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fter witnessing how “shocking logging and deforestation” was ing tree-free fibers into the marketplace makes denuding Costa Rica’s natural ecosystems, Stephen E. Baker decided to sense—it’s a good agricultural product people can make money growing, and we can use it. take on the wasteful world of office supplies, founding GreenLine Paper Company in 1992. Based out of Baker’s hometown of York, Pa., GreenLine is What sort of fun new products perfectly situated to serve the major metropolitan areas of the East Coast— have come out recently? think Dunder Mifflin with a green mission—and has recently expanded its We’re stocking pencils and rulers made from old blue jeans and old money [pictured]. There’s a free-shipping zone from New York City to Richmond, Va. We caught up with compostable barrel pen out therestage now by PaThe other non-meat takes center by bernard brown Baker to talk about the future of paper. perMate… it’s a vegetable-based pen, so you can

Tempeh Tantrum

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and the inside. In contrast to the earthy meatloaf, the vegan spring rolls were dominated by the carrot and onion inside; the marinated, ground tempeh gave them a hearty base that vegan dishes too often lack. Neither dish screamed tempeh, but they demonstrate how it can work as a sturdier foundation than its squishier cousin, tofu.

g sin Ri

The Land Steward Hardena, 1754 S. Hicks St. Tempeh is pretty much just tempeh at

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My Turn

The mission of Cities is to create aHardena, dialogue bea hole-in-the-wall Indonesian Then, I opened my refrigerator to develop a “what’s left in the restaurant at Hicks and Moore. You get fridge?” recipe featuring… you guessed it… tempeh. tween urban transportation officials, share best a plate of rice and pick what goes over it brick of tempeh from implementhe array of dishes behind the coun- 1 practices and advocate for the rapid tomato ter. I got the steamed vegetables, the col- 1 ¼ cup tahini tation of innovative design. This time theya came lard greens, large vegetable fritter and 3 tbsp. olive oil a heap of the tempeh, simply fried with garlic chili sauce to taste to Philadelphia—ranked highest in bicycle comparsley for garnish thick, sweet soy sauce. muters per capita among the 10 largest U.S. cities The Belgian Café, 2047 Green St. ˜Cut the tempeh half-inch cubes. Heat oil in a wok or byintodana henry (1.6 percent; nearly three times theTempeh national averprovides the body for vegetarian skillet over high heat and fry the tempeh until it’s golden brown Dr at Belgian Café, a Fairmont gas- and crispy on the outside (about 7 minutes). Dice tomatoes and age of 0.55 percent)—to check outdishes the goods. n tropub. The thick slice of vegan meatloaf add to the cooked tempeh, then turn off the heat. Spoon in tahini l The delegation included some was heavy hitters: rich with shitake and crimini mush- and as much chili sauce as you can stand, mix so everything is co ■ and walnut, crispy on the outside coated and sprinkle the parsley on top to garnish. + Lin Jon Orcutt, Director of Policy for rooms the New York Vegan City Department of Transportation, Robert meatloaf from the Belgian Café Burchfield, City Traffic Engineer for the City of Bernard’s ad hoc tempeh hash Portland DOT, Timothy Papandreou, Deputy Director of Transportation Planning and Development, San Francisco Metropolitan Planning Theand 25-employee operation offers canning food production is a year-round activi Agency, Eric Gilliland, Executive Director of NATCO. The farm itself is also a kind of ex and cheese-making for local food hobbyists, 2 Now, many of us love biking in Philadelphia— healthy snack-making and cooking classes for in agricultural restoration. When the p Erie Aand ve mostly the city is easy to navigate flat, and Cities for S EPTEMB ER 2011 GRIDPH I L LY. C O M 3 1 public school youth, and owners, Drew and Melissa Smith, bo there aretwo-year a few key agricultural Cycling tours andfarmers loads ofcommitted to apprenticeships forlanes young family farm Philadelphia 10 years ago—then name people out there ridG R I D P H I L LY. C O M O C TO BER 2009 P HOT OS BY LUCA S the HA R DI SON OB E R 20 0 9 G R I D P H I L LY.was COM 27 business of local organic growing. Farmers CreekOCTOrchards—it a 150-year-o Alleghe ing along with you— kidding about the geekery). Turns out urban cynbut give educational tours curious cropped soy and corn y Aother are wayvisitors, clists canand be divided into four groups: the tiny se- farm. Years of vetocities ahead ofand us inharvesting terms lection of “Strongand and Fearless,” the small group offer bi-weekly planting opporsynthetic fertilizing practices ha of infrastructure. Be- of “Enthused and Confident,” the large segment tunities for those who want to get their hands the soilAvofe its nutrients. The couple go tween 2006 and 2009, of “Interested but Concerned,” and the rest who rd fruit trees, diversifying the dirty. Their four-season and on-site planting eliminate this unique bicycling hazard. New York installed miles ofCSA new on-street say market, “No way, No How.” kfoMost policy is directed at Le200 hhas ighbuffered anConcerned,” Ave andmeat, Wait, what? A dozen transportation officials bike lanes. Portland coloredcheeses the “Interested aiming to makestrawberry patc sourcing regional produce, and but and introducing Frcrops from across the country are talking about im- lanes, bicycle boulevards, cycle tracks and bike urban cycling more attractive to that impressionbaked goods, gives testament that sustainable were able to purchase the developmen proving cycling Ri in Philadelphia? And they’re boxes. San Francisco has “floating bike lanes” able population. dgactually riding bikes? doing it while that shift when parking is permitted on striped Long story short, it’s all about the Benjamins, e What can I say—it Av was the most fantastic streets. It’s hard not to be jealous of those inno- er, the infrastructure. Sure, Philly showed off e afternoon of bike geekery I’ve experienced in vations. the newly paved lanes along Pine and Spruce, Diamon d St our ride, Cities the freshly striped lanes on South and Lommonths. The four-hour ride was part of a twoOn the evening following day visit to Philadelphia organized by Cities for representatives spoke at a MOTU forum at the bard around the South Street Bridge and the Cycling, a program led by the National Associa- Academy of Natural Sciences titled “Cities for lovely but crowded Schuylkill Banks Park, but ) ideas for how to reclaim the Dela(REVIweSITED (REAOfficials by still need tion of City Transportation (NATCO). Cycling: Riding the Innovation Line.” (I wasn’t L) V V ware Waterfront, improve bike access to the years ago during Ben Franklin Bridge and redesign the Two Spring T HE ROUTE Tyler Holmberg and hi Garden bike lanes. the University of Penn And that’s only the beginning. Girard Ave Can you imagine Sansom Street as a Bike terPreCenter for Commu ferred Corridor? Or cycle tracks on Broad and brainstorming started Girard? What about buffered lanes in ing the 5th the southern porti Fair 611 Street tunnel, or along the Chestnut and Walnut mou Garden into an operat nt A ve Street Bridges? I know I suffer from if-you-giveSt B den then, their vision has b Spring Gar Fr an Spring Garden St a-mouse-a-cookie syndrome, but what if Spruce kli Callowhill n last month, ground wa St Pk and Pine had “floating lanes” or bike boxes? 13 w y E XT R E M E LY E XT R E M E ; D E C I B E L M AG AZ I N E . C O M The next day, the delegation met with Mayor Nutter to discuss the overall state of bicycle in676  BUILDING COMMUN frastructure in Philadelphia, followed by meetJF Kenned Tyler Holmberg and st y Blvd Chestnu t St ings with city council to discuss legislative hurArch St 12 from the Urban Nutrit dles and past successes in other cities. You can Market St frame out raised beds Spruce St bet no one brought up bicycle license plates. ■ Chestnu t St

Longview Agricultural Center links communities through organic agriculture T BLVD

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VEL people together,” says J ood is a great way OSEbring ROto Brodsky, Greener Partners’ chief operating officer. At Longvi ricultural Center, a 90-acre certified organic farm in Collegev hub for Greener Partners, food is at the heart of their mission. ABOVE

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Can you imagine Sansom Street as a Bike Preferred Corridor? Or cycle tracks on Broad and Girard?

Lucas Hardison

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CITIES FOR CYCLING julie lorch Sun A Hit cowbellmagazine.com for more of his shots.

ace that Train!” yelled Alex Doty. A familiar site was before us: a CSX train slowly lurching towards the Locust Street crossing to Schuylkill Banks Park. Charles Carmalt, Pedestrian and Bicycle Coordinator for the Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities (MOTU), was already halfway across the tracks. About a dozen transportation officials from across the country quickly heeded Doty’s call, grabbed their bikes and raced across the tracks, narrowly escaping the certain doom of a blocked entrance. With everyone safely through—and still chuckling at the mayhem—the group discussed solutions to the bike versus train races that happen here daily. Doty, director of the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, beamed as he explained plans for the recently-funded Connector Bridge, an infrastructure project that will

RD

Royal Tavern, 937 E. Passyunk Ave. I had trouble fitting the Royal Tavern’s tempeh club into my mouth. The South Philly bar’s double-decker sandwich was packed with lettuce, tomato— marinated in soy sauce—and grilled tempeh (layer one), plus smoky veggie bacon (layer two), which itself is made from thinly-sliced tempeh, all on toasted multi-grain bread. Sometimes tempeh can be a little starchy to feature in a sandwich, but here the lettuce and tomato balanced it well. With fries, a pickle and a beer, it was a great low-on-the-food-chain take on a lunch standard.

St

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I ventured into our city in search of tempeh. Here’s what I found.

I’m a huge fan of the softer fresh tempeh, which you can purchase in South Philly corner markets near Hardena (see below), but opinions vary. As my friend Lillian puts it, “I like my tofu soft and my tempeh hard.” Either works great, be it cubed in a stew, chopped or ground up as a hearty base to a sauce, marinated and fried to munch on with ketchup, or stacked in a sandwich such as the classic tempeh Reuben (with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese and Russian dressing on rye).

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part of whether it and compost the rest e alldispose knowoftofu, as a food or a[picpunchline, waste paper and bales it, empowering the mill tured]. but what about tempeh? Just like tofu, tempeh is a susthat uses waste paper stock. It’s a strong message tainable alternative to animal products. Both are made that we want recycling to be an economically vi- Does GreenLine really ship products are probably the boxes? most resource-efficient way to able way of doing things. from soybeans, which in repurposed booze convert sunlight, airAbsolutely! and soil into picking tempeh Weprotein, work inso coordination [with]over aniproducts water, land,state greenhouse emissions and other What are more sustainablemal options for savesPennsylvania stores andgas pick up boxes on making paper than clear-cutting trees? a regular basis. doneathis since the beginpollution. The beans, however, goWe’ve through very different process to There are a lot of things we call tree-free source ning; I know of no other company reuses become tempeh—they’re essentially fermented by that a fungal culture. I fibers: kenaf, hemp, bamboo… and they are all cartons as we do. know, the idea of eating something after it’s been worked over by mold good, I think, as long as they are sustainably isn’t tooand appetizing, butmore trust me—or rather, trust millions of Indoneinformation and a complete line of produced. The best options are kenaf hemp: For sians who’ve been products, eating itvisit as agreenlinepaper.com staple protein source for centuries. they require very little maintenance, grow like . weeds and make excellent paper fiber. Introduc-

N Front

Why is switching to 100 percent recycled copier/printer paper the most important step toward “greening” an office or classroom? Offices should recycle their paper, of course— it’s a huge thing. When you buy recycled paper, you are “closing the loop” of the process. There has to be a viable market for waste paper when you recycle it… if there is no demand for recycled products, there is not demand for waste paper, and it just becomes trash to be disposed of. When you buy that recycled copy paper, you are empowering the commodities broker who collects

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Coffins rise from the… JA N UA RY 2 0 1 1 you know

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City Hall is one of four buildings that will undergo energy conservation measures.

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Director of Sustainability Rotted meat and for the City of Philadelphia potatoes

gruesome stuff relish Preferable to hot dogflavored water

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city-wide projects, such as the Philly Spring Cleanup and the campaign for smoke-free legislation, before accepting her current position. She’s extremely process-driven, which helps

matt putrid Drawn and quartered

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terrorizer

survival guide

Run away, run away from the pain

tombs of the blind dead Sic ’em, eyeless!

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LANDMINE MARATHON54 ince 2009, Katherine Gajewski has been Gajewski’s bread and butter from the 611 76 dead HAMMERS OF start, define her work still been the face of sustainability for thePatt isonand she’s Avitestill continues to 30 MISFORTUNE City. When she took the job, Green- to make Philadelphia a leader in sustainability. Decompose it yourself works Philadelphia, the City’s sustainability “Sustainability should be the new norm,” says ENTRAILS plan, had just launched. Gajewski was faced Gajewski. Thanks to her tireless implementahorrendous is a little closer with the formidable task of implementing the tion of Greenworks, the reality32 INSOMNIUM framework as well as overseeing a spectrum of to that ideal. —Samantha Wittchen Just chillin’ 58 projects that routinely cross departmental lines. MOURNFUL For some people, that might have been 34 crucified mortals CONGREGATION daunting, but Gajewski had been managing

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Katherine zombie inc. Surgical precision Don’t desist deceasin’ Gajewski 44 zombie apocalypse 42

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Julie Lorch is a student and bike enthusiast; she’s currently hard at work onDefiling where tothe G R I DISSUES P H I L LY. C O MTHEY DECEMBER 2011 PROJECTS6AND CHAMPION bike: philadelphia, an upcoming print guide to cycling in the city. 20 40

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Bartram’s Garden re tradition with a new BY DANIELcommunity center EKEROTH

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So, how was it? “Hot, dusty and awesome,” Nsays AV Hardison of the three-day party that featured highlightE sets by Gogol Bordello, Beirut, this month’s cover band My Morning Jacket (see p. ��), Mumford & Sons, Black Philly knows Tempeh Keys and others. “It’s a well-oiled machine at this point,” says Hardison. “It’s a beautiful thing to see such an enormous apparatus run so smoothly. Hippies get a bad rap, man. These guys have their shit together.”

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Guaranteed Nails, unpolished DEC 2011 // No. 086 Energy Savings 36 crypticus Project Three would be a crowd

q & a: tom savini Gray matters

the top 25 zombie metal songs of all time Every one you love is dead

the decibel hall of fame Deceased were true to their bloody roots on living dead love letter Fearless Undead


SUSTAINABLE PHILADELPHIA

profile

Vieux Carré absinthe, Bluecoat gin and Penn 1681 rye vodka, distilled in the Northeast, photographed at the Sidecar Bar & Grille at 22nd and Christian Sts.

Philly Distilled

The city’s first craft distillery hopes to replicate beer’s success

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raft beer has transformed the drinking scene in Philly over the past decade, growing from a niche tipple to a fixture at most bars. Now, the more rarefied—or just more determined at getting drunk faster—world of craft spirits is hoping for the same luck. At least, it will if Grid Magazine’s stated mission is to has inspire theto say about five-year-old, award-winning Philadelphia Distilling anything people of Philadelphia to create a more just, livable, how you spend your Friday nights out.

and sustainable city.

“It is happening, and the numbers prove it,” also feature the Penn 1681 rye vodka (the date says Andrew Auwerda, president of Philadel- commemorates the year when King Charles II Aside from the more technical, and for the most part phia Distilling (PD), about the growth of craft signed the charter for the Pennsylvania colony). invisible, roles played at Grid, I also served as a staff distilling. Made from locally-sourced organic rye, 1681 is Auwerda has more than just belief editor smooth and crisp, perfect for sipping or mixing photographer. Ashisaown photo and retoucher, this in his business going for him, though; his com- at your next green event. was a great opportunity to “put up or shut up.” pany’s flagship liquor, Bluecoat gin, just won the “We were asked by so many people to make 2009 Double Gold Medal at the San Francisco vodka, and we think it has the most relevance World Spirits Competition. Made with mostly to sell it in Pennsylvania, Delaware and New organic ingredients, including the juniper ber- Jersey,” Auwerda says of their decision to only ries that give gin its dry kick, Bluecoat is both distribute the vodka locally. homage to Philly’s revolutionary past and a very Pennsylvania farmers use rye as a cover crop, flavorful and smooth spirit. Its fragrant smell, meaning it helps maintain good soil, among othT and iconic deep blue bottle with gold lettering Her things. So, in a way, the more shots you down, exude class. the more you help our local farmland. “People really like the spirit,” says Auwerda Everything at PD is made in small batches of the gin, which is now distributed in 20 states to preserve quality and freshness. Bluecoat is I thought I should be working with the kids. But I quickly realized that “copper and two foreign countries. “They like the taste made in a uniquecollege-bound still designed for the people learn in different ways—some of the smartest people I’ve ever worked with were shop and the idea of a spirit like Bluecoat coming from company, and Penn teachers.” 1681 is distilled four times, Philly.” so only the most pure elements make it into the If you’re looking for a truly local spirit, they bottle. hat movie matinee tale— lovable underdogs, hard-earned success, colorful characters—does apply to West Philly’s Hybrid X Team, an afterschool program at the Auto Academy focused on building electric and hybrid cars. They’re currently participating in the Progressive Insurance Automotive X Prize (PIAXP) competition, an international contest that challenges teams to design, build and sell super-efficient, consumer-friendly cars. Prize money totals $10 million. The team has two cars in the hunt—a modified Ford Focus (bought for a good price from Pacifico Ford, a local dealership) and a GT, assembled from parts by the students and teachers. Both cars utilize plug-in hybrid technology and get over 100 mpg. The Focus features 81 batteries (in nine neat rows) and a modified motorcycle engine donated by Harley Davidson. The two-door GT has a Volkswagen diesel engine to augment an electric motor, and can go from zero to 60 in under five seconds. From the original 43 teams, only 22 remain. Big names like MIT and Tesla were eliminated during the “Shake Down” phase of tests and benchmarks. West Philly Hybrid X, the only high school team in the competition, is one of only two teams with cars in both the four-door

BACK FUTURE to the 12

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disney movie pitch: A group of high school kids (almost all African-American) from West Philadelphia build cars for an international competition, striving for a $10 million dollar prize. There’s a handsome, ambitious teacher, highly-funded, flashy competitors with big names (and budgets) by lee stabert and an environmental angle—these vehicles are designed to get over 100 miles per gallon. ¶ That’s a great story, one that’s familiar and easy to tell. But it might not be quite as interesting—or as important—as the messier narrative of how our society readies kids for a challenging future. If Philadelphia truly hopes to become the “most sustainable city in America,” creative, project-driven vocational education needs a place in the plan. 14

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The Hybrid X team behind their GT, including: Simon Hauger, far right; Ann Cohen, third from right; Gerry DiLossi, far left; Ron Preiss, fifth from left.

MOTOR CITY

Justin Clarke, 19, stands beneath Hybrid X's modified Ford Focus

—Simon Hauger, Team Director

“I worked with all the programs in the city,” says Cohen. “West stood out. They were producing the best kids, and I became a fan of Simon’s work.” Cohen started dragging her family to watch the Hybrid X Team compete, and eventually became involved with fundraising. “When it was time to retire, they had a wonderful position for me: full-time volunteer,” she quips. Ron Preiss and Gerry DiLossi, both former full-time mechanics, are teachers at Auto who devote tremendous time and resources to Hybrid X. They speak both personally and passionately about the impact vocational education can have on students. “This has been my thing from when I was a young boy,” says DiLossi. “My father had a garage up the street. Eleven years old, and I could walk three blocks and play mechanic.” The South Philly native was a school district employee for seven years, repairing buses and cars, before he became a teacher. In 1980, he started working towards his college degree, and graduated from Temple in ’98—his oldest son beating him to the cap and gown. Last year, DiLossi was recruited by Preiss to join the team at Auto. “The year before last, I was the only auto teacher here and I was getting my butt kicked,” explains Preiss, also a Philadelphia native who grew up in the far Northeast. His dad was a scientist, and he too grew up playing with motors and machines. “When I came out of high school, I knew where I was going,” he says. “Fixing cars was all I wanted to do.” After 17 years running a garage, he was hired by the school district. He’s also working towards a degree in education. Both men talk persuasively about the varied nature of talent and intelligence. If you can show the value of a lesson, kids will get excited. “I ran an auto shop, and I had people work for me who could not read, could not write their own name,” says

We don’t want to celebrate too much. We want to win the X Prize.”

TEAM BUILDING

West Philly’s Hybrid X Team builds green cars, and the case for vocational education

auger, a Drexel electrical engineering grad turned science and math teacher, launched the team 10 years ago. “At 24 years old, I thought everyone should go to college,” says Hauger. “I was placed in the Automotive Academy and I was quite disappointed that I was working with vo-tec [vocational tech] kids. I thought I should be working with the college-bound kids. But I quickly realized that people learn in different ways—some of the smartest people I’ve ever worked with were shop teachers.” As Hauger’s outlook shifted, he began to look for new ways to engage the teachers and the students. That’s when he created the afterschool program. Not originally designed with an environmental focus, the team encountered its muse in the form of an electric go-cart. “PECO was sponsoring an electric go-cart competition, and they donated one, so we had it in the shop,” recalls Hauger. “I challenged the kids to turn it into a science fair project, and they did exceptionally well. Kids from West Philly hadn’t done well in science fairs previous to that, so we wanted to do something bigger. The next logical step was an electric car.” Hauger has a low-key energy about him that belies an intense focus. His blog posts on the team’s website are casual yet detailed. He also has a sly sense of humor, referring to one round of “Shake Down” tests in the X Prize competition as “a bad proctology exam.” And the success he’s had with the team is simply astounding—they've won the Tour de Sol, an annual showcase for environmentally-friendly vehicles, three times. Hauger has had plenty of help. Team Manager Ann Cohen— who wrote about her disco-era passive house in May’s Grid— spent most of her career working as a union rep for the city. In the early ’90s, there was a dispute regarding contracts for

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and two-door divisions. This month, they’ll travel to Detroit for “Knock Outs,” another series of cuts and evaluations, including rigorous technical inspections, on-track events and emissions and mileage testing. “We have moments where we feel like we’re in way over our heads,” admits team director and founder Simon Hauger. “But then it dawns on me that everyone is taking us seriously. At the end of the day, we’re educators, and the fact that we’ve created this educational experience for our kids and they’re being put on a national stage, that’s really what we wanted. So, in many ways, I feel like we’ve won already.”

� Daniel Moore, junior

rebuilding engines and transmissions. “One day, one of the managers in the police department called me up,” explains Cohen. “He said, ‘Hey, would you mind if I sent some engines over to Edison High School to have them rebuilt?’ After I got done cursing him out—and filing a grievance—I called him back and said, ‘If you really want kids to get experience, then we’re doing a real internship program.’” In 1993, the city and the union launched a joint internship and apprentice program for the city’s automotive academies, moving students from high school into full-time jobs maintaining the city’s fleet. The program continues to this day. � J ULY 2 0 1 0

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The decision to create an absinthe (the first to be legally made in this area for over 100 years), though, speaks more to the company’s commitment to standWhere out inthere’s the liquor world. “We like to a will… zig when other I companies zag,” Auwerda boasts. “For Robert [Cassell, master distiller], absinthe is like a master’s degree. It’s challenging.” Another Double Gold Medal at the World Spirits Competition for their Vieux Carré absinthe shows that, for PD, it really isn’t much of a problem. (And if you like the flavors of anise and fennel— not to mention pretending to be a 19th century bohemian—you should give it a try). All of PD’s offerings are available at liquor stores throughout Philly, and they are planning on expanding into the beloved land of brown liquors within the next five years. Meanwhile, Nation they’re happy just carving out a Reclamation special With an emphasis onplace salvage, Greensaw pioneers a Slow Build philosophy in Philly’s local drinking history. “We believe in the Buy Local movement,” says Auwerda. “Don’t all of those people deserve a local, green spirit?” + ■ publisher

s there anything quite so complicated and unwieldy as a big city public school system? Yes, the school district takes a lot of flack—and much of it is deserved. But truth is, the district’s responsible for educating some of the city’s most at-risk students while fighting a constant battle of attrition—concerned parents who can afford to do so often move out of the district—all with a budget that’s acutely susceptible to the whims of the greater economy and ideologue state politicians.

This is meant neither as apology nor slam. That’s not GRID’s gig. Think of this more as a practical acknowledgement: Making city schools function is a hard job, and we’re reasonably sure that most of those tasked with it—particularly those interacting with kids day in, day out—bust their butts because they recognize what hangs in the balance. Which is why, with Philly’s schools gearing up for fall session fresh off an astonishing, and very well-publicized $629 million budget shortfall, our look at sustainability in schools focuses a bit on what’s at risk, a bit on programs that are thriving in the face of adversity, and a bit on programs fighting to quell the damage. In our main story, Liz Pacheco looks into a controversial plan that would convert many school cafeterias to pre-plated, or “satellite,” meals. The decision was made to help close that budget gap by saving the district a couple million dollars. But advocates for better school lunches— including representatives of the Food Trust, Fair Food and our cover model, student activist Seth Brown of the Philadelphia Urban Food and Fitness Alliance—wonder at what ultimate cost. The satellite lunches, at least from what we’ve seen reported (GRID requested and was denied a sample lunch) may technically be nutritionally sound, but they sure look unappealing. Despite the setback, the organizations behind Philadelphia’s chapter of the forward-thinking Farm to School program, which brings farm-fresh food to school cafeterias, continue to push. Ariela Rose tells you about the West Philadelphia Alliance for Children’s efforts to reopen closed school libraries, and also gets her grow on with Howard Brosius, the man behind the ingenious Chipping Hill Micro Farms—small, heated, covered beds that will allow for yearround agricultural education, even through our frigid winters.

Alex Mulcahy 215.625.9850 ext. 102 alex@gridphilly.com editor-in-chief

Brian Howard brian.howard@gridphilly.com editor at large

Felicia D’Ambrosio felicia@gridphilly.com managing editor

Liz Pacheco liz@gridphilly.com

associate editor

Ariela Rose ariela@gridphilly.com art director

Jamie Leary jamie@gridphilly.com designer

Melissa McFeeters distribution

Claire Connelly 215.625.9850 ext. 107 claire@gridphilly.com copy editor

Andrew Bonazelli

production artist

Lucas Hardison writers

Pacheco also tagged along with a group of students at the George W. Pepper Middle School who call themselves the Southwest Child Rebel Gardeners; along with tending their own impressive school plot, they’re teaming up with the endangered Eastwick Common Grounds community garden. Which is all kind of inspiring; despite difficult times in one of the most labyrinthine of city bureaucracies, great, sustainable, grassroots ideas continue to find a way.

Shaun Brady Bernard Brown Tenaya Darlington Brian Freedman Lucas Hardison Lindsay Lidge Joy Manning Char Vandermeer Tyler Weaver Samantha Wittchen intern

Kelly Clayton

photographers

Charles Bartholomew Lucas Hardison Michael Perisco Gene Smirnov Emily Wren Albert Yee illustrator

Melissa McFeeters ad sales

Brian Howard, Editor-in-Chief brian.howard@gridphilly.com

Alex Mulcahy 215.625.9850 ext. 102 alex@gridphilly.com bookeeper

Alicia McClung published by

Red Flag Media 1032 Arch Street, 3rd Floor Philadelphia, PA 19107 215.625.9850 G R I D P H I L LY . C O M

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SEPTEMBER 2011

by lee stabert

Often lost in the shuffle of cutting-edge technology and innovative techniques is the fact that the greenest buildings are those you don’t build. Reuse and renovation are essential elements of environmentally-sensitive construction. The world is full of viable materials, requiring only the vision to see their value. Greensaw Design & Build has cultivated a business on that particular skill, spotlighting salvaged and reclaimed materials in all their work. Owner Brendan Jones is currently completing a renovation that exemplifies this approach and aesthetic—a home at 8th and Federal reimagined as the first “Slow Build” project. The South Philly rowhouse has been transformed, and the eye is drawn to myriad examples of exquisite work: an old Dietz & Watson freezer door (bought for $50) rejuvenated as an entryway to the basement, a patch of vintage wallpaper visible through a window in the wall, tile from the Divine Lorraine Hotel given new life in a bright, airy bathroom and a backyard garden (installed by Grace Wicks of Graceful Gardens) blooming with chilies, kale and bamboo. “The idea of Slow Build is using reclaimed materials and implementing them in a way that’s going to last 200 years instead of 50,” explains Jones. “We also focus on providing jobs and labor. Making something that lasts and using materials that you don’t get a second chance on calls for a high level of craftsmanship.” Green systems and finishes are also essential—the house features top-of-the-line, energy-efficient appliances (with the washer and dryer being the exception; they were “salvaged” from Jones’ aunt’s house), radiant floors and a dual-flush toilet from Greenable. Most of the elements that now comprise this stunning home were destined for a landfill—a forceful testament to Greensaw’s philosophy. The company’s other current projects include a Society Hill home and a mixed-use space on Girard Avenue, planned as Pennsylvania’s first LEED Platinum renovation project. “Both my parents were journalists,” explains Jones. “I was always brought up with stories. The coolest thing about this is that every little piece has a story, and it just beats going to the Home Depot and grabbing a bunch of material. Everything has so much history. We even get the framing from struck movie sets.”

Bluecoat gin and Penn 1681 rye vodka are available at all state stores; Vieux Carré absinthe is available at Premium Collection stores like 1913 Chestnut St., 724 South St. and 1940 S. Christopher Columbus Blvd. Or, ask for them at your local watering hole.

Preiss. “There was at time when that was OK. But now, you need to be able to write descriptively and explain yourself well so you can get paid. A guy might write down, ‘RR Alternator,’ but he never wrote down the fact that it took him two hours to find the problem. So, he didn’t get paid for those two hours. Descriptive writing—being able to write down everything you did on that service order—is what puts money in your pocket. Some kids who are graduating from high school can’t do that.” DiLossi argues that project-based education can provide a dynamic learning experience. “Learning how to read manuals, that’s important,” he says. “In the auto field, you need science—hydraulics is important. And they learn the chemistry of biodiesel. And math, they have to know fractions; they have to know metric. And you have to know angles for alignment. It’s important to know these things.” Hauger agrees. “From an educational standpoint, we try to frame out a problem with the kids,” he says. “There’s just so much rich learning to be done in a project like this. And I don’t want to underestimate the amount of knowledge we’ve accumulated over the last 10 years. We’re not automotive engineers, but we’re also not just a bunch of teachers who are doing it for the first time. If you look at the cars we built the first year, and the cars we’re building now, there’s a huge difference. We’ve really taken the X Prize rules very seriously—we’re building cars that consumers will want.”

T

by Will Dean

hen, of course, there are the students. After a chat with the grown-ups, Cohen and Hauger pass me along to three of their team members for a tour. These young men are no strangers to press interviews—their composure and kindness signal a maturity that doesn’t often come to teens before they’ve worked really hard on something they care about. Daniel Moore, a 17-year-old junior, helped out last year, but has been an integral member of the team since October. “I got interested because I like cars,” he says. “And I like being on a team that actually built a car that’s running.” Moore enjoys drawing, as well as building things, so he’s thinking about a career as an architect. When asked how the team celebrates

For more on Greensaw Design & Build, visit greensawdesign.com

Breathing Room Indoor air quality consultants work on the space between the walls by ariela rose

from health problems caused by indoor environmental conditions for nearly 12 years. Realizing that information about these issues was not readily available to the public, the couple launched Healthy Spaces. The Quigleys assist clients with a variety of ailments, including ADHD, autism, cancer, building “illness” and a general feeling of not being well. The company evaluates a client’s home or office in an effort to understand the root cause of these issues. “It is always based on the client or occupant’s needs,” says Jim, “but it usually revolves around one or more common issues—biological contaminants like mold or bacteria; common chemical contaminants like formaldehyde and pesticides; and particulates like metals, dust, lead, mercury and arsenic.” Information on the space is gleaned via a

phone conversation, home visit and completed questionnaire. If necessary, the work may also include lab testing of specific indoor quality elements. Healthy Spaces will also assist aspiring home owners as they embark on buying or building, recommending healthier green materials, paint, furnishings and construction practices. “Consumers should trust their senses and instincts,” says Quigley. “If a building smells, or if they just don’t feel right while in the home, either get it evaluated before buying or move on to the next home. One trick is to notice how they feel after they leave the home; do they have a runny nose, a sore throat, itchy eyes, a headache?”

P HOTO BY L UCAS HARDIS ON

The safety and health of a building is often determined by the soundness of the structure— walls that are well-insulated, sturdy floors and a roof that doesn’t leak. What happens inside the walls can be overlooked. Healthy Spaces, a Delaware Valley-based company, specializes in helping Pennsylvanians understand that the conditions inside a building are just as important as the exterior. Founders Jim and Theresa Quigley suffered

For more information, visit healthyspaces.com or contact info@healthyspaces.com, 215-233-1852

DELAWARE VALLEY GREEN BUILDING COUNCIL 2010 | GREENPRINT | 7


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GIFT GUIDE

Words and Photos

Ikea gift certificate? C’mon, you can do better than that. Once the tinsel comes down that special homebody on your list will be thankful to have new (or old) curios and oddities to deck the halls. Making use of antiques is a great way to lessen your impact this gifting season, and classy!

How lucky we are to live and shop in Philadelphia. We can bypass box stores and their buffet of bland and cheaply made goods and instead, we can choose thoughtful gifts, sold to us by our neighbors. When we give our gifts, we’ll know our family and friends will recognize the thought and care taken in our selections. And the best part—the whole time we will be stirring the local economy. When compiling our gift guide, we asked four questions of every item: 1 Is it locally made? 2 Is it made from sustainable

materials? 3 Can it be purchased from a

locally-owned business? 4 Is it awesome?

If the answer was “yes” to question four, and at least one other, it had a chance to make the cut.

We organized the guide by personality type: The Foodie, Bookworm, Nester, Pipsqueak, Fair Lady, Chic Geek and Gardener.

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The list is by no means comprehensive. There are oodles of things we would have loved to include if we had infinite space. But we hope the guide gives you the spark to take to the streets, enjoy where you live and find your holiday treasures.

1 BIRD AND BLOSSOM PILLOW Women in

the rural Kathmandu Valley of Nepal sew recycled fabric into lovely pillow covers with help from the Association for Craft Producers, which provides design and marketing services to low-income artiWhat do you do for the literati on your sans. $38 at Ten Thousand Villages list? You gave them all Snuggies® last year. Well, Philadelphia has no shortage of cozy bookstores to spend a little quiet time on your shopping spree. Complete the scene with a blanket and cup of tea and you’ve just made winter somebody’s favorite season.

written & curated by KATIE WINKLER™photos by LUCAS HARDISON & MELISSA M FEETERS

BOOKWORM

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What do you do for the literati on your list? You gave them all Snuggies® last year. Well, Philadelphia has no shortage of cozy bookstores to spend a little quiet time on your shopping spree. Complete the scene with a blanket and cup of tea and you’ve just made winter somebody’s favorite season.

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1 BIRD AND BLOSSOM PILLOW Women in

the rural Kathmandu Valley of Nepal sew recycled fabric into lovely pillow covers with help from the Association for Craft Producers, which provides design and marketing services to low-income artisans. $38 at Ten Thousand Villages

2 NAPKIN RINGS Designed by Pennsyl-

high-quality scrap hardwood, these bookmarks by Beacon Bookmarks (Beacon, N.Y.) feature original drawings and prints from vintage rubber letter stamps. $7 at Art Star Boutique

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16 SEEDS OF DISCENT A novel about rebuilding cities greenward in the face of America’s failing economy. Written by Nic Esposito, a Philadelphia urban farmer.

drops automatically during writing. Made from recycled paper and recycled rubber. $4.99 at Big Green Earth Store

$20 PM at seedsofdiscent.com 12/1/2011 4:52:42

GLASSES CASE Keep your glasses cozy

and protected in one of these Philly-made cases hand-sewn from recycled materials. $12 at Samantha Moore on Etsy

17 THE MEOWMORPHOSIS The latest in the remixed classics series from Old City’s Quirk Books, The Meowmorphosis features Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis, but with a man-sized kitten. $12.95 at Headhouse Books

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vania makers Jonathan and Julia Spoons, these cherry wood napkin rings feature decorative carvings and flame-blackened edges. $18 at Center for Art in Wood

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8 CRATES Sturdy vintage wooden crates

houseware (and great gift) from an online Philadelphia antique shop. $28 at Hoof and Antler on Etsy

that make great rustic display pieces and fun forms of storage. $30 at Hoof and Antler on Etsy

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9 PHILADELPHIA MAP Hand-drawn, screen-printed posters, maps, charts and diagrams by Peaceful Traveler/Wicked Wanderer. $26 at Fabric Horse or peacefultraveler.org

great way to keep those office necessities close to your desk. Made from recycled felt. $70 at AIA Bookstore 5 CANDLE HOLDER Recycled glass mosaic candleholder made by artisans working with Noah’s Ark in Moradabad, India, an organization that provides education and medical treatment for artisans and their families. $16 at Ten Thousand Villages

hoods. $24.99 at AIA Bookstore Stuff that stocking with delectables and equip your LEAF favorite withto the 2 RISHI LOOSE TEAfoodie BAGS Easy finest kitchenwarefully Philly has to offer. fill, chemical-free, biodegradable Or, if you’re looking to keep gasnatural tea filters made with those cellulose and trophiles busy$5 this manila hemp. at winter, Cook set them up with a canning system… or even better, a homebrewing kit. Festive!

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14 “BRAIN COLUMN” BOWL Daniel Teran’s etched pottery reminds you to slow down and enjoy life. $45 at The Clay Studio

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15 LETTERPRESS LETTERS Vintage wooden letterpress type blocks, wonderfully weathered and perfect for a home or office. About $4 per letter at Hoof and Antler on Etsy

11 TAKE A SEAT COASTERS Wooden coasters, hand-rubbed with tung oil. Hand drawn chairs have been etched on the cherry wood and tiny pieces have been cut away. Set of four. $28 at Art Star Boutique

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13 GREEN MOSS ORNAMENT Vibrant green reindeer moss encased in a threeinch round glass ball ornament made by Square Pin (also available in red). $8 at Square Peg Artery & Salvage

10 GLASS CONTAINERS Vintage-inspired glass apothecary jars with aged metal lids. $18-$20 at Three Potato Four

FOODIE

WILSON’S SOAPS A failed attempt to

open a biodiesel plant in Philadelphia led to making soap the old fashioned way— with soybean oil, coconut oil and natural plant-based essential oils. $4 at VIX Emporium or wilsonssoap.com

ing the seconds until the end of class, but would be a great addition to a workshop or home. $45 at Hoof and Antler on Etsy

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houseware (and great gi Philadelphia antique sho and Antler on Etsy

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great way to keep those 12 close to your desk. Made felt. $70 at AIA Booksto

5 CANDLE HOLDER Recy 3 URBAN APIARIES HON

candleholder made by ar city-dwelling honeybees, with Noah’s Ark in Morad labeled by zip code. $5-$ organization that provid Honey Market, Green Ais medical treatment for ar Food Farmstand families. $16 at Ten Thou

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4 ORGANIC FAIR TRADE 6 RED BOOTS DESIGN W leaf teas from Cook come BOTTLE OPENER Handm

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6 BLANKET Woven from

fibers by families in the t Katakora, Bolivia. Ten Th sells the villagers’ work a design assistance. $195 a Villages

7 COFFEE MUG Ceramic m a member of the Pennsy Craftsmen-Haverford Ch able and oven-safe. $16 a originally designed for sa $160-$190 at Art In The Awl on Etsy

helps you safely and easily handle hot jars and lids, measure headspace and remove air bubbles (jars sold separately). $17.50 at Greensgrow Farms, Rittenhouse Hardware, 10th St. Hardware and Fantes. 3 PRELOVED MITTENS C Quality never goes out of style, and 4 JIN-JA This all-natural 2 STARGAZERS TRADITIONAL BRUT Starmade from sweater remn nothing says quality like handcrafted is a blend of ginger, cayen gazers Vineyard in Coatesville, Pa. uses garments from your local neighborhood for maximum warmth. $2 mint, green tea and suga sustainable practices to grow their grapes, Boutique artisans. Do yourself a favor and visit of Philadelphia lawyer Re and solar power provides electricity for Philly’s charming boutiques instead 4 LEATHER Jin-Ja claimsWINGSPAN to increaseS the winery and their home. The Traditionof clawing your way through the big Handmade in and Philly ERS improve digestion re al Brut is a blend of Pinot and Chardondepartment store crowds. And the best leather by Canoe inflammation. $15Crafts. at Gre$ nay. $21 at Stargazers Vineyard part? You’ll find better gifts! You know Boutiqe or Canoe Crafts and Pumpkin Market 3 REANIMATOR she deserves it. COFFEE Fishtown’s Re5 MOON & ARROW PONC 5 CELEBRATE VEGAN Dy Animator Coffee provides freshly roasted, 1 BOOK JEWELRY Handmade necklace using high quality vintage age makes vegan cooking sustainable, single-origin coffee delivered with a tiny leather-bound book. By Minna wools sourced locally by celebrations more enjoya by bike. $15 at Green Aisle Grocery, Aaparyti, owner of The Craft Foundry in owner of Moon & Arrow. collection of recipes from consumer recycled mater Quince Fine Foods, Sue’s Produce MarKensington. Craft classes also available. Arrow. the globe. $17.95 at Josea water-based adhesives ket, One Shot Coffee, Grindcore House $58 at The Craft Foundry dyes. $89.95 at Philadel and Whipped Bakeshop 6 KNIT HAT Hand-knit h 2 PEG AND AWL TOTE Sturdy and stylowner of Nice Things HanP 3 FINGERLESS GLOVES Fingerless gloves? Check. Woolleather, socks? ish, this tote, made with antique Nice Thingsuse Handmade et’s gloves wool from Check. Handcrafted hat and shirt? vintage fabrics and waxed canvas, was and deerskin on 18 JANUARY 201 warmers 2 Chic! GRIDPHILLY.COM Don’t be Scrooge-y. That PAwarm and stretchy. Choo manufactured folding bike isn’t going at pimpgloves.com. $65 to put itself under the tree. The stylin’

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vania makers Jonathan a these cherry wood napki decorative carvings and edges. $18 at Center for

Earl Grey and Chamomile vaged wood and screenThe tins are reusable. $8 ors and designs. $28-$32 5 FABRIC HORSE Th Handmade or RedBAG Boots backpack pairs old-schoo rable and water-resistan 1 LEVERAGE: STRENGTHENING NEIGH16 GRIDPHILLY.COM JANUA RY 201and 2 cordura fabrics. Allow BORHOODS THROUGH DESIGN The Comcustom orders. $78 at Fa munity Design Collaborative highlights 20 Fabric Horse products fo of their 600 projects from the past two Revolutions, Firehouse B decades to show how design is bringing Bike Shop) positive change to Philadelphia neighbor-

15 DAVID COPPERFIELD Find your favorite bookworm a special read at one of Philadelphia’s fine used bookstores. Wooden Shoe, Brickbat Books, Bookspace, Book Trader

10 LITTLE OTSU WEEKLY PLANNER No ordinary planner, each weekly spread features a different drawing to inspire organization. $18 at Art Star Boutique

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PEG AND AWL BOOKENDS Made of

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1 7 VINTAGE GENERAL ELECTRIC SCHOOLROOM WALL CLOCK Reminds us of count-

vaged wood and screen-printed in fun colors and designs. $28-$32 at Nice Things Handmade or Red Boots Design on Etsy

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fibers by families in the tiny village of Katakora, Bolivia. Ten Thousand Villages sells the villagers’ work and offers product design assistance. $195 at Ten Thousand Villages 7 COFFEE MUG Ceramic mug by Ken Beiler, a member of the Pennsylvania Guild of Craftsmen-Haverford Chapter. Microwaveable and oven-safe. $16 at VIX Emporium

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Ikea gift certificate? C’mon, you can do better than that. Once the tinsel comes down that special homebody on your list will be thankful to have new (or old) curios and oddities to deck the halls. Making use of antiques is a great way to lessen your impact this gifting season, and classy!

14 LIBRARY BOOK NOTEBOOKS Overdue Industries takes cast-off books and gives them new life as journals filled with recycled paper and bound by recycled steel. $18 at VIX Emporium

6 BLANKET Woven from alpaca wool

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oak reclaimed from old shipping crates, painted with milk paint and finished with tung oil. Silhouettes come from profile shots of infamous female criminals. $60$75 at Peg and Awl on Etsy

9 WOODEN BOOKMARKS Crafted from

backpack pairs old-school class with a durable and water-resistant waxed canvas and cordura fabrics. Allow three weeks for custom orders. $78 at Fabric Horse (other Fabric Horse products found at Bicycle Revolutions, Firehouse Bicycles and Bell’s Bike Shop)

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spoon with decorative carvings and flame-blackened edges designed by Pennsylvania makers Jonathan and Julie Spoons. $18 at Pennsylvania General Store in Reading Terminal Market

5 FABRIC HORSE BAG This handmade

2 RISHI LOOSE LEAF TEA BAGS Easy to fill, chemical-free, fully biodegradable natural tea filters made with cellulose and manila hemp. $5 at Cook

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city-dwelling honeybees, this honey is labeled by zip code. $5-$10 at Milk & Honey Market, Green Aisle Grocery, Fair Food Farmstand leaf teas from Cook come in blends like Earl Grey and Chamomile Medley. Bonus: The tins are reusable. $8 at Cook

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8 MOONSPOON Cherry wood honey

4 ORGANIC FAIR TRADE TEAS These loose

BORHOODS THROUGH DESIGN The Community Design Collaborative highlights 20 of their 600 projects from the past two decades to show how design is bringing positive change to Philadelphia neighborhoods. $24.99 at AIA Bookstore

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Stuff that stocking with delectables and equip your favorite foodie with the finest kitchenware Philly has to offer. Or, if you’re looking to keep those gastrophiles busy this winter, set them up with a canning system… or even better, a homebrewing kit. Festive!

GREEN THUMB

1 PRESERVING SET The Ball Utensil Set helps you safely and easily handle hot jars and lids, measure headspace and remove air bubbles (jars sold separately). $17.50 at Greensgrow Farms, Rittenhouse Hardware, 10th St. Hardware and Fantes. 2 STARGAZERS TRADITIONAL BRUT Star-

gazers Vineyard in Coatesville, Pa. uses sustainable practices to grow their grapes, and solar power provides electricity for the winery and their home. The Traditional Brut is a blend of Pinot and Chardonnay. $21 at Stargazers Vineyard 3 REANIMATOR COFFEE Fishtown’s Re-

Animator Coffee provides freshly roasted, sustainable, single-origin coffee delivered by bike. $15 at Green Aisle Grocery, Quince Fine Foods, Sue’s Produce Market, One Shot Coffee, Grindcore House and Whipped Bakeshop

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15 4 JIN-JA This all-natural, herbal tonic is a blend of ginger, cayenne, lemon, mint, green tea and sugar. The creation of Philadelphia lawyer Reuben Canada, Jin-Ja claims to increase metabolism, improve digestion and reduce arthritic inflammation. $15 at Green Aisle Grocery and Pumpkin Market 5 CELEBRATE VEGAN Dynise Balcavage makes vegan cooking for traditional celebrations more enjoyable with this collection of recipes from holidays across the globe. $17.95 at Joseph Fox Bookshop

6 ALMOST MEATLESS Not interested in going vegetarian? Here’s some recipe inspiration for a more modest intake of meat. By Philadelphia’s Joy Manning and Tara Mataraza Desmond. $22.50 at Cook

8 WHISKEY STONES Made from natural soapstone by Vermont craftsmen, these stones put a slight chill in your whiskey without diluting it or adding unwanted flavors. $19.95 at Art In The Age

7 RHUBY In 1771, Ben Franklin sent John

9 TOWEL Flour sack kitchen towels by the Philadelphia-based designer Girls Can Tell feature ingenious diagrams of everyday technologies, foods and places. $14 at VIX Emporium, Nice Things Handmade, Girls Can Tell Shop

Bartram America’s first rhubarb seeds. Bartram brewed a garden tea from the seeds. This year, Art in the Age took Bartram’s recipe and created a unique certified-organic spirit. $30+ in most liquor stores.

HOMEBREW BEGINNER’S EQUIPMENT KIT Pick up a new hobby and create a

fresh brew with this beginner’s setup. The kit and ingredient package provide almost everything you need to start brewing (bottles not included). $69.95 at Home Sweet Homebrew WOOD BURNED SPOONS Fun and quirky

designs burned into wooden spoons by Philadelphia’s Lorraine Daliessio. $18 at VIX Emporium

CUTTING BOARD Made from the beams of demolished local factories, these Philly-crafted cutting boards by Bolle Designs have amazing character. $30-$200 at Art In The Age

LAMB RAGU Green Aisle Grocery partners with area restaurants to carry some of their specialty products, like LeVirtu’s Lamb Ragu, made from Lancaster County lamb shoulder. $13 at Green Aisle Grocery

GINGER PEAR PRESERVES Preserves from La Copine made with Bosc pears from Three Springs Fruit Farm in Wenksville, Pa. $10 at Green Aisle Grocery

CORE BAMBOO BOWL Crafted from 100% organically-grown bamboo this bucket bowl is chic, practical and great for salads and snacks. Small $28, Large $45 at Center For Art In Wood

STRAWBERRY VANILLA SYRUP Local

fruit syrup made by the La Copine brunch truck. A great addition to holiday morning pancakes. $10 at Green Aisle Grocery

PHILADELPHIA CHOCOLATE COLLEC-

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grid_features_2012.01.indd 18 get there with help to go and how to

JOHN & KIRAS CHOCOLATE BEES Salted caramel chocolate bees made with fragrant basswood honey from Draper Family Apiaries in Millerton, Pa. $25 at Cook, Weaver’s Way, Di Bruno Brothers and the Fair Food Farmstand

G R I DP H I L LY. C O M

from GRID’s good friend, Julie Lorch’s Where to Bike: Philadelphia.

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mote timeless style, perfect fit and perGREEN THUMB sonalized details. Custom shirt about $175

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2 OWLY SHADOW PUPPET A perfect ac-

6 NEEDLINGS OWL Plush owls made by

companiment for storytelling time. $12 at Art Star Boutique

You’ve made your list and checked it twice, but it doesn’t really matter if they’re naughty or nice—you still have to get something for the rugrats. It’s actually not that hard to avoid the trappings of Saturday morning cartoon merch and drop something special down the chimney. The kids are gonna love it.

3 COLOR YOUR OWN PLUSH Greenstar Studio combines two favorite toys: coloring book and a stuffed friend. $15 at Square Peg Artery and Salvage

hand with eco-friendly felt in Canada. $30 at Nice Things Handmade or Needlings on Etsy

1 LITTLE MONSTER HOODIE & PLUSH TOY Hand-stitched by Philadelphia’s

5 GREEN TOYS TOOLSET No job is too big with this environmentally-friendly tool kit. 15-piece set. $19.89 at Save Some Green

Diane Koss. Hoodie $45, toy $29 at P.POD (located inside the Philadelphia Museum of Art) or Cutesy But Not Cutsey on Etsy.

4 LONGBOARD Arbor skateboards and

snowboards use sustainable-certified wood cores and water-based finishes. Decks are gripped with crushed recycled glass. $135-$170 at Human Zoom

7 POWERHOUSE This interactive kit lets kids build models of a greenhouse, a solar cell array, a wind power generator and more. $129.99 at Franklin Institute Gift Shop 8 SEPTA WOODEN RAILWAY What kid

isn’t fascinated by trains? Give them the gift of these classics with a Philly twist! $14.99-$26.99 at O’Doodles or Franklin Institute Gift Shop

9 VENUS FLY TRAP This itty-bitty Venus Fly Trap will bring endless hours of entertainment. $7-$10 at Primex Garden Center and City Planter 10 CRITTER CARRIERS Made by Jurgita Cenkute of BedHeadSheep using wool felting techniques. $45 at Art Star Boutique 11 KNIT ANIMAL MITTENS The only mittens that come as opposing animal rivalry pairs. Made by Vs. Mittens. $30-$40 at Square Peg Artery and Salvage

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2 BROOKS BIOMOGO SNEAKERS These

sneaks have the biodegradWinter can be a first-ever trying time for the able midsole, withthe 75% postgardener, butare youmade can give gift that keeps on growing. Cultivate some holiday cheer with gifts from Philly’s best local garden centers. Keep it up and you’ll be a perennial contender for Santa’s favorite little helper.

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thank you. Then you can tell him where

TION Philadelphia has seen hundreds of confectioners, and this box of chocolates represents some of the best still in operation today. $25.99 at Pennsylvania General Store

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CHIC GEEK

2 0 GRIDPHILLY.COM JANUA 2 urbanite in your life won’t know howRY to 2014 RELOAD FLIGHT PACK

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Great for starting seedlings, Hydrofarm’s grow light system is easy to assemble and comes with a one-year warranty. $69.99 at Primex

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waterproof backpack ha weight and waterproof li waxed brown canvas out Reload Bags, Bicycle Rev Therapy and Firehouse B

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5 ENDLESS HATS Made garden. $98 at City Plant ber of Bloomsburg, Pa., t hats are a great addition 3 WORTH TRANSPLANT ter wardrobe. $45 atofBicy garden tool is made he

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aluminum withSOCKS standard 6 WOOLRICH Dur surements. $12.95 at Urb a lifetime guarantee. The

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rooftop farm project in W buying a tote bag. $10 @ blogspot.com 5 BIRDHOUSE Recycled

forms unwanted furniture kind birdhouses. $50-$89 Heirloom Home & Studio 2 OWLY SHADOW PUPP Rowhouse on Etsy companiment for storyte Art Star Boutique 6 MUD GLOVES Made fro

organic cotton anPLU ex 3 COLOR YOURwith OWN You’ve made your andHerb checked it delphia-made Shiftlist Space Garden coating. $12 at City Plant Studio combines two fav twice, butfor it adoesn’t really matter if is perfect beginner’s vertical wall oring book and a stuffed they’re naughty or nice—you still have Square Peg Artery and S to get something for the rugrats. It’s actually not that hard to avoid the 4 LONGBOARD Arbor ska 2 2 GRIDPHILLY.COM JANUARY 201 2 trappings of Saturday morning cartoon snowboards use sustaina merch and drop something special wood cores and water-ba down the chimney. The kids are gonna Decks are gripped with cr grid_features_2012.01.indd 17 love it. glass. $135-$170 at Hum

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Grid Gift Guide 2011 Curated by Katie Winkler and the Grid staff Design and Art Direction by Melissa McFeeters

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TOY Hand-stitched by Philadelphia’s

Diane Koss. Hoodie $45, toy $29 at P.POD (located inside the Philadelphia Museum of Art) or Cutesy But Not Cutsey on Etsy.

5 GREEN TOYS TOOLSET

with this environmentall 15-piece set. $19.89 at Sa


SUSTAINABLE PHILADELPHIA

/ chef ’s plate

Local Ingredients at Café Estelle

Thai Style Chile Paste by marshall green, café estelle 1 4-6 ¼ 2 1½

Taste the homestyle flavor at this open-kitchen eatery by stephanie singer

O

n the evening that his grandmother, Estelle, passed away, Mar-

˜Wash and dry chiles. Roughly chop, removing and discarding stems. Add all ingredients to a medium non-reactive pot. ˜Bring to boil over medium heat, stirring to prevent scorching. Turn heat to low and simmer for 20-30 min. until chilies are soft. Remove from heat. ˜Add contents to the bowl or a food processor and pulse untilFOODsmooth but chunky; taste to adjust seasonings. · ITTY BITTY BREWERY ˜Cool completelyW and store covered in I’m not a particularly hop-forward brewer. I don’t like it to be ‘all refrigerator for up to three months. hops’ or ‘all seasoning.’

Examples photos shot forheGrid Magazine. shallof Green told her that would open a restaurant and name it after

her. Thatby promise was fulfilled November 1,and 2007, whenLeary. Café EsPage layouts designers MelissaonMcFeeters Jamie telle opened its doors. Located between Spring Garden and Callowhill Streets, the restaurant is set back off of 4th Street in the 444 N. 4th condo building. Its menu features locally grown and organic vegetables, free range organic brown eggs, and / tempeh house-smoked and -cured meats and fish. “Philadelphia is such a rich agricultural area,” Green Tempeh Tantrum enthuses. The restaurant’s owner and head chef Wisn’t just talking about Jersey tomatoes and corn, but “local cheese, eggs, lamb, coffee and so much more. I want to serve the best, freshest ingredients because it tastes better.” Green grew up in a house that his family rented on a corn farm outside of Philadelphia. From a young age, he and his mother canned tomaThe other non-meat takes center stage

Philly knows Tempeh

I ventured into our city in search of tempeh. Here’s what I found.

by bernard brown

e all know tofu, whether as a food or a punchline, but what about tempeh? Just like tofu, tempeh is a sustainable alternative to animal products. Both are made from soybeans, which are probably the most resource-efficient way to convert sunlight, air and soil into protein, so picking tempeh over animal products saves water, land, greenhouse gas emissions and other pollution. The beans, however, go through a very different process to become tempeh—they’re essentially fermented by a fungal culture. I know, the idea of eating something after it’s been worked over by mold isn’t too appetizing, but trust me—or rather, trust millions of Indonesians who’ve been eating it as a staple protein source for centuries.

I’m a huge fan of the softer fresh tempeh, which you can purchase in South Philly corner markets near Hardena (see below), but opinions vary. As my friend Lillian puts it, “I like my tofu soft and my tempeh hard.” Either works great, be it cubed in a stew, chopped or ground up as a hearty base to a sauce, marinated and fried to munch on with ketchup, or stacked in a sandwich such as the classic tempeh Reuben (with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese and Russian dressing on rye).

The tempeh club from South Philly’s Royal Tavern

Royal Tavern, 937 E. Passyunk Ave. I had trouble fitting the Royal Tavern’s tempeh club into my mouth. The South Philly bar’s double-decker sandwich was packed with lettuce, tomato— marinated in soy sauce—and grilled tempeh (layer one), plus smoky veggie bacon (layer two), which itself is made from thinly-sliced tempeh, all on toasted multi-grain bread. Sometimes tempeh can be a little starchy to feature in a sandwich, but here the lettuce and tomato balanced it well. With fries, a pickle and a beer, it was a great low-on-the-food-chain take on a lunch standard. Hardena, 1754 S. Hicks St. Tempeh is pretty much just tempeh at Hardena, a hole-in-the-wall Indonesian restaurant at Hicks and Moore. You get a plate of rice and pick what goes over it from the array of dishes behind the counter. I got the steamed vegetables, the collard greens, a large vegetable fritter and a heap of the tempeh, simply fried with thick, sweet soy sauce.

The Belgian Café, 2047 Green St. Tempeh provides the body for vegetarian dishes at Belgian Café, a Fairmont gastropub. The thick slice of vegan meatloaf was rich with shitake and crimini mushrooms and walnut, crispy on the outside

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toes and pickled beets with produce harvested from their garden. “I grew up around homemade food,” says Green. And that’s what he serves. Every August and September, Green also · · grows peppers in front of his South Philly home in containers from his father’s business, Primex Garden Center in Glenside. After he harvests his peppers, he creates a spicy Thai style chile paste (see recipe on right). “Peppers are easy to grow, and I love heat,” he exclaims. Enjoy this tasty Drink topping with salt cod fritters andinpoached egg or the Season a small salad at Café Estelle this month! FOOD

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P H O T O S BY L UC AS H ARD I S O N

· CRAFT · NEWS

My Turn

Dogfish Head Punkin’ Ale | Milton, DE | Every year on the first weekend after Halloween, the maniacs in Delaware gather for the World Championship Punkin Chunkin, an offbeat pumpkin-tossing contest in which homemade catapults and trebuchets fling gourds more than 4,000 feet through the air. Call it inventive recycling. Here’s Dogfish’s offbeat tribute to the contest: an ale made with pumpkin meat, organic sugar and freshly crushed cinnamon and allspice from Frontier Co-op.

brick of tempeh tomato cup tahini tbsp. olive oil garlic chili sauce to taste parsley for garnish

Local brews just in time for the fall by don russell

˜Cut the tempeh into half-inch cubes. Heat oil in a wok or skillet over high heat and fry the tempeh until it’s golden brown and crispy on the outside (about 7 minutes). Dice tomatoes and add to the cooked tempeh, then turn off the heat. Spoon in tahini and as much chili sauce as you can stand, mix so everything is coated and sprinkle the parsley on top to garnish. ■

F

or more than a century, the prototypical autumn beer has been Oktoberfestbier, the amber, slightly sweet lager brewed in the spirit of the world’s biggest festival, Munich’s Oktoberfest. The style, also called Märzen (German for March) because it was originally brewed in that month and aged until the fall, seems an appropriate transition from the the light, effervescent brews of the summer to those dark and hearty warmer brews of the wintertime. Even its color is reminiscent of the changing leaves. But suddenly, this perfectly suitable autumn beer has found itself facing down a seasonal challenge from—of all things— the lowly pumpkin. Check out the aisles of your favorite beer distributor, and you’ll think you’re wandering through Linus’ famous pumpkin patch. The Great Pumpkin lives! A smooth, full-bodied lager or a spice-cabinet ale—the choice is yours. Mix and match them with this six-pack of locally-brewed fall beers.

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Vegan meatloaf from the Belgian Café Bernard’s ad hoc tempeh hash

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Flying Fish OktoberFish | Cherry Hill, NJ | This is a stealth Oktoberfest. Though it mirrors the qualities of a classic, bottom-fermenting Bavarian lager, it’s actually brewed with top-fermenting Düsseldorf Alt yeast. The result is very clean, lightly sweet malt flavor that finishes with the tart, refreshing snap of an ale. Pair it with bratwurst. Sly Fox Oktoberfest | Royersford, PA | Beer fans know Sly Fox best for its classic spring beer festival, which features a raucous goat race and hearty bock beer at its Phoenixville brewpub. In the fall, Sly Fox is a bit more subtle, quietly releasing this classic amber lager in large, 22-ounce bottles. Made with classic German Vienna malt for full-bodied depth, it’s particularly smooth, and pairs well with smoked meats. Stoudt’s Oktoberfest | Adamstown, PA | When Stoudt’s opened in the mid-’80s, local beer enthusiasts raved about this “new,” almost revolutionary beer being brewed out in the farmland of Lancaster County. Copper-colored with a subtle sweetness, it was unlike anything else you’d ever tasted. Twenty years later, it turns out Oktoberfest wasn’t “new”—it’s traditional, in the best Bavarian sense of the word. Easton, PA | With the move toward “imperial” or “double” beer styles (Imperial pale ale, Imperial pilsner, etc.), it was inevitable that somebody would brew an imperial pumpkin. It only makes sense that it would come from Weyerbacher, with a well-deserved rep for “big” beers. This one is a bear, with a big bite of cinnamon and nutmeg, not to mention a solid kick—8 percent—of alcohol.

Weyerbacher Imperial Pumpkin Ale

good job of getting me into craft beer, and I really like to pick things apart to see how they work,” he says. “I got a good response from my friends. I’d been looking for something a bit more handson, and brewing just kind of stuck.” He decided to go professional in December 2010, but didn’t want to start out big: Patton freely admits he has no experience working in either a brewpub or a production brewery. He decided to start small. Really small. Saint Benjamin is a nanobrewery—which means it makes fewer than 100 gallons (about six kegs) per batch. Patton’s original plan was to start up the nanobrewery in his spacious firehouse, but the zoning waiver process didn’t go well: Neighbors who had previously supported him changed their minds, claiming that Saint Benjamin would be a brewpub and, therefore, a nuisance. Patton emphatically denies this and explains his plan was to brew small, keg-only batches to supply local bars. In the end, he gave up the fight and found warehouse space in Kensington, where he’s currently setting up shop. He plans to open during the winter. In the meantime, Patton has been serving his brews (for free) at Philadelphia events. During Philly Beer Week, Saint Benjamin was at Opening Tap and the Super Secret Beer Concert Series; his Transcontinental beer received second place at Beer Camp. Patton has also shared brews at Fishtown Neighbors Association events and with the Fishtown Beer Runners. One of the first things you notice about Saint

Benjamin beers is that while none are particularly highly hopped, most have a velvety maltiness. “I’m not a particularly hop-forward brewer,” Patton admits. “My philosophy is not to hit people over the head. I don’t like it to be ‘all hops’ or ‘all seasoning’ or anything like that. I’m kind of the opposite of most brewers, in that I’m more focused on the malt and the yeast.” Patton plans to keep Saint Benjamin small, local and sustainable. When it comes to ingredients, sustainability gets a little more complicated. Since local malt is difficult to find, he sources from the regional Valley Malts in Massachusetts. “As for rye, corn and wheat,” he says, “I want to see what local options are.” With small batches, Patton can frequent local markets for more specialized ingredients. He plans to use local honey and is exploring options for buying coriander and other spices from nearby greenhouses. “My vision is something like a neighborhood or European small-town brewery,” says Patton. “Maybe not the widest reach, but the freedom to make whatever I want at that time.”

NOTE Chiles should be of mixed varieties. Chef suggests: Jalapeño, Habenero, Cayenne, Serrano, Italian hot, or any other hot ripe pepper, depending on personal tolerance for heat.

Then, I opened my refrigerator to develop a “what’s left in the fridge?” recipe featuring… you guessed it… tempeh. 1 1 ¼ 3

The new Saint Benjamin nanobrewery plans to keep its batches incredibly small, and its reach incredibly local by brendan skwire

DESIGN AND MORE

hen tim patton moved to Philadelphia in 2006, going into the beer business wasn’t even on his radar. “I came up from Wilmington, where I’d started an Internet business,” he says. “I wanted to get out of the suburbs, so I moved up here to find something else to do with my life.” Patton began homebrewing in 2008, and soon after purchased the old firehouse that would inspire the name of Saint Benjamin Brewing Co., his openingsoon brewery. “My girlfriend did a really

and the inside. In contrast to the earthy meatloaf, the vegan spring rolls were dominated by the carrot and onion inside; the marinated, ground tempeh gave them a hearty base that vegan dishes too often lack. Neither dish screamed tempeh, but they demonstrate how it can work as a sturdier foundation than its squishier cousin, tofu.

Don Russell writes the Joe Sixpack column at the Daily News and shares more beer info at joesixpack.net. 26

POLICY

lb. mixed ripe chiles washed cloves garlic cup sugar tbsp. salt cup white vinegar

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Yards Poor Richard’s Tavern Spruce Ale | Philadelphia | Forget Festbier, pass on pumpkin—if you really want to go the non-traditional path this fall, try this completely different spruce-flavored ale. Yes, spruce—as in Christmas trees. Before hops, it was one of the many botanicals that was used to bitter or spice beer. This one’s a tribute to a recipe found in the papers of Ben Franklin and originally brewed in honor of his 300th birthday. O C T O B E R 20 0 9

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This fall, look for Patton’s beers at the Laurel Hill Beer Barons to Homebrewers event and the fall Beer Camp. To keep tabs on Saint Benjamin’s progress and to find out where you can taste a brew, visit blog.stbenjaminbrewing.com and facebook.com/stbenjaminbrew.

CHEESE OF THE MONTH

Puddle Duck Creek If you’re a fan of Beatrix Potter, then you probably remember Jemima Puddle Duck, a character in many Peter Rabbit stories. If there’s a young reader in your house, this might be the perfect time to introduce this tender morsel of cheese with a pleasing, grassy character. Puddle Duck Creek, a bloomy muffin from Peach Bottom, Pa., is nothing short of adorable. The rind is lacy and quilted, and the paste within looks like banana pudding. A cheese this golden inside can only mean one thing: The milk comes from grassfed cows. Beta carotene in milk gives cheese a buttery glow. This is a good thing, a sign of pastured

animals, which is how ruminants were meant to live and eat. Hillacres Pride in Lancaster County produces Puddle Duck Creek. The Arrowsmiths, a threegeneration family, run the farm and provide most of the labor. Their many cheeses are usually made from raw milk, but Puddle Duck is pasteurized, since it’s young (a federal requirement). Still, this cheese is flavorful, lactic and herbaceous, with a peppery pop to the rind. Try it on water crackers with fresh fruit or jam. —Tenaya Darlington, madamefromage.blogspot.com

Puddle Duck Creek is available at Green Aisle Grocery, Whole Foods and the Hillacres Pride stand at Headhouse Farmers Market. To learn more: Hillacres Pride, 194 Arcadia Trace Road, Peach Bottom, Pa., 17563, 717-548-9031; hillacrespride.com O C TO B E R 2 0 1 1

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Art Direction with Jamie Leary, Melissa McFeeters, and Lee Stabert

Green Valley Dairy

You won’t find many cave-aged cheddars in these parts, and that’s part of what makes this raw-milk dream from Lancaster County so special. It’s nutty, sweet and flecked with tiny tyrosine crystals from aging. Pour a local IPA and set out a crusty loaf of Metropolitan bread. Don’t forget to toast the rinds.

Calkins Creamery

This Brie-style cheese has a sweet, vegetal aroma and a beautiful ivory paste. Like the real stuff from France, it’s made from raw cow’s milk. You can taste grassy notes and layers of complexity—flavors you’d be hard-pressed to find in supermarket Brie. It’s delicious for breakfast alongside chive eggs, or served fireside with roasted chestnuts and a drizzle of local honey. In the glass: champagne.

Valley Shepherd Creamery

New Jersey Locatelli? You got it! This cave-aged sheep’s milk cheese is sweetly robust—think lamb chops and brown butter. Shave it over gnocchi, or serve it straight up with meaty green olives, rosemary flat bread and a curvaceous red.

Amazing Acres

This leaf-wrapped goat cheese has gained favor with Inquirer food writer Craig LeBan, who chose it as a favorite this fall. It’s mellow and gently boozy—the cloak of grape leaves is soaked in brandy. Tender and creamy, it’s sure to win the hearts of the goat-cheese averse. Serve naked or with baguette rounds and a snifter of pear brandy.

GATHERING AROUND THE TABLE TO SHARE

a meal is one of life’s most universal pleasures, so it’s no surprise the ritual is essential to our holiday celebrations. This season, we wanted to focus on that experience, and all the ways you can make it more engaging, thoughtful and delicious. Cook with family, buy your ingredients locally, consider how food was treated before reaching your plate and, if you decide to give gifts, think simple, sustainable and edible.

Regional cheeses perfect for holiday snacking by tenaya darlington madamefromage.blogspot.com

Oh, and don’t forget to raise a glass.

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God’s Country Creamery

Looking to introduce your guests to some local specialties? Why not dazzle them with stellar cheeses from the region? Local cheesemakers produce a variety of styles—whether you favor creamy and mild or wild and pungent. Œ

Finally, a blue that’s mellow enough to serve to your granny, but interesting enough to impress the cheese geeks in the family. This wonderfully creamy blue is pungent and woodsy with pronounced black walnut notes. Serve it with port or barley wine, alongside biscotti and dried figs. For a quick appetizer, spread it on baguette rounds and top with toasted walnuts and a sprig of fresh rosemary.

All of these cheeses are available at the Fair Food Farmstand in Reading Terminal Market. Other cheese counters, such as Di Bruno Bros., Downtown Cheese and Milk & Honey Market also carry local cheese.

YOU MIGHT THINK the hard work of finding true love would be over once D EC E M B E R 2 0 1 0

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the knee is bent and that special someone says “yes.” Though agreeing to

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lifetime commitment is a major accomplishment, planning the wedding that marks it can seem an insurmountable—and hellaciously wasteful— mountain to climb. Despite the wedding-industrial complex’s mission to convince you otherwise, there are myriad ways to maintain environmental values without sacrificing elegance or entering indentured servitude to

Green Your Classroom A

your credit card balance. In these pages, find nonprofit natural venues, no-waste caterers and local flower farms all ready to help you create a day that’s more about love, and less about stuff. —Felicia D’Ambrosio

GREEN LIVING

Why is switching to 100 percent recycled copier/printer paper the most important step toward “greening” an office or classroom? Offices should recycle their paper, of course— it’s a huge thing. When you buy recycled paper, you are “closing the loop” of the process. There has to be a viable market for waste paper when you recycle it… if there is no demand for recycled products, there is not demand for waste paper, and it just becomes trash to be disposed of. When you buy that recycled copy paper, you are empowering the commodities broker who collects

SOMETHING GOLD TO SOMETHING NEW ANNA BARIO AND PAGE NEAL are in the business of turning sparkly daydreams into reality, with lessened impact on people and planet. From their BarioNeal studio/shop in Queen Village, they handcraft fine jewelry from conflictfree gems and reclaimed precious metals, both from their own designs and custom orders. The pair will also melt down and refashion old rings, gold fillings, mateless earrings and broken jewelry into new engagement or wedding rings, often featuring heirloom stones from a couple’s family. “Family members often have things lying around that make great wedding bands, and they love to contribute,” says Bario. “It’s a sort of ‘community mining.’” Pun intended. —Felicia D’Ambrosio

Pretty Poisons Y

PAPER PRODUCTS NEED NOT ENLARGE YOUR SCHOOL’S OR COMPANY’S FOOTPRINT. by felicia d’ambrosio

fter witnessing how “shocking logging and deforestation” was denuding Costa Rica’s natural ecosystems, Stephen E. Baker decided to take on the wasteful world of office supplies, founding GreenLine Paper Company in 1992. Based out of Baker’s hometown of York, Pa., GreenLine is perfectly situated to serve the major metropolitan areas of the East Coast— think Dunder Mifflin with a green mission—and has recently expanded its free-shipping zone from New York City to Richmond, Va. We caught up with Baker to talk about the future of paper. waste paper and bales it, empowering the mill that uses waste paper stock. It’s a strong message that we want recycling to be an economically viable way of doing things. What are more sustainable options for making paper than clear-cutting trees? There are a lot of things we call tree-free source fibers: kenaf, hemp, bamboo… and they are all good, I think, as long as they are sustainably produced. The best options are kenaf and hemp: they require very little maintenance, grow like weeds and make excellent paper fiber. Introduc-

ing tree-free fibers into the marketplace makes sense—it’s a good agricultural product people can make money growing, and we can use it. What sort of fun new products have come out recently? We’re stocking pencils and rulers made from old blue jeans and old money [pictured]. There’s a compostable barrel pen out there now by PaperMate… it’s a vegetable-based pen, so you can dispose of part of it and compost the rest [pictured].

The nitrocellulose-based nail polish used by most salons is a highly toxic brew. Made from film-forming agents, adhesive polymers (tosylamide-formaldehyde resin), plasticizers (camphor), coloring agents and solvents (toluene, formaldehyde), it’s considered a hazardous waste by many regulatory bodies (see sidebar). “The new research on increased rates of breast cancer, severe respiratory and brain damage, and short-term memory loss for nail technicians is staggering,” says Mitchell. An architect by trade, Mitchell founded his blog, The Nail Industry Exposed (tierramianailindustryexposed.wordpress.com), when researching the effect working as a nail technician was having on Restrepo’s health. Together, the pair built Tierra Mia just over two years ago, as a safe sanctuary for both nail professionals and clients; here they’re developing and patenting their own completely organic, zero-fume base coat, top coat, remover and nail

Does GreenLine really ship products in repurposed booze boxes? Absolutely! We work in coordination [with] Pennsylvania state stores and pick up boxes on a regular basis. We’ve done this since the beginning; I know of no other company that reuses cartons as we do. For more information and a complete line of products, visit greenlinepaper.com.

LOSING the LACQUER

Bario-Neal, 700 S. Sixth St., 215-454-2164, bario-neal.com

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Art Direction with Melissa McFeeters

Margerum’s Herbs Etc., Saturday at Clark Park Farmers Market and Sunday at Headhouse Farmers Market, both 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Email noelles@netscape.com to order.

FLORAL OR SAVORY SIMPLE SYRUP

conditioner, all used in conjunction with waterbased, nontoxic polishes. Tierra Mia is the first— and currently the only—100 percent organic, zero-fume nail salon in the country. “The nail industry is completely unregulated, which leads to the worst kind of greenwashing,” says Mitchell. “Polishes marketed as free of the ‘toxic trio’ [toluene, dibutyl phthalates and the known carcinogen formaldehyde] are in no way nontoxic. We absorb through our nails just like our skin—nails are an incredibly porous surface—and this stuff is staying on your nailbeds and seeping directly into the bloodstream, and causing a longer-term effect.” For Tierra Mia clients, the gritty reality of poisonous nail salons is replaced by sensual delights. Freshly grated lime zests and coconut waft through the air, and each treatment ends with a manicure that lasts at least two weeks, chip-free. Natural beauty never looked so good. Tierra Mia Organic Nail Spa, 328 S. 17th St., 215-735-7980, tierramiaorganicnailspa.com

“The [EPA] classifies nail polish and remover as household hazardous waste,” writes Grist columnist Umbra Fisk. Just like paint, thinners, antifreeze, drain openers and rat poison, some cosmetics—and all nail polish and remover— require safe and approved methods of disposal. Fisk suggests the National Recycling Hotline at 1-800-CLEANUP (253-2687) and its online database, earth911.com, to find locations accepting household hazardous waste. Here you’ll find info for the Regional Southeastern Pennsylvania Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Drop-off Program, the Franklin Township Recycling Center and Philadelphia HHW Drop-off Events. You can also contact the Philadelphia Streets Department (215-686-5560, phila.gov/streets/HHW.html) for dates and times of upcoming HHW Drop-off Events by calling. Upcoming events are scheduled for Sept. 24 at 22nd and York sts. and Oct. 22 at 3033 S. 63rd St.; all drop-offs are held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

DO ME A FAVOR WEDDING FAVOR is given to guests as a sweet reminder of their witness to a very special day. So don’t burden them with useless junk, engraved or otherwise. Making your own simple syrup with seasonal herbs and flowers is quick and inexpensive enough that you can make favors and zip up the wedding-day toast with your own special blend. Locally grown dried and fresh botanicals like lavender and chamomile, sweet basil, honeysuckle, lemon verbena, rosemary and thyme can be sourced from Margerum’s Herbs Etc. at the Clark Park and Headhouse Farmers Markets. Pair pretty, beribboned bottles from Lancaster’s Fillmore Container Company (fillmorecontainer. com) with your celebratory recipe to send your dear ones home with a memory they can taste. —Janina A. Larenas

How Tierra Mia is fighting the toxic ills of the

ou’ll never see fresh-cut flowers in a nail salon,” says Justin fingernail biz Mitchell, who co-owns Center City’s Tierra Mia Organic Nail Spa with by felicia d’ambrosio his fiancée Karina Restrepo. “Flowers die in just a few hours, because the fumes in the air are so bad. It sounds like a tall tale, but it’s shocking, really.”

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S EP TEM BER 2 0 1 1

(MAKES 12 OZ.; RECIPE CAN BE MULTIPLIED FOR BULK PRODUCTION)

˜ ˜ ˜ ˜

Steep cup of dried or cup fresh herbs or flowers in 2 cups hot water. Strain out flowers and return liquid to the stove with 2 cups sugar. Heat to a soft boil or until sugar is fully dissolved. Keep hot as you fill sterilized bottles; seal immediately and refrigerate after opening.

DREAM TEAM

FLAVORS TO TRY: Lemon verbena-lavender, sweet woodruff, chamomile-rosemary, honeysuckle

BOTANICAL BUBBLE COCKTAIL ˜ ˜

Dry sparkling wine such as cava, prosecco, cremant or Brut Champagne. Add 1.5 oz. syrup per flute, garnish with fresh flowers or herbs if desired.

THINK GLOBAL,

JUST SAY NO to big box stores. Though it can seem that chain retailers have the wedding registry market locked up, there’s an easy way to get your guests buying in the neighborhood. With the goal of inspiring local couples to choose at least 10 wedding gifts from small, local sellers—keeping an estimated $1,000 in the local economy per wedding—Jeffery Miller Catering launched Registry10 in February 2010 as an enhancement to their event planning website, partyspace.com. Registry partners spanning the Delaware Valley offer gifts like passes and memberships to cultural institutions (Bryn Mawr Film

GIFT LOCAL

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The TreePhilly initiative is working to turn more city streets into treelined avenues, like Delancey Street (shown here).

MEET FOUR MEMBERS OF MAYOR NUTTER’S ADMINISTRATION, AND THE PROJECTS AND ISSUES THEY CHAMPION

Institute), charitable donations (PhilAbundance), adventures like sport fishing or hot-air balloon rides, and services from spa days to cooking classes. Free for both vendors and registering couples, gift buyers pay the normal sales tax, shipping and handling on their purchase. Everything is done online, says marketing manager Eliza Savage, who encourages users to suggest merchants they’d like to see featured. “We even have a CSA [community supported agriculture] from Farm to Philly,” she says. “It’s one of our most requested gifts, and really exemplifies what the registry is all about.” —Felicia D’Ambrosio

Katherine Gajewski

Visit weddings.partyspace.com/couple_the_ten to sign up for Registry10.

Director of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia

PHOTO BY LU C A S H A R D I S O N

michael di berardinis

City Hall is one of four buildings that will undergo energy conservation measures.

S

ince 2009, Katherine Gajewski has been the face of sustainability for the City. When she took the job, Greenworks Philadelphia, the City’s sustainability plan, had just launched. Gajewski was faced with the formidable task of implementing the framework as well as overseeing a spectrum of projects that routinely cross departmental lines. For some people, that might have been daunting, but Gajewski had been managing city-wide projects, such as the Philly Spring Cleanup and the campaign for smoke-free legislation, before accepting her current position. She’s extremely process-driven, which helps her organize tasks and keep things on track— two things especially crucial when working with multiple city agencies. Gajewski is also a relentless advocate for better communication. Speak to her for just a short period of time, and she’ll likely bring up this missing piece of the sustainability puzzle—that, as a society, we’re not doing enough to communicate the value of sustainability. It’s undoubtedly what drives her to make Greenworks so visible in Philadelphia and move the sustainability conversation forward. The implementation of Greenworks has

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eputy mayor Michael DiBerardinis didn’t grow up in Philadelphia, but his love for the city is unquestionable. After graduating from St. Joseph’s University, he settled in Kensington/Fishtown where he and his wife raised their four kids. After spending the late 1970s as a community activist advocating for urban homesteading, DiBerardinis started working for a congressman. This job led to public administration, and from 1992 to 2000 DiBerardinis was Recreation Commissioner for Philadelphia. “But during that time,” he says, “[the Recreation Department] had very little focus on sustainability or on energy use, land use, land management.” DiBerardinis gained more exposure in 2003 when he became secretary of Pennsylvania’s Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. “That world is really filled with policy, operational questions and demands that relate directly to sustainability,” he says. “It was a big leap for me. It took about six months to really understand it and to manage [from] that perspective.” During this time, DiBerardinis also became

Guaranteed Energy Savings Project The Office of Sustainability has been working with the Department of Public Property and the Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities to put together an energy management and conservation program for the city.The program will help meet the Greenworks target of reducing city government energy consumption by 30 percent. The Guaranteed Energy Savings Project kicked off in June and will focus on the City’s “Quadplex” (City Hall, Municipal Service Building, One Parkway and the Center for Criminal Justice). Energy conservation measures, such as lighting upgrades, energy management systems, new chillers for the air conditioning and heating system upgrades, will be made in the Quadplex and paid for by the energy

savings generated by the measures. The financing model used will allow the City to realize savings without making a significant investment up-front, something critical in these cash-strapped times. Projects like this can yield energy savings of 20 percent, which would go a long way towards helping the City reach its 30 percent energy reduction target. As Gajewski explains, the project is a great example of how the mayor’s administration, City Council—which had to pass an ordinance to allow the project to move forward—and outside advocacy organizations can all work together to push projects through that make the City more sustainable. For more information, visit phila.gov

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an unofficial consultant on Mayor Nutter’s Greenworks Philadelphia plan. He worked with Mark Alan Hughes, founding Director of Sustainability for Philadelphia, on initiatives related to his work in Harrisburg. When DiBerardinis returned as Deputy Mayor for Environmental and Community Resources— a role that oversees the now combined Parks and Recreation Department—he advocated for individual city departments to take leadership roles in reaching the targets. While a number of Greenworks targets fall under Parks and Recreation, DiBerardinis has focused on three: restoring tree coverage, providing access to public parks and promoting urban agriculture. By working toward these targets DiBerardinis feels his department can reach their ultimate goal: equity. “We want to bring green space, recreation space [and] park space to citizens that don’t have it,” he says. —Liz Pacheco

her to engage engineers, city bureaucrats, community members, state government agencies and regional transit authorities. Trained as a social worker, Cutler views herself as a change agent who’s helping to shepherd Philadelphia into a new era focused on livability—a word she thinks resonates more with the average citizen than “sustainability.”

Citywide Bike Share

Public Transit Improvements

For years, Philadelphians have been pitching the idea for a citywide bike share. Since then, various concept studies have been done, both by the city and outside organizations. While the rollout is still likely a year to 18 months away, the Mayor’s Office of Transporation and Utilities has already stated exploring how to finance a citywide bike share. One option they’re exploring is how corporate sponsorship might work for such a program.

MOTU is looking to improve the convenience and accessibility of public transit. They’ll be working with SEPTA to define bus corridors in Philadelphia and implement preemptive traffic signals to make bus service faster. Cutler has also advocated for the renovation of the decaying City Hall station and implementation of an electronic fare system. Although both are still several years out, the projects are already underway. For more, visit phila.gov/motu

In the coming years expect improvements to SEPTA, such as faster bus service, a renovated City Hall station and an electronic fare system.

Deputy Mayor for Environmental and Community Resources been Gajewski’s bread and butter from the start, and it still continues to define her work to make Philadelphia a leader in sustainability. “Sustainability should be the new norm,” says Gajewski. Thanks to her tireless implementation of Greenworks, the reality is a little closer to that ideal. —Samantha Wittchen

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n her role as Deputy Mayor for Transportation and Public Utilities, Rina Cutler oversees four major entities: the Streets Department, the Water Department, Philadelphia Airport and the City’s Energy Office. This means large-scale infrastructure projects—like the forthcoming airport expansion—fall under Cutler’s jurisdiction, requiring

She focuses on helping people understand and accept that the world is changing, and that we need to work together to change with it. When it comes to city sustainability issues within her control—be they transit, waste or utilities— Cutler feels strongly that part of her job is framing the discussion in a way that makes it real for residents. In her words: “It really is about a long-term effort to make the city a place where people want to live, play, work and recreate.” Because the Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities (MOTU) is in charge of a diverse group of city departments, the projects defining Rina Cutler’s work are equally varied. During her tenure, the Water Department rolled out its Green City, Clean Waters program, the recycling rate jumped from five to 19.5 percent, the almost-forgotten South Street bridge project was completed, and the city opened a series of new bike lanes. It’s a portfolio of accomplishments that might cause one to become complacent. But Cutler isn’t resting on her laurels. She has a few new projects in the works to support her goal to make Philadelphia more livable. —Samantha Wittchen

Rina Cutler Deputy Mayor for Transportation and Public Utilities

Green 2015 and TreePhilly To achieve green space equity for residents, the department has introduced Green2015. The plan is to convert 500 acres of vacant and underused land into parks. So far, about 150 acres have been revived and another 100 are planned. One contributor to Green2015 is TreePhilly—a new initiative to plant 15,000 new trees in 2012. The program is led by Parks and Recreation with support from the City of Philadelphia. The new trees will contribute to the Greenworks target of planting 300,000 trees by 2015. To reach this goal, all Philadelphians are being called upon to plant trees: neighborhoods, businesses, nonprofits, schools, city departments, landowners and most importantly, individual residents. This spring, the program gave out more than 2,400 free trees to residents. And this September, the department is hoping to give away at least another 2,000. For more information and to apply for a tree, visit treephilly.org

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Black & White Portraits by Albert Yee


SUSTAINABLE PHILADELPHIA

WHEN IT RAINS, IT POURS

UP THE CREEK

On a cold and wet December day, the combined sewer outfall in Morris Park near Lebanon Ave. and 68th St. flows into Cobbs Creek.

IN PHILADELPHIA,

there is nothing as cleansing as a good rain. In the moments after a storm, the city feels renewed: trees drip, skies clear and birds reemerge. Dirt, soot and trash have been swiftly swept away. The concrete and pavement feel, if not exactly new, at least a little fresher. Unfortunately, this temporary idyll masks an unseen crisis: washing the city clean incurs a steep environmental cost.

Stormwater management is one of our city’s most pressing challenges, and change is on the way by jacob lambert

Two-thirds of Philadelphia—from East Germantown to South Philadelphia and most parts in between—sits above a Combined Sewer System, in which precipitation and wastewater run into a single pipe. (The remainder uses a Separate System, keeping the liquids apart.) In dry times, combined sewers do not pose a problem: Emptied tubs and toilet flushes flow to one of three treatment plants across the city. But, when it rains, water cascades off roofs and lots into dirty streets, picking up pollutants before dropping into inlets and mixing with civic waste. []

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AGRICULTURE

More photos, including a rainy-day trek around Cobbs Creek (above).

Hops are easy to grow if you give them lots of sun and water, something to climb on, and a soil medium that encourages spread and growth. It doesn’t hurt to sit below them and enjoy a beer, either.

Bike maps (opposite) created in collaboration with designer Jamie Leary.

by brendan skwire

HEN YOU THINK OF HOPS, you think

of beer. After all, the viney, aromatic plant is what makes beer taste like beer: Without the distinctive bitterness, your favorite brew would taste like alcoholic pancake syrup. But if you think about where they come from, you probably don’t think of Philadelphia. Hops are cultivated commercially in many areas of the world, and the majority grown domestically come from the Pacific Northwest. They come in more varieties than space here permits. If you have a taste for craft beers, you may recognize Cascade hops, which give Sierra Nevada Pale Ale its distinctive floral aroma, and Simcoe hops, which lend a citrusy tang to Yards Philadelphia Pale Ale. Even though places like Oregon and Washington account for most domestic hops production, sustainability-minded Philadelphia-area breweries and small farms have begun experimenting with growing this hardy perennial locally. Philadelphia Brewing Co. has been growing varieties such as Cascade and Northern Brewer in its courtyard for the past couple of years, and offers the seasonal Harvest From the Hood, which also includes hops grown by their neighbors at Greensgrow Farm. 24

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But you don’t have to be a brewer—or even a beer drinker—to grow your own hops. I’ve been growing them for the past five years, and I recommend them to anyone looking for an easy-tosustain green canopy in the backyard. Hops can reach heights of up to 40 feet (so you’ll probably want to have at least two stories for this vigorous vine), and they come back year after year. When trained properly, they make a dense and aromatic privacy screen for your backyard. And honeybees seem to love ’em—always a plus. Hops don’t grow from seed or a bulb, but from a thick, woody rhizome (essentially a horizontal, underground stem) you plant in late March or early April. I’m sure there are other suppliers in the city, but I got mine (Cascade and Nugget) from George Hummel and Nancy Rigberg, owners of Home Sweet Homebrew (2008 Sansom St., 215-569-9469, homesweethomebrew.com). “Hops are easy to grow if you give them lots of sun and water, something to climb on, and a soil medium that encourages spread and growth,” says Rig-

berg. “It doesn’t hurt to sit below them and enjoy a beer, either. A strategically placed hammock can be [an ideal] vantage point for watching them grow, sometimes a foot a day in season.” The rhizome is covered with tiny buds: Plant it vertically, with the buds pointing up, about two inches deep. Hops love compost and direct sunlight, so plant in a south-facing yard, mulch heavily with black gold, and water copiously. Soon after planting, you’ll find literally dozens of shoots erupting. Trim back all but the three strongest shoots from each rhizome, or be prepared for a mess. I have a two-story twin in Southwest Philly, and to train my hops I hammered three large nails per plant into my windowsill, tied strong rope around each, and draped the rope over trellises attached to my deck rail. Hops grow incredibly fast, and even though Rigberg jokes about it, you really can expect rates of up to a foot a day. Although the flowers can be a little sparse the first year, the plant fills out quickly, with wide

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CHOP TALK

Ed Yin, with daughter Sarah at Headhouse Square, enthusiastically educates his customers about his unique offerings and traditional cooking methods.

Two DuPont chemiststurned-farmers master the art of growing organic, and authentic Asian produce

fan leaves that form a wall up your deck and a roof over your head. By midsummer, the flowering cones begin to appear everywhere. Depending on which variety you’ve planted, they may look like tiny green pineapples or pinecones. Nuggets can look like miniature artichokes; the largest is about half the size of a pingpong ball. On the other end of the spectrum, Cascades grow to an enormous size: 2 to 3 inches long, looking disturbingly like giant green bugs. If you tear the flowers open, bright yellow resin sticks to your fingers—the smell is glorious. Begin harvesting hops in earnest when the tips of the flowers start to turn brown; a food dehydrator set on low is the ideal drying agent. Once you’ve harvested as many hops as you can, cut the vines back to about 2 inches above the soil and allow the rhizome to rest through the winter. Once spring returns, it’ll be back, and each year will yield more hops than the year before.

by dana henry

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uohong ed yin of Queens Farm in West Chester will gladly explain his scientific reasons for growing organic vegetables and fruit. The DuPont chemist and family farm owner has a Ph.D. in plant physiology, a master’s in chemistry and a longtime interest in Chinese medicine. Stop by his farm stand at Headhouse Square (2nd and South) on a Sunday, and he and his daughter Sarah will show you numerous Asian mushroom varieties, which Yin claims support the health of the kidney, liver, cardiovascular system and immune system. The 200 Asian vegetables he grows on his 38-acre organic farm—including Chinese lettuce, Fava beans, bok choy, Chinese eggplant and Japanese basil—are a reaction to the overfertilized crops typically found in American supermarkets, packed with more carcinogenic nitrogen dioxide than nutrition.

brendan skwire is an avid gardener, homebrewer, bass-fiddle player and rabble rouser. Read more of his work at brendancalling.com.

Yet Yin’s decision to become an organic farmer was made on behalf of his taste buds. When he came to America 16 years ago from China, Yin experienced a flavor drought. The produce available at his neighborhood supermarket, he says, all tasted the same—like water. So, Yin decided to plant a few sweet peppers in his backyard. The first bite was his eureka moment. “I realized that it’s not because we are in America, but because of how we plant,” Yin recalls. “I said to myself, ‘Since that is the case, I will decide to make an organic farm.’” Yin and his wife, Xiuqin Qin, started planting. Their farm, which Yin named “Queens Farm” in honor of Qin, began as a three-acre backyard garden. Despite their book learning (Qin is also a chemist) and farming background (both came from farming families in China), the

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couple has had to do a lot of additional reading and research on organic gardening. They’ve developed devoutly chemical-free practices including heat tunnels, crop rotation, and house-made fertilizers of mushroom and composted crops, weeds and leaves. Still, applying their extensive knowledge of plants has had its challenges. Yin recalls the Japanese beetle outbreak in their first few farming years that devoured nearly all their edamame. They had to wake up each morning to remove the pests by hand, a practice they continue today. Luckily, Queens Farm has no neighboring farms so once the bugs are gone, they don’t come back. In the eight years since the farm has been selling produce, sales have continually grown. The family now sells three times more than their first season at Headhouse Farmers Market. They

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also sell at West Chester Farmers Market and a market on their farm property, which has built a loyal following drawing from both the West Chester and Asian communities. Qin has since quite her job at DuPont to work full time as a farmer, and the operation is eager to hire more farming labor. Queens Farm will never produce mega-sized, supermarket-style peppers and tomatoes. But its diverse, patiently harvested, naturally-sized veggies, beans and fruits are dense with flavor, nutrition and antioxidants. Next year, Yin hopes

Mike Landers churns out tasty vegan sweets

/ local business

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Young, urban and with no professional culinary experience, Landers is a textbook example of how local vegan fare has flourished. Three years ago, he was just another devoted vegan living in the former industrial neighborhoods of eastern North Philly (hint: say Northern Liberties-Port Richmond-Fishtown-Kensington three times fast), teaching himself to cook wholesome vegan meals. His sweet tooth demanded he learn how to bake, so he started messing around with cookie recipes. Pretty soon friends were stopping by for dairy-free deliciousness. Then friends of friends, owners of neighborhood coffee shops and cafés, began requesting his treats in bulk. Armed with increased confidence as a baker and salesperson, Landers eventually started approaching vendors cold, armed with cookie samples. Greensgrow Farmers’ Market gave him his first big break, allowing him to sell directly to customers. For the last year or so, the Factory has been based out of Philly Kitchen Share, a shared commercial kitchen at 15th and South Streets. Things were getting a bit crowded there, so this month Landers is moving operations back to his namesake neighborhood, taking over a kitchen in Kensington. The plan is to eventually move into Greensgrow’s temporarily-stalled Philadelphia Incubation Community Kitchens project. Landers sells between 700 and 1,000 pieces weekly to local shops, including six varieties of cookies (chocolate-walnut, double chocolatechip, ginger molasses, snicker-doodle and peanut butter), brownies, peanut butter rice-crispy treats, muffins and buns. He has also ventured into less traditional territory with April Fool’s “Gluten Free Maple Bacon Doughnuts” and bright green Cinco de Mayo Guacamole cookies. Experimentations aside, the light, fluffy, egg-free cinnamon buns remain the baker’s crowning glory. (Anyone who’s ever baked without dairy knows the tendency towards density). Landers’ bulk ingredients—cane sugar and flax seeds (used in every cookie)—are fair trade and organic whenever possible, and he’ll soon be baking with Daisy Flour, milled in Lancaster County. + ■ North Port Fishington Cookie Factory goods are available at Almanac Market, Soy Cafe, Higher Grounds, Bennas, B2, the Last Drop, Flying Saucer, Milkboy, Satellite, Mariposa, Greensgrow (seasonally), Weaver’s Way (Mt. Airy and Chestnut Hill), Red Hook Coffee, Rocket Cat and Leotah’s Place. facebook.com/northportfishington

PORT R A IT BY LUCA S HA R DISON

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For the Birds

The Audubon Society’s Keith Russell tracks migrating birds felled by windows by bernard brown

Handcrafted Haven Nice Things Handmade carries on a tradition in South Philly by claire connelly

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addened by the recent closings of some of Philadelphia’s favorite specialty shops, Elissa Kara made a bold move. In February, the local artist and restaurant veteran opened Nice Things Handmade, a boutique gallery on booming East Passyunk Avenue. Kara, a former White Dog Cafe manager, was heartbroken when the beloved Black Cat Gift Shop closed last year. Then, in January, her good friends at Mew Gallery closed their doors as well. “I got really upset,” she says. “We had already lost the Black Cat, which was such a staple in West Philly; now we’re losing another important fixture like that in South Philly!”

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Fresh produce from Queens Farm (2069 W. Street Rd., West Chester, 610-793-2834) is available at the Headhouse Farmers Market on Sundays and the West Chester Growers Market on Saturdays.

/ profile

by dana henry

ike Landers, founder of North Port Fishington Cookie Factory, is part of a generation of vegan bakers rewriting your grandma’s recipes. Those who’ve tasted the chewy oatmeal-cashew-cranberry cookie, the gooey chocolate peanut butter-frosted brownie or the ever-fluffy cinnamon roll have been known to exclaim, “I can’t believe this is vegan.” Landers takes the left-handed compliment in stride. “People have traditionally been less exposed to stuff that’s good and vegan,” he says. “They sometimes assume it’s gonna be some kind of weird health food cookie instead of this rich sugary treat. But it can be done. Just by recipes being out there in the world, people begin to experiment.”

to expand Queens Farm and follow his wife’s lead by leaving DuPont to be a full-time farmer. In the meantime, he has just one wish for the future of American produce: “I hope everyone in this country gets healthy, good-tasting vegetables,” he says. “I hope that more and more farmers choose to grow organically.”

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Cookie Monster

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Better Living Through Farming

— N A N CY R I G B E R G

YOU, TOO, CAN GROW BEER’S SIGNATURE INGREDIENT

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Kara grew up around South Street, and has fond memories of visiting the shops there with her mother. The declining state of retail in that area troubles her, and those childhood excursions now serve as a source of inspiration. “I can’t let all of those stores disappear from this city,” she says. “I thought of all the wonderful people who make things, and it all started com-

MAY 2 01 0

ing together. Why not try?” She found the perfect storefront across from Marra’s (the legendary, 70-year-old pizza joint), with a butcher shop on one side and a scooter shop o n the other. “I feel so fortunate,” says Kara of her store’s location. “There’s a lot of local love here.” Nice Things (named after a shop Kara’s mother ran in Atlantic City during the ’70s) features art, jewelry, handmade clothing and accessories from independent artists. “I like to support primarily local artists,” says Kara. “But I’ve also found great artists from all over the country. It’s important to bring fresh and exciting ideas to the city.” Among the eye-catching wares, you’ll find gems like handmade all-natural soaps from local artisan Lisa Volta and earrings by Krista Peel, co-director of the Philadelphia Art Hotel. Colorful wallets and clutches from Rogue Theory—a pair of Philly designers who are masters at stitchwork—and Daymaker Industries’ inventive, do-it-yourself, 3-D paper models (including replicas of Kenzinger and Mambo Movers’ trucks and iconic Philly rowhomes) are just a few examples of the creativity on display at Nice Things. Kara plans to host frequent events in her new space, including Second Saturdays with featured artists and workshops for children and adults. “I want to create a sense of community,” she explains. “It’s exciting to be able to give back and be part of something here in this growing community.” → Nice Things Handmade, 1731 E. Passyunk

Ave., nicethingshandmade.com

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eith Russell shows me two white-throated sparrows and an ovenbird, all dead, at 5:30 a.m., when I meet him at 19th and Market. Russell, the Pennsylvania Audubon Society’s Fairmount Park Outreach Coordinator, had found the three migrants just on his walk over from the bus stop. “It’s a good night for birds to migrate,” he observes with a sigh. “Clear and chilly.” The first time I met Russell, two years falcons. The Germantown resident and ago, he was wielding binoculars at an committed urbanite (he doesn’t drive) environmental festival in North Philly, has been a bird fanatic since his grade connecting residents with the wildlife school days in Mt. Airy. of Fairmount Park East. Since then, If you say “birder,” I think of well-off, he’s been juggling a range of conserva- suburban white people running around tion projects; Sunday morning, when exotic locales with expensive telephoto we meet, he’s working on an Audubon/ lenses. I mention this to Russell, who is Philadelphia Zoo/Academy of Natural African-American and devoted to birdSciences partnership studying the ing in a racially diverse city with a high problem of migrating birds flying into poverty rate. “That’s why Audubon is in buildings. By surveying the same route Philadelphia. We’re interested in reachbefore and just after sunrise, the study ing an audience we haven’t reached in attempts to quantify how many birds the past.” Russell proudly points out die by day, by attempting that Philadelphians can to fly through glass, verfind over 100 species of sus by night, either hitbirds without leaving ting objects they don’t see the city. “You give people or drawn in by lights. a chance to open their Turn out your lights At 5:45 a.m., Russell minds. You show them a at night, Russell picks up a palm warbler, red-bellied woodpecker, advises, and hang a delicate gray and yeland they say, ‘I didn’t blinds to cut back on even know that was low bird. We find a herdaytime collisions. mit thrush and another here.’ That’s the kind of Bird silhouette stickovenbird before sunrise, eureka moment we’re goers don’t work. You both still supple and ing for.” can also buy window glass or stick-on warm. “The city birds The sun is up as we film with ultraviolet have learned,” Russell walk the route one more stripes transparent remarks. “These other time and conclude the to us but visible as birds have never encounsurvey. It is almost 8 barriers to birds. tered glass.” a.m. when we set off for Both are new prodIt’s no fun for a man the Academy of Natural ucts, promising but who loves birds to colSciences to deposit the not entirely proven yet. Bird feeders lect their corpses. Rusdead birds for later study. should be less than sell happily rattles off Russell points out the three feet away from a list of other species beautiful white-throated windows so if birds Center City residents sparrow chirping and take off in the wrong can observe alive, from zipping around us in a direction, they hit at pocket park off Market robins and swifts to raplow speed. tors, including peregrine Street. ■

REDUCE BIRD COLLISIONS

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Lost & Found WANT TO LEARN MORE ABOUT PHILADELPHIA BIRDS? Get a good set of binoculars and a field guide; Russell recommends The Sibley Guide to Birds for beginners. Get outside! Philadelphia is blessed with the bird-life-rich Fairmount Park system, arboretums and the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge. Our local bird clubs sponsor frequent free outings. Connect with local birders through the Delaware Valley Ornithological Club dvoc.org or the Wyncote Audubon Society wyncoteaudubon.org.

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A local architectural salvage company finds value in the discarded by lee stabert

alking into Provenance Old Soul Architectural Salvage’s Fairmount Avenue space is a bit like entering the world of a children’s book—the sort with creaky doors and hidden passages to menacing places. The best kind. There is a strange sort of magic to old things, to objects that have been on a journey. Items with history are Provenance’s specialty. Their warehouse overflows with row upon row of doors and windows, old church pews, light fixtures, slab marble, chunks of old-growth wood, knobs of every shape and size, molding, mantles, bricks and thousands of other objects. 20

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Provenance began with one man: Bob Beaty. Beaty was born and raised in West Philadelphia, then spent several years in California, running a landfill and working in the salvage and composting businesses. He has always been fascinated by the things our society throws away. “People ask me, ‘How did you ever get into this business?’” says Beaty. “And I say, a little tongue-in-cheek, ‘It was a calling.’” 22 years ago, Beaty returned to the area and became involved in an assortment of projects, including the restoration of coal-damaged land in Schulykill County. Their work involved laying down composted lawn waste and spraying with wildflower seeds. “You drive up I-81 now and instead of hillsides of black coal or black residue, it’s all wildflowers,” he explains with a smile. Beaty eventually started working for a com-

pany in Philadelphia that specialized in recycling construction waste and finding gems among the wreckage. He bought a warehouse to store all his finds. Architectural salvage became a side business, and then a full-time occupation. Three years ago, Beaty was joined at Provenance by partner Chris Donna, and then, a year and a half ago, by another partner, Scott Lash. Lash was a bond trader who spent his weekends restoring houses to relieve the stress. He would come to Provenance for supplies. “I was tired of being one of 800 people,” says Lash. “Now I work in a salvage shop that’s one of a handful.” With the help of Donna and Lash, the business has grown. They are currently in the process of relocating from the space on Fairmount Avenue to a large warehouse on Front Street. The new Provenance will be easier to navigate and have vast amounts of space for all their material. Provenance’s cache of goods comes mostly from renovations and demolitions of historic buildings. For architectural salvagers, taking something apart can sometimes be as delicate as putting it together, especially since most old buildings were built to last. “People always talk about the PH O T O S BY LU C A S HA R DI S O N

architects that build bui something has to be said bricklayers, carpenters a Those guys were unbelie The fruits of Provenan over the city, if you know recently done work for se including Marc Vetri’s

Revolution

The world is full of dis material, and it’s a big figuring out what to do it all. Revolution Recov specializes in recycling reusing building mater produced by new cons and demolition. They a provide raw materials architectural salvage f local artists, non-profit contractors. Partners Jon Wybar and Avi Golen became friends in high school.


lanes, bicycle boulevards, cycle tracks and bike boxes. San Francisco has “floating bike lanes” that shift when parking is permitted on striped streets. It’s hard not to be jealous of those innovations. Diamon d St our ride, Cities On the evening following representatives spoke at a MOTU forum at the Academy of Natural Sciences titled “Cities for Cycling: Riding the Innovation Line.” (I wasn’t

urban cycling to that impressionbecomemore my localattractive go-to Stilton impersonCreamery in Newburg, Pa., where the ator. Like its famous British counterpart, it’s Dietrich-Cochran family has farmed since able population. straw colored with beautiful indigo veining, the ’70s. They milk their own Jerseys and densely short, packed beneath produce a variety of raw-milk cheeses with Long story it’s alla cobblestone-like about the Benjamins, rind. One whiff, and you smell a burlap sack whimsical names, such as Dragon’s Breath er, the infrastructure. Sure, Philly off Like most farmstead cheesefull of walnuts. One taste, and your mouthshowed and Wallaby. fills with toasty nuts and portobello mushmakers, the Dietrich-Cochrans are incredthe newly paved lanes along Pine and Spruce, rooms. The finish is like green branches on ibly devoted to their herd and don’t use any your tongue. the freshly striped lanes on South andhormones Lom-or pesticides. What you taste This is a perfect winter cheese, excelis pure Cumberland Valley milk made by bard around South Street Bridge and thewonderful British-style cheese. lent withthe port, preferably served fireside. hand into Although it’s flavorful, it’s not particularly Like Elvis, it’s classic. —Tenaya Darlington, lovely but crowded Schuylkill Banks Park, but salty so you won’t mind reaching for secmadamefromage.blogspot.com onds and thirds.for For an appetizer, toast we still need ideas how to reclaim the DelaKeswick Creamery, 114 Lesher Rd., Blue Suede aboard rustic breadCHEESE with a few OF THE MONTH improve bike accessNewburg, to thePA 17240; 717-423-6758; pear slices and walnut crumbles tucked PHILADELPHIAware Waterfront, underneath. A drizzle of local Urban Apiaries keswickcreamerycheese.com Ben Franklin Bridge and honey, post-toasting, makesredesign this sublime. the Spring UNIVERSITY Garden bike So doeslanes. a quick crank of black pepper. In France, spring the goat cheese is prized for the And that’s only beginning. delicate, vegetal flavor imparted by grass blades Girard Ave MASTER OF Can you imagine Sansom Street asget a Bike Prethe nanny goats nibble. In Philadelphia, you can a taste of this early succulence when you cut into TAP ferredON Corridor? Or cycle tracks on Broad and SCIENCE IN Baby Bloomer. This aged log of local goat cheese is on a recipe for Bucheron, a Frenchlanes specialty in the 5th Girard? based What about buffered SUSTAINABLE Tröegs Brewing that looks like a cake roll. Its center is dense and Company, Hershey, Pa. Belgian Strong and Dark Ale / 11.0% ABV Street tunnel, orthealong Chestnut Walnut supple, and surface isthe covered in “bloom”—a DESIGN fine layer of snowy mold. Imagine a creamy chèvre the season to keep an eye out for one of Santa’s favorite Street‘tis Bridges? I know with a lemony prickle. I suffer from if-you-givelittle helpers. Tröegs Mad Elf has already started appearing on Baby Bloomersyndrome, was developed by Chester County if Spruce a-mouse-a-cookie but shelf, what shelves, but unlike that otherAfter elf on ONLINE GRADUATE cheesemaker Debbie Mikulak. shethe retired lastthis little guy won’t be tattling on you. and Pine had “floating lanes” bike boxes? year, Mikulak sold her farm to a pair ofor aspiring mushrooms and ramps. Try serving rounds of Baby CERTIFICATE IN Categorized a Belgian Strong Dark Ale, it features honey, cheesemakersas from Havertown, Will and Lynne Bloomer on top of spring mix or steamed baby next day, the met Mayor Reid. Will gave up hisdelegation desk job at anotes tech firm to with and understated spice to give it a little Christmas SUSTAINABLE Thecherries, vegetables. It’s also lovely for breakfast, smeared a full-time goat-milker andcomfortably cheesemaker. It’s a clear ruby quaff most served in ainheavy Nutterkick. tobecome discuss the overall state of bicycle on fresh bread with a spot of homemade preserves. The results so far are promising, and fans of AmazPRACTICES chalice. And clocking in at 11.0% ABV, it won’t take much Darlington, to put a madamefromage.blogspot.com frastructure inunusual Philadelphia, by—Tenaya meeting Acres’ local goat cheesesfollowed have been little jingle in your step. —Lucas Hardison delighted to see them return. Look for Sea Smoke, Amazing Acres goat cheese is available in A COLLABORATIVE, ings witha puck cityof goat council to discuss legislative hurCHEESE MONTH cheese striped with ash—a SnowOF THE Philadelphia at the Fair Food Farmstand, Di Bruno MULTIDISCIPLINARY MadWhite-like Elf is available October through December. More Bros. at troegs.com . treat from the same maker. and Weavers Way Co-op. Amazing Acres Goat dles and past successes in other cities. You can LEARNING EXPERIENCE Spring goat cheese pairs well with the first Dairy, 184 Grove Rd., Elverson, Pa. 610.913.7002; farmers market produce: fiddleheads, bet no one brought up berries, bicycle license plates. amazingacresgoatdairy.com +■

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The Globe Inn 326 Fourth St., East Greenville, 215-679-5948, globeinn.net

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We ate pizza around the corner and caught a movie at the Grand, a recently restored one-screen theater. We drank some water. Then we drank some more water. After a good night’s sleep, we hit the flea market. Row after row of dealers offered antiques, furniture and collectibles. Unfortunately, our saddlebags couldn’t handle the 1950s card catalogue or the 10-pound wire mesh seltzer bottle, but we still managed to accrue plenty of small trinkets, including a tiny silver perfume bottle once owned by a “Lynne Elkins”—the name was engraved along the face. Our legs were a little stiff when we got back on the Perki trail. Once we hit Salford, I noticed a father and son duo hot on our tail; the son looked to be about seven years old. But I only had one thing on my mind: getting up that 12 percent grade. Thank goodness we resisted the seltzer bottle. We built up some solid momentum at the base of the ascent, switching gears, spinning in the gravel. I was breathing hard, trying to push through the burn, when I noticed two voices getting progressively louder. Wait. Were the father and son going to Zoom us on a 12 percent grade? No. Yes. They absolutely were. In an incredible blow to our egos—and as karmic retribution for all the 10-year-olds we gleefully passed the previous day—we were Zoomed so badly it was almost a Zing. At the top of the hill (reached on foot; we had to get off and walk our stupid skinny tires), we couldn’t even look each other in the eye. Zing Zang Zung by the father and son. Our comeuppance, as oppressive as the July humidity, was palpable all the way home. ■

Julie Lorch pedals along with notable members of Philly’s bicycle community on a route of their choice. They ride, they chat, she reports back.

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Julie Lorch pedals along with notable members of Philly’s bicycle community on a route of their choice. They ride, they chat, she reports back. THE ROUTE

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sky and ridgelines unencumbered. Chester County, it turns out, is heaven. In keeping with PASA’s overall mission, food is at the center of Bike Fresh Bike Local. Returning to Victory after 55 miles of riding (yup, we missed a turn on the most wellmarked route in history), we hobbled to the beer truck and pounded barbeque sandwiches made with local pork, slathered in slaw. The ride lasted a luxurious five hours—we downed the delicious meal in around three minutes. ■

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‘That’s beautiful,’” says Anthony of his Victor. “Like when you kiss somebody or give them a hug, and you know it’s awesome—it was like that.” He pauses. “It was an immediate connection.” At this point, it seems relevant to mention that Curtis Anthony sports one hell of a handlebar mustache. He asks me to compare the curvature of his ’stache with the handlebars of his high wheel. They’re a perfect match. We cross Falls Bridge and pick up West River Drive, which is closed to traffic today. Almost every cyclist we pass either knows Anthony, has bought a bike from him or stops to ogle the high wheel.  We bump into Joel Flood, another familiar face, near the Strawberry Mansion Bridge. Flood runs bikeville.com, Via’s blog, and accompanies Anthony to flea markets, swaps and sales to buy vintage inventory for Via. Like Anthony, he’s riding a bicycle that could be sitting in a museum: a 1961 Schwinn Paramount Tourist. “I love my bikes,” says Flood. “I feel it’s perfectly acceptable to ride these awesome bikes around the city. They were intended to be used, not coveted.” As we ride along, Flood and Anthony point out bikes they’ve sold to customers over the years. It feels like they must be at least partly responsible for the high concentration of beautiful old bicycles in Philadelphia. “I don’t know if you’ve ever seen the van full,” says Anthony of the scene after the swaps. “We bring back huge loads at least a half-dozen times a year. We usually have 50 to 60 bikes—one time we had 71.” He pauses, thinking about the beloved van. “That almost killed Morrison.” Flood rides ahead to Rittenhouse to count dogs in the park while we stop to sit in the grass by the river. An 1872 wrench falls out of Anthony’s pocket. “That’s a real wrench from the day of this bike,” he says. We talk about his first shop on Bainbridge, increased business from SEPTA strikes, solid rubber tires and single speeds. “With gas prices being so high a few years ago—plus parking being such a nuisance—people were finding out how easy it is to get around on bicycle,” he says. He also has a suggestion for making bicycling more comfortable in the city: “Surfacing the bike lanes would be a good thing.” “Riding bikes just makes people happy,” he adds. “It makes them laugh.” And, like a vintage gentleman, Anthony drops me at my front door on his way back to the shop. ■ Via Bicycles, a neighborhood bike shop with a vintage bent, is located at 606 S. 9th St. Visit bikeville.com.

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Headhouse Square is paying The brewpub homage to its historical roots as scene welON TAP a thriving public marketplace in comes Forest Delaware Valley College is a new way. The New Market, & Main Brewhelping to fight hunger with a open on spring and summer ing Company. hang with brewers long new community garden. The Fridays, willout feature locally made Opened in one-acre space, planted in colfood, goods and services. Expect early April, the enough and eventually you’ll hear laboration the Hunger Nufavorites like Capogiro, Bennett Ambler brewpub offers homeEarth Bread +with Brewery, Philadelphia one say “brewers make wort, trition Coalition of Bucks County, Compost, Farm to City and more. made beers and seasonal food, Belgian Amber Ale / 4.4% ABV yeast makes beer.” False modwill grow crops to be donated to Begins May 11. all within the comfort of a refuresty aside, there’s a lot of bished 19th century home. area food pantries. St. between Pinefermenting truth to that. It’s not just booze and2nd bubbles our fine 700 E. Butler Ave., and Lombard Sts., 61 N. Main St., Ambler, friends are putting out, it’s the esters and phenols (and other, Doylestown, delval.edu newmarketphiladelphia.com forestandmain.com

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sometimes less desirable, compounds) that contribute to a beer’s fruity or spicy flavor profile. Nestled in Mount Airy in the northwest corner of Philadelphia proper, Earth Bread + Brewery is something of a fermentation destination. Their flatbread dough is made 24 hours in advance to give the yeast time to generate all those flavorful compounds and carbon dioxide that make bread grid_departments_2012.06.indd 17 delicious and textured. And while it’s the same species of yeasty eukaryotes used in the beer, they’re very different strains with very different results. Brunette is a Belgian-style amber ale brewed with the Ardennes yeast strain and fermented a few degrees warmer than usual to encourage production of citrus-y esters. It’s a bright copper pour with a solid balance between the hops and malts flavors—clearly the yeast is the star of the show here. They never brew the same recipe twice, so Brunette won’t be around forever. If you miss it, console yourself with the Baltic porter and Belgian IPA they have on deck. —Lucas Hardison

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and at the Fair Food Farmstand in Reading Terminal Market. Wholesome Dairy Farms, 181 Camp Rd., 4/5/2012 2:25:48 PM Douglassville, 610.621.0508,

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While there’s only the slightest alcohol warmth in the tasting, it madamefromageblog.com does tip the scales at a robust 9.8% ABV. Available only on draft, Wholesome Grass-Fed this brew is best enjoyed in the comfort of Dairy’s a dimly lit café, while Ricotta is sold at Greensgrow the happy hour crowd drifts away. —Lucas Hardison

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ice ride!” shouts a dude on a bike. “Awesome!” yells another. In 2010, a high wheel bicycle is a strange sight in Center City. But in 1886, the year that Curtis Anthony’s prized Victor was built, the high wheel represented state-ofthe-art bicycle engineering. Many collectors would scoff at riding this valuable antique, just as they would be shocked to know that Anthony actually wears his 1975 Harrogate racing cap instead of, say, keeping it in a glass case. But Anthony believes in riding the bike. Anthony opened Via Bicycles 29 years ago with a $5,000 loan from his mother, backed by an antique bed for collateral. “I was a bike nut,” admits Anthony. “I thought I knew something about bikes. But as soon as I started the shop, I realized how little I knew.” Our ride begins at the shop on 9th Street (near South), and cuts a winding route along the Schuylkill River. It’s a breezy Sunday morning. We talk about plans for our summer gardens, and Anthony recounts adorable tales of Curtie, his four-and-a-half year old son: On the way back from John’s Water Ice one night, Curtie rode on Anthony’s shoulders, dripping all over his head. “I said, ‘Curtie, let’s sit down on a step and enjoy this together,’” recalls Anthony. “So, we’re on the step, and, you know when you put a nut and a bolt together and there’s that round thing with a hole in it?” “A washer,” I offer. “Yes. So, he picks one up and goes, ‘Daddy, look—a dryer!’” I’m smiling as we come up to a short, steep downhill. The high wheel is fixed-gear, and has no breaks. Before I can even imagine how this will work, Anthony whips his right leg around the back of the bicycle, puts his foot on top of the tiny rear wheel and slows the Victor with the rubber sole of his Vans. It is truly a site to behold. The high wheel continues to forge an effortless path through the crowd. “As soon as I got on it, it was like,

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We fold up the maps and head out on the Spring Garden bike lanes behind the Art Museum. Riding towards the West Bank Greenway, we meander through the pink blob, pausing in Woodlands Cemetery. Included on the National Register of Historic Places, the cemetery is so peaceful and well-landscaped that it immediately jumps to the top of my list of favorite places to explore on bicycle. Leaving the cemetery and heading towards Bartram’s, we approach a yellow light at the bottom of a hill. I really think she’s going to go for it. She has to go for it. I pull up to Stuart, joyously anticipating a run yellow. I can almost taste victory. When she hits the brakes on her Fuji commuter, I’m shocked—so shocked that I nick her saddlebag with my front wheel. We use the lesser known river entrance to Bartram’s Garden off 51st Street and Botanic Drive. The irony of this street name, which connects the oldest surviving botanical garden in North America to a PIDC-owned brownfield, cannot be overstated. Walking our bicycles up the freshly Spring Art mowed pathway that will become BarGarden Museum tram’s Trail, Stuart and I find ourselves in a wild meadow, staring at the city skyline. 676 It is an awe-inspiring moment. After leaving Bartram’s, we make a quick stop at Cobbs Creek—a bikeway Market Chestn that will soon be linked to the 58th Street ut Walnut Connector being developed by the Pennsylvania Environmental Council (PEC)— 611 and then head back towards the city via South Grays Ferry. In 14 miles, Stuart did not break one traffic rule. Her confidence in Complete Washington the Schuylkill River Trail is both inspirational, and, based on the progress already made in the campaign, believable. “In my PHILADELPHIA mind,” asserts Stuart, “there’s no way we’re not going to succeed.” ■

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/ bike culture tep one: Place local food activists, cycling enthusiasts and the rolling hills of Chester County into a pot. Two: Add a cup of glorious weather. Three: Sprinkle spandex to taste. Four: Bike 50 miles; immediately scarf lunch, turn in drink ticket for a Victory brew and voila! Bike Fresh Bike Local leaves you wondering if life could get any better. This year marked the third annual ride, a fundraiser for PASA (Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture) and a celebration of local food and bicycling. On September 26, over 650 cyclists gathered to tackle 25, 50 or 75-mile loops, winding through quiet roads and serene farmland. Grid’s Managing Editor, Lee Stabert, joined me for the 50-mile option. Before the ride, we caught up with Marilyn Anthony, Southeast Regional Director of PASA and one of the ride organizers. Three years ago, Anthony dreamed of an event “that would engage the non-farming community, and put them in touch with beautiful farmland and foods from those farms, and with the work that PASA does to keep family farming in our region.” She mentioned her idea to two longtime local foods activists, Chef Royer Smith and Victory Brewing’s Bill Covaleski. As luck would have it, both were also bike lovers. The idea took off, with more and more cyclists saddling up every year. Of course, it makes perfect sense that Smith and Covaleski are avid cyclists—eating locally connects us to each other and to the earth, as does riding a bicycle. We become aware of the seasons, and are offered the opportunity to deepen our relationship with the natural world. Sometimes, we switch on the ability to be 23 humbled by sensory experiences. If lucky, we are moved. The ride was magical. The route started at Victory Brewing in Downingtown, picked up Struble Trail and headed CHESTER towards French Creek State Park on Bicycle Route L. We 401 cut through Chester County and passed Springton Manor Farm before returning to the 100 brewery. There was little traffic, but we did pass tons of crickets, farm animals, spectacular open spaces and little white 76 arrows marking the turns—no Marsh Creek cue sheet fumbling required. State Park And the roads! They were so well-paved they made Spruce and Pine feel like a couple of dodgy double tracks. It’s true 282 that cyclists experience the world differently from drivers. We breathe more deeply and feel the texture of the road jangle our bodies; we see the DOWNINGTOWN

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ouring over a stack of maps, Sarah Clark Stuart, Campaign Director for the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, points to a pink blob in West Philadelphia. “It is our intention to realize a seamless recreation and transportation corridor,” she says. “This blob between the West Bank Greenway and the University Avenue Bridge represents a major study area for the Complete the Schuylkill River Trail Coalition.” Yes, I’m listening, but I’m also plotting ways to get Stuart to break some traffic laws. (Members of the Bicycle Coalition are famous for following every rule). Maybe I can let her in on the pure joy of blowing through a red light? Or not coming to a complete stop at a four-way intersection? Or the prized wrong way down a one-way street? “[The study area] is part of finding the best route to get from Locust Street, which is the current trail terminus, to Bartram’s Garden,” she continues, “and then down to the Cobbs Creek Bikeway.” Stuart means business. I might just have to settle for riding side by side on a busy street. Last February, the City of Philadelphia secured $17.2 million in federal funding from the TIGER program (The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery Discretionary Grant Program). “It was truly amazing and fantastic,” enthuses Stuart. “There were over 1,400 applications.” The TIGER funding will build five segments below the Fairmount Dam, including a "Connector Bridge" over the CSX railroad tracks at Locust Street. The Connector Bridge is a special victory for Stuart, who began her bicycle/pedestrian advocacy work in 2004 with the Free the Schuylkill River Park campaign. The campaign successfully advocated for permanent streetlevel railroad crossings at Race and Locust, allowing unencumbered access to Schuylkill Banks. TIGER is also funding a boardwalk from Locust to South Street, streetscaping on the Walnut Street Bridge, a new trail through Bartram’s Garden and the “58th Street Connector” between Bartram’s and Cobbs Creek.

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Hollow Farm debuted a new cheese he calls Maysiola—a moon pie of pasteurized goat’s milk named after Masie, one of his favorite Nubian goats, and with nods to robiola, ananother restaurant using Add Italian cheese. Maysiola has a grassy scent There’s a new destination for local and seasonal ingredients to and custardy innards, and if you’re a Brie Elevation Burger has taken farm fresh produce. Blue Moon your list. The much-anticipated head, you’ll enjoy this bloomy-rinded charAcres is opening a retail outlet The Pickled Heron opened this ONflight TAPlocally. The hamburger acter. which It’s more robust than a Brie, but winter not asin Fishtown, featuring chain, boasts organic, this spring at their farm in Pentangy as burgers a typicaland robiola. grass-fed fresh-cut nington, N.J. Expect former Ritz-Carltonale Philadelphia falls pretty far to the maltyorganic profriesDemchur has added another location duce, fruit, flowers, pasteurized chefs makes Maysiola at his home in Todd Braley and Daniela end of the spectrum and fealike to eat Maysiola with Asian to the Philadelphia area.he maintains a D’Ambrosio. eggs and pear,” other says localDonna goods. DemChester County, where herd tures a mild roasty flavor with Sly of Foxabout Brewing Co., Pottstown Pa. produces a variety of chur Levitsky, who collaborated with her brother Pete 70 Nubian goats and maybe some cherry notes. 11 Willow Creek Dr., Pennington, N.J. 3945 Welsh Rd.,/ Willow Grove 2218 Frankford to create this cheese. “You can also It’s drizzle it with olive goat’s milkAle products, from kefir to his wildly popular Ave. Strong Scotch 7.5% ABV elevationburger.com thepickledheron.com bluemoonacres.net a well-behaved bottle-condioil and add black pepper.” Try this combination on a Shellbark Extra Sharp—a chevre that comes on grilled baguette, and you’ve a quick this month’s beer celebrates tioned beer, thin headgot and not patio supper. strong, but in thefeatured best possible way. He also bears CHEESE MONTH —Tenaya Darlington, madamefromageblog.com the distinction of being one of the area’s Scottish poet Robert Burns, owing itsfirst nameOF toTHE excessively carbonated. All cheese makers. yearsplans ago, he hisgoat famous line: “theFifteen best-laid o’ started mice an’ kilt and no claymore. Bless Maysiola is sold in 1.5-pound square blocks and in producing batches chevre as a hobby, and men gang aftsmall agley.” But of don’t worry, lads, nothme bagpipes, it’s aatgood yin. 5-ounce disks. Look for it the Fair Food Farmstand today he sells to farmers markets around the region, ing went awry with this bottle. —Lucas Hardison including Chestnut Hill, Bryn Mawr, Phoenixville and in Reading Terminal Market and on the menu at the Brewed in Pottstown, 40 miles up the Farmers’ Cabinet (1113 Walnut St.). Shellbark Hollow East Goshen. Cornwallis Dr., West Chester, shellbarkhol3/1/2012 1:57:33 PM Schuylkill northwest ofgranular Philly, weeberries, heavy Farm, More942 at slyfoxbeer.com Forget about cement that Robiolas pairthe wellsad, with all things this summer: hearts and minds of Philadelphia dairy lovers. low.com , 610.431.0786 comes in supermarket tubs. Fresh ricotta feathereff ervescent beverages and particularly hardiscider. “I Today he milks 46 strapping bovines, and what he light, like the cheese Mark Lopez produces at his doesn’t sell at his farm store or to Capogiro, he’s Wholesome Dairy Farms in Yellow House, Pa. Made using to make cheese. from grass-fed milk, this stuff is dream-inducing. To jumpstart his new venture, Lopez began Take a spoonful, drizzle some honey on it, and you making whey ricotta this year, a labor-intensive Four years and more than 1,300 restaurant C19 straining (formerly will experience double rainbows. That’s a promise. process that involvesPhilly heating whey and household later, Cichetteria extending their A veterinarian by training, Lopez gave up his members the finethe curds. The result is airy,19) likeisthe consistency ON TAP Having timeingetting to start his Elkins Park neighborhood has farm-to-table commitment beclinicala hard practice 2007 to own small dairy. of perfectly fluffed couscous. Try spreading it on a a Lopez farmers market? Bring local finally broken ground on their yond prepared meals. Theirbrings Gratethe night is most famous as the “Capogiro guy”—he baguette and add a drizzle of olive oil, along with produce into thetoworkplace with that hasCreekSide is ful Acres Farm from in Orwigsburg, respite the for assaults supplies milk the gelateria won the Co-op.aConstruction pinch of salt and pepper. When you’re ready an office farm share program. The slated to take six months, so look Pa., which supplies produce for the load day,itand your next of course, ontowe celDelaware Valley Farm Share is Manayunk for this Brewing community to be the restaurant, will be supporting Co.,spot Philadelphia Pa. berries or ebrate just scoop some into tulips a with glass offering 12-week shares with an open in the fall. a 22-week Community Supported bowl and of topcloudy with dark chocolate Belgian Strong Dark Ale / 9.8% ABV dark amber optional add-on dairy. Agriculture program, with options ale Follow their progress at creekshavings, orange zest and for full and partial shares. brewed on thecrushed banks of To learn more, e-mail Kristin Mulside.coop. 7909 High School pistachios. theRd., Schuylkill in nearby Manayunk. Nocturnum boasts a malty, venna, kristin@farmtocity.org. Elkins Park creekside.coop Learn more c19philly.com. Ethereal. Youat may never need ice fruity flavor of plum/fig/blackberry with a spicy Belgian bite. cream again. —Tenaya Darlington,

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n one of the hottest days of summer, a friend and I embarked on a two-day bike trip OregonMonday, over 300 vento Perkiomenville. Every Ave dors gather at the corner of Route 29 and the Perkiomen Trail for what is widely considered one of the best flea markets around. We had our saddlebags ready for the 96-mile round trip, loaded with PB&Js, extra bike tire tubes and as much water as we could manage. The route to Perkiomenville is a mix of on-road, paved path and packed gravel. So, which bike to take? My comPatt ison Ave over his touring panion chose a comfortable single-speed bike. I grabbed a lightweight road bike, ditching my city workhorse and its slightly fatter tires. Four and a half miles on the Schuylkill River Trail took us to Manayunk, where, based on our sleek rides, we favored Umbria Street over the gravel Towpath. At mile eight, we reached the Valley Forge Trail. Here, I let my buddy in on a favorite bicycling activity of mine: the Zoom. Coined on a trip through Sonoma, Zooming is the simple pleasure of speeding up to pass slow movers, including but not limited to tricycles, joggers, families and little kids. For maximum gratification, “Zoom” is whispered just before the act, “Zoomed” immediately after. We were so busy Zooming 10-year-olds with our skinny tires that the paved path to Valley Forge flew by. We pounded those PB&Js and refilled our water bottles at a picnic area around mile 21. For shorter trips, the trail network beyond Valley Forge offers options to Evansburg State Park and Phoenixville. The packed-gravel Perkiomen Trail was up next. It was shaded and much cooler than the sunny Valley Forge path. Our bikes handled surprisingly well on the gravel, allowing for decent speed. We even managed the occasional Zoom. At mile 35, we spotted a sign that sent shockwaves through my tired legs: “12% Grade Ahead.” As we made our approach, I released an audible wheeze of relief—it was downhill. We sped joyously along, tucking away our climbing anxiety until tomorrow. Near the end of the Perkiomen Trail, at mile 40, we breezed by the site of the flea market. But we weren’t quite done—we still had eight miles along Route 29 to reach the Globe Inn and its glorious A/C. (There is camping near the market, but we’re soft.) We tackled the final three hills in silent, sweaty despair. The Globe opened in 1895, and has operated on the same corner in East Greenville ever since.

Maysiola

She mentions the great novice rides through flat parts of the city and some of the more challenging BCP favorites through hilly suburbs. “We have a very diverse membership, representing all levels of cycling interest and ability,” she says. “Some of our members are daily bike commuters, others enjoy weekly rides to their favorite eatery and still others do long-distance travel by bike.” The jaunt is so enjoyable that I go again the following week. The ride departs from the Allens Lane Train Station, along with a more challenging C+ ride. I’m tempted to go with the C’s—they looked so sleek and athletic—but stick with the D’s for a relaxing ride around Chestnut Hill. On the McCallum Street Bridge, we D’s are “zoomed” by a racing team of cycling stallions. Silent but for the whir of their methodical cadence, this Class A team of rock hard bodies whizz by with graceful precision. Chasing the stallions are a dozen clydesdales. A couple of awkward ponies bring up the rear. I’m no longer afraid of BCP, and you shouldn’t be either. There are rides for every level, including a list of options designed to help you climb the ladder: the Instructional D Ride for newbies (where no one is left behind), the C Spin-Off that “cheerfully waits to regroup,” and the Saturday Northwest Philly Rides for aspiring B cyclists. The starting points are all over the city and suburbs, and many of the launch sites offer two or more ride options. If you’ve ever longed for a ready-made bike posse, or just want to explore some new parts of the city with cyclists who know the best roads, then make the move. Heed Linda’s call: “Why don’t you try an easy ride to get used to cycling in a group?” They may challenge you to ride farther and faster than you thought you could, but they’re also pretty darn nice. ■

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Linda McGrane (above), and a group of cyclists ready to go (right).

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and tomatoes. is one LY.COM JAsummer NPale UAAleRY 2 0ABV 1But 1 Kidchego GRIDPHIL 29 American / 5.5% siasts the arguments for for the cheese board. It stands up to cured in meats, early february, watering aluminum—specifically, muscles in aroundPhiladelphia almonds and does holes welcomed Forge Brewing superior protection from wicked gyrationsOld with rosemary bread.Company to Spanish Manchego typically from their taps with a seriesisof eventsmade celebrating the light and oxygen—tend to sheep’snewly milk, which creates adistribution. lusciously fattyAmong brewer’s broadened be more convincing than the wheel often served on tapas plates alongside their suds is a new canning line of 16 oz. Endless mostly aesthetic arguments cured ham and quince paste. Kidchego is surprisingly cheese travels well. Pair it with a wheat beer or Summer and T-Rail Pale Ale. for glass. And the idea that saison to play off the woodsy, herbaceous notes, or rich tasting, given that goats don’t produce fatty T-Rail Pale pours a light amber color with a pick a light white or rosé.you can’tDarlington, get good beer in —Tenaya milk. The paste is bone-colored CHEESE OF THE MONTH and dense, and the thinrind head… okay, yes, probably going a can has long since been put to rest, so when is marked with faintyou’re reed-like impressions fromto madamefromage.blogspot.com enjoy straight from the can—who arenod we kid- you’re finished with that “pounder” (or is it a thethis baskets used in shaping this cheese—a is available atsomething the Fair Food to Farmstand in toward ding here?tradition. It’s light on carbonation, checks in at Kidchego “tall boy”?), that’s think about on Terminal Market, and is distributed through As youand prepare forasummer festivals, patio-en5.5% ABV, offers soft and balanced one-two Reading your way to the recycling bin. —Lucas Hardison Farm Fromage (farmfromage.com ). Misty Creek Goat tertaining picnics on the banks the Delaware, of hops andand malts. Basically yourofquintessential Dairy, 43 West Eby Rd., Leola, Pa., 717.656.1345 consider packing a wedge of Kidchego. This sturdy session beer. More at oldforgebrewingcompany.com This spring, Pete Demchur of Shellbark

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Cyclists Ray Scheinfeld and John Siemiarowski started the Philadelphia Ride of Silence in 2005 to commemorate the death of John’s friend Maurice Attie. Learn more about the Ride at rideofsilence.org.

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was terrified to ride with the Bicycle Club of Philadelphia (BCP). Mere mention of the group conjures images of sleek cyclists clad in spandex racing up the Manayunk Wall and through the hills of Northwest Philadelphia. They have skinny tires and aerodynamic helmets. You will get dropped. I met one of BCP’s leaders, Linda McGrane, last March. She is a petite woman with blonde hair and a welcoming smile. That she appears so warm and unassuming only enhances my terror. Linda remembers your name and wants you to join the Club for a ride. On a bike, this woman will crush you. For months, I scroll through the options on BCP’s website, phillybikeclub.org. There are weekly rides with lengthy descriptions and reams of archived cue sheets. In April, I become a member. I learn about Ride Classifications: Class A, “Difficult, 15 to 100+ miles, 18-20 mph average on flat terrain.” I am not Class A. I scroll down to Class B: “Advanced, 25 to 90 miles, 15-18 mph average on flat terrain.” Right. I do not go for a ride until July. I would have put it off longer had I not ran into Linda at Neighborhood Bike Works. She encourages me to try an easy ride to get used to cycling in a group. I really like Linda. I go home and scroll through the rides again. I find a Tuesday evening “Delightful, Delicious ‘D’ Ride.” The ride description claims it’s an “easy-paced evening jaunt for novice riders and/or anyone interested in a gentle recovery ride.” Class D rides are “Easy, 10 to 25 miles, 8-11 mph on flat terrain.” D it is! On Tuesday, I roll up and encounter an older woman riding a 1970s Schwinn cruiser MT. AIRY with fat tires (an easy-paced jaunt) and a tall Wharton student with red and white spandex and a matching Trek (recovery ride). Every BCP ride is led by a capable cyclist; Ste nto they research and prepare nA the route ahead of time (ride ve leaders generously volunteer their time and efforts to BCP). Linda happens to be leading tonight’s ride. There are nearly 1,000 members of BCP, but she remembers my name—and the names of the evening’s other cyclists—with ease. Linda has been a member of BCP since the early ’90s and president since February 2009. She says that joining BCP was one of the best decisions she’s ever made. “I’ve had the good fortune to meet so many marvelous people in the bicycling community,” she explains. “I’ve formed many long-lasting friendships.”

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group of older gentlemen wearing bright yellow reflective vests stand to the left. Behind them are about a dozen kids sporting denim cutoffs and tattoos, leaning against their beat-up single-speeds. There are women from Sturdy Girl Cycling in hot pink spandex, ambassadors from the Bicycle Coalition passing around sign-in sheets and commuters eyeing each other’s sleek, small-wheeled folding bikes. Familiar faces from local shops and clubs are sprinkled throughout the crowd. This diverse group of cyclists is gathered at the Art Museum steps to participate in the Ride of Silence, an annual event commemorating riders who have lost their lives on public roadways. The ride (which took place on Erie Ave May 20) also provides an opportunity to reflect on responsible riding habits. The original Ride of Silence was inspired by the 2003 death of Larry Schwartz in Dallas, Texas. The gesture has since spread across the globe, with over 300 rides taking place in all 50 states and 25 countries. A second ride Alle in gheny Ave our area was organized by Don Berk in Doylestown. The evening begins with the voice of Ray Scheinfeld, Perkiomenville Auction & one of the Ride’s organizers: “Cheryl Janzer, 50. Rick e the Flea Market Route 29 v and A Perkiomenville Trail; open Mondays Clendaniel, 42. Anthony Hoffman, 51. William James ford Bradley V, 17. Edward Boye, 54. Robert Mitchell, 13. These Lehigh nk 326 Fourth St., The Globe Inn Ave are the names of the six Delaware Valley bicycle riders Fra 215-679-5948, East Greenville, Julie Lorch who were killed by motorists since we rode last year’s globeinn.net pedals along with of Silence.” Rid Ride The Grand has its Movie Theater notable members ge “We ride tonight to make this one point: We have the and silence are solemn, but the collective rhythm 252the Main same right to use the roads as motorists,” continues John own energy, similar to heavy raindrops, the way citySt., East Greenville, A 215-679-4300, thegrandtheater.org of Philly’s bicycle ve Siemiarowski, another organizer. “We need to remem- feels in the middle of a downpour. ber that whenever we ride, we are ambassadors for Diam all The six deaths that occurred this year in the Delaware community on ond St cyclists… I want to be able to say to a motorist, ‘We follow Valley all took place outside the city limits. This might a route of their the rules, now you should too.’” He pauses: “We are not sound counterintuitive, but urban motorists are far more choice. They ride, holding up traffic; we are traffic!” This statement draws accustomed to sharing the road—whether they like it or applause and the high, bright chime of bike bells. not. According to the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philathey chat, she After a moment of silence, the only sound is the stac- delphia, when the number of bikes on a street doubles, reports back. cato click of shoes into pedals. The Ride starts with a the crash risk for each individual declines by one third. cruise down Benjamin Franklin Parkway towards City “Bicyclists have to follow rules, too!” screams a shrill Girard Ave Hall—the maximum speed is 12 mph, recalling a funeral voice on 10th Street. We are holding up north-south trafprocession. A police escort conducts rolling street clo- fic as we pedal down Spruce. This man might be disresures, giving riders the full run of the road. Both the pace spectful, but he’s right. THE R OUTE The Ride heads north on 23rd Street. Ahead of me, I watch a steady stream of cyclists make a left onto Wal611 nut Street. It’s dusk. Turning the corner, I see hundreds of riders crossing the bridge to West Philly. The orange B Fr 76 light reflects off the river, the buildings, the bikes, the an klin helmets; moving together, the riders look like a single Pk 13 w y sunset-hued organism. I say my first word in almost an hour: “Whoa.” 676 With a few final turns, we return to the steps of the Market St Art Museum. Standing together, the assembled horde pauses for a final moment of remembrance, lifting bikes Walnut St high in the air, and giving thanks for a safe ride through Market St the city at dusk. ■

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“The principle of sustainability is reshaping the way we think Break is outasome Kid Rock; there’s Kidchego Lorch student and bike enthusiast; about the world, encouraging Julie us in the house. Amos Miller, an Amish cheeseto improve the way we she’s currently hard workmay onbewhere to grid_departments_2011.12.indd 15 at County, maker from Lancaster the design, build and live in the 21st ON only TAPperson in the country who is making bike: philadelphia, an upcoming print Spanish-style Manchego from raw goat’s century” milk. Miller, who runs Misty Creek Goat Dairy, guide to cycling in the city. — Rob Fleming, is known for his goat’s milk ricotta salata, a Program Director snow-white cheese he calls Misty Lovely. It’s

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from across the country are talking about improving cycling Ri in Philadelphia? And they’re dgactually riding bikes? doing it while e What can I say—it Av was the most fantastic e afternoon of bike geekery I’ve experienced in months. The four-hour ride was part of a twoday visit to Philadelphia organized by Cities for Cycling, a program led by the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NATCO).

JUNE 2012 JULY 2012

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DECIBEL

For this Slayer story, the concept was a release of their tenth album, of theAmerican play on imagesOn from eve film thethe four members of of the day with spends awere Psycho. MyDecibel directions toeach take the they’re the only original why examine to clean images provided by the photograthrash band that never let up, not even for pher and “grunge them up...story help sell the photos by neil visel by j. bennett a second. concept.”

SLAYER

Decibel is North America’s only monthly metal magazine. Published since 2004, in 2010 pastemagazine.com listed it as one of the top 20 magazines of the year. THE

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May 2010 [T67]

Alex Mulcahy

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Adrien Begrand J. Bennett Jess Blumensheid Shawn Bosler Liz Brenner Brent Burton Richard Christy John Darnielle Jerry A. Deathburger Chris Dick Jeanne Fury Nick Green Joe Gross Cosmo Lee Frank Lemke Daniel Lukes Shawn Macomber Shane Mehling Kirk Miller Greg Moffitt Andrew Parks Etan Rosenbloom Scott Seward Kevin Sharp Rod Smith Zach Smith Kevin Stewart-Panko Adem Tepedelen Jeff Treppel Zena Tsarfin Catherine Yates

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Andrew Bonazelli

andrew@redflagmedia.com

Jamie Leary

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Chuck BB, Mark Rudolph, Paul Romano, Bruno Guerreiro Lucas Hardison Albert Mudrian

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Mark Evans

apologists. Throughout this magazine’s history, we’ve from the editor never shied away from tackling “difficultâ€? subject matter. Whether that means running a year-in-the-making exposĂŠ on the National Socialist Black Metal movement (“And Out Come the Wolves,â€? #19), getting the not-so-straight story on what it’s like to be an openly gay musician in the extreme metal scene (“A Rainbow in the Dark,â€? #23), or breaking the news about Cretin guitarist/vocalist Marissa Martinez, the first transgender artist in the death metal/grindcore scene (“Daddy’s Little Girl,â€? #45), Decibel has constantly strived to challenge our readers. Because—let’s be honest—we think a bit more highly of you than some other publications might. With that in mind, we present our first cover story starring a convicted murderer and committed racist. Maybe I’m fortunate in that I’ve always been able to separate the artist from their art. I mean, honestly, there are numerous people who have graced the cover of Decibel who I have absolutely no desire to ever share a beer with, yet I have no issues sharing beers with others while listening to their music. Ultimately, Varg Vikernes’ contributions to the second wave of black metal are completely undeniable. Odin knows that I own and thoroughly dig all of his Burzum releases (excluding those shitty, decidedly un-jailhouse rock synth recordings, of course). All of that doesn’t mean that I didn’t wrestle with the idea of a Burzum cover at least a little bit before I stepped down from my personal soapbox and remembered that it’s our job as, you know, journalists to grab this story by the proverbial horns. Thankfully, J. Bennett rewarded my decision with an incredibly in-depth examination of Varg via a series of email interviews (the Artist Formerly Known as Count Grishnackh refuses to do any phone or in-person interviews), in order to unravel his cult of personality and the swarm of controversy indelibly linked to it. Now, I’m not naive enough to expect that all of our readers will agree with this cover choice. So, I invite you to make the “Letterbombsâ€? section a little more entertaining over the next couple issues. Go ahead, take a stab at it.

—Albert Mudrian, Editor-in-Chief

just words

E X T RE M E LY E X T RE M E

November 2011 [T85] decibelmagazine.com

upfront; 10 news Derrick Prince’s mean cuisine 14 grinding it out No comment

73 lead review Mastodon stave off extinction in a big way on The Hunter

38 warbringer Bit by bit, torn apart 40 call & response:

alice cooper

74 album reviews Records that should kick just slightly more ass than Hurricane Irene, including Bloodsoaked, Absu, Nailgun Massacre, Fuck the Facts and Arsis

You’ve been blown to pieces

15 brewtal truth Best of the fest 16 cry now, cry later Peace core 18 live reviews Obscene report 20 studio report Goatwhore carves up a new slab 22 trapped under ice Not trending 24 the atlas moth They don’t care where, just far 26 circle of ouroborus Womb raiders 28 mordbrand Young macabre gods

42 machine head A locust we can get behind 44 chimaira Altering the future

106 sub:culture Yes, we’re reviewing fucking RPGs now

46 q & a: dan lilker Alien grindcore punks, fuck off 50 the decibel

hall of fame There’s nothing charitable about Ministry’s acrimonious industrial masterpiece The Mind Is a Terrible Thing to Taste

gear

subculture

dispatch

36 goreaphobia Have a magical day

live reviews

Say hola to Jeff Walker’s little friend, El Triturador

Coffin fit

60

34 junius Afterlife lessons

Some artists might be unfamiliar to those of you who don’t arrive at MDF by 11 a.m. each year, while others should be as recognizable as the food court options at the Monroeville Mall.

112 south pole

30 beneath oblivion Worst case studies 32 wolvhammer Cooled customers

If it were up to Decibel’s longsuffering managing editor from the editor Andrew Bonazelli, this zombie special issue would never have been brought (back to) life. In fact, if I handed him the keys to the dB kingdom, you’d probably be holding the “Ike Davis Issue� right now. So, you’re welcome. Anyway, Bonzo believes that zombie culture has jumped the shark (and not in the literal and awesome Zombi 2 sense either). Whether the undead are selling us personal computers, or occupying prime AMC space while everyone waits for Mad Men to get their shit together, it’s easy to see why Andrew feels this zombie zeitgeist kind of—to borrow a term from my 12-year-old self—rots. I mean, I just typed the words “zombie zeitgeist,� for fuck’s sake. But rather than let sleeping corpses lie, I thought this issue could actually be, you know, fun. Of course, the template established by our previous special issues on death metal, grindcore and stoner rock was only gonna get us so far. Zombies aren’t particularly good interviews unless the quote you’re fishing for is “BRAINS!!!� So, our interview subjects this time around were exclusively (with the notable exception of legendary zombie effects artist Tom Savini) headbangers whose fascination with the undead informs their obsession with all things heavy and metal. Some artists, like Gruesome Stuff Relish and Undead Creep, might be unfamiliar to those of you who don’t arrive at MDF by 11 a.m. each year, while Deceased, Coffins, Hooded Menace and the rather no-shit cover selection of Cannibal Corpse should be as recognizable as the food court options at the Monroeville Mall. And they all come together here in one great big unstoppable army of darkness. If that doesn’t scare Bonazelli, then he’s as dead as his baseball team’s chances in 2012.

reviews;

features;

F

ernandes Guitars’ signa-

—albert mudrian, Editor-in-Chief

mark.evans@redflagmedia.com

Save the apologies for the

Rebecca Haimovitz Jess Blumensheid Chris Dick Vince Thompson

Jon Pushnik Ester Segarra Justina Villanueva Neil Visel Brandon Wu

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more triumphant. Mining choice cuts from the

Decibel (ISSN 1557-2137) is published monthly by Red Flag Media, Inc., 1993 And the Forests DreamAnnual Eternally EP, the 2009 1032 Arch Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107. subscription price is $29.95. Periodicalinstant postage,classic Philadelphia, PA, and mailing Evangelion, andother nearly every record offices. Submission of manuscripts, illustrations and/or photographs must in between, the Polish blackened death metallers be accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. The publisher the audience in transcendent thrall. Fists assumes no responsibilityhold for unsolicited materials.

pumped, thrown, blood shed, gods ridiPostmaster send changesare of address forhorns Decibel to Red Flag Media, 1032 Arch Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia 19107.In short, a spectacle that culed and castPA aside‌ will Media, not beInc. easily surpassed nextReproduction year sans virgin Copyright Š2012 by Red Flag All rights reserved. in wholeBehemoth or in part withoutand written permission of the publisher is strictly volcano. —SHAWN MACOMBER prohibited.

evokes stark images of terrorists, child soldiers,

Watain

ture Jeff Walker bass, the gangbangers and warlords the world over. When Gearified asked Walker about it, he replied, “It’s El Triturador, translates just a joke, really.� So, no reading into it. Endless drives—and drive—make the fraternity of MATT OLIVO’S to “the Grinder.� WeThe couldn’t SKELETONWITCH worth pledging have christened it better our- ➋ SOUND: Walker wanted the solid mahogany selves. And true to the Carcass body to be very thick so the sound comes first and foremost from the resonance of the wood— mainman’s original style, he not the pickups. Then, he added the select combiboxesof of animal parts and35CS lashing bones didn’t want to merely take a stock model and “stick on some graphics and slap mypawing through nation the EMG withto EQ and an onboard an eight-foot-tall backstage Satanic altar can become unreEBS for ain modern-sounding punch A fewdistortion minutes of immersion the scene and name on it.� Perhaps Zakk Wylde should put the magazine down at this point. markable. even manifestly non-kvlt venue staff will bat nary an eyeCOVER STORY

Decibel Magazine Tour

upfront_0412.indd 4

j a c k s ong u i ta r s . c o m

2/9/2012 3:44:45 PM

WHO: Behemoth, Watain, the Devil’s Blood, In Solitude, Evoken WHERE: The Trocadero, Philadelphia, PA WHEN: May 6

COVER AND CONTENTS PHOTO BY CHRIS CASELLA

Sometimes images provided by the photographer don’t meet the expectations of the editor or art director, so they call me in to retouch and/or embellish. Decibel (ISSN 1557-2137) is published monthly by Red Flag Media, Inc., 1032 Arch Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107. Annual subscription price is $29.95. Periodical postage, Philadelphia, PA, and other mailing offices. Submission of manuscripts, illustrations and/or photographs must be accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. Postmaster send changes of address for Decibel to Red Flag Media, 1032 Arch Street, 3rd Floor, Philadelphia PA 19107. CopyrightŠ 2011 by Red Flag Media, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited.

It is amazing how quickly a gruff, leather-bound roadie

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with overdrive that works quite well for any rock lash as evening players shellacked in corpsepaint and/or coagulating stroll past. orblood metal application. ening roar, but the opening volley in this multiinaugural Decibel Magazine tour rolls into originally an F-hole, but town. itTheultimately front dark offensive comes courtesy of longAlternate realities emerge. running New Jersey funeral doom powerhouse Clad in pre-show casual wear—sleeveless In proved too costly to reproduce in the ➌ PLAYABILITY: The neck has a remarkably comEvoken, whose excellent feel-it-in-your-loins Solitude shirt, black shorts—Behemoth’s Nergal growl ‘n’ pummel sonically mimes the band’s gazes out approvingly at the bustling malevolent production models. The body has an fortable C shape at the nut that smoothly transicarnival. Barely a year ago, the extreme metal icon Facebook bio: “Hammering the long, cold, hard nails into your coffin...â€? was sidelined, locked in mortal battle with leukeimpressively thick top and bottom tions Uupdated shape by solid as the Mercyful Fate/the 12th fret. Right mia. “The thing is, after all the experiences I wentto aAsnice through, I came out less interested in any compro- NWOBHM jams of last year’s The World. The Flesh. dual binding that only stops the“Today I do things out ofI the box, bass isbolstered a player. Even bends, The Devil remain,this the road has seriously mise,â€? heon tells Decibel. because In Solitude’s bite. The man-possessed flail of fully stand behind them or just‌ fuck it. For me, bottom for the contouredthisheel vibrato and slides are and achieved with ease. And frontman Pelle “Fur is murder appropriate is a verywhere natural progression... ‘No comproneckwearâ€? Ă…hman stands in marked contrast to mise’ could be an alternative name for this tour.â€? Devil’s Blood’s ethereal and engrossing Later, during the build-up to an ecstatic the maple set-neck-through design the renneckthedoesn’t fight you atFarida all. Lemouchi, a pagan amalgamation of Grace Slick dition of “Conquer All,â€? Nergal will scream “It so fucking good to be alive!â€? inciting a deaf- and post-pig bloodbath Carrie White floating elegantly joins the body. feels The binding then continues around the entire rose- âž? SUMMARY: The classic looks, great playability, wood fingerboard, over the headstock custom neck inlays and an onboard distortion and back to the body—pretty sweet. circuit make this a no-brainer for the bassist who The fretboard board inlays feature wants to kick-start the apocalypse. various medical instruments combed from the classic Carcass “Tools of the Tradeâ€? ➎ CONS: Only comes in a four-string model, imagery. The computer-controlled routing for the which will turn away the growing population inlays is superb. Furthermore, the combination of musicians out there who want to play basses of the classy-looking inlay job and cold, surgithat look like an ironing board. However, as cal look of the tool shapes creates a (no doubt Carcass guitarist Bill Steer quite rightly pointed intended) chilling effect. out, “You wouldn’t add more keys or strings to a One inlay that’s particularly disturbing piano, so why the fuck would you feel the need marks the 12th fret position. It’s the shape of the to do so to a bloody guitar?â€? most recognizable and despised weapon in the world, the Soviet-made AK-47. This iconic tableau âž? PRICE: $999.00 (Also available in white) A !-

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upfront_0812_ALBERT.indd 18

➊ LOOK: The shape of the body is actually strikingly similar to the old school Dean “Cadillac� guitar. It’s still not an obvious choice for a metal instrument, like, say, a Flying V, Star Body or Warlock. But it actually makes for a nice, stout, classic look nonetheless. The glossy black finish has a deep quality to it, like you’d imagine how the original ’60s Batmobile might look up close. There’s also a painted, white lightning bolt design that was

6/7/2012 11:42:36 AM

Book review of former Broken Hope guitarist Jeremy Wagner’s The Armageddon Chord.

(REVISITED)

DANIEL ONLY The LEVIATHAN THE SWEDISH DEATH METAL BYEKEROTH INTERVIEW books Read (REAL) V

DECIBEL

Chord

Guitarmageddon is nigh in Broken Hope expat’s insane new novel THE ARMAGEDDON CHORD by Jeremy Wagner

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LEVIATHAN

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THE ONLYV INTERVIEW

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SKELETONWITCH midwest metallers brew up their breakthrough PLUS BRUTAL TRUTH | MACHINE HEAD

NOV 2011 // No. 085

GOATWHORE | EXHUMED | GOREAPHOBIA | CHIMAIRA

WOLVHAMMER | MORDBRAND BENEATH OBLIVION | WARBRINGER

018

/ DEC 2011

/ N OV 2 0 1 1

Q8 6

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INSIDE THE ATLAS MOTH | JUNIUS

E XT R E M E LY E XT R E M E ; D E C I B E L M AG AZ I N E . C O M

116 (HEAD-RATTLING)

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MUNICIPAL WASTE TRAGEDY RUSSIAN CIRCLES ABSU SKINNY PUPPY ANIMALS AS LEADERS

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V to Egypt a Turns out the devil came down few thousand years ago and recorded a demo on 7-inch papyrus in cryptic hieroglyphics. With the Nazi’s Egyptology expertise, Vaisto transcribes the music and arranges it for the modern six-string. The idea is when our guitar hero plays the unholy riff, finished with an “ultra-brutal and catastrophic power chord,� Satan will rise from his abysmal prison and his demonic horde will ignite Armageddon. We tried this at home and the worst we could conjure was an abominable cockroach from a hole in the carpet under the infernal loveseat. We suspect some exotic alternate tuning must be involved. —LUCAS HARDISON

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BY DANIEL EKEROTH SWEDISH DEATH METAL cover WASTE (REVISITED) V

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LANDMINE MARATHON HAMMERS OF MISFORTUNE ENTRAILS INSOMNIUM MOURNFUL CONGREGATION DEC 2011 // No. 086

MEGADETH

The 13 Lives of Dave Mustaine (AND FINGERS)

Former Broken Hope guitarist Jeremy Wagner puts pen to paper and weaves a horror novel in the mode of your typical late ’80s Saturday morning cartoon. Think Aleister Crowley spinning G.I. Joe scripts. Okay, not really. But when you pick up this book, the power of, well, something, will compel you to finish it. Guitar god Kirk Vaisto can’t help but sign any dotted line put in front of him. So, when a billionaire media tycoon comes knocking with a couple of goons and his occult-obsessed Nazi number two in tow, it doesn’t take long before Vaisto finds himself contractually obligated to usher in the end times.

(HEAD-RATTLING)

MEGADETH V

Can’t find your

ANAAL NATHRAKH

M E G A D E T H L E V I AT H A N SW E D I S H D E AT H M E TA L R E V I S I T E D T R AG E DY M U N I C I PA L WA ST E E N T R A I L S

S K E L E TO N W I TC H A L I C E C O O P E R M I N I ST RY B R U TA L T R U T H M AC H I N E H E A D G OAT W H O R E T H E AT L A S M O T H

E XT R E M E LY E XT R E M E ; D E C I B E L M AG AZ I N E . C O M

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018

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M E G A D E T H L E V I AT H A N SW E D I S H D E AT H M E TA L R E V I S I T E D T R AG E DY M U N I C I PA L WA ST E E N T R A I LS

ALICE COOPER HALLOWEEN CALL & RESPONSE

E XT R E M E LY E XT R E M E ; D E C I B E L M AG AZ I N E . C O M

Filmed in California as part of the delayed continuation of the “Diary Of A Madman� tour after the death of Randy Rhoads. Features the lineup of Ozzy Osbourne, Brad Gillis, Rudy Sarzo and Tommy Aldridge.

LANDMINE MARATHON HAMMERS OF MISFORTUNE ENTRAILS INSOMNIUM MOURNFUL CONGREGATION DEC 2011 // No. 086


LIVE!

TENNESSEE Indie rock magazine Cowbell was published 2010-2011 and distributed nationally on newsstands and in record stores, with a monthly circulation of 30,000.

HEAT Cowbell snaps up Bonnaroo

Our very own Lucas Hardison is something of a Bonna-

roo lifer, having been to the last eight installments of the ��-year-old Tennessee music and arts festival. Hence, when he ditched work for the week in June, we insisted he take his camera. So, how was it? “Hot, dusty and awesome,” says Hardison of the three-day party that featured highlight sets by Gogol Bordello, Beirut, this month’s cover band My Morning Jacket (see p. ��), Mumford & Sons, Black Keys and others. “It’s a well-oiled machine at this point,” says Hardison. “It’s a beautiful thing to see such an enormous apparatus run so smoothly. Hippies get a bad rap, man. These guys have their shit together.” Hit cowbellmagazine.com for more of his shots. 1

2 3

4

12

MY MORNING JACKET

COMES ALIVE Jim James and his hirsute Louisville rockers are the kings of the festival circuit. story by SEAN L. MALONEY

My Morning Jacket, photographed on stage at Bonnaroo music festival in 2011 (Manchester, TN).

photo by LUCAS HARDISON

PHOTOS BY LUCAS HARDISON


1. The crowd at Bassnectar 2. Eugene Hütz from Gogol Bordello 3. Zach Condon of Beirut 4. Low Anthem 5. Black Keys 6. Dr. John with Original Meters and Allen Toussaint 7. Sam Beam from Iron & Wine 8. Mumford & Sons 7

/music

Photo essay of Bonnaroo music festival in 2011 (Manchester, TN).

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(Extended) Family Affair 6

Phil Selway puts his drums in storage and makes some new friends for his first solo album / by JESS HARVELL

L

ike those pro athletes who ditch the sport that made them famous

to try their hand at a whole new game, you worry a bit when a virtuoso musician sets down their chosen instrument to record a solo album. For Phil Selway—also known as Radiohead’s drummer, meaning he came up with the booming “Airbag” break for starters—it meant ditching the 13 drum kit entirely. There are no beats on Familial, Selway’s first release under his own name, unless you count a smattering of small moments where it sounds like someone’s drumming on the guitar case. That’s the potentially scary news. The good news Finn had done all the hard work for me.” is that Familial is another Radiohead side project Selway returned to England, and on breaks from that succeeds because it sounds very little like the Radiohead, he kept at the guitar, “chipping away” World’s Biggest Art-Rock Band. Like Thom Yorke’s at songs and fired by the “intense creativity” of the solo Eraser and Jonny Greenwood’s soundtrack Seven Worlds Collide seswork, there are echoes of Radiohead on Familial, sions. Eventually it became /music gentler acoustic moments, but especially the band’s hard to ignore that these it also recalls the drowsy, drifting, late-night quality low-key, home-brewed tunes, not quite right for you’ll find on records by the Blue Nile and David Sylthe Brit-prog grandeur of vian. As a singer-songwriter with a rather exquisite his regular gig, seemed to ear for atmosphere, Selway has both listened hard, and found a voice of his own. be building to an album. He It took some time to locate that voice, of course. began working with proSelway first picked up a guitar when he was a teenducer Ian Davenport who ager, in tandemPhil with the drums, and continued to “helped me find my singing Selway puts his drums in storage and makes some by for in hisRadiohead, first solo album play throughoutnew hisfriends tenure though “in voice” and the two began a those pro athletes ditch theof sport famous of demo-ing a very private way, ike very much in thewho confi nes mythat made longthem process to try their hand at a whole new game, you worry a bit when a virtuoso own room, very much under radar. Nobody reallyto record and refi ning. musician setsthe down their chosen instrument a solo album. For Phil Selway—also known as Radiohead’s drummer, meaning he came heard it, apart fromup my wife from time to time.” “It felt like a new prowith the booming “Airbag” break for starters—it meant ditching the drum kit drafted entirely. There are no beats on Familial, release It wasn’t until he was several years ago Selway’s cess,”firsthe says. “I hadn’t under his own name, unless you count a smattering of small moments where by Neil Finn toittake in Seven Worlds Collide, soundspart like someone’s drumming on the guitar case. written anything since I That’s the potentially scary news. The good news Finn had done all the hard work for me.” tory. The title is a bit of a tip-off, but Familial is Selway taking stock of the a benefit project for anti-poverty group Oxfam, was a teenager, and so comis that Familial is another Radiohead side project Selway returned to England, and on breaks from relationships that formed him, and drawing on a married father’s day-to-day. that succeeds because it sounds very little like the Bind” Radiohead, he kept at the guitar, away” wouldn’t be ready to write these lyrics any time before turning ��,” Selway that he wrote Familial’s “The Ties That and ing to“chipping the process as some—PHIL “ISELWAY World’s Biggest Art-Rock Band. Like Thom Yorke’s at songs and fired by the “intense creativity” of the says. “You turn ��, and hopefully you’ve got a much more developed sense of solo Eraser and Jonny Greenwood’s soundtrack Sebastian Seven Worlds Collide sesyourself. And although there’s a lot going on in your life, it isn’t necessarily the met future collaborators Lisa Germano, one who was turning ��, work, there are echoes of Radiohead on Familial, sions. Eventually it became stuff you think of as being very ‘rock and roll.’ But there’s just a huge richness the band’s gentler acoustic moments, but hard to ignore in it, a huge richness in commonplace stuff. That’s where I’ve always felt the Steinberg, and especially Wilco members Glenn Kotche andthat these you have You to find something turn 40, it also recalls the drowsy, drifting, late-night quality low-key, home-brewed heartbeat of my life is, really.” and hopefully you’ll findfoursome on records by the Blue“really Nile and David brought Syltunes, notmy quite right for Therethat.” was, of course, a not inconsiderable final hurdle before inviting his new that’s appropriate to that, and that reflects Pat Sansone. The vian. As a singer-songwriter with a rather exquisite the Brit-prog grandeur of bandmates to England: This was the first time Selway had stepped in front of you’ve got a much more ear foropened atmosphere, Selway both listened hard, hisfor regular gig, seemed to For lyrical inspiration, he didn’t have a microphone a nearly ��-year career as a professional musician. “I made songs to life, and uphaspossibilities me. to inlook and found a voice of his own. be building to an album. He developed sense of a compilation CD for myself when I started, more as a kind of guide towards took some timeprocess.” to locate that voice, of course. began “Neil working with prohow toown sing,” hehissays. Selway’s voice has the appealing fragility of a first-time But it was a veryItnatural He laughs. much further than his own house, and his yourself. And although

You turn 40, and hopefully you’ve got a much more developed sense of yourself. And although there’s a lot going on in your life, it isn’t necessarily the stuff you think of as being very ‘rock and roll.’”

(Extended) Family Affair

L

24

Selway first picked up a guitar when he was a teenager, in tandem with the drums, and continued to play throughout his tenure in Radiohead, though “in a very private way, very much in the confines of my own room, very much under the radar. Nobody really heard it, apart from my wife from time to time.” It wasn’t until he was drafted several years ago by Neil Finn to take part in Seven Worlds Collide, a benefit project for anti-poverty group Oxfam, that he wrote Familial’s “The Ties That Bind” and met future collaborators Lisa Germano, Sebastian Steinberg, and Wilco members Glenn Kotche and Pat Sansone. The foursome “really brought my songs to life, and opened up possibilities for me. But it was a very natural process.” He laughs. “Neil 24

/

JESS HARVELL

ducer Ian Davenport who “helped me find my singing voice” and the two began a long process of demo-ing and refining. “It felt like a new process,” he says. “I hadn’t written anything since I was a teenager, and so coming to the process as some—PHIL SELWAY one who was turning ��, you have to find something that’s appropriate to that, and that reflects that.” For lyrical inspiration, he didn’t have to look much further than his own house, and his own his-

there’s a lot going on in your life, it isn’t necessarily the stuff you think of as being very ‘rock and roll.’”

PHOTO BY LUCAS HARDISON

fect is magn cheap head might as w opposite th “There w cords that stones for things like Everyone, ‘Prince’ Bi he says. “Th you get feel and place o ing, that sen thing that’s tory. The title is a bit of a tip-off, but Familial is Selway taking stock of the the room at the time. The fact that you ca relationships that formed him, and drawing on a married father’s day-to-day. scraping or strings buzzing, I think it d “I wouldn’t be ready to write these lyrics any time before turning ��,” Selway much closer to the whole recording.” says. “You turn ��, and hopefully you’ve got a much more developed sense of But despite the sounds of ambient l yourself. And although there’s a lot going on in your life, it isn’t necessarily the through, Familial was also carefully e more obvious things, where you hav stuff you think of as being very ‘rock and roll.’ But there’s just a huge richness in it, a huge richness in commonplace stuff. That’s where I’ve always felt the dropping a pile of plates in the backgr heartbeat of my life is, really.” aren’t the kind of things you want in t There was, of course, a not inconsiderable final hurdle before inviting his new cut those out,” he says. “But there are th bandmates to England: This was the first time Selway had stepped in front of occasional door slamming, which sudd a microphone in a nearly ��-year career as a professional musician. “I made like part of the song itself. And that ca a compilation CD for myself when I started, more as a kind of guide towards something to the recording.” how to sing,” he says. Selway’s voice has the appealing fragility of a first-time Selway doesn’t dismiss the idea of a singer who’s still a bit tentative about his talent, but his hushed restraint also album, but he also notes that “the way t fect is magnified on even cheap headphones; you feels more like a choice than a necessity. as Radiohead, that kind of determine might as well be sitting opposite the band. “There are always those singers that have a very distinctive approach, but else, as it should. We have our ‘Radiohe “There were also records that were touchyou’re just drawn into them, really,” he says of his how-to-sing CD-R, which ally, where we work for these certain pe stones for me as well, things like Master and included artists like Juana Molina and Beth Gibbons. “There’s someare very intensive, trying to g Everyone, the Bonnie ‘Prince’ Billy record,” thing so intimate about how they put a song across. It’s not about in that time. But we’ve also r he says. “Those records, you get feel for themaking time these great statements; it’s just drawing you in. I like that the way we work also benefit and place of the recording, that sense of everykind of intimacy.” ing some time away.” And as thing that’s going on in the room at the time. The fact that you can hear picksFamilial really is an eerily intimate recording, where the atmoawaited eighth Radiohead alb scraping or strings buzzing, I think it draws you in much closer to the whole recording.” sphere of the room—the coughs and chairs shifting and rustling of low-up to ����’s “gave it away But despite the sounds of ambient life bleeding through, Familial was also carefully edited.clothes—becomes “The another instrumental color in the mix. Though it still sold a zillion copies” In more obvious things, where you have somebody dropping a pile of plates in the background, Selway those often sings only a notch above a whisper, it feels as if he’s Selway says the band is no rush aren’t the kind of things you want in there, so you cut those out,” he says. “But there are things like the hovering right by your ear, and the microphones sound like they were uct to market. “We work in le Familial is occasional door slamming, which suddenly sounds available in like part of the song itself. And that can reallyplaced lend centimeters from the guitars, so close that you can hear the laughs. “We work on a four-ye stores now from something to the recording.” Selway doesn’t dismiss the idea of a second solo squeak and hum of fingers brushing strings. Needless to say, the efit’s a nice way of working.” Nonesuch.

singer who’s still a bit tentative about his talent, but his hushed restraint also album, but he also notes that “the way that we work feels more like a choice than a necessity. as Radiohead, that kind of determines everything “There are always those singers that have a very distinctive approach, but else, as it should. We have our ‘Radiohead Time,’ reyou’re just drawn into them, really,” he says of his how-to-sing CD-R, which ally, where we work for these certain periods which PHOTO BY LUCAS included artists like Juana Molina and Beth Gibbons. “There’sHARDISON someare very intensive, trying to get a lot done thing so intimate about how they put a song across. It’s not about in that time. But we’ve also realized that making these great statements; it’s just drawing you in. I like that the way we work also benefits from havkind of intimacy.” ing some time away.” And as for the longFamilial really is an eerily intimate recording, where the atmoawaited eighth Radiohead album, the folsphere of the room—the coughs and chairs shifting and rustling of low-up to ����’s “gave it away for free and clothes—becomes another instrumental color in the mix. Though it still sold a zillion copies” In Rainbows? Selway often sings only a notch above a whisper, it feels as if he’s Selway says the band is no rush to get prodhovering right by your ear, and the microphones sound like they were uct to market. “We work in leap years,” he Familial is available in placed centimeters from the guitars, so close that you can hear the laughs. “We work on a four-year cycle. And stores now from squeak and hum of fingers brushing strings. Needless to say, the efit’s a nice way of working.” Nonesuch. 25

Portrait of drummer Phil Selway (Radiohead) in New York, NY, summer 2011.


Web Development

Blogs and e-commerce sites built on the Shopify and Squarespace platforms. Developed in collaboration with Red Flag Media designers Jamie Leary and Bruno Guerreiro, and Magnet web designer Ed Morgan.

The Magnet store was a slightly different project. The main site had been built years ago on Wordpress, so we cloned the layout and built the e-commerce portion on the Shopify platform. Wordpress still hosts the editorial content of the site while Shopify handles the store.


Concert Photography Assorted photos from shows in the Philadelphia area as well as the Firefly and Bonnaroo festivals.


Print production services have also been provided to the following publications:

Lucas Hardison lucas.hardison@gmail.com 207-266-0124 229 E Girard Ave Philadelphia PA 19125

Lucas Hardison Portfolio 2013  

Prodution Artist, Photographer, Graphic Designer, Information Tech

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