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Standard for Headship Flexible Route To Headship Coach/Participant Pack May 2013


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Flexible Route to Headship FRH7 Contents 2013 Section 1 Information 1. FRH Model 2. Programme Summary 3. FRH7 Timeline 4. FRH Coaching Model 5. Coaching Contract and 6 Month Evaluation 6. Self-evaluation: Guidance 7. SfH Audit Instrument 8. Professional Learning Plan 9. Head Teacher/Supporter Notes 10. Reflective Journaling 11. Reading Guide and Relevant Literature Section 2 Assessment 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

FRH Assessment Model Assessment Flowchart Assessment and Moderation Process Reflective Commentary Assessment Criteria Portfolio of Evidence Assessment Criteria Assessment Guidance – 3000 Word Stage 3000 Word Assessment Checklist Assessment Guidance: Reflective Commentary Assessment Guidance: Discrete claim Assessment Checklist Reflective Commentary Assessment Guidance: Portfolio of Evidence Assessment Checklist Portfolio of Evidence Field Visit: Guidance for Participant and Field Assessor Field Visit Communication Formative Assessment Forms 1-4 and Field Visit Form 5 Summative Assessment Document Professional Interview Stage Professional Interview Summative Assessment Document


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Flexible Route to Headship

Section 1 INFORMATION


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Flexible Route to Headship Flexible Route to Headship (FRH) Model Design Principles FRH is a leadership development programme for aspiring Head Teachers. The FRH programme will:            

offer choice and flexibility for individual participants capitalise on experiential learning opportunities be predominantly practice-based with a strong focus on impact on learners take account of individual lifestyles and professional commitments take account of different learning styles and of relevant prior learning take account of local school or service improvement plans focus on promoting personal and potentially transformational professional development in a leadership context allow each participant to develop, implement and reflect upon a professional learning plan (PLP) recognise and explore the prime importance of personal qualities and interpersonal skills and abilities in successful leadership acknowledge and utilise, as a key methodology, the power of coaching relationships in the development of self and of professional confidence, competence and expertise promote substantial reflection on and analysis of aspects of leadership through situational analyses and critical reading of relevant literature be subject to rigorous assessment through a framework of on-going formative and summative assessment which gives parity to each aspect of the Standard for Headship (SfH).

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Flexible Route to Headship FRH Learning Model The key aspects of the learning model adopted for the programme are:  

      

self-audit against the Standard for Headship, self-evaluation and individual analysis, planning, professional development activity and reflection on impact on learning on-going confidential support of an allocated leadership development coach acting primarily as individual coach to the participant and meeting on a regular basis, but also at times assuming the role of tutor, mentor, assessor and facilitator as the programme requires on-going formative feedback by the coach with regard to the participant’s progress within the programme participation at four interactive national residential conferences focusing on leadership development attendance at local (or consortium) ‘networking’ or professional learning meetings along with cohort colleagues individual critical reading of relevant literature maintenance of a personal learning journal as an aid to reflection and professional development consideration and analysis of ‘critical incidents’ as a catalyst of learning support from Head Teacher and/or other relevant colleagues in role of mentor/supporter.

Conceptual view of leadership The Standards for Leadership and Management (GTCS, 2013), which supersede the Standard for Headship (Scottish Executive, 2005), include both the Standard for Middle Leadership and the Standard for Headship. The Standards for Leadership and Management are part of the suite of GTC Scotland’s Professional Standards which also include the Standards for Registration and the Standards for Career-Long Professional Learning. They have been developed to support the selfevaluation and professional learning of those in, or aspiring to, formal leadership roles in schools. The Head Teacher acts as the leading professional in a school and as an officer in the local authority. The Head Teacher also plays a pivotal role within the broader children’s services network. Head Teachers lead the whole school community in order to establish, sustain and enhance a positive ethos and culture of learning through which every learner is able to learn effectively and achieve their potential. In line with the vision and values of the school, Head Teachers, working with others: (i) Establish, sustain and enhance the culture of self-evaluation for school improvement; (ii) Develop staff capability, capacity and leadership to support the culture and practice of learning; (iii) Ensure consistent high quality teaching and learning for all learners; (iv) Build and sustain partnerships with learners, families and relevant partners to meet the identified needs of all learners; (v) Allocate resources effectively in line with identified strategic and operational priorities. 2


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Flexible Route to Headship

Across all of these areas, Head Teachers contribute to leadership for improvement at school and system level. The latter statement emphasises the all-important roles of self-determination, self-evaluation and individual critical thinking espoused by the Flexible Route to Headship. FRH participants will be committed to critical exploration of the effectiveness of different styles of leadership and to critical self-evaluation leading them in determining what works best for them, their leadership teams, their school and the learners for whom they are responsible. A first feature of the FRH concept of leadership is the recognition of the importance for leaders of personal qualities and interpersonal skills. This focus is illustrated early in the programme through the emotional competence audit completed by participants in which they reflect on their own behaviour and attitude as leaders and on their awareness of their own emotions and the emotions of others. Knowledge and understanding of emotional competence is emphasised as significantly important in FRH and leadership development of participants as aspiring Head Teachers. A second feature is the potential for personal transformation of participants as a consequence of support and challenge through working with the leadership development coach. Evidence indicates that the coaching relationship is instrumental in influencing the behaviour and attitude of participants and how the aspiring Head Teacher then interrelates with colleagues at school. A third feature is how the coaching process empowers FRH participants to be more influential in the critically important leadership responsibility of leading and developing others in school. A fourth feature of the FRH concept of leadership is the recognition that the combination of experiences for the participants on this programme will lead to transformational development, will improve skill levels and expertise in leadership and importantly prepare participants for the role of headship. The FRH programme Certain aspects of FRH : 

coaching

coaching model

impact of coaching

extension of the coaching culture and capacity

on-going formative feedback by the coach

interactive nature of the residential conferences 3


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Flexible Route to Headship 

power of the ‘networking’ arrangements

experientially-based development at school level

potential for personal transformation

flexibility of individualisation of PLPs, professional learning opportunities, duration of programme and alternative modes of submission.

The strength of the FRH programme, however, lies not only in the above aspects, but in the judicious and dynamic combination of these aspects with acknowledged best practice of other leadership development programmes.

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Flexible Route to Headship PROGRAMME SUMMARY

Overall vision

The Flexible Route to achieving the Standard for Headship, supported by high quality coaching, will develop the leadership potential of aspiring Head Teachers throughout Scotland.

Aims and intended outcomes

The principal aim of the programme is to encourage more teachers to become Head Teachers by offering flexibility and choice. The programme is designed to enhance current provision offered through the Scottish Qualification for Headship (SQH). On successful completion of the Flexible Route programme, participants will be recognised as having achieved the Standard for Headship. A further aim is to promote significant development and growth in terms of leadership confidence, competence, skills and capacities, for the individual participants in the programme.

Flexibility

Methodology

Self-evaluation

The flexibility of the programme lies in the account taken of local context and individual circumstances, the individualisation of the PLP, the choice of oral or written mode for aspects of the submissions, professional learning opportunities, and duration of the programme. Personal reflection, based on self-audit, experiential learning, analysis and wide reading are core activities, supported throughout by the coaching relationship, and by opportunities for in-depth interaction and discussion at residentials and other network meetings. In the initial phase, self-audit and emotional competence tools are used to explore directions for leadership development.

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Professional Learning Planning Reflective learning journaling Reflective Commentary

Critical incident reflection Portfolio of evidence Field visit

GTCS panel presentation and interview

Assessment

A Professional Learning Plan is developed and approved by the coach. This will remain a “dynamic” document and will be referred to throughout the programme. A highly recommended activity which can offer a significant aid to personal learning and development and to constructing key aspects of the reflective commentary A substantial piece of reflective work which describes and analyses the participant’s leadership journey over a period of time and which overtakes the essential elements and professional actions outlined in the Standard for Headship A key part of the reflective commentary. Critical reflection on 2 incidents is required. A substantial body of relevant evidence which illuminates and corroborates all aspects of professional actions. A further opportunity for illumination and corroboration of the participant’s claims to have achieved the Standard for Headship The final stage in the programme, where the participant makes a presentation describing their learning journey on FRH and then responds to questions from the Panel. These questions relate to the Standard for Headship (2.3) “Interpersonal skills and abilities”. The GTCS has a role in ensuring the validity of assessment criteria and procedures. There will be on-going formative assessment by the coach and summative assessment by the field assessor. Full details of the assessment process and procedures are included in this FRH pack.

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Flexible Route to Headship Flexible Route to Headship Programme Timeline for FRH 7

Activities

Board 1 – January 2015

Board 2 – April 2015

Recruitment and selection of coaches and participants

March /April 2013

March /April 2013

Two day residential national conference

28/29 May 2013

28/29 May 2013

Professional Learning Plan (PLP) submitted for approval

Friday 27 September 2013

Friday 29 November 2013

One day national conference

Wednesday 20 November 2013 Wednesday 20 November 2013

3000 words on introduction, rationale for focus and one critical incident Friday 24 January 2014

Friday 25 April 2014

3000 word moderation to Education Scotland (ES)

May 2014

February 2014

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Flexible Route to Headship Coach provides own feedback to participant on 3000 word submission

February 2014

May 2014

One day national conference

Wednesday 26 February 2014

Wednesday 26 February 2014

Initial submission of 10,000 reflective commentary, portfolio of evidence, two critical incidents and discrete claim. Submitted to own coach for formative assessment and to field assessor.

Monday 19 May 2014

Monday 17 November 2014

Moderation of 10,000 words submissions – ES and external assessors

May 2014

November 2014

Own coach and field assessor discuss submission prior to field assessment visit

End of May 2014

End of December 2014

Field assessment is organised by participant and field assessor. Field assessor compiles report and sends to participants coach including recommendation to move to stage 4. Own coach provides formative feedback to participant based on the assessment report from field assessor.

June 2014

December 2014

Final submission of reflective commentary and portfolio

Monday 27 October 2014

Friday 6 March 2015

Field assessor compiles summative report and sends to ES

Friday 7 November 2014

20 March 2015

Moderation of 10,000 words – ES and external assessors

End of November 2014

End of March 2015

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Flexible Route to Headship ES send participant list to GTCS of satisfactory submissions

8 December 2014

6 April 2015

Professional Interview at the GTCS

January 2015

April 2015

GTCS to complete final report and send to participant, coach and ES

January 2015

April 2015

Awards ceremony

March 2015

March 2016

Coach Network Meetings Wednesday 24 April 2013 - Glasgow Wednesday 19 June 2013– Livingston Wednesday 11 September 2013 – Dundee Wednesday 6 November 2013 – Edinburgh Wednesday 7 May 2014 – Stirling

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Flexible Route to Headship Coaching Model Within Flexible Route to Headship the coaching model offers a balance of professional support and challenge, with a focus on personal leadership development through open and active listening, dialogue, judicious questioning and on-going honest feedback all within a non-judgemental framework. Coach: Supports and encourages the participant often towards a specific goal through: listening actively seeking clarification through questioning providing challenge offering honest feedback based on practice and/or observable data encouraging reflection about practice enabling the participant to clarify a way forward on their leadership journey showing empathy. Facilitator: Enables group discussion, achieves an open culture encouraging positive movement/learning to take place/develop. Organises events, resources etc related to identified CPD needs. Establishes networks to build learning communities. Mentor: Offers good counsel, supports and challenges, offers alternative ways of looking at or responding to situations and shares experiences. Tutor: Promotes/teaches new skills and enables/encourages further learning. Provides guidance on fulfilling the requirements of the programme and advises on relevant academic reading. Assessor: Offers formative feedback on progress regarding personal leadership development and with the reflective commentary and portfolio as required; as field assessor offers feedback to other participants on the programme at key stages; writes summative report for feedback as field assessor.

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Flexible Route to Headship Our Coaching Contract Coach: Coachee: Date: Confidentiality Any areas out of bounds for either coach or coachee? Frequency How often will we meet? Duration How long will each session last? Other support Email, telephone, msn messenger? Location What works best? Note taking Purpose, usage, confidentiality Expectations Feedback, challenges, support, honesty-authentic voice Completion date for review. (6months)

Signed: Coachee: Coach:

__________________________ __________________________

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Flexible Route to Headship Coaching Evaluation 6 month Evaluation Participant name ………………………….

Please complete this evaluation honestly in order that the next 6 months will be as beneficial to you as possible. I look forward to reading your views, reflecting on my own practice and reviewing the format of the programme in order to support you more fully. Many thanks. 

What has gone well?

What has been the impact of coaching?

What do you think about the quality of your experience of coaching to date?

How might things improve?

What would you like the next steps to be e.g. coaching, frequency of contact, etc?

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Flexible Route to Headship Self-evaluation: Guidance General: The purpose of the self-evaluation/audit is to help you ascertain which experiences you can identify and document that would demonstrate that you meet the SfH. You will critically evaluate how much evidence you can already provide as well as identifying the professional actions that you may need to address. By completing this audit you should be able to answer the following questions which will help you devise your own Professional Learning Plan to overtake all the SfH competencies. To demonstrate that you meet the Standard for Headship completely means you need to:     

demonstrate that you meet all the competencies in the Standard provide evidence that you meet all the competencies for the ‘Professional Actions’ provide evidence of the leadership and management processes you undertook provide evidence of the impact made as a direct result of your leadership and management critically reflect on the processes and the outcomes of your leadership and management with explicit reference to relevant literature.

1. What key experiences can I report to demonstrate the SfH competencies? 2. Which professional actions from the SfH do these experiences address? 3. What evidence can I provide? 4. What evidence can I provide of the impact my leadership and management has had on learners and learning? 5. Which SfH competencies currently do I have difficulty in demonstrating or evidencing? 6. Which experiences might I plan to gain to meet this current shortfall? 7. What evidence do I need to collect and analyse?

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Flexible Route to Headship In considering your response to the above questions, it may be helpful to consider the following points:  Critical reading and reflection around school improvement planning (SIP), leading and managing change and leadership and managements processes and styles.  Impact of professional learning experiences.  Reflection on critical incidents and other learning experiences.  What evidence do you have of impact on your own thinking , knowledge, understanding and practice as a reflective leader?  Impact of leadership on staff effectiveness, quality of learning and/or teaching, and on wider school community.  Evidence you will need to collect and analyse, leadership and management process, impact on staff effectiveness and/or quality of teaching, impact on pupils’ learning experiences, impact on school community and impact on self as a learner. In conclusion the self-evaluation:       

should be a working document must be evidenced based should inform your situational analysis - Where are you? What further experiences do you need to gain? should underpin your Professional Learning Plan (PLP) should engage you in a professional dialogue with peers and your Head Teacher will be the basis of coaching sessions should be referred to throughout your learning journey.

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Flexible Route to Headship Standard for Headship – Self-audit Instrument

Participant Name: Post Title: School: Email Address: 4.1 Establish, sustain and enhance the culture of selfevaluation for school improvement 4.1.1 Head Teachers establish a range of relationships and practices to foster selfevaluation at every level in the school

 model good practice in

personal self-evaluation against the relevant Professional Standard and appropriate benchmarks; promote an open, honest and critical stance in examining practice; encourage and support others to critically analyse and evaluate their own practice in relation to relevant policies and procedures.

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Flexible Route to Headship Standard for Headship – Self-audit Instrument 4.1.2 Head Teachers establish and use systems to collect evidence with which to inform decision making

4.1.3 Head Teachers establish and use processes to gather valid information from stakeholders to inform improvement strategies 4.1.4 Head Teachers collaborate with staff, learners, parents and the wider school community and networks in identifying, agreeing and implementing improvement priorities

develop a culture of evidence-

informed practice; ensure systematic evidence collection and analysis against national and international benchmarks; use collated evidence to inform decision-making; encourage and enable staff to use data to plan teaching, learning, reporting and assessment, with a focus on improving outcomes for all learners. ensure that data is gathered systematically from a wide range of stakeholders; developing innovative approaches to engage all groups; share data to inform decisionmaking and to identify priorities. create regular opportunities to engage with staff, learners and the wider school community to identify priorities; identify key areas for improvement using the evidence gathered; establish, sustain and enhance a culture where all learners are involved in meaningful decision-making about the planning and enhancement of learning and in wider school

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Flexible Route to Headship Standard for Headship – Self-audit Instrument

4.1.5 Head Teachers develop systems for ongoing monitoring and review of the school’s improvement agenda

4.1.6 Head Teachers critically engage with literature, research and policy, in relation to all of the above

improvement; establish processes and facilitate opportunities for groups to work collaboratively to take forward improvement priorities. undertake regular and systematic review of progress towards the school’s priorities; establish a range of processes which enables staff to contribute to the overall monitoring and review of the school improvement plan. develop and use knowledge from literature, research and policy sources to support the processes of self- evaluation for the enhancement of professional practice and decision-making.

4.2 Develop staff capability, capacity and leadership to support the culture and practice of learning 4.2.1 Head Teachers work within the structure of employment legislation, national and local agreements and policies governing employment

take due account of legislation

and national and local agreements in all aspects of human resource management; take due account of the legislative framework related to equality and social inclusion to promote an inclusive community which values diversity and

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Flexible Route to Headship Standard for Headship – Self-audit Instrument

4.2.2 Head Teachers establish and promote collaborative practice to support a culture of learning within and beyond the school

4.2.3 Head Teachers establish and ensure the consistent use of PRD processes to identify strengths and development needs

challenges discrimination. take responsibility for, and engage actively in, ongoing professional learning to deepen their personal and professional skills and knowledge base; promote ambition and set high expectations of continuing professional learning for all staff and ensure opportunities which deliver this; create and utilise opportunities for staff to take on leadership roles across and beyond the school; build constructive relationships that engender commitment and collegiality. use and develop in colleagues, coaching and mentoring skills to support the PRD process; foster the personal commitment of staff to, and personal responsibility for, PRD using relevant professional standards to support self-evaluation and reflection; ensure that meaningful and rigorous PRD takes place regularly and that the outcomes of the process contribute to improvement of professional practice.

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Flexible Route to Headship Standard for Headship – Self-audit Instrument 4.2.4 Head Teachers ensure a systematic approach to support the culture of professional learning

4.2.5 Head Teachers build systems to monitor the impact of professional learning on the culture of learning.

4.2.6 Head Teachers contribute to systems level leadership of education in their context and beyond

ensure staff use relevant

professional standards to support self-evaluation as part of continuous professional learning; encourage an extended understanding of the nature and depth of professional learning and promote relevant systematic and progressive professional learning opportunities; ensure an appropriate balance between collaborative and personal professional learning; ensure an appropriate balance between personal and professional goals and school and local authority priorities. build staff capability to selfevaluate individual and collegiate professional learning and reflect on their development; plan and evaluate professional learning in relation to both its direct and indirect impact on outcomes for learners. contribute to the development of others, including peer Head Teachers, through coaching and mentoring, and networking opportunities; support cross-sector working at cluster, local authority and national levels; contribute to cluster, local and

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Flexible Route to Headship Standard for Headship – Self-audit Instrument

4.2.7 Head Teachers critically engage with literature, research and policy in relation to all of the above

national developments and discussions to support and enhance the policy making process. develop and use knowledge from literature, research and policy sources to support the processes of leading and developing staff and creating school cultures for the enhancement of professional practice and decision-making.

4.3 Ensure consistent, high quality teaching and learning for all learners 4.3.1 Head Teachers build a shared vision to support the improvement of teaching and learning and set consistently high expectations for all in the school community

4.3.2 Head Teachers ensure appropriate curriculum design and planning are

work with whole school

community to identify and articulate a shared vision, values and aims in relation to teaching and learning; set clear standards in relation to enacting the principles of inclusion, sustainability, equality and social justice in the teaching and learning processes; model and develop a culture of mutual trust, respect and accountability. take a strategic overview of the planning, delivery and assessment of learning to ensure that school- based decisions are in

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Flexible Route to Headship Standard for Headship – Self-audit Instrument developed to meet the learning and pastoral needs of all learners

4.3.3 Head Teachers establish and sustain processes to develop pedagogic practices across the school

4.3.4 Head Teachers build collaborative processes to review and enhance pedagogic practice

accordance with the principles of good curriculum design and planning; agree and develop curricular frameworks to ensure appropriate personalisation and choice;  collaborate with partners to facilitate access to appropriate learning opportunities and resources. set, and communicate clearly, high expectations of the quality of teaching and assessment; develop a culture which supports and ensures high quality teaching and assessment; provide systematic opportunities to enhance and refresh teachers‟ pedagogic practice. promote a culture of critical reflection and self-evaluation and establish approaches to review and teaching and learning which gathers from the views and experience of learners, staff, parents and partners; establish and sustain teacher leadership and collaborative working to support the enhancement of teaching and learning; establish systems to validate the quality of teaching, learning

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Flexible Route to Headship Standard for Headship – Self-audit Instrument

4.3.5 Head Teachers critically engage with literature, research and policy in relation to all of the above

and assessment. engage with educational literature, research and policy sources in leading and developing the curriculum, including taking account of international benchmarking to inform their thinking and support the enhancement of professional practice and decision-making.

4.4 Build and sustain partnerships with learners, families and relevant partners to meet the identified needs of all learners 4.4.1 Head Teachers build and communicate the vision, values, ethos and aims of the school with partners

4.4.2 Head Teachers embed processes to ensure learners contribute to planning and enhancement of their own learning programmes

co-create an aspirational

vision, values, ethos and aims, agreed in partnership with all stakeholders; communicate and model the vision, values, ethos and aims regularly to all learners and the wider school community. establish a culture where learners participate meaningfully in decisions related to their learning and their school; ensure all learners have genuine opportunities to participate in these decisionmaking processes.

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Flexible Route to Headship Standard for Headship – Self-audit Instrument 4.4.3 Head Teachers develop strategies to foster parental involvement

4.4.4 Head Teachers build, maintain and review partnerships with other professions and agencies to support the learning, pastoral and emotional needs of learners

4.4.5 Head Teachers critically engage with literature, research and policy in relation to the above

establish a culture to build and

facilitate the partnership between parents and carers, learners and the school; ensure all parents and carers have genuine opportunities to participate in these partnership activities and processes. adhere to and implement child protection policies and procedures to ensure the care and welfare of all learners;  understand the National Practice Model within GIRFEC, and develop this understanding in colleagues; recognise and encourage the wide and diverse range of partnerships which contribute to the well-being of all learners; ensure that systems are in place, which enable all partners to contribute to, and support the diverse needs of all learners in line with local and national policy and legislation. develop and use knowledge from literature, research and policy sources to support the processes of collaborative working for the enhancement of professional practice and decision making.

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Flexible Route to Headship Standard for Headship – Self-audit Instrument 4.5 Allocate resources effectively in line with identified strategic and operational priorities 4.5.1 Head Teachers use the review and improvement planning processes to identify priorities and inform resourcing decisions

4.5.2 Head Teachers allocate resources in a fair and equitable manner in line with priorities to support learning

4.5.3 Head Teachers ensure systems are

consult with relevant

stakeholders to inform appropriate resourcing decisions; use data and evaluations of previous planning priorities to inform future resourcing decisions; consider the sustainability implications of resourcing decisions. make best strategic and operational use of available resources to create, maintain and enhance an appropriate learning environment for effective teaching and learning and to support improvement; delegate appropriate tasks and responsibilities to other staff, including promoted staff; demonstrate transparent and equitable allocation of resources which takes account of identified need; foster collective responsibility for the sustainable, transparent, fair and effective use of resources. ensure best value and appropriate devolved

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Flexible Route to Headship Standard for Headship – Self-audit Instrument established and used to monitor, evaluate and review the use of resources

4.5.4 Head Teachers critically engage with literature, research and policy texts

accountability to support effective teaching and learning; show a strategic awareness when engaging with resource management to ensure continuous improvement; give due regard to health and safety legislation to ensure safety and welfare of all; utilise all available support in budget and resource management. develop and use knowledge from literature, research and policy sources in the area of resource management to inform professional practice and decisionmaking.

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Flexible Route to Headship Professional Learning Plan 1. The Professional Learning Plan (PLP) should be about your professional learning development. It should describe your route to achieving the Standard for Headship. 2. The coach will support you in the planning process of the PLP which will involve all of the following steps: 

Self-evaluation using SfH audit and Emotional Competence Inventory (ESCI) or equivalent 360 instrument.

Reflection regarding competencies already met, based on quality of evidence of impact on self as leader and impact on learning and teaching.

Reflection to highlight any gaps in competencies.

Identification of a maximum of two projects which will enable your learning to be moved forward and have an impact on school improvement.

Discussion with your Head Teacher on how your professional learning plan will impact on school improvement

3. The PLP should include: 

the main heading of each professional action and element of the Standard for Headship addressed by the plan

a description of the learning activities to be undertaken

criteria for success (focussing on impact)

related evaluation measures

evidence to be gathered or presented

professional learning activities including reading to support your leadership development

timescales

where appropriate, resources required.

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Flexible Route to Headship 4. The range of content should include: 

A brief description of your background and the context in which you currently work.

A rationale for the PLP including reference to strategic planning and situational analysis for the areas which you have included in your PLP.

Your self-evaluation against the Standard as an appendix.

5. The PLP has usually been in tabular format and covering the essential criteria listed above. Examples of the PLP are available for consideration.

6. An effective PLP 

will provide a platform for learning

will be a working document which will be regularly discussed with the coach

should inform professional actions

should ensure a focus on impact on learning and teaching

will enable aspiring leaders to produce a reflective commentary and portfolio of evidence which will focus on their own learning and the impact of their leadership on school improvement through:

professional actions of the Head Teacher critical reflection on the processes and the outcomes of leadership and management explicit reference to relevant literature which has impacted on strategic leadership and management.

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Flexible Route to Headship

Flexible route to achieving the Standard for Headship Head Teacher/Supporter Notes The Standard for Headship The purpose of the Standard is to define the leadership and management capabilities of Head Teachers. It defines the professional actions required of effective Head Teachers, acknowledges the changing context in which they operate and takes account of the many challenges which they face. It serves to inform, challenge and enthuse Head Teachers and those aspiring to headship, and to offer a template against which they can match their experience and skills in order to determine their strengths and areas for development. The Standard analyses the role of the Head Teacher into professional actions, and essential elements. The essential elements are expressed through effective professional action. Refer to The Standard for Leadership and Management on the FRH GLOW community. The Supporter The supporter has certain specific tasks and responsibilities in supporting the participant. Briefly these are to:    

have a good knowledge of the Standard for Headship ensure that there is a balance between the participant’s workload and their SfH commitments ensure that other staff are aware of their colleague’s SfH commitments arrange a regular programme of formal and informal meetings with the participant to discuss the programme.

Unless in discussion and with the agreement of the participant, it is not the responsibility of the Head Teacher/supporter to engage with the reflective commentary since the commentary is confidential to the participant and the coach. However it is the responsibility of the supporter to ensure the evidence submitted is genuinely the work of the participant through an authenticity statement which is an essential part of the portfolio.

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Flexible Route to Headship In working with the participant, the supporter should:    

be a critical friend to the participant by listening carefully, showing empathy and challenging appropriately offer encouragement through regular and meaningful professional dialogue ensure that the focus for the participant’s Professional Learning Plan is linked to whole school improvement priorities and will therefore be of direct benefit to the school observe conventions of confidentiality when required.

The supporter should also ensure:    

the participant has sufficient opportunities, through their whole school responsibilities and the work undertaken as part of the Flexible Route to Headship to meet the competencies of the Standard the participant is encouraged to reflect; to consider alternative courses of action; to take responsibility; to review progress and to work confidently towards meeting the assessment criteria the achievements of the participant are recognised and celebrated consideration of how best to utilise the participant’s enhanced knowledge, understanding, skills and experience to the continued improvement of learning and teaching in their establishment.

The coach will offer opportunities for regular professional dialogue with the supporter around the FRH programme.

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Flexible Route to Headship Notes on Reflective Journaling: Keeping a Learning Journal is useful in providing insight into self-awareness:

   

What you do (behaviours). Why you do it (values, belief, assumptions, aspirations). How you feel (emotional intelligence). How you think.

Journaling can expose contradictions, misconceptions and even conflict. Journaling can help you turn every incident into a new potential learning experience and opportunity. Not merely a chronicle: it is important to understand that journaling is not just the act of chronicling one’s experiences. Writing about one’s experiences can be useful as it helps to make explicit knowledge or practices that one may have learned and practiced implicitly for better or worse. It may also help to provide perspective, structure and meaning to daily events that sometimes appear random or chaotic. However, research suggests that active reflection is needed if true transformational learning is to be realised. Journals work best when entries are:

  

regular and made on a consistent periodic schedule truly reflective – i.e. not merely descriptive chronicles of events, but critical assessment/analysis of particular situations and behaviours transformational - i.e. meaning that specific, realistic strategies for change are identified and subsequently implemented.

Note: entries need not be lengthy to be meaningful.

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Document 1.10

Flexible Route to Headship Reflective Journaling – Processes(1)

      

Develops critical awareness and thinking. Clarifies thinking. Makes sense of situations or events. Unpicks emotional responses. Increases self-awareness. Provides focus (e.g. for reading). Suggests directions or options for action.

Reflective Journaling- Processes (2)

   

Develops styles of writing. Develops confidence in articulating feelings and opinions. Provides useful basis for more extensive reflective writing and analysis (e.g. reflection on critical incidents or reflection on leadership and management styles!). Is therapeutic/clears the head.

Reflective Journaling - Critical Incidents Key focus questions:

       

What happened? Why did it happen that way? Who was involved? What emotions were involved? What situational/organisational factors were involved? What could have happened? What might happen next time? What have I learned?

Reflective Journaling questions to consider: 31


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Flexible Route to Headship

      

Briefly describe a situation that occurred this week that affected you as an individual or as a team. Why are you describing this incident? Did you experience challenges in meeting it? Did you exhibit strengths? Did you learn something? About yourself? About others? Is there an overarching problem here? Are there values at stake? What were you feeling at the time of the incident/situation? Did you have pre-conceived ideas or assumptions? Has this experience challenged your assumptions, prejudices, biases or beliefs? What specific (potential) solutions have you been able to identify? Will this experience alter your future behaviours, attitudes or aspirations? If so, in what ways?

Reflective Journaling- Caveats

     

Confessional writing. Negative spirals. Ethical standpoint (ref others). Inhibitions. Not just description and anecdote (uncritical). Becomes a chore.

Reflective Journaling - Reading Moon, J (1999) Learning Journals London: Kogan Page Ghaye, A & Ghaye, K (1998) Teaching and Learning through Critical Reflective Practice London: David Fulton Publishers Bolton, G (2005) Reflective Practice: Writing and Professional Development London: Sage Tripp, D (1993) Critical Incidents in Teaching London: Routledge Falmer

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Document 1.11

Flexible Route to Headship LITERATURE RELATING TO EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT National FRH Programme: A short introduction to reading There is a wide range of materials on leadership, and headship specifically, available and these range from policy documents, guidelines, practitioner articles, theoretical and research based discussions and more polemical or critical materials. One of the dangers of confining reading to official documents and practitioner oriented materials is that much of this material is normative asserting what 'good leaders' should do or not do without any real acknowledgement of the complexities of school leadership, the inherently contested nature of leadership practice and the dilemmas faced daily by those in leadership roles. The texts identified below are a selection from a vast literature available which explore some of these issues. A starter bibliography on educational leadership Busher, H. (2006) Understanding Educational Leadership: People, Power and Culture, Maidenhead: Berkshire: Open University Press. This book looks at leadership in schools and the relationship between school and the policy environment. Strong on issues related to culture and community. Coleman, M. and Glover, D. (2010) Educational Leadership and Management: Developing Insights and Skills, Maidenhead: Berkshire: Open University Press. A basic text looking at skills development. Begins with a discussion of diversity and social justice and moves onto values as the starting point for leadership and then covers the broad areas of managing people and developing as a leader. Crawford, M. (2009) Getting to the Heart of Leadership: Emotion and the Educational Leader, London: Sage. A short book which explores various aspects of leadership especially in terms of handling emotions - the leader's own emotions but also an appreciation of how emotions are an important dynamic of organisational life. Preedy, M., Bennett, N. and Wise, C. (2012) (eds.) Educational Leadership: Context, strategy and collaboration, Buckingham: Open University. This is an edited collection of sound essays, which explore different issues and dimensions in leadership in education. Here there is a good range of theoretical and philosophical issues and then material on strategy including the classic Johnson and Scholes on strategic management. It is particularly strong on wider issues related to school leadership as part of interprofessional working, within communities and across sectors- a useful introduction. O'Brien, J., Murphy, D. and Draper, J. (2008) School Leadership, Edinburgh: Dunedin Academic Press. This is an edited collection which covers some of the basic principles of leadership and 33


Document 1.11

Flexible Route to Headship management. Areas covered include professional learning, leadership for learning, managing people, leadership in different contexts. One of the few Scottish books on educational leadership. West-Burnham, J. (2009) Rethinking Educational Leadership: From improvement to transformation, London: Network Continuum. An accessible book covers the main concepts around leadership, values and ideas. Includes some useful material on interpersonal and personal skills as well as dimensions such as creativity, spirituality and leadership. Three classics Bush, T. (2011) Theories of Educational Leadership and Management, London: Sage. This is the standard text that surveys the wide range of theoretical perspectives on management and leadership. It covers different models and particularly chapter 4 on 'Collegial Models' is useful in explaining the tensions and issues related to ideas of distribution and collaboration. This sets current priorities in a wider understandings and helps explain some of the tensions and issues. Gronn, P. (2003) The New Work of Educational Leaders, London: Sage. This is Gronn's classic work in which he draws from extensive biographical studies of educational leaders to explore the work of leaders, the way in organisations work, where distributed leadership fits in and the knotty issue of why many in education choose not to progress as leaders. It is in this text Gronn discusses the idea of leadership as 'greedy work'. Spillane, J. (2006) Distributed Leadership, San Francisco, Jossey-Bass. Spillane is one of the key researchers in this area continues to investigate empirically the idea of distributed leadership and how this is develops in schools. This book is a good starting point for Spillane's work, which he has published widely in academic journals. Sources: Publishers There are a number of publishers who routinely published books on areas related to educational leadership and management as well as on a range of other educational issues. Their websites are useful for browsing. Sage Recent Sage publications have had a strong emphasis on theoretically sound writing that is accessible to professional practitioners. Sage has a substantial current list as well as a backlist of some of the classic works in this area. Corwin Press Corwin Press is part of Sage International and most Corwin Press publications originate in USA. There is a strong practitioner bias but a health warning - some material tends to be exhortative and lacks substance. Routledge Routledge publishes across the range but perhaps favours more conceptual and theoretical analysis of issues. Open University Press The Open University press again has a range of texts including anthologies of essays which they use to support their programmes (e.g. Preedy et al., 2012). Again there is a good mixture of books with a theoretical focus as well as material with perspectives on 34


Document 1.11

Flexible Route to Headship practice. Dunedin Academic Press This is the only academic press with a Scottish education series. The Policy into Practice series takes specific issues or areas in Scottish education including leadership and provides a critical analysis of the translation of educational policy into practice. Continuum (or Network Continuum) Continuum has a series of books around leadership, inclusion and social justice, personalised education. Sense Publishers A Dutch publisher who has a long international publications list on an extensive range of topics in education. Many are more philosophical or policy oriented. Some interesting works are on school improvement, leadership etc which bring international perspectives. Journals Two types of journals are useful (1) academic journals that publish peer-reviewed articles, which present the latest research, thinking or critique and (2) professional journals which provide academically sound discussions around current concerns and developments. Useful academic journals School Leadership and Management Educational Management, Administration and Leadership School Effectiveness and School Improvement International Journal of Leadership in Education Professional Development in Education Useful professional journals Management in Education Managing Schools Today Professional Development Today

Professor C Forde, University of Glasgow Christine.Forde@glasgow.ac.uk

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Flexible Route to Headship Additional Reading – These lists represent literature, mainly of the last two decades, which relates to educational leadership and management. The lists are presented for information to allow interested parties to browse and to consider what might be of interest to them at their own stage in reflection on leadership development. Some guidance on relevant reading may be provided to an extent by programme team members and coaches as the programme develops. Notes: There is no “definitive” text on educational leadership. Selection to suit personal interests is paramount. You are encouraged to share your findings from your reading with others. The information is divided into sections as follows: LIST A: A selection of reading on educational leadership and management although not intended as a fully comprehensive list. LIST B: Some relevant websites and periodicals LIST C: A selection of articles on school leadership and school improvement LIST A:         

The Intelligent School (2nd edn.) MacGilchrist, B., Myers; K. and Reed, J. (2004) London: Sage Publications Living Headship: Voices, Values and Vision. Tomlinson, H., Gunter, H., and Smith, P., (eds) (1999) London: Paul Chapman School leadership in 21st Century: developing a strategic approach Brent Davies, Linda Ellison and Christopher Bowring Carr (2005) What's worth fighting for in Education? Hargreaves and Fullan (1998) Open University Press What's worth fighting for in Headship? Hargreaves and Fullan (1997) Open University Press Critical Incidents in Teaching: Developing Professional Judgement. Tripp, D (1993) London: Routledge Developing Leadership in Primary Schools Day, Hall & Whitaker (1998) Paul Chapman publishing Effective School Management Everard and Morris (1996) Paul Chapman publishing Strategic Leadership and Educational Improvement: Margaret Preedy, Ron Glather and Christine Wise 36


Document 1.11

Flexible Route to Headship 

School Leadership O’Brien, J, Murphy D. and Draper, J.(2003) Edinburgh : Dunedin Press

Performance Management in Education : Improving Practice. Reeves, J., Forde, C., O’Brien, J. Smith, P. and Tomlinson, H. (2002) London: Paul Chapman Learning to Read Critically in Educational Leadership and Management. Wallace, M. and Poulson, L (eds) (2003) London: Paul Chapman Effective Management in Schools A & A Paisey (1987) Blackwell (see Chap 3) A Manager's Guide to Self-Development M Pedler et al (2001) McGraw-Hill The Power of Diversity Barbara Prailing (1998) Network Educational Press (note pp 299301) Managing the Effective School M Preedy (ed) (1993) The Open University (see Ch 13) The Reflective Practitioner D Schon (1991) Ashgate School Effectiveness for Whom? R Slee et al (eds) (1998) Falmer Press Changing our Schools Stoll & Fink (1996) Open Univ Press Note Ch 7 on Invitational Leadership The Leadership Crash Course (!!) Paul Taffinder (2000) Kogan Page Coaching Solutions: Practical Ways to Improve Performance in Education W Thomas A Smith (2004) Network Educational Press Managing Change in Schools P Whitaker (1993) Open Univ Press note pp 73/74 Reflective Practice to Improve Schools J York-Barr et al (2006) SAGE publications Learning to read critically in Teaching and Learning Poulson & Wallace (eds) (2004) SAGE publications The Dance of Change Peter Senge (1999) Nicholas Breasley Publishing Re-thinking Educational Leadership Bennett & Anderson (2003) SAGE publications Leaders and Leadership in Education Helen Gunter (2001) Paul Chapman Publishing Democratic Leadership in Education Philip Woods (2005) Paul Chapman Publishing Developing Educational Leadership: using evidence for policy and practice Anderson & Bennett (2003) SAGE publications The Challenges of Educational Leadership: values in a globalized age Mike Bottery (2007) SAGE publications School Leadership: national and international perspectives Dunford, Fawcett & Bennett (2000) Kogan Page Developing Sustainable Leadership Brent Davies (ed) (2007) SAGE publications Effective School Leadership: responding to change John McBeth (ed) (2002) SAGE publications Educational Leadership: ambiguity, professionals and managerialism Hoyle & Wallace (2005) SAGE publications Teacher Leadership and Behaviour Management B Rogers (2002) SAGE Dancing on the Ceiling V Hall (1996) SAGE Primal Leadership: Learning to Lead with Emotional Intelligence Goleman, Boyatzis, McKee (2002) Harvard Business School Press The Motivated School Alan McLean (2003) SAGE publications

                          

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                   

The Principles and Practice of Educational Management Bush, T and Bell, L (eds.) (2002) London: Paul Chapman Transforming Learning and Teaching: We can if... MacGilchrist & Buttress (2004) Chapman Publishing Leadership and Management in Education, Cultures, Change and Conflict: Marianne Coleman and Peter Earley (2004) OUP School reform From the Inside Out: Policy, Practice and Performance- Richard F. Elmore (2004) Breakthrough- Michael Fullan, Peter Hill and Carmel Crevola (2007) SAGE publications On Common Ground: The Power of Professional Learning Communities Barbara EasonWatkins, Richard DuFour, Michael G Fullan, Robert E. Eaker, Lawrence Lezotte - (2005) Solution Tree publications Educational Leadership and the Community Gelsthorpe & West-Burnham (eds) (2003) Pearson Education Effective Learning in Schools: How to integrate learning and leadership for a successful school Bowring-Carr & West-Burnham (1997) Pitman publishing Leading and Managing People in Education: Tony Bush and David Middlewood The New Strategic Direction and Development of the School: Brent Davies and Linda Ellison (1999) Routledge Research Methods in Educational Leadership and Management; Ann RJ Briggs and Marianne Coleman (2002) SAGE Leading the Strategically Focused School-Success and Sustainability by Brent Davies (2006) Pine Forge Press Teachers Leading Change: Doing Research for School Improvement by Judy Durrant and Gary Holde (2006) SAGE Teachers Matter-Connecting Lives, Work Effectiveness by Christopher Day, Pam Sammobs, Gordon Stobbart, Alison Kingston and Quing Gu (2007) Open Univ Press Professional Learning Communities: Divergence, Depth and Dilemmas by Louise Stoll and Karen Seashore Low (2007) Open Univ Press Learning Journals. Moon, J. (1999) London : Kogan Page Educational Leadership. Tomlinson, H (2004) London : Kogan Page Successful School Improvement M Fullan (1992) McGraw-Hill Bridging the Gap between Standards and Achievement Richard Elmore (2002) Albert Shanker Institute. Leading in a culture of change M Fullan (2001) Jossey-Bass pubs

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Flexible Route to Headship LIST B: SOME USEFUL WEBSITES AND PERIODICALS Website links to Scottish Government Papers on Leadership Ambitious, excellent schools: Leadership? A discussion Paper http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/06/17104251/42534 Continuing Professional Development for Educational Leaders Teaching in Scotland http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2003/09/18229/26740 A definition of the leadership and management capabilities of Head Teachers. http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2005/11/3085829/58300 The Standard for Headship: explains the Standard, the key purposes of Headship and the elements of practice for Headship http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2002/11/15817/13985 Some other useful websites: These are only a few. There are many more so please share them if you find one of use.          

Department for Education and Skills (England): http://www.dfes.gov.uk General teaching Council Scotland : http://www.gtcs.org.uk H.M.S.O: http://www.scotland-legislation.hmso.gov.uk Learning and Teaching Scotland http://www.ltscotland.com National Education Research Forum: http://www.nerf-uk.org Scottish Council for Research in Education: http://www.scre.ac.uk Scottish Executive: http://www/scotland.gov.uk Scottish Policy Net: http://www.scottishpolicynet.org.uk The Times Educational Supplement Scotland: http://www.tes.co.uk/scotland? Summer school- http://www.scotlandschoolleadershipevent.com (NEW)

Periodicals also often have useful and stimulating articles, for example:     

School Leadership and Management The Journal of Inservice Education Managing School Today Management in Education Improving Schools (SAGE)

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Flexible Route to Headship Note: see following list for examples of some interesting useful articles LIST C: SOME INTERESTING ARTICLES ON SCHOOL LEADERSHIP AND SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT Leadership that gets results Daniel Goleman Harvard Business review, March-April 2000

The price of accountability Want to improve schools? Invest in the people who work in them By Richard Elmore Results, November 2002 This article is excerpted from Bridging the Gap Between Standards and Achievement: The Imperative for Professional Development in Education by Richard Elmore. Reprinted with permission, Richard F. Elmore, professor, Graduate School of Education, Harvard University and senior research fellow, Consortium for Policy Research in Education, and The Albert Shanker Institute. The entire publication is available at www.ashankerinst.org or for $10 each from the Albert Shanker Institute, (202) 879-4401.

The distribution of leadership and power in schools Richard Hatcher* University of Central England in Birmingham, UK British Journal of Sociology of Education Vol. 26, No. 2, April 2005, pp. 253–267 ISSN 0142-5692 (print)/ISSN 1465-3346 (online)/05/020253–15 © 2005 Taylor & Francis Ltd DOI: 10.1080/0142569042000294200 School Leadership Teams: A Process Model of Team Development* Janet H. Chrispeels, Salvador Castillo, and Janet Brown Graduate School of Education, University of California, Santa Barbara School Effectiveness and School Improvement 0924-3453/00/1101-0020$15.00 2000, Vol. 11, No. 1, pp. 20–56 © Swets & Zeitlinger

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Flexible Route to Headship Distributed leadership and headship: a paradoxical relationship? School Leadership and Management, Vol. 25, No. 3, August 2005, pp. 213!/215 EDITORIAL Preparing Teachers for Leadership Roles in the 21st Century Julie A. Sherrill Theory into Practice, Vol. 38, No. 1, Redefining Teacher Quality. (Winter, 1999), pp. 56-61. Transformational School Leadership Effects: A Replication Kenneth Leithwood and Doris Jantzi Centre for Leadership Development, The Ontario Institute Studies in Education, University of Toronto School Effectiveness and School Improvement 0924-3453/99/1004-0451$15.00 1999, Vol. 10, No. 4, pp. 451–479 © Swets & Zeitlinger Critical Incidents in the working lives of a group of primary deputy heads Professor Trevor Kerry, University of Lincoln Improving Schools SAGE publications, Vol 8, no 1, March 2005 Using Critical Incidents in the Improvement of Teaching and Learning David Tripp, Murdoch Univ, Western Australia (2000) Learning, Technology and Education Reform in the Knowledge Age or “We’re Wired, Webbed and Windowed, Now What?” B Trilling & P Hood from Learning, Space & Identity Paechter, Edwards, Harrison & Twining (2001) Chapman publishing Learning Styles and School Improvement Colin Conner, Univ of Cambridge Improving Schools Vol 6 No 1 Spring 2003 Improving and Effective Schools in Disadvantaged areas: a summary of research findings Daniel Muijs, Univ of Warwick Improving Schools Vol 6 No 1 Spring 2003 Democratic Leadership: drawing distinctions with distributed leadership Philip A Woods International Journal of Leadership in Education March 2004 Vol 7 No 1

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Flexible Route to Headship How successful Headteachers survive and thrive Prof Tim Brighouse RM - can be downloaded Essential Pieces: the Jigsaw of a Successful School Prof Tim Brighouse RM - can be downloaded

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Section 2 ASSESSMENT


Document 2.1

Flexible Route to Headship

FRH Assessment Model

The FRH model consists of a total of 4 assessments:    

Reflective Commentary Portfolio of Evidence Field Visit Professional Interview

The FRH assessment model ensures a balance between summative and formative assessment. The summative nature is ensured in all 4 assessments. However all 4 assessments incorporate feedback at some stage to the participant, including formative feedback from the GTCS following professional interview. (Detailed information on each of these assessments is provided in FRH documentation.) The Reflective Commentary Summative assessment process but formative in early stages. Portfolio of Evidence Summative assessment process but also formative in early stages. Field Visit A summative process following the visit. Feedback from the field assessor to the coach ensures the formative nature of the visit. Professional Interview A summative process with formative feedback from the GTCS.

The FRH assessment model incorporating these 4 assessments is illustrated in a 5 stage process. This provides further guidance for participants on the assessment process from initial submission of the first part of the reflective commentary (stage 1) through to professional interview (stage 5).

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Document 2.2

Flexible Route to Headship Assessment Flowchart

Stage 1: Formative Assessment 3000 words of reflective commentary,  One critical incidentincluding:  Introduction and contents page  Rationale  One critical incident  Appendix consisting of PLP

1: for assessment feedback given in on SubmittedStage to coach based guidelines. Moderation centrally. Written feedback given in dialogue by coach.

Stage 2: Formative Assessment

Stage 3: Field Visit School visit by field assessor. Involves dialogue with participant, Head Teacher, colleagues in school and others as appropriate. Field assessor provides for the coach a written report of the field visit. Assessment by the field assessor is based on field visit and assessment grading from formative stage 2. If satisfactory then participant proceeds to stage 4. Coach provides feedback to participant based on completed submission and field visit.

Stage 5: Professional Interview Summative Assessment

Completed submission:  Reflective commentary (includes 2 critical incidents and 3.4.4. discrete claim)  Portfolio of evidence

Submitted to coach and field assessor for assessment based on guidelines. Coach and field assessor agree assessment gradings and themes to be followed up on field visit. Field assessor feeds themes back to participant. Field visit programme is constructed based on these themes. Moderation centrally including external moderator.

Stage 4: Final Submission Summative Assessment

  

Presentation made by participant followed by questions from the panel focussing on the Standard for Headship. Panel includes two Head Teachers, one representative from a local authority and one GTCS member as chair. 44

Reflective commentary Portfolio of evidence

Assessment by (same) field assessor. External moderation by sampling. If pass then participant will be invited to attend GTCS for a professional interview. If unsuccessful then participant feedback by field assessor and advised to resubmit. Summative report by field assessor to GTCS and to FRH Central Team. Participant receives summative report from FRH Central Team.


Document 2.3

Flexible Route to Headship Assessment

Action

Documentation

Copied to

Timescale for completion

Stage 1 3000 words Formative assessment of one third of reflective commentary

Coach completes 3000 word assessment. Coach provides verbal formative feedback to participant.

Document 2.7 (3000 word checklist)

Participant

2 weeks after the deadline for submission

Stage 2 Formative assessment of completed reflective commentary and portfolio of evidence

Field assessor and coach both complete and electronically exchange documents 2.10 and 2.12 (from FRH pack).

Documents 2.10 and 2.12 from field assessor and coach. Field assessor and coach complete document 2.15 forms 1 and 2.

FRH Central Team*

All within 2 weeks of submission date

Field assessor and coach agree assessment grading as 1, 2 or 3 (or combination). Field assessor and coach discuss and agree areas to verify/authenticate/further explore on field visit.

Field assessor completes document 2.15 form 3

FRH Central Team

Field assessor feedback to participant on areas for further exploration on visit and recommended date for visit.

Exemplar letters 2.14 or equivalent (including agenda for visit) to be sent to participant by field assessor

Participant, coach, Head Teacher, FRH Central Team

2 weeks prior to date of field visit

Field visit carried out by field assessor. Field assessor makes a professional judgement on the overall assessment grading based on the full submission and evidence from the field visit.

Document 2.15 form 5 (as guidance)

Field assessor sends to coach the written report on the field visit including recommendation to proceed to stage 4 or advice on resubmission. Field assessor ensures completed documentation.

Document 2.15 forms 4-5

Coach, FRH Central Team

Within 1 week of field visit

Document 2.15 forms 1-5

FRH Central Team

Within 1 week of

Stage 3 Summative assessment: field visit

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field visit

Stage 4 Summative assessment of completed reflective commentary and portfolio of evidence

Verbal formative feedback from coach to participant.

Reference to document 2.15 forms 1- 5 and documents 2.10 and 2.12

Within 1-2 weeks of receiving report from field assessor

Field assessor completes summative assessment of full submission and summative assessment document.

Document 2.16

FRH Central Team

1-2 weeks from submission date

FRH Central Team forward summative assessment form to participant and coach.

Document 2.16

Participant, coach and local authority

2 weeks from submission date

If satisfactory FRH Central Team forwards summative assessment document to GTCS and participant proceeds to final interview.

Document 2.16

GTCS

If unsatisfactory then option to resubmit full submission. NB This may involve a further field visit. Stage 5 Summative assessment: professional interview panel

GTCS invite participant for interview. Report at GTCS signed off by Chair of panel. Report sent from GTCS.

Document 2.18

If unsatisfactory interview then option to return for second interview at GTCS.

Participant, coach, Local Authority, FRH Central Team, Scottish Government

By agreement among participant, coach, local authority and FRH Central Team Within 1-2 weeks after the date of interview at GTCS

By agreement with participant and GTCS

*All documentation for the FRH Central Team should be sent to frhenquiries@educationscotland.gov.uk

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*Please note: the next section details the moderation process which some of the coaches will engage with at some of the stages Moderation

Action

Documentation

Copied to

Stage 1 3000 words

Sample moderation process at FRH Central Team. Only if requested, local authority co-ordinator forwards 3000 words and completed checklist.

Document 2.7 (3000 word checklist)

FRH Central Team

3000 word moderation completed at FRH Central Team and forwarded to local authority co-ordinator.

Moderated document 3000 word checklist or summary comments

Local authority coordinator

Moderation process of borderline or unsatisfactory full submissions If requested then full submission sent by local authority co-ordinator to FRH Central Team.

Full submission with Documents 2.10 and 2.12

FRH Central Team and external moderator

Moderation completed by external moderator.

Documents 2.10 and 2.12 and report

FRH Central Team, coach and field assessor

Moderation process only if unsatisfactory overall assessment at stage 3 and then only if considered appropriate.

Full submission, documents 2.10 and 2.15 forms 1-4

FRH Central Team and external moderator

Feedback from external moderator based on full submission with document 2.15 forms 1-4.

Document 2.15 forms 1-4

FRH Central Team, coach and field assessor

Stage 2 Full submission

Stage 3 Field visit

47

Timescale for completion

Before coach feedback to participant

Before date of scheduled field visit

Within 2-3 weeks of overall assessment

Within 2-3 weeks of overall assessment


Stage 4 Final submission

If unsatisfactory then moderation process: Field assessor sends documentation for external moderation.

Document 2.16 Full final submission

FRH Central Team, external moderator

Within 3 weeks from submission date

External moderator completes assessment.

Document 2.16

FRH Central Team and field assessor

3 weeks from submission date

Field assessor feedback following moderation.

Document 2.16

FRH Central Team and Field assessor

3 weeks from submission date

FRH Central Team forward moderated summative assessment document.

Document 2.16

Participant, field assessor, coach, local authority and GTCS

4 weeks from submission date

Field assessor feedback to participant.

Document 2.16

If satisfactory following moderation then feedback from external moderator means participant proceeds to final interview.

Document 2.16

FRH Central Team and field assessor

FRH Central Team forward moderated summative assessment document . Annual moderation meeting after Stage 4 of FRH Central team, external moderator with selection of coaches/field assessors invited to participate on a rota (each local authority to be involved at least once every four years). Moderation meeting involves samples of reflective commentaries and portfolios from the local authorities attending and sample unsatisfactory/borderline from the entire programme. Meeting will involve cross-marking and discussion about issues/concerns. External moderator to prepare report for FRH Central team.

Document 2.16

Participant, coach, local authority and GTCS

If remains unsatisfactory then feedback from external moderator means participant does not proceed to final interview.

Post Stage 4

Documents 2.10 and 2.12

Report copied to all coaches/local authority co-ordinators. Co-ordinators.

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Document 2.4

Flexible Route to Headship

Standard for Headship Flexible Route The Reflective Commentary Assessment Criteria

49


The Reflective Commentary Criteria 1. The participant presents a reflective commentary on significant leadership/management experiences which allow the participant to critically reflect upon their professional actions and the processes involved.

Satisfactory In the reflective commentary the participant will articulate a clear, justified rationale for the improvement focus and for the management/leadership approaches taken.

Unsatisfactory There is no clear rationale articulated.

The synthesis of the following is clearly evident and articulated in the rationale:  personal experience  professional reading,  situational analyses/audits,  critical analysis and reflection  intended impact.

The rationale does not include meaningful synthesis of key information.

The participant presents critical reflection on:  the processes involved in the professional actions taken  the nature and extent of the evidence of impact on learners, learning and school improvement.

Little critical reflection on professional actions taken and on the impact achieved.

The participant presents a conclusion that:  summarises key findings  identifies current position

There is insufficient consideration of evaluation of findings, potential for sustainability and plans for future development. There is no conclusion to

50


 

identifies potential for sustainability outlines next steps for further development as a leader.

discuss key findings, current position, the potential for sustainability and next steps as a leader.

There is a clear basis for practice in terms of educational and social values.

The relationship between values and behaviours is dealt with superficially.

The participant shows a clear awareness of the relationship between values and behaviour as a leader and manager. Behaviour is shaped by and justified in terms of values.

Behaviours are not justified in terms of values.

There is a clear relationship between values and the aims and strategies adopted in the project.

The relationship between values and aims and strategies in the experience(s) is unclear or inconsistent.

Opportunities are sought to discuss/explore/reflect on the purposes of the project with the relevant stakeholders – emerging issues have been discussed.

Limited opportunities are sought to discuss/explore/reflect on the purpose of the experience(s) with relevant stakeholders. A values position is asserted with very little or no attempt at involvement/participation.

Critical use is made of the relevant literature. Material drawn from reading is incorporated into on-going discussion/reflection.

Little reference/citation is made as part of the ongong discussion.

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2. The participant demonstrates, through the reflective commentary, that the two core elements underpin and permeate the whole process.

Material is used to illuminate/support/evaluate aspects of own practice. A range of relevant texts are contained within the bibliography including theoretical texts as well as official documents and guidelines.

Little or no critical use is made of relevant literature. Material quoted is not built in to the on-going discussion in a coherent way. There is a predominance of policy documents and guidelines.

In relation to the two core elements, there is a consistency through the actions taken, the evidence provided and the attitudes, beliefs and theories expressed in the reflective commentary.

Insufficient consistency among actions taken, evidence provided and expressed theories and values.

The two core elements are: 

Professional values and personal commitment



Strategic vision, professional knowledge and understanding and interpersonal skills and abilities

3. The participant presents a critical analysis of Two critical incidents are analysed critically and two critical incidents: appropriately. 

Making reference to the literature and demonstrating how the literature has further informed and challenged

The critical incidents relate appropriately to aspects of school improvement or to the leadership and management actions of the SfH.

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Two critical incidents are not critically analysed appropriately. The critical incidents do not relate appropriately to aspects of school improvement or to the leadership and management actions of the SfH.


thinking/attitudes/practice. 

Demonstrating an ethical approach to leadership and management

The critical incidents are discussed in relation to the experiences(s) and with reference to the literature.

Demonstrating sound educational and social values.

An ethical approach to leadership and management is demonstrated and justified.

Little or no discussion is presented of any issues/dilemmas/tensions arising in the experience(s).

An awareness of the importance of values in education/educational management is clear. A set of underpinning values are put forward which are justified.

Little or no discussion/awareness is presented on the importance of values. Simple assertions are made without justification or discussion in terms of values.

A discussion is presented on the participant’s development of professional skills and abilities.

A discussion is not presented on participant’s development of interpersonal abilities.

Appropriate reflection of the results of the ESCI /360 self-evaluation are evident and tied into personal and professional development thinking.

No clear learning or development is evident from ESCI/360 self-evaluation.

4. The participant provides a discussion on the reflection of their own learning: 

Development of professional skills and abilities, making reference to professional literature

An analysis of own professional development and identification of next Clear reference is made to strengths and steps as a leader and manager of development needs, supported by evidence in school improvement, making relation to the SfH. reference to literature

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The critical incidents are not discussed in relation to the experience(s). Little/no reference is made to the literature.

Clear reference is not made to strengths and development needs, supported by evidence in relation to the SfH. Critical use is not made of relevant literature.


Critical use is made of relevant literature. Material drawn from reading is incorporated into on-going discussion/reflection. Material is used to illuminate/support/evaluate aspects of own practice. A range of relevant texts are contained within the bibliography including those pertaining to emotional intelligence. A critical and reflective approach is adopted in examining the conduct and outcomes of the experience(s).

Material drawn from reading is not incorporated into on-going discussion/reflection. Material is not used to illuminate/support/evaluate aspects of own practice. An appropriate range of relevant texts is not contained within the bibliography. Little or no use is made of critical reflection. Issues arising from conduct and outcomes of the experience(s) are dealt with superficially. There is limited discussion of own learning.

Reflection includes a focus on own development as a whole school leader and manager. Self-awareness is evident with sound analysis of own experience and areas for further development. Within the experience(s), opportunities for those involved to review progress are used as a source for reflection. Reflections/review is supported by reference to own practice. Possible evidence to include extracts from

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Little use is made of issues which emerged from experience(s).

There is a tendency to be descriptive and simply narrate events.

There is a tendency to assert/make claims without specific reference to own practice.


reflective learning journals. 5. The participant demonstrates a broad and Analysis across the elements of the SfH is clear. holistic understanding of key concepts and Appreciation of a holistic view of the SfH is principles in relation to the Standard for Headship evident. in practice. There is a clear understanding that one of the key purposes of headship is impact on raising achievement/effective learning.

6. Presents work in a coherent, accessible structure, using appropriate conventions, with attention to referencing, accuracy and confidentiality.

There is little or no reference to the elements of the SfH. A fragmented view is presented of the SfH.

There is a clear understanding of the complementary nature of leadership and management.

There is little or no recognition of the relationship between headship, raising achievement and effective learning.

There is a broad indication of the leadership and management principles encompassing the professional actions.

There is little understanding of the complementary nature of leadership and management. Little reference is made to the professional actions. Work is poorly presented and/or lacks coherence.

Work is presented in a coherent and accessible form. The overall structure for the commentary is clear, with an introduction, headings, sub-headings and conclusion.

Work is difficult to access with no clear structure – lack of clarity in introduction, lack of consistency in the use of headings, etc.

Appendix materials are clearly presented and easily accessible.

Appendix materials are not clearly presented and not easily accessible.

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A sufficiently comprehensive bibliography is presented which accurately reflects references to the literature. Additional reading not referred to in the commentary may be included in the bibliography.

The bibliography does not reflect the references made to the literature. The bibliography is not sufficiently comprehensive.

Appropriate conventions have been adhered to in regard to referencing and notations.

Appropriate conventions have not been followed consistently or have been ignored.

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Document 2.5

Flexible Route to Headship

Standard for Headship Flexible Route The Portfolio Assessment Criteria

57


The Portfolio Criteria

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

General

Participant explicitly states how the items of evidence relate to practice of the full management process for each professional action:

Evidence provided is not coherently presented, analysed and explained.

Maximum of 30 pieces of evidence of competence in the full management process for each of the Professional Actions (4.1.1 to 4.5.4) of the Standard for Headship. Evidence might include the following: Audits and/or situational analysis of the internal and external situation to ascertain school’s capacity for change and to aid school planning.

      

situational analysis audit planning implementation monitoring evaluating process and impact next steps.

Documentation that evidences and evaluates: Participant presents a range of evidence  the processes of consultation involved which: in the drafting of plans and policies  the processes for the implementation of a new initiative  the processes of publicising and exemplifying the school’s aims and policies. Annotated minutes, remits of teams/departments; team building

     

constitutes a reasonable proof of assertions made is accessible is authentic is sufficient is valid and current matches the professional actions in the

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Limited evidence of practice of the full management process for each professional action. There are concerns about the appropriateness and effectiveness of the strategies adopted and depicted in the evidence. Evidence of impact is limited. Evidence of ongoing improvement (actual and intended impact) is insufficient/not included.


tasks/programme; implementation of policies Standard for Headship. – both short and long term; planning and evaluation of specific professional learning All items of evidence are clearly labelled. initiatives; action plans and monitoring of Authentic witness statements linked to the working groups; planning, monitoring and Standard for Headship are signed and dated. review of whole staff programmes, evaluation reports. Plans, formats for planning; curriculum development; policy document guidance for delivery, structure for departments; assessment procedures and processes, recording and reporting documentation; analysis and use of pupil attainment data, other monitoring procedures, audits and systematic evaluations of provision; reflective learning journal entries. Documentation/other evidence of: Encouraging school-community communications; developing links with parents, support agencies, local businesses and other schools; developing system for consulting stakeholders including school councils, parents and pupils on school policies; leading initiatives to build

Evidence relates directly to the personal work of the participant as a leader and manager. A justification grid is used to clearly identify and explain how the evidence provided substantiates the claim being made against each competence of the professional actions. Evidence was generated not more than five years before the date of submission, and is still a significant part of the on-going work of the school. All data used for evaluation of impact is systematically collected, collated and analysed.

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Items of evidence are not clearly labelled and presented. Witness statements do not relate to the professional actions or are not signed.


relationships Lack of systematic research and analysis of data into nature and extent of impact made.

Documentation/other evidence of: an ability to draw up appropriate criteria for the use of resources and finance in support of school improvement; responsibility for managing a significant budget; and linking finance plans with school plans; ensuring the safety of accommodation and facilities and the effective use of the physical environment to develop best practice in learning and teaching. Establish, sustain and enhance the culture of self-evaluation for school improvement (4.1)

The participant clearly demonstrates the ability to establish, sustain and enhance a culture of self-evaluation for school improvement. The participant demonstrates personal commitment to continuous and thorough selfevaluation.

Evidence is insufficient in terms of quantity and/or lacking in quality or relevance in one or more of the following areas:   

It is clearly demonstrated that the participant has had a lead role or has made a significant contribution to:

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fostering self-evaluation at different levels in the school using systems (e.g. auditing) to collect evidence to inform decision making establishing/using processes to gather valid information from stakeholders to inform improvement strategies collaborative practices to identify, agree and implement improvement


the establishment of a range of relationships and practices to foster self-evaluation at every level in the school  the establishment and use of systems to collect evidence with which to inform decision making  the establishment and use of processes to gather valid information from stakeholders to inform improvement strategies  collaboration with staff, learners, parents and the wider community and networks in identifying, agreeing and implementing improvement priorities  the development of systems for ongoing monitoring and review of the school’s improvement agenda. The participant has critically engaged with literature, research and policy in relation to the above aspects of 4.1. Develop staff capability, capacity and leadership to support the culture and practice of learning (4.2)

The participant clearly demonstrates the ability to develop staff capability, capacity and leadership to support the culture and practice of learning.

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priorities monitoring and review of the school’s improvement agenda.

Evidence is insufficient in terms of quantity and/or lacking in quality or relevance in one or more of the following areas: 

demonstrating a clear understanding of employment legislation, national and local agreements and policies


It is clearly demonstrated that the participant has had a lead role or has made a significant contribution to: 

working within the structure of employment legislation, national and local agreements and policies governing employment (this includes all aspects of human resource management)  the establishment and promotion of collaborative practice to support a culture of learning within and beyond the school  the establishment and implementation of the consistent use of PRD processes to identify strengths and development needs  a systematic approach to support the culture of professional learning  the building of systems to monitor the impact of professional learning on the culture of learning  systems level leadership of education in their context and beyond. The participant has critically engaged with literature, research and policy in relation to the above aspects of 4.2

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  

collaborative practice, including consultation and participation, to support a culture of learning within and beyond the school use of PRD processes to identify strengths and development needs a systematic approach to supporting a culture of professional learning and to monitoring its impact demonstrating a clear understanding of the role of Head Teachers in impacting on systems level leadership.


Ensure consistent high quality teaching and learning for all learners (4.3)

The participant clearly demonstrates the ability to ensure consistent high quality teaching and learning for all learners.

Evidence is insufficient in terms of quantity and/or lacking in quality or relevance in one or more of the following areas: 

It is clearly demonstrated that the participant has had a lead role or has made a significant contribution to: 

the building of a shared vision to support the improvement of teaching and learning and the setting of consistently high expectations for all in the school community  ensuring that appropriate curriculum design and planning are developed to meet the learning and pastoral needs of all learners  the establishment and sustainability of processes to develop pedagogic practices across the school  the building of processes to review and enhance pedagogic practice. The participant has critically engaged with literature, research and policy in relation to the above aspects of 4.3

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  

a shared vision to support improvement of teaching and learning setting of consistently high expectations for all appropriate curriculum planning and design the development of effective pedagogic practices and processes to review and enhance those practices.


Build and sustain partnerships with learners, families and relevant partners to meet the identified needs of all learners (4.4)

The participant clearly demonstrates the ability to build and sustain partnerships with learners, families and relevant partners to meet the identified needs of all learners. It is clearly demonstrated that the participant has had a lead role or has made a significant contribution to: 

the building and communication of the vision, values, ethos and aims of the school with partners  the embedding of processes to ensure learners contribute to planning and enhancement of their own learning programmes  the development of strategies to foster parental involvement  the building, maintenance and review of partnerships with other professions and agencies to support the learning, pastoral and emotional needs of learners. The participant has critically engaged with literature, research and policy in relation to the above aspects of 4.4

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Evidence is insufficient in terms of quantity and/or lacking in quality or relevance in one or more of the following areas: 

  

building and communication of vision, values, ethos and aims of the school with partners contribution of learners to their own learning parental involvement building, maintenance and review of partnerships.


Allocate resources effectively in line with identified strategic and operational priorities (4.5)

The participant clearly demonstrates the ability to allocate resources effectively in line with identified strategic and operational priorities. It is clearly demonstrated that the participant has had a lead role or has made a significant contribution to: 

the use of the review and improvement planning processes to identify priorities and inform resourcing decisions  the allocation of resources in a fair and equitable manner in line with priorities to support learning  ensuring that systems are established and used to monitor, evaluate and review the use of resources. The participant has critically engaged with literature, research and policy texts in relation to the above aspects of 4.5

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Evidence is insufficient in terms of quantity and/or lacking in quality or relevance in one or more of the following areas: 

 

the use of review and improvement planning to identify priorities and inform resourcing decisions allocation of resources in a fair and equitable manner to support learning systems being used to monitor, evaluate and review the use of resources.


6. Clear guide to the portfolio structure and presented in a coherent and accessible format, including a grid which is crossreferenced to the SfH.

7. Valid Authenticity Statement

The portfolio is structured clearly with a guide to contents provided.

The portfolio is not structured clearly.

The participant has presented the portfolio clearly, using a consistent and coherent referencing system.

The participant has not presented their portfolio clearly using a consistent and coherent referencing system.

Evidence is clearly identified, cross-referenced to the SfH, accessible and made anonymous.

Evidence is not clearly identified, not crossreferenced to the SfH, not accessible or made anonymous.

A valid authenticity statement is provided that has been signed by Head Teacher or equivalent.

Signed authenticity statement not included.

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A guide to contents is not included.


Document 2.6

Flexible Route to Headship

Assessment guidance- 3000 words stage You will find it helpful to refer to the Assessment Guidance – the Reflective Commentary and to the Reflective Commentary Assessment Criteria. Your first 3000 words: The critical analysis and reflection on your own learning should be shown through your critical incidents and implementation of project(s). It is important that you adhere to the word limit (+ or – 10%). The bibliography is not included in the word count. A commentary that is too short may be selfpenalising. Exceeding the upper word limit may result in your commentary being assessed as unsatisfactory. Contents page: You should include a contents page as a signpost for your submission. This should be numerically ordered and titled. This should include: Introduction Rationale for improvement focus Rationale for Leadership and Management Critical incident (1) Conclusion – including next steps Introduction: This is your guide section. Think how you are addressing your claim for the full Standard for Headship. How will the structure and contents fit all aspects of the SfH? You should make reference to your self-evaluation and identified areas for development and how these are being addressed. You may find it helpful to read the Reflective Commentary Assessment Criteria. Rationale for focus: If you have two projects you will need to write a rationale for each focus for improvement (project) in your full commentary and will need to divide your 10,000 word count accordingly. For the 3000 words stage, you should include a rationale for one project only.

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Document 2.6

Flexible Route to Headship Look at the assessment guidance. Your rationale must include context (include any tensions- new builds, staffing etc), results of audit/analyses and critical and analytical use of research.

Your focus is on sustainable improvement and you will be linking local authority/national policy to research on school improvement and you must argue that critically. Rationale for Leadership and Management For this rationale, written for your commentary, you will find it useful to read the Assessment Guidance – Reflective Commentary. Ensure you refer to how reading has challenged/informed your values etc. Critical Incident (1) The Assessment Guidance – Reflective Commentary gives clear guidance as does the Reflective Commentary Assessment Criteria on analysing critical incidents. Again ensure you refer to how your professional reading has challenged/informed your actions/beliefs etc. Your values and attitudes should be clear throughout the critical incident. Remember the ‘critical’ part of the incident should relate to your learning and this should be explicit. Remember that the literature can justify what you know and believe but it is important to remember that literature will also challenge your thinking and practice. This is as far as you need to go for your 3000 words.

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Document 2.7

Flexible Route to Headship Participant’s name:

School:

CHECKLIST FOR FIRST 3000 WORDS

COMMENTS

Contents page – numerically ordered and titled/pages numbered

Introduction to the Commentary – how the claims for competence are being addressed – audit processes/ESCI/PLP/reflection/need for impact – guide to content/2 essential elements underpin the whole process (professional values and personal commitment; strategic vision, professional knowledge and understanding and interpersonal skills and abilities)

Rationale for focus (improvement project) – context: local/national policy/school

Results of situational analysis/audit

Critical use of literature

Critical analysis/reflection

State intended impact – sustainable improvement

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Rationale for leadership and management approaches taken – contextual factors and influences

Literature – show how informs/challenges understanding, attitudes, beliefs, practice

Critical incident should include; The incident/how it challenged thinking/practice and the participant’s response/what they did/outcomes

Links should be clear between values and behaviour/ethics are important/values are justified/reflection and learning are evident

References (in critical incident) to literature which informs/challenges

Should be reflective and analytical throughout this first 3000 words of commentary

Overall

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Document 2.8

Flexible Route to Headship Assessment Guidance- The Reflective Commentary The following sections can be presented for assessment through either written submission or oral presentation: The total word count for the reflective commentary (final submission) should be 10,000 words (+ or – 10%). The bibliography is not included in the word count. A commentary that is too short may be self-penalising. Exceeding the upper word limit may result in your commentary being assessed as unsatisfactory. Contents page 

the signpost for the submission which should be numerically ordered and titled

Introduction 

a brief overview of the organisation of written commentary/presentation to guide the reader through the structure and contents for the commentary and for the claim for full Standard for Headship.

Rationale for focus (for each development) 

Context- national, local, policy and school community analysing the tensions and teasing out the links between them.

Results of the situational analysis/audits which should be done before you launch your project and should inform your rationale.

Critical and analytical use of theory and research literature to show how it informs and challenges your understanding of the focus and aids identification of related issues. This should help provide a clearly articulated rationale for the focus and demonstrate that you are the lead learner.

Rationale for Leadership and Management approach taken  Contextual factors and influences. 

Critical and analytical use of theory and research literature on leadership and management to show how it informs and challenges your understanding, attitudes, beliefs and practice.

With reference to both personal experience and to the literature, critical and analytical reflection on: 71


1. The full implementation cycle from planning through to impact of school improvement initiative(s) that have been led and managed by you and allow you to demonstrate relevant SfH competencies for the essential elements and professional actions. Consider the progress made to date: 

Nature and extent of the realisation of plans and the effectiveness of your planning.

Nature and extent of impact achieved, to date including: o impact on staff: attitudes, behaviours, knowledge/understanding, teaching o impact on pupils: attitudes, behaviours, knowledge/understanding, learning o impact on school, wider community and partners: attitudes, knowledge/understanding, policy and practice.

2. Leadership and Management processes Drawing on both your own reflection and feedback from those involvedstaff, parents, pupils, inter-agency colleagues: o Critically reflect on the process and impact made. o Include critical reflection on interpersonal/intra-personal issues (may well be your critical incidents?). Literature can justify what you know but can also challenge or inform your thinking. Therefore you can, if you wish, recount something you disagree with and justify why. Link your experiences back and forward to reading and reflection. Remember it is not a narrative. What did you do? What impact did it have? Why? What reading did you do? What did it mean? How did it impact on your learning and practice? The submission should be a marriage of theory, practice and research. It is a jigsaw where you are trying to loop all three and tie in the connections to your own learning. Critical analysis and discussion of, and reflection on, your own learning: 

Development of interpersonal abilities, with reference to data and literature (should come through in reflection of ESCI/360 audit and at GTCS panel interview).

Own professional development and identification of next steps as a leader and manager of school improvement, making reference to literature.

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Conclusion (as regards the development(s) and own learning) This is a significant part and should reflect- Where am I now! - in terms of the development and as a leader. 

Identify the current position of the implementation of the initiative/project and summarise the key findings through systematic monitoring and evaluation.

Identify and discuss potential for sustainability.

Outline and justify next steps for further development of the initiative/project and further exploration of emerging issues.

The following section can only be presented for assessment in written form but if doing an oral presentation then one critical incident may be done orally and one written. Critical analysis and discussion of two critical incidents. Each critical incident should include: Discussion of : 

catalyst or disorientating incident

how it challenged your thinking, practice and your response

what you did about this

why you took this particular action (rationale for the focus?)

the outcome and impact, so far

reflection on the ways in which your own leadership/management understanding and practice have developed (links to attitudes, beliefs and values).

Evaluative analysis and reflection that identifies what you might do differently as a result of the whole experience Essential Elements The nature of the essential elements is such that they will permeate and underpin all the approaches and actions taken. At times they may be more implicit than explicit in the written reflective commentary. However, the essential elements are the main focus of formal assessment in the final professional interview and therefore, the participant will have the opportunity to make these more explicit. Within the commentary the following areas should be clear: 

Personal commitment to all learners’ intellectual, social and ethical growth and well-being.

An awareness of the importance of values in education and educational leadership and management including social justice, integrity, trust and respect and professional commitment.

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A clear awareness of the relationship between values and behaviour as a leader and manager. Behaviour is shaped by, and justified in terms of, values.

Specific issues/dilemmas/tensions dealt with in the experience(s) are highlighted and discussed in relation to an underlying moral/ethical position.

The role of school leaders in creating and sharing strategic vision, ethos and aims for their school including their commitment to career-long learning.

The importance of school leaders having complex knowledge and understanding of educational thinking and developments in society, education and teaching and learning.

The range of professional skills and abilities which leaders draw upon in leading and managing effectively including: demonstrating self-awareness and inspiring and motivating others; judging wisely and deciding appropriately; communicating effectively; demonstrating political insight.

Throughout the commentary you should show how reading and experiences and formative feedback have been used together to inform and challenge your thinking and actions. Additional general guidance: 1. Please ensure the submission has substance and is not only a narrative. 2. There is further guidance on the first 3000 word submission. 3. An information sheet is available to help the coach at the formative submission/ field visit stage. 4. When using quotations from professional reading use the ‘So what?’ test. So what: o are the implications o learning has taken place o informed or challenged your thinking, attitudes and/or practice o action took place. Direct quotations can be used but these must make sense, flow within the commentary and be appropriately referenced.

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Document 2.9

Flexible Route to Headship Discrete Claim (Reflective commentary) All participants are required to write a discrete claim relating to SfH 4.5 ‘Allocate resources effectively in line with identified strategic and operational priorities’. The claim is part of the reflective commentary and will focus on one aspect of 4.5 from resource and budget management and health and safety. The rationale for this discrete claim is centred on experience of Head Teacher development programmes where often participants have limited knowledge and experience of the Standard for Headship (4.5) relating to resource and budget management and health and safety. Participants with experience in this area can make a discrete claim based on their prior learning and follow the approach detailed in this document. Participants without experience in this area should show, in the discrete claim, an understanding of the one aspect chosen from 4.5 and present this following the approach described. Standard for Headship Allocate resources effectively in line with identified strategic and operational priorities (4.5) 4.5.1 Head Teachers use the review and improvement planning processes to identify priorities and inform resourcing decisions (professional actions: consult with relevant stakeholders to inform appropriate resourcing decisions; use data and evaluations of previous planning priorities to inform future resourcing decisions; consider the sustainability implications of resourcing decisions) 4.5.2 Head Teachers allocate resources in a fair and equitable manner in line with priorities to support learning (professional actions: make best strategic and operational use of available resources to create, maintain and enhance an appropriate learning environment for effective teaching and learning and to support improvement; delegate appropriate tasks and responsibilities to other staff, including promoted staff; demonstrate transparent and equitable allocation of resources which takes account of identified need; foster collective responsibility for the sustainable, transparent, fair and effective use of resources). 4.5.3 Head Teachers ensure systems are established and used to monitor, evaluate and review the use of resources (professional actions: ensure best value and appropriate devolved accountability to support effective teaching and learning; show a strategic awareness when engaging with resource management to ensure continuous improvement; give due regard to health and safety legislation to ensure safety and welfare of all; utilise all available support in budget and resource management). 75


Before writing a discrete claim:  Consider the important responsibilities in 4.5 (budget and resource management; health and safety).  Choose one which you are confident you have experience and evidence of impact. Remember to include the impact on learning and teaching or school improvement.  Or choose one aspect of 4.5 which for you is a development action. The discrete claim then will relate to one of:  resource and budget management, for example, deployment of staff, delegation of tasks and responsibilities, budgeting, devolved school management  health and safety, for example, child protection, school building, transport, fire safety. Making the discrete claim will include:  a rationale  critical use of literature  learning  practice  reflection – what have you learned? What changes would you make and why? What would you have done differently and why?  evidence – variety/quality  impact. Further guidance  Write explicitly.  Be clear about why you made decisions.  How do the decisions made really affect outcomes, i.e. impact on learning and teaching?  The total number of words should be in the region of 700/800 words with any more than this restricting the other necessary detail in your reflective commentary.  The claim (700/800 words) is part of the 10,000 word reflective commentary.  If you have not had experience of any of these aspects of 4.5 you still make a discrete claim in the same way to show understanding of the process.  Always bear in mind the intended/desired impact, especially on learning and teaching.  The field visit will explore further an understanding of the remaining aspects of SfH 4.5 not covered in the discrete claim.

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Document 2.10

Flexible Route to Headship Assessment checklist for Reflective Commentary Participant’s name: 1.Criteria 1 Introduction

School: Comment

Rationale for improvement focus 2

Impact articulated in rationale

3

Rationale for leadership and management approaches taken

4

Synthesis of experience and reading

5

Situational analysis/audits

6

Critical reflections on leadership and management experiences involved with the Professional Actions (4.1-4.5) 4.1 Establish, sustain and enhance the culture of selfevaluation for school improvement 4.2 Develop staff capability, capacity and leadership to support the culture and practice of learning 4.3 Ensure consistent, high quality teaching and learning for all learners 4.4 Build and sustain partnerships with learners, families and relevant partners to meet the identified needs of all learners 4.5 Allocate resources effectively in line with identified strategic and operational priorities 77

P

F


7

Consistency of actions, attitudes, beliefs and theories expressed through the SfH elements (1-2) 1 Professional values and personal commitment:  Social justice  Integrity  Trust and respect  Professional commitment 2.1 Strategic vision 2.2 Professional knowledge and understanding 2.3 Interpersonal skills and abilities

8

Conclusion to summarise key findings of project(s)

9

Current position articulated

10 Potential sustainability of project(s) 11 Next steps for development (of project(s) and self) 12 2 critical incidents within the commentary How an ethical approach to leadership and management is demonstrated How behaviour is shaped by and justified in terms of sound educational and social values How literature has informed/challenged thinking and attitudes/practice

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13 Development of interpersonal skills and abilities is discussed with ref to:  literature  ESCI/360 evaluation

14 Analysis of professional development:  Self awareness is evident with sound analysis of own experience and areas for further development  Evaluations of own practice used as a source of reflection  Learning to date  Next steps as a leader and manager of school improvement  Reference to professional literature 15 Broad and holistic understanding of key principles of headship:  raising achievement / effective learning  complementary nature of leadership and management 16 Commentary presented is coherent and accessible 17 Overall structure is clear with introduction, headings and conclusion

18 Bibliography is comprehensive and sufficient

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Document 2.11

Flexible Route to Headship Assessment Guidance - Portfolio

Your commentary must match the criteria and be backed up by evidence in the portfolio. All professional actions must be evidenced (4.1-4.5) If you have additional evidence of prior learning it is acceptable but must be clearly justified in the evidence trail overview. You may wish to separate your portfolio of evidence into two sections – that which relates to the commentary and that which is prior learning and separate from the commentary. 1.

Ensure you have read over and are familiar with the guidance and criteria issued for the portfolio.

2.

Remember your Head Teacher is required to write an authenticity statement about the contents of your portfolio and will need time to look it over before doing this.

3.

Remember to include a cross reference grid in your portfolio which highlights that all aspects of the Standard have been met by evidence – annotate the evidence to ensure it meets the criteria you are claiming it evidences.

4.

If you are using witness statements as evidence to validate any aspects of the Standard ensure these are explicit, signed and dated.

5.

Read over your portfolio with criteria to hand to check for validity, accuracy, typographical errors or spelling mistakes.

6.

Read over your portfolio to ensure you have: a guide to the structure of your portfolio, the authenticity statement, cross reference grid, justification grid and the evidence clearly labelled and annotated if necessary. You also need to include your annotated/ongoing PLP.

7.

Please remember to submit for assessment 2 copies of the full submission (commentary and portfolio) and always be aware of the FRH timeline.

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Document 2.12

Flexible Route to Headship Assessment checklist for the Portfolio Participant’s name: No. Criteria 1 Introduction

School: Comment

Authenticity statement 2

Guide, accessible and clearly labelled

3

Sufficient, valid, current (5yrs)

4

Cross reference grid

5

Justification grid substantiates the claim against each competence

6

Participant’s contribution is clear

7

Situational analysis

8

Full management process is explicit: of audit, plan, implement, monitor and evaluate

9

Systematic research and analysis of data into the extent of impact made

10

Evidence impacts on ongoing work of the school

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P

F


11 Establish, sustain and enhance the culture of selfevaluation for school improvement (4.1.1-4.1.6)

12 Develop staff capability, capacity and leadership to support the culture and practice of learning (4.2.14.2.7)

13 Ensure consistent high quality teaching and learning for all learners (4.3.1-4.3.5) 14 Build and sustain partnerships with learners, families and relevant partners to meet the identified needs of all learners (4.4.1-4.4.5) 15 Allocate resources effectively in line with identified strategic and operational priorities (4.5.1-4.5.4)

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Document 2.13

Flexible Route to Headship Field Visit Guidance for Participant Purpose The purpose of the field visit within the Flexible Route programme is 

to illuminate the work described in the portfolio and commentary

to seek clarification about the professional abilities of the participant including discussion of interpersonal skills and abilities

to further explore aspects of the Standard for Headship including those aspects of 4.5 not included in the discrete claim

to obtain an overall view of the participant’s progress in achieving the Standard.

The field assessor‘s role is to corroborate the evidence and information submitted in the portfolio and commentary by interviewing key people within the school. Standard letters explaining the purpose and format of the visit are available to the field assessor to send in advance to the participant and others involved. The key people will include the Head Teacher (or appropriate line manager) and other staff (usually teaching, but may include non-teaching) and may, if appropriate, include parent representatives or small groups of pupils. The visit can include a tour of the school. The field assessor can provide formative feedback on the strengths of the commentary and portfolio and brief oral feedback at the end of the school visit. However the field assessor will not be in position at the end of the visit to indicate the overall outcome as satisfactory or unsatisfactory until the observation from the field visit is considered with the assessment grading from the earlier submission. The overall outcome will be reported in writing to the coach who is then in place to inform the participant on the next stage. During the visit the field assessor will not ask for additional portfolio evidence although this could be discussed.

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Document 2.13

Flexible Route to Headship Procedures  

   

Following discussion with the coach and agreement of a date for the field visit, it is the participant's responsibility to inform the Head Teacher (or line manager) about the date of the field visit as soon as possible. The field assessor will email the participant 2-3 weeks before the visit enclosing information for the participant, the Head Teacher (or line manager) and others who will be participating during the visit (e.g. those involved with project(s) discussed in the commentary and others who have observed the participant's leadership/interpersonal development). In the communication from the field assessor, the agenda of the visit will be explained and timings suggested. The visit is expected to last around 3 hours. The participant then plans the detail of the visit, makes appropriate class cover arrangements if required and communicates the detailed programme of the visit to the field assessor Following assessment of the commentary and portfolio, the field assessor will have discussed with the participant's coach and based on their discussion the focus for the field visit will have been set. Following the field visit, written formative feedback will be agreed between the coach and the field assessor and will be communicated to the participant by the coach within one week of the visit.

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Field Visit Advice for Field Assessors The field assessor’s role is to further explore aspects of the Standard contained in the commentary and corroborate evidence submitted in the portfolio. At the outset of the visit, the field assessor can provide verbal feedback on the strengths of the submission. At the end of the school visit the field assessor can provide brief verbal feedback on the visit but will not be in position to comment on the overall assessment of the participant’s progress in achieving the Standard for Headship. After the field visit the field assessor will send a written report to the coach. On the basis of the assessment grading for the submission and observation from the visit, the assessor will indicate the stage at which the participant is considered to be in progress towards achieving the Standard. A satisfactory outcome enables the participant to proceed to stage 4, the final submission. An unsatisfactory outcome following the visit indicates that the participant is not ready to proceed to stage 4 and will result in the coach discussing next steps with the participant. Communication with coach before the field visit It is important for the field assessor to communicate with the coach assessor to discuss and agree the agenda for the field visit. The agenda for the field visit should cover the following aspects:   

areas of strength to be explored matters for further clarification professional skills and abilities.

Confidentiality The portfolio is a public document within the assessment process. Those involved in assessment and in the field visit, including the Head Teacher and interviewees, can use and make comment on any part of the portfolio. The commentary however is confidential to those directly involved in the assessment process and can only be made available to others by the participant. Confidentiality is important in relation to the commentary.

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Document 2.14

Flexible Route to Headship Exemplar letter 1 (from field assessor to participant) Dear………..(participant’s name) I would like to confirm the details of the field visit to your school which will take place on ……date/time………… During the visit I would like to meet with:  yourself  your Head Teacher  other members of staff nominated by you because they have a particular knowledge of your leadership and management of the project(s) involved  some pupils involved with the project(s) you have implemented. I expect my interview with you to take around one hour, with the Head Teacher to be around 30 minutes and to see the other individuals or groups for around 30-40 minutes each. The purpose of the field visit within the Flexible Route programme is:  to authenticate and illuminate the work described in the reflective commentary and portfolio of evidence  to further explore the claim against the professional actions of the Standard for Headship  to seek further clarification on professional skills and abilities and abilities  to allow a professional judgement to be made in terms of your progress towards achieving the Standard for Headship. Following a detailed preliminary assessment of the commentary and portfolio and discussion with the coach, I can confirm that the agenda for the field visit will focus on:    etc. At the time of the visit I may be able to give you some informal feedback of my experience on the field visit. Following the visit, feedback will take place through formative assessment advice from your coach.

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I also attach information for both the Head Teacher and the nominated member(s) of staff with whom I will speak, and I would ask that you pass this on to them. The detail does not outline the content focus of the visit. I hope that you will brief your Head Teacher and the other member(s) of staff as required and based on the set agenda. Please do not hesitate to contact me should you require further clarification or discussion of the areas for discussion during the field visit. I very much look forward to visiting the school and meeting with you.

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Exemplar letter 2 (from field assessor to Head Teacher) Dear ………… (Head Teacher), Field Visit Assessment for ………….. Participant on the Flexible Route Programme for the Standard for Headship I am contacting you because I hope to meet with you as Head Teacher in connection with the work being undertaken in school by ………… in connection with the Standard for Headship. In the recent past ……….. has been leading and managing activities in the school within the framework of the Standard for Headship. In doing so he/she has accumulated a range of evidence of work and its impact on the school, himself/herself and others. This evidence has been submitted by the participant in a portfolio of evidence together with a detailed reflective commentary. Following an assessment of the written submission it is a required part of the assessment process that I now visit the school to explore some issues in detail and to ensure the validity and authenticity of the evidence provided. The questions I am likely to ask you, and the discussion that will arise from these questions, have therefore been based on the leadership and management processes as represented to me and the coach through the participant’s evidence. This questioning will be professional and structured. There is no question that this assessment is in any form an assessment of the school and its processes. The focus will be on how the participant has led and managed the relevant activities in the life of the school. I have indicated to ………. in another correspondence those areas which I will be particularly interested in during my visit and I know that these will be shared with you. For each of the areas included in the agenda, I will want to ask for;  a short description of the participant’s role in the project(s)  your view of what happened at a particular stage or event in the progress of the project(s)  your opinion of the participant’s personal qualities, including discussion of their interpersonal abilities.

It is expected that our professional discussion will take around forty minutes and I look forward to visiting the school and to meeting with you.

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Exemplar letter 3 (from field assessor to staff member) Field Visit Assessment for …………. Participant on the Flexible Route programme for the Standard for Headship Dear………. (member of staff) I am contacting you because, as you will be aware, I hope to meet with you in connection with the work being undertaken in school by ………… in connection with the Standard for Headship. In the recent past he/she has been leading and managing activities in the school within the framework of the Standard for Headship. In doing so he/she has accumulated a range of evidence of work and its impact on the school, himself/herself and others. This evidence has been submitted by the participant in a portfolio of evidence together with a detailed reflective commentary. Following an assessment of the written submission it is a required part of the assessment process that I now visit the school to further explore some issues in detail and to ensure the validity of the evidence provided. The questions I am likely to ask you, and the discussion that will arise from these questions, have therefore been based on the leadership and/or management processes as represented to me and the coach through the participant’s submission. This questioning will be professional and structured. There is no question, however, that this assessment is in any form an assessment of the school and its processes. The focus will be how the participant has led and managed the relevant activities in the life of the school. I have shared with the participant in another communication those areas which I will be particularly interested in during my visit and I trust these will be shared with you. For each of the areas included in the agenda, I will want to ask for;  a short description of the participant’s role in the project(s)  your view of what happened at a particular stage or event in the progress of the project(s)  your opinion of the participant’s professional abilities, including discussion of their interpersonal abilities.

It is expected that our professional discussion will take around 30 minutes and I look forward to visiting the school and to meeting with you.

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Document 2.15

Flexible Route to Headship Form 1: Assessment – Reflective Commentary Flexible Route to Achieving the Standard for Headship Participant:

School:

Coach Assessor:

Field Assessor:

Strengths of the Reflective Commentary

Areas for further exploration during field visit.

Assessment Grading: 1. Strengths with recommended areas for development 2. Strengths with required areas for development 3. Weaknesses to be addressed

Additional comments:

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Form 2: Assessment – Portfolio of evidence Flexible Route to Achieving the Standard for Headship Participant:

School:

Coach Assessor:

Field Assessor:

Strengths of Portfolio

Areas for further exploration during field visit.

Assessment Grading: 1. Strengths with recommended areas for development 2. Strengths with required areas for development 3. Weaknesses to be addressed

Additional comments:

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Form 3: Record of Discussion between Coach Assessor and Field Assessor

Name of Participant: School: Coach Assessor: Field Assessor: Initial assessment categories (Assessment Grading Forms 1 & 2): Reflective commentary: 1, 2 or 3 Portfolio of evidence: 1, 2 or 3

The field visit:1. Strengths to highlight:

2. Main areas on field visit to verify/authenticate/further explore:

3. Aspects of professional skills and abilities to be explored:

Date arranged for Field Visit:

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Form 4: The Field Visit Report Participant: School: Field Assessor: Date of Field Visit: General comments given at start to participant: Reflective Commentary strengths: Portfolio of Evidence strengths:

Main areas for further validation/authentication/exploration. Comments to aid formative feedback:

Additional remarks:

Overall assessment: By field assessor following observation on field visit and submission at stage 2 : Satisfactory, proceed to stage 4 Unsatisfactory

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Form 5: The Field Visit Participant: Provides evidence of competence in the professional actions and essential elements outlined in the field visit agenda as follows:

School:

S

U

Professional actions: 4.1 Establish, sustain and enhance the culture of self-evaluation for school improvement 4.2 Develop staff capability, capacity and leadership to support the culture and practice of learning

4.3 Ensure consistent high quality teaching and learning for all learners 4.4 Build and sustain partnerships with learners, families and relevant partners to meet identified needs of all learners

4.5 Allocate resources effectively in line with identified strategic and operational priorities

Essential elements: 1 Professional values and personal commitment  Social justice  Integrity  Trust and respect  Professional commitment  2.1 Strategic vision 2.2 Professional knowledge and understanding 2.3 Interpersonal skills and abilities

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Comments


Flexible Route to Headship

Document 2.16

The Standard for Headship Assessment Form

Name of Participant

Registration No

Assessor

Date

Recommendation:

S – Satisfactory

U – Unsatisfactory

Reflective Commentary

Portfolio Overall Grade

please insert ‘S’ for Satisfactory or ‘U’ for Unsatisfactory

Assessor Signature

Date

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General Criteria

Name

Reg No

Please Tick

S

U Comments

1

Presents work in a coherent, accessible structure, using appropriate conventions, with attention to referencing and accuracy

2

Is able to research, analyse and present data clearly and to make appropriate interpretations and conclusions based on this data.

3

Appropriate use of theoretical concepts and principles

4

Use of relevant literature

5

Proper ethical standards

S – Satisfactory

U – Unsatisfactory

Overall Grade

(please insert ‘S’ for Satisfactory or ‘U’ for Unsatisfactory)

General Comment

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Specific Criteria: Reflective Commentary

Name Please Tick

S 1

Presents a reflective commentary on management/leadership experience(s) which allows the participant to critically reflect upon their Professional Actions and the processes involved.

2

Demonstrates that the essential elements underpin and permeate the whole process. The two essential elements are: 

Professional values and personal commitment

Strategic vision, professional knowledge and understanding, interpersonal skills and abilities

3

Reg No

U

Comments

Presents critical analysis of two critical incidents: 

 

Making reference to professional literature and demonstrating how the literature has further informed and challenged thinking/attitudes/practice. Demonstrating an ethical approach to leadership and management. Demonstrating sound educational and social values.

4

Provides a discussion on development of interpersonal skills and abilities and an analysis of professional development, learning to date, making reference to professional literature.

5

Demonstrates a broad and holistic understanding of key concepts and principles in relation to the Standard for Headship in practice.

S – Satisfactory

U – Unsatisfactory

Overall Grade

(please insert ‘S’ for Satisfactory or ‘U’ for Unsatisfactory)

General Comment

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Specific Criteria: Portfolio

Provides evidence of competence in the full management process for each of the professional actions of Standard for Headship. The participant demonstrates this in the following areas:

Name

Reg No

Please Tick

S

U

Comments

1 Establish, sustain and enhance the culture of self-evaluation for school improvement 2

Develop staff capability, capacity and leadership to support the culture and practice of learning

3

Ensure consistent, high quality teaching and learning for all learners

4

Build and sustain partnerships with learners, families and relevant partners to meet the identified needs of all learners

5

Allocate resources effectively in line with identified strategic and operational priorities

6

Provides a clear guide to the portfolio structure and presents work in a coherent and accessible format.

7

Provides a valid Authenticity Statement.

S – Satisfactory

U – Unsatisfactory

Overall Grade

(please insert ‘S’ for Satisfactory or ‘U’ for Unsatisfactory)

General Comment

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Document 2.17

Flexible Route to Headship Assessment Model The Professional Interview On successful completion of the reflective commentary/portfolio at stage 4, the participant will be invited by the GTCS to attend for professional interview. The assessment panel at GTCS will consist of a GTCS member as chairperson, two Head Teachers and a representative from the local education authorities. The participant will make a presentation around their learning journey on the route to achieving the Standard for Headship. The format of the presentation is for the participant to decide. This presentation is followed by questions from the interview panel and will focus on the essential element 2.3 from the Standard: interpersonal skills and abilities. In responding to these questions, participants will be in a position to demonstrate their awareness on this important element of the Standard. The question session will take approximately 30 minutes. The professional interview is a summative assessment stage. The assessment panel will make a decision on the outcome of the interview, either satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Participants will receive written feedback from the GTCS and where appropriate this will include comments of a formative nature to assist further professional development. Successful participants at professional interview will be considered to have met the Standard for Headship in full. If unsuccessful at professional interview then the participant will have the opportunity to present for a second interview at a time considered to be appropriate for their needs.

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Document 2.18

The Standard for Headship Professional Interview Name of Participant

GTCS Registration No

Date of Panel

Panel Decision Meets the Standard for Headship in full

Does not meet the Standard for Headship in full

Signature Chair of Panel

Date

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Specific Criteria: Professional Interview

Name

Reg No

Please Tick

Interpersonal skills and abilities

S

U

Comments

1 Demonstrating self-awareness and inspiring and motivating others.

2 Judging wisely and deciding appropriately.

3 Communicating effectively.

4 Demonstrating political insight.

S – Satisfactory

U – Unsatisfactory

Panel Decision

(please insert ‘S’ for Satisfactory or ‘U’ for Unsatisfactory)

General Comment

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Frh7 pack may 2013  

Frh7 pack may 2013