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Lincoln Trail

Area Development District

2011 Annual Report


www.ltadd.org • (270) 769-2393

A Message from the Chairman It’s been another fine year for the Lincoln Trail Area Development District, and I know our Board and the entire LTADD staff continue to do their utmost to continue providing the high level of support our district has come to expect. I am thankful for this opportunity to share the accomplishments of the past year and recognize the talented group of dedicated professionals and volunteers who strive together to shape the future of our region – A region that has to be counted among the very best nationally. So enjoy this edition of our annual report, follow our efforts, and work with us in the coming year as we strive to make FY12 our best year yet! John Settles Chairman, LTADD Board of Directors

Introduction -- The 2011 Lincoln Trail Area Development District

(LTADD) annual report provides a summary of the ADD’s support the eight-county Lincoln Trail Region -- Breckinridge, Grayson, Hardin LaRue, Marion, Meade, Nelson, and Washington Counties.

Our Mission and Goals

The LTADD’s mission is to bring local civic and governmental leaders together to accomplish major objectives and take advantage of opportunities which cannot be achieved or realized by those governments acting alone. The LTADD partners with community groups, governments, and the private sector to develop special projects and provide technical support. This includes: • Providing assistance in responsible and efficient local governance, • Providing assistance in the development of a safe, efficient and economically viable transportation system, • Helping the region utilize area natural resources in an environmentally responsible manner, • Improving the social environment through the enhancement of educational, supportive and health services, • Improving and increasing the economic vitality of the region through greater employment opportunities and a higher standard of living • Supporting the development of efficient infrastructure networks that effectively serve the needs of the region. • Improving the quality of life throughout the region through grant assistance and administration, and comprehensive training activities.


Community and Economic Development The Community and Economic Development team provided a broad range of support to local municipalities and counties including transportation planning, water and wastewater management, Global Positioning System (GPS) road inventories (approximately 50 miles inventoried in FY11), public administration and general community and economic development activities. They do so with tireless support from community representatives who volunteer their time on key committees

Transportation

The Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) provides transportation planning and recommendations for Hardin and Meade County while the Regional Transportation and Highway Safety Committee (RTHS) provides similar planning and recommendations for Breckinridge, Grayson, LaRue, Marion, Nelson and Washington Counties. In 2011, the MPO prioritized 25 projects valued at $393 million. The RTHS reviewed and prioritized 17 projects, totaling over $276 million, during the FY 11. Working closely with its partners at the Transportation Cabinet, One Knox, the Governor’s office, numerous legislators and other key government offices, the MPO was pleased to secure the additional $112 million in funds to complete the 4 key BRAC transportation projects including the Elizabethtown – Radcliff Connector and the extension of KY Highway 313 to Brandenburg either under construction, designs approved and/or acquiring easements. The completion of these projects is anticipated for 2014.

Public Safety

We contracted with Marion County to provide 911 mapping data that will enable them to begin the process of transitioning to Phase II and Enhanced 911 capabilities. Additionally, and as a result of FEMA funding, three new bridges are being constructed in Breckinridge and Marion counties. These projects will mitigate the isolation of citizens during floods by modernizing and elevating stream crossings. All construction activities are expected to be completed during 2012.

Water Management Planning

Water and Waste Water management are critical functions to the sustainment and growth of our communities. The Lincoln Trail Water Management Planning Council helped develop, review, and prioritize 77 water and 43 wastewater projects totaling over $205 million in priorities to meet area infrastructure needs. Other important accomplishments include the following:

• Project Administration of 25 projects valued at $10,000,000

• Prepared an application for State Drinking Water Funding for the City of Brandenburg. The project received approval for $2,080,000 in loan funding for Water Treatment System Upgrades.

Continued coordination and support to the Governor’s BRAC Taskforce on Year 2 projects to be funded under KY Economic Development Cabinet - Economic Development Bond totaling approximately $38 million in water & wastewater projects

Maintained and Updated Geographic Information System (GIS) inventory of over 4,226 miles of water and 858 miles of wastewater lines in the district, including associated infrastructure (water tanks, treatment plants, etc.).

• Maintained and updated the Kentucky Infrastructure Authority (KIA) Water & Wastewater Resource Information System Web Portal, which contains system and project information for all the public systems in the region (http://kia.ky.gov/wris/portal/).

Economic Development Administration (EDA)

An application for $1 million in EDA funding for the City of Leitchfield was submitted and subsequently awarded for a project to tie-in a new water intake to the existing water treatment plant. The total project is estimated to be $4 million. The project will insure the community remains economically viable for several industries that rely on the City’s water infrastructure.

Community Development Block Grants (CDBG)

Each year the Community and Economic Development Department team manages applications for Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) - federal funds available through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Applications were approved for two CDBG Community Projects that are valued at $1,000,000. Both are senior center projects, one to serve the senior population of Loretto and the other for Nelson County.

Lincoln Trail ADD Revolving Loan Fund Committee

In addition to public sector investments resulting from CDBGs, the LTADD’s Community and Economic Development team oversees a Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) that helps spur private sector investment. In fiscal year 2011, $65,000 in RLF funds were distributed in association with $335,000 in leveraged funds, creating 31 jobs. Since its inception, RLF activities have resulted in 61 loans, $2,965,000 in distributions, $16,035,000 in leveraged funds and the creation of 974 jobs. Revolving Loan Fund Impact to Date • Total loans to date.................................................................61 • Total funds distributed.............................................$2,965,000 • Total leveraged funds............................................$16,035,000 • Total Jobs............................................................................974


Employment and Training While areas closest to Fort Knox were experiencing unprecedented growth and prosperity, employers in significant parts of the region were still suffering from the global recession. This resulted in continuing high unemployment. That’s where the Lincoln Trail Career Centers (LTCC) managed by the Lincoln Trail Workforce Investment Board (LTWIB) played an important and vital role. The four area Career Centers served more than 95,000 residents with re-employment services and unemployment insurance.

Business Services

In 2011 we provided on –the-Job Training (OJT) agreement funded reimbursements for nine employers in LaRue, Hardin, Washington, Nelson, and Marion counties. Employers in this program are eligible for reimbursement of up to 50% of the trainee’s starting wage during the allowed training period. Smaller employers are eligible for a higher rate of reimbursement up to 90%, with the maximum amount of reimbursement for any employer is $5,000. A total of 54 WIAeligible clients were hired to learn new occupational skills with an average starting wage of $13.59/hour. A total of $111,384 of WIA funds were reimbursed to the employers. Additionally, the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Business Liaison participated in two employer seminars conducted by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development. The seminars provided information regarding the Kentucky Small Business Investment Credit Program that started in 2011, where small businesses are eligible for a state income tax credit for creating new jobs and investing in equipment or technology. In February the Nelson County Economic Development Agency and Lincoln Trail Career Centers teamed to conduct a job fair in Bardstown. Eight Career Center staffers assisted in helping over 500 jobseekers match their skills and experience with over 25 participating employers. In April the Business Liaison and three WIA Client Services Managers visited four industries on a community industry tour sponsored by the Elizabethtown Industrial Foundation Training Consortium and Elizabethtown Community and Technical College. During the visits we gained valuable knowledge about the companies and their products, as well as information on the job skills required by these companies. This learning is critical to helping the region build a demand driven workforce. The Lincoln Trail Workforce Investment Board contracted with Innovative Productivity Inc. to provide a series of small business workshops called “Fitness Workouts”. The five, four-hour sessions provided an opportunity for small business owners to learn solutions for common weaknesses that can threaten the overall success of a business. The sessions addressed such topics as business plans, cash flow management, operating costs for a business, using business templates and spreadsheets, optimizing the business website and increasing customer awareness. A total of ten businesses participated in these valuable workshops.

Youth Services

The Workplace Principles program, a partnership between Marion County Board of Education, the Marion County Fiscal Court and the Lincoln Trail Workforce Investment Board, provided assistance to youth at risk of dropping out of school. These at risk young people received encouragement and an opportunity for success with newlycreated work experience. The course was offered to a select group of seniors nominated by their teachers from August 2010 to June 2011. The curriculum included the following areas: Planning to Work; Matching Skills with Jobs; Applying for Jobs; Resumes, Tests and Choices; Being Ready to Work; Workplace Safety and Learning at Work; Communicating with Co-Workers and Supervisors and Interviewing. Students were placed in career fields that they were considering for study in college. Most of the nominated students had never held a job before, and the program provided them with new skills and some earned income while attending high school. According to feedback from the students, the program motivated them to keep their grades up so they would be able to continue work after school. The ultimate goal of the program is to help these students gain fulltime employment upon completion of high school. Of the nominated students, five of ten were WIA eligible. Nine of the ten successfully graduated high school, with the only exception being a Junior participant who is scheduled to graduate in May 2012

Participant Services

95,207 customers were provided employment and training services through the four Lincoln Trail Career Centers in 2011. Over 600 participants were enrolled in training services. Rapid Response services were provided to more than 400 individuals who were dislocated from six companies in the Lincoln Trail region.

WIRED65

The work of the Wired65 initiative continued through FY20ll, even though the federal grant period had expired at the end of FY2010. Still centered around the attraction, retention and development of regional talent, the LTADD WIB, as well as KentuckianaWorks and the Lake Cumberland Area Development District provided continued funding and leadership. Actively collaborating as a region, the Wired team proved that their work could go on regardless of funding. In fact, a National Fund for Workforce solutions grant was procured that will support industry sectors including automotive, healthcare, and food/beverage. In fiscal year 2011, the Wired65 Leadership team under the management of the LTWIB, kept the centerpiece project, kix.com – the Kentucky Indiana Exchange, on line. A single source for nearly all jobs in the region, as well as a wealth of labor market information and tools for area employers, economic developers, workforce development professionals and education providers, kix. com continues to provide the region with a one-stop source of jobs, employer data and up-to-date information. As the year ended, plans were being finalized to identify a permanent source of funding for this valuable tool.


Fort Knox Transformation

As the new Human Resource Center of Excellence worked to complete its move to Fort Knox, the Army continued its efforts to fill hundreds of vacancies. To that end the Employment and Training team, One Knox, the LTWIB and our Army partners worked to provide information and resources to those seeking employment as well as to the more than 150 Armor School workforce members who did not want to make the move to its new home in Georgia. Support included: • Monthly Federal Hiring Symposiums through December 2010. • Job fairs throughout the region and on college campuses reaching more than 1500 jobseekers, students, faculty and alumni with the message of kix.com and the civilian jobs at Fort Knox • Continued outreach to the relocating workforce and their families • Continued outreach and assistance to the dislocated Armor School workforce

Technology Services The LTADD provided state-of-the-art technology services to the LTADD staff and to several dozen regional civic and government entities. This support included Hardware and Software Services, Network Services, System Security and Training.

Aging Services In 2011 the Lincoln Trail Area Agency on Aging (LTAAA) continued its outstanding support to our region’s older adults, their caregivers and family members. But they don’t do it alone. Volunteers, advisory councils, contractors, service providers and many other community partners help the LTAAA meet the needs of our region’s senior population. These include the Advisory Council, who meet regularly to receive reports from contract agencies and updates on provider services, and to make LTAAA aware of any other community issues; the Lincoln Trail Service Providers, a coalition of providers from throughout the eight-county region representing health and human service agencies and other organizations supporting our

older population, who meet monthly to share information, identify gaps and recommend solutions. They also sponsored the annual Senior Celebration; and, the Elder Abuse Prevention Coalition, who ensure our region’s seniors are safe, no matter where they reside. Summary of Service Support • 619 clients were served through our case managed in-home care programs • 30 clients attend our two Adult Day Care programs and received a combined 15,516 hours of service • 617 clients were provided senior transportation services for a total of 22,188 trips • The Long Term Care Ombudsman provided service(s) to 1,561 persons residing in our district’s intermediate care facilities and family care homes. • 900 persons received congregate meals through our 13 senior centers receiving 45,758 congrega te meals. • 291 clients received home delivered meals for a total of 66,431 meals over the past year. • 38 participants were served under the Personal Care Attendant Program grant, receiving 69,120 hours of care. • 91 grandparents representing 166 grandchildren were assisted under the Kentucky Caregiver Program, receiving $73,769 in goods and services • The Medicaid funded Consumer Directed Options program provided employment to an average of 110 employees per pay period and provided an average payroll of $41,232 semi-monthly. The SHIP program (State Health Insurance Assistance Program) provided information and assistance on Medicare benefits, health and prescription drug insurance options and other issues pertaining to public benefits to an average of more than 1000 elderly Kentuckians in our region each month. The Lincoln Trail SHIP was recognized as having achieved exemplary status in their effort to reach out to persons eligible for, but not receiving assistance. Exemplary status recognition was provided to only three counties in Kentucky and few others nationwide.

Financial Report – State of Revenues and Expenditures of the year ending June 30, 2011 Revenue Community & Economic Development......................................................................................................................................1,490,384 Transportation..............................................................................................................................................................................223,975 Revolving Loan Fund...................................................................................................................................................................17,805 Employment & Training.............................................................................................................................................................4,438,671 Social Services..........................................................................................................................................................................5,147,502 District Contracts...........................................................................................................................................................................253,014 Total Revenues......................................................................................................................................................................11,571,351 Expenses Personnel.................................................................................................................................................................................. 2,359,556 Contractual Services................................................................................................................................................................. 4,123,805 Client Services/Program Costs................................................................................................................................................. 4,539,100 Direct Costs Other........................................................................................................................................................................517,028 RLF Loan Write Off.........................................................................................................................................................................23,028 Total Expenses...................................................................................................................................................................... 11,562,517 Excess Expenditures Over Revenue (Net Loss).......................................................................................................................8,834


Message from the Executive Director While these continue to be challenging times, there are some very positive things happening in our district. Forbes magazine ranked the Elizabethtown MSA, which includes Hardin and LaRue counties, among the best small places for business and careers. And the MSA was first in the country, out of 366 metro areas, for income growth. New roads, housing construction and jobs are the result, which is good news for everyone. So on behalf of the LTADD Board of Directors, I want to recognize and thank all of our staff who have provided, and continue to deliver, exemplary service. There’s still plenty to do, and as you’ve learned from reading this report, working together for the common good of the community can yield some amazing results. Thanks for a great year, and an even brighter future. Wendell C. Lawrence Executive Director, LTADD

The LTADD Leadership Team

Lincoln Trail Area Development District Board of Directors

Left to Right (Front Row): Mike Burress, Deputy Director; Katie Peace, Executive Assistant; Wendell Lawrence, Executive Director; (Back Row): Sherry Johnson, Associate Director for Employment/Training; Nancy Addington, Associate Director for Aging Services; Jane Alsip, Fiscal Officer

Left to Right: Judge John Settles, Chairman; Mr. Bobby Claycomb, First Vice-Chairman; Judge John G. Mattingly, Second Vice-Chairman; Judge Harry Berry, Treasurer; not pictured, Mayor David Pace, Secretary

LTADD Staff 2011


2011 Annual Report