems B.V.

SÄLLSKAP chair with storage . Stained, clear lacquered solid pine. Designer: Mikael Warnhammar. W44×D47, H75cm. Assorted colours

SÄLLSKAP quilt cover and pillowcase 100% cotton. Designer: Maria Vinka. Quilt cover W150×L200cm. Pillow-case W50×L60cm. White/green

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Photo courtesy of IKEA Systems B.V.I © IKEA Systems B.V.

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Rosenthal equips 3-Michelin-starred chef Corey Lee

“In Situ” – the restaurant on the ground floor of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art – united 80 passionate master chefs and their recipes from all over the world to create a single concept, implemented by 3-Michelin-starred chef Corey Lee.

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Photo courtesy of Rosenthal GmbH © Rosenthal GmbH

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Conceived by Rosenthal specially for the restaurant, the “In Situ Plate” is a white, 23 x 28 cm, semigloss porcelain plate that separates the different elements of a dish and echoes the tilting lines of longitude and latitude that underlie the concept behind the restaurant.

| INSPIRATIONS

“In Situ” – the restaurant on the ground floor of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art – united 80 passionate master chefs and their recipes from all over the world to create a single concept, implemented by 3-Michelin-starred chef Corey Lee. The focus here is on the originality of the recipes, including their ingredients and preparation, but always in harmony with the times and seasons of San Francisco. None of the recipes are Lee’s own. Instead, the concept behind his restaurant draws inspiration from the museum itself: to act as curator, collecting and emphasising the best of different genres from all over the world. The restaurant’s décor, too, is inspired by the world’s time zones, and a pallet of blues and greys conjures up the oceans that link the continents. The team headed by Lee has adopted the Mercator projection, which is commonly used for nautical charts. As they meet in San Francisco, the lines of longitude and latitude are slightly modified in their axial tilt, a design feature that plays out in all of the different design elements – from the menus themselves to the logo and website – and hints at the shift from a recipe’s origins to its new “origins” in San Francisco. Conceived by Rosenthal specially for the restaurant, the “In Situ Plate” is a white, 23 x 28 cm, semi-gloss porcelain plate that separates the different elements of a dish and echoes the tilting lines of longitude and latitude that underlie the concept behind the restaurant. The plate was created by designer Andrea Lenardin Madden, who is also the creative director behind the overall concept. From October, a white-glazed version of the plate will also be available worldwide via Rosenthal Hotel & Restaurant Service. For more information, visit hotel.rosenthal.de.

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Photo courtesy of Rosenthal GmbH © Rosenthal GmbH

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Artist provocateur // Provocation on porcelain The artist special edition 'No Prostitution here' by Philippe Shangti and Villeroy & Boch for the trendy L‘OpĂŠra restaurant

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Photo courtesy of VILLEROY & BOCH © VILLEROY & BOCH

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An exciting relationship between word and picture is created by the ambivalent and ostentatious nature of the photographic works. The sexualised motifs balance provocatively above the gulf between morality and taboos. And that is exactly where only art is allowed.

| INSPIRATIONS

Born in 1983 in Toulouse, the artist and photographer Philippe Shangti is the wild, young talent of the French art scene. He lives in the chic town of Saint-Tropez, where glamour and profligacy are as closely juxtaposed as nightlife and excess. It was 2008 when Shangti was first fêted in the art world for his photo series 'No Cocaine here', in which he made a sardonic style statement that brought together fantasy and reality. The truth again lies hidden in the images captured in his new photographic journey 'No Prostitution here'. An exciting relationship between word and picture is created by the ambivalent and ostentatious nature of the photographic works. The sexualised motifs balance provocatively above the gulf between morality and taboos. And that is exactly where only art is allowed. Six artist plates for delicate moments Villeroy & Boch has now commissioned Shangti to bring his art to the table. Six designs from the April 2016 exhibition 'No Prostitution here' have thus been applied to the plates of the successful Dune series. A Geisha on a golden foreground, a Japanese artist of entertainment selected as a motif by Shangti and L‘Opéra, forms only one of the artistic décors. Others display a décolleté covered with kiss imprints, or an opulent golden chastity belt. The text motifs are playful, ranging from 'Voulez vous manger avec moi le soir' to 'Taste me and reach orgasm' - referring of course to the meal presented on the plate. Further information about the artist: http://www.philippeshangtistudio.com/ http://www.opera-saint-tropez.com/fr/

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Photo courtesy of VILLEROY & BOCH © VILLEROY & BOCH

Photo courtesy of VILLEROY & BOCH © VILLEROY & BOCH

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Photo courtesy of VILLEROY & BOCH © VILLEROY & BOCH

Photo courtesy of VILLEROY & BOCH © VILLEROY & BOCH

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Photo courtesy of VILLEROY & BOCH © VILLEROY & BOCH

Photo courtesy of VILLEROY & BOCH © VILLEROY & BOCH

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PlusONE/ SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

ADDRESS BOOK

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ALMA KARINA

FRÉDÉRIC MANÉ

PASQUALE BRUNI

www.almakarina.com

www.fredericmane.com

www.pasqualebruni.com

BAVNA

GILAN

ROBERTO COIN

www.bavna.com

www.gilan.com

www.robertocoin.com

BORGIONI

GUCCI Jewelry & Timespieces

SICIS

www.borgionis.com

www.guccitimeless.com

www.sicis.com

BUDDHA MAMA

HARRY KOTLAR

SOTHEBY’S

www.buddhamama.com

www.harrykotlar.com

www.sothebys.com

BUTANI

LE VIAN

VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

www.butani.com

www.levian.com

www.vancleefarpels.com

CARATELL

LYDIA COURTEILLE

YANNIS SERGAKIS

www.caratell.com

www.lydiacourteille.com

www.yannissergakis.com

CARRERA Y CARRERA

MATTIA CIELO

YEWN

www.carreraycarrera.com

www.mattiacielo.com

www.yewn.com

CINDY CHAO

MAISON BOGHOSSIAN

YOKO LONDON

www.cindychao.com

www.bogh-art.com

www.yokolondon.com

DAMIANI

MAXIOR

ZOLOTAS

www.damiani.com

www.maxior.com.br

www.zolotas.gr

DE GRISOGONO

NOUDAR

www.degrisogono.com

www.noudar.com

DOVES BY DORON PALOMA

NIRAV MODI

www.dovesjewelry.com

www.niravmodi.com

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CONRADO / SHUTTERSTOCK . COM

www.jewelleryhistorian.com

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Jewellery Historian, #21  

Discover and read online, issue #21 of the Jewellery Historian, "the best kept secret in the world of luxury". www.jewelleryhistorian.com

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