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VICTORY ACADEMY SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLAN Includes Title I School-Wide Component

2008-2011

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Asterisks indicates School-Wide Requirements

MISSION STATEMENT .................................................................................................. 4  BELIEF STATEMENTS ................................................................................................... 4  SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING COMMITTEE .................................................... 5  * COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT ................................................................ 7  SCHOOL PROFILE ............................................................................................................... 7  ENROLLMENT TRENDS ...................................................................................................................... 7  STAFF ................................................................................................................................................... 8  CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT AND INSTRUCTION ........................................................................... 10  COMMUNITY DEMOGRAPHICS ....................................................................................................... 11 

STUDENT DATA ................................................................................................................. 13  SUB-GROUP ANALYSIS (DISAGGREGATED DATA) MEAP ........................................................... 13 

ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF ASSESSMENT ........................................................... 25  DISCIPLINE DATA (REFERRALS TO THE OFFICE) ........................................................................ 25 

PERCEPTION DATA (SURVEYS) ...................................................................................... 27  PARENT SURVEYS (2008-2009)....................................................................................................... 27  TEACHER SURVEYS ......................................................................................................................... 28 

Student Surveys .................................................................................................................. 28  SYSTEM SURVEY (EDUCATION YES) ............................................................................. 30 

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF TITLE I AND 31A STUDENTS ................................. 31  GOAL STATEMENTS: .................................................................................................. 33  *SCHOOL-WIDE IMPROVEMENT REFORM STRATEGIES/ACTION PLAN ............... 35  *INSTRUCTION BY HIGHLY QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL STAFF ........................... 62  (TEACHERS AND INSTRUCTIONAL PARAPROFESSIONALS) ................................. 62  *STRATEGIES TO ATTRACT HIGH-QUALITY, ........................................................... 63  HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS TO HIGH-NEED SCHOOLS ................................... 63  *HIGH-QUALITY AND ONGOING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ........................ 63  TECHNOLOGY PLAN ................................................................................................... 67  *STRATEGIES TO INCREASE PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT ...................................... 68  PARENT *COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT ........................................................................... 70  PARENT/STUDENT/TEACHER COMPACT ....................................................................... 72 

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ROLE OF ADULT AND COMMUNITY EDUCATION, LIBRARIES AND ....................... 75  COMMUNITY COLLEGES ............................................................................................ 75  OPPORTUNITIES FOR STRUCTURED ON THE JOB LEARNING ............................. 75  *PRESCHOOL TRANSITION STRATEGIES ................................................................ 75  *TEACHER PARTICIPATION IN MAKING ASSESSMENT DECISIONS...................... 77  BUILDING LEVEL DECISION MAKING ........................................................................ 77  *TIMELY AND ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE TO STUDENTS HAVING DIFFICULTY MASTERING THE STANDARDS ............................................................................ 78  *COORDINATION AND INTEGRATION OF FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAMS AND RESOURCES ............................................................................ 78  REQUIRED STAKEHOLDERS ..................................................................................... 80 

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VICTORY ACADEMY MISSION STATEMENT The mission of Victory Academy, in collaboration with the community, is to promote lifelong learning by nurturing academic excellence, positive character, and an appreciation of cultures.

BELIEF STATEMENTS We believe in… • • • • • • • •

A team approach of caring supportive staff members Authentic learning experiences High Expectations Individualizing Instruction Developing positive character traits and problem solving skills Developing leaders with confidence and a positive attitude Meeting each student’s academic, emotional, physical and environmental needs Results

We believe that… • • • • • • • •

Our learning environment should be safe, respectful, orderly, and positive Our School, Community and Parents are partners in the learning process Learning is enhanced through recognition of strengths, weaknesses and diversity Everyone has the potential to learn All students must actively engage themselves in the learning process to reach their maximum potential The greatest influence on student learning is what parents, teachers, and the community model in their actions, thoughts and beliefs Analyzing data and information should be central to the decision making process Learning is lifelong and occurs in every aspect of an individual’s life

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SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PLANNING COMMITTEE Rozlyn Williams

2nd

Mark Niebuhr

3rd

Rima Dari

Assessment Coordinator

Carolyn Ayers

Global Educational Excellence (SWIP Budget Advisor)

Carolyn Grutza

Physical Education

Maria Garcia

Spanish

Carla Olando

Kindergarten

Kathy Klages

Special Education

Tracy Stoermer

4th

SWIP Secretary

Nicole Milks

Reading

SWIP Chair

Robin Tolbert

1st

Tiffany Samson

5th

Kevin Whelan

Principal

Latrina Roberson

Parent

Jeff Bates

Board Member

John Collins

Community Member

Dr. Mike Syropoulos

State Education Facilitator

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INTRODUCTION/PROCESS The first step to any School wide Improvement Process is to gather a school improvement team to pull together all the elements of the plan. The following chart lists the staff members and community members who participated in the School Improvement team meetings. The school principal, Mr. Whelan, was named principal at Victory Academy in 06-07. Mr. Whelan received his masters degree in school principalship from Central Michigan University and is applying the skills that he learned at Victory Academy. He is also receiving training about school operations provided by the school’s authorizer, Bay Mills Community College, which includes training in needs assessment The SIT has analyzed student achievement data for 2006-2008. The members participated in needs assessment workshops under the leadership of Mr. Whelan. Mr. Whelan trained the teachers in data analysis procedures in order for the teachers to participate in the overall process. During these workshops, the teachers carefully analyzed MEAP, Terra Nova, and Ed Performance scores and included disaggregated sub-group achievement data in their analysis. Because Victory Academy has a small student population, some of the subgroups were not large enough to get reliable data for a score as a group. In these cases, the teachers looked at individual student data to determine the needs of the students at Victory Academy. Teachers looked at Item Analysis reports from the MEAP and EdPerformance tests across grade levels to identify standards and benchmarks that showed low scores. This information gave teachers insight into areas they were covering adequately with their curriculum and areas that needed stronger, more intensive instructional strategies applied. Victory Academy teachers were trained to administer the DRA test to monitor progress of student achievement in reading. DRA inventory results were taken into consideration and were compared with standardized test results for any discrepancies between the scores. Victory Academy uses Chapter tests in the content areas. Local assessments are used and constantly under development. Students who were not at grade level were recommended for the Summer School program and after school tutoring. The emphasis of the programs is on Reading and Writing across the curriculum and the goal was to increase each student’s level of academic achievement. Approximately 30 students attended the program under the instruction of three teachers. Victory Academy also analyzed perception data gathered from teachers and parents through surveys. This information is valuable for determining strengths and weaknesses in school processes and procedures. Education Yes information was gathered to determine strengths and weaknesses in the five Education Yes strands that are evident in highly achieving schools. Information gathered in the Education Yes process was taken into consideration when writing the school improvement plan. The following pages contain information gathered through the Comprehensive Needs Assessment and contain a plan of action based on all the collected data.

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* COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSMENT SCHOOL PROFILE School Established:

August, 2006

Grade Levels:

K-5

Current 2008-2009 School Enrollment: 107 Enrollment Trend:

06-07

95

07-08

103

08-09

110

ENROLLMENT TRENDS

Victory Academy Enrollment Trends by Grade Level

Year

2006-2007

Grade

#

%

#

%

K

30

31%

15

14%

25

23%

1

20

21%

24

23%

21

19%

2

10

11%

17

16%

19

17%

3

14

15%

14

14%

21

19%

4

10

11%

10

10%

13

12%

5

11

11%

12

12%

11

10%

6

n/a

n/a

11

11%

110

100%

Totals

95

7

100%

2007-2008

103

100%

2008-2009 #

%


Victory Academy Sub-group Enrollment

Total School Enrollment Year 1

Group #

Year 2

%

#

Year 3

%

#

%

Economically Disadvantaged

84

88%

87

84%

93

85%

Black

91

96%

98

95%

104

95%

White

4

4%

4

3%

2

2%

Hispanic

0

0%

1

.9%

4

3%

Students with Disabilities

11

12%

16

15%

10

9%

Limited English Proficient (LEP)

0

0%

2

1%

6

5%

Male

49

52%

51

49.5%

59

54%

Female

46

48%

52

50.5%

50

46%

Year 4

Year 5

#

# %

%

Gender

STAFF Average Number of Years of Teacher Experience:

4.5 years

Average Number of Years of Teachers in this School 1.5 years Number of Years Administrator in School

2.0 years

Victory Academy employs full and part-time staff members. All classroom teachers are highly qualified with certification in the areas in which they are teaching.

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The staff membership includes: • 6 classroom teachers • 1 Special Education Teacher • 1 Reading Specialist • 1 School Social Worker (outside contracted service) • 1 School Psychologist (outside contracted service) • 1 Speech and Language Specialist (outside contracted service) • 1 Occupational Therapy Specialist (outside contracted service) • 2 Paraprofessionals/Classroom Aides • 1 Administrative Assistant • 1 Health and Physical Education Teacher • 1 Principal • 1 Auxiliary Support Staff (kitchen and custodial) • 1 Assessment Coordinator • 1 Bus Driver • Victory Academy staff is involved with school operations through after school staff meetings. Staff is empowered through School Improvement Team meetings. The staff has opportunities to look into using research based curriculum that is learned about through professional development. Staff meetings and Professional Development is used routinely to discuss best practices in regards to our mission. • Victory Academy is safe and orderly. All staff members realize the importance of procedures and routines which are implemented immediately. Victory Academy uses a school wide behavior program that was referenced earlier called PRIDE. • Our disciplinary policies are in accordance with our family and student handbook. Our board approved handbook is followed for all disciplinary action. Each family is given a handbook and asked to sign the back and return it to school at the beginning of the year. • The school climate is improving daily. With the implementation of our PRIDE program students are showing positive school spirit. The implementation of the programs has come directly from the staff so they are seeing the benefits of the hard work. • The school is managed as a team. All members of the team have a role that they fulfill. Each team member is also flexible and prepared to help another team member when it is necessary.

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CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT AND INSTRUCTION •

Victory Academy’s core curriculum consists of: English Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, and Math. In additional to our core curriculum, students receive instruction in physical education, art, computer technology, and Spanish. The curriculum has been aligned by correlating our curriculum to the state standards, benchmark requirements and grade level content expectations. Curriculum templates and quarterly pacing guides with performance objectives and corresponding benchmarks have been implemented in grades K-6.

All instructional materials have been purchased new in the summer of 2006. Victory Academy uses the Open Court reading program, Everyday Mathematics, Harcourt Science, and Social Studies Alive. Many supplemental resources are used such as Making Meaning, Glory Math, Sitton Spelling, Novels, and poetry.

Staff members express high expectations for student achievement through a variety of techniques. These techniques include but are not limited to holding students accountable for their learning, clearly defining and positively reinforcing individual students for meeting these expectations.

Victory Academy’s staff participates in a review cycle every semester. This process requires the involvement of teachers, parents and community members. The curriculum is evaluated and revisions are made in consideration with any modifications to the states benchmarks in preparation for the next school year.

The Howard Gardner theory on multiple intelligences and Jerome Bruner’s theory of spiral curriculum is intertwined throughout Math, Science, ELA and Social Studies. This research supports the curriculum and the instructional program that is being used at Victory Academy.

The assessment instruments used to measure student achievement include; Developmental Reading Assessments, EdPerformance, Terranova, & MEAP. These assessments are scheduled by administration throughout the school year. More general assessments are used to measure student achievement in their grade level that is directly related to concepts taught. Assessment results are used to aim instruction.

Instructional technology is available to all students through a rolling lap top cart along with computers in each classroom. Teachers also integrate technology through use of projectors, power point presentations, computer software, and a school account through United Streaming.

As a school, the staff meets to discuss success and struggles of particular curriculums. Through these discussions, changes are made and supplemental material is used to accommodate for these discrepancies.

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COMMUNITY DEMOGRAPHICS Ypsilanti is a small urban community in Washtenaw County, thirty miles outside of the larger city of Detroit. The city is only 4.36 square miles and is surrounded by the cities of Ann Arbor, Belleville, Dixboro and Milan. Ypsilanti was originally settled by the French in 1809. When the road, now called Michigan Avenue arrived in 1839, it brought prosperity, industry and rapid growth. Two distinct business districts sprang up: one clustered around the railroad (now our historic Depot Town), the other taking advantage of traffic on the Chicago-Detroit Road (our downtown area). Henry Ford and the automotive industry came to Ypsilanti in the 1930s and beautiful Ford Lake was created to generate hydroelectric power for the manufacturing plants. During World War II, Ypsilanti became home to the Willow Run Bomber Plant, a factory which would employ 100,000 workers. The city boomed as job-seekers poured in from all over the country. Much of Ypsilanti you see today is marked by its history – from the dual business centers to our beautiful lakes and rivers. As of the census of 2000, there were 22,362 people, 8,551 households, and 3,377 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,962.3/km (5,081.5/mi). There were 9.215 housing units at an average density of 806.6/km (2,094.0/mi. The racial makeup of the city was 61.40% white, 30.58% African American, 0.44 Native American, 3.18% Asian, 0.07%Pacific Islander, 1.32% from other races, and 3.01% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino was 2.47% of the population. There were 8,551 households out of which 19.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 23.0% were married couples living together, 13.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 60.5% were non-families. 40.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2,15 and the average family size was 2.96. In the city the population was spread out with 15.9% under the age of 18, 38.2% from 18 to 24, 26.4% from 25 to 44, 12.4% from 45 to 64, and 7.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 24 years. For every 100 females there were 89.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.2 males. The median income for a household in the city was $28,610, and the median income for a family was $40,793. Males had a median income of $30,328 versus $26,745 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,692. About 16.9% of families and 25.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.1% of those under age 18 and 15.3% of those ages 65 or over. The Ypsilanti area is served by three public school districts: Ypsilanti Public Schools, Lincoln consolidated Schools, and Willow run Community Schools.

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Ypsilanti Schools draws students from the city proper, western Ypsilanti Township east of Golfside Road, northern Ypsilanti Township east of Prospect, and small parts of the township south of I-94. Willow Run Schools, named after the famous Willow Run bomber plant and airport east of the city, draws students primarily from eastern Ypsilanti Township north of I-94. Lincoln Schools draws students from the township south of I94. In recent years, as southern Ypsilanti township has grown remarkably, Lincoln Schools have grown in tandem, while Ypsilanti and Willow Run have suffered. Both have seen enrollment slides, and both are actively using Washtenaw County’s “school of choice” program to market themselves to students from elsewhere. These programs have yielded mixed results. Ypsilanti is also home to Eastern Michigan University, founded in 1849 as Michigan State Normal School. Today, EMU has 19,000 undergraduate and over 4,800 graduate students. The college is vital to the commercial landscape of the city and keeps the median age in Ypsilanti relatively low. SUMMARY OF SCHOOL DEMOGRAPHIC DATA Based on the school demographic data and information, it should be noted that Victory is a newly established Charter School operating with a student population where 84% of the students are free/reduced lunch. The administrator and staff focused on curriculum delivery while dealing with the distractions of getting the school systems in place. Many of the teachers were implementing programs for the first time and did not have a full repertoire of supplemental materials that a more established school and staff would have in place at the beginning of the school year. These circumstances created a challenge to full implementation of the academic programs and mastery of Michigan Standards and Benchmarks. In the second year of operation Victory Academy has established school-wide behavior guidelines and procedures and this has created more focused time to concentrate on curriculum delivery and more time on task for students. The 07-08 MEAP scores reflect gains in student achievement; however, there are still significant areas of need which are addressed in this School-Wide Improvement Plan. We attribute this improvement to the fact that the school is now well established in the community and the infrastructure and procedural guidelines of operation are now stabilized. In the third year of operation Victory Academy has managed to establish a school wide culture of learning. Students understand the expectations set forth by the staff and continue to grow and learn. Implementation of a reading specialist has allowed staff to focus on bringing struggling students individualized interventions. The individualized instruction has strengthened the area of weaknesses of students as determined by the results of the MEAP.

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STUDENT DATA SUB-GROUP ANALYSIS (DISAGGREGATED DATA) MEAP The following two graphs give a graphic representation of disaggregated data for the 3rd 4th and 5th grades on the 2008 MEAP test. Victory Academy has a small student population of a total of 107 students in grades K-5. The graph shows all of the subgroups that the MEAP test identifies with disaggregated data. Because the school is so small there are not enough students in some of the sub-groups to collect test data. The subgroups that were too small (>10 students) included Economically disadvantaged, Special Education, Limited English Proficient (LEP) and Gender (Male and Female).

3rd grade Sub-Group Analysis (Disaggregated Data)

The economically disadvantaged sub-group data indicates that 44% were proficient in Reading, 6% in Writing, 44% in total ELA, and 53% in Math. The Ethnic subgroup in the third grade, which consists of African Americans, showed 47% were proficient in Reading, 21% were proficient in Writing, 47% were proficient in ELA, and 55% were proficient in Math. The data indicates a need for improvement in writing. There was no sub-group data available for the 3rd grade males except for 60% were proficient in Math. The data for females indicates 45% were proficient in Reading, 18% in Writing, 45% in Total ELA, and 55% in Math. 4th grade Sub-Group Analysis (Disaggregated Data)

The economically disadvantaged sub-group data indicates that 64% were proficient in Reading, 14% in Writing, 64% in total ELA, and 75% in Math. The Ethnic subgroup in the third grade, which consists of African Americans, showed 64% were proficient in Reading, 14% were proficient in Writing, 64% were proficient in ELA, and 73% were proficient in Math. The data indicates a need for improvement in writing. There was no other sub-group data available for the 4th grade. The sub-groups had less than 10 students.

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5th grade Sub-Group Analysis (Disaggregated Data)

The Ethnic subgroup in the fifth grade, which consists of African Americans, showed 73% were proficient in Reading, 55% were proficient in Writing, 73% were proficient in ELA, and 45% were proficient in Math, 64% were proficient in Science. The data indicates a need for improvement in Writing and Math. There was no economically disadvantaged sub-group data available for the 5th grade. The sub-groups had less than 10 students.

3rd Grade MEAP Fall 08 Proficient & advanced proficient

Not and partially proficient 16

12 9

10

10

10

10

4

Math Fall 08

Reading Fall 08

Writing Fall 08

ELA Fall 08

4th Grade MEAP Fall 08 Proficient & advanced proficient

Not and partially proficient 13

11

10

4

10

5

5 2

Math Fall 08

Reading Fall 08

Writing Fall 08

14

ELA Fall 08


5th Grade MEAP Fall 08 Proficient & advanced proficient

Not and partially proficient

8

8 7

6

6 5

5

4 3

Math Fall 08

3

Reading Fall 08 Writing Fall 08

ELA Fall 08

Science Fall 08

4th Grade MEAP Cohort 13 SS   87% Not Proficient

Proficient

AYP 77

69 53

65

59 47 31 23

Reading

Total ELA

AYP

Math

15

AYP


5th Grade MEAP Cohort 8 SS    73% Not Proficient

Proficient

AYP

87 74 57

62 50 50

26 13

Reading

Total ELA

AYP

Math

16

AYP


DRA - Grade 1 Year 2008-2009 (9/15/2009) 18 16 14 12 10

Below

8

At

6

Above

4 2 0 First Grade Fall

First Grade Spring 

Students in first grade are expected to begin the school year at or above a level four and make gains throughout the year to end at or above a level sixteen. In the Fall 81% of the students were below level and 19% were at level. In the Spring 71% of the students were below level and 29% were above level; showing a growth of 10% in students at or above level.

DRA - Grade 2 Year 2008-2009 (9/15/2009) 14 12 10 8

Below

6

At Above

4 2 0 Second grade Fall

Second Grade Spring 

Students are expected to begin the second grade at or above a level eighteen and make gains throughout the year to end at or above a level twenty-eight. In the Fall 72% of the students were below grade level, 22% were at grade level and 6% were above grade level. In the Spring 72% of the students were below grade level, 17% were at level and 11% were above grade level.

DRA - Grade 3 Year 2007-2008 (9/15/2009) 17


12 10 8 Below

6

At 4

Above

2 0 Third Grade Spring

Third Grade Fall 

Students are expected to begin third grade at or above a level thirty and make gains throughout the year to end at or above a level forty. In the Spring 59% of the students were below grade level, 12% were at grade level and 29% were above level. In the fall 41% of the students were below grade level, 59% were above grade level; showing an incline of 18% in students at or above grade level.

DRA - Grade 4 Year 2007-2008 (9/15/2009) 14 12 10 8

Below

6

At Above

4 2 0 Fourth Grade Fall

Fourth Grade Spring

Students are expected to begin fourth grade at or above a level forty and make gains throughout the year to end at or above a level forty. In the fall 92% of the students were below grade level and 8% were above. In the spring 31% of the students were below grade level, 23% were at level and 46% were above grade level; showing an increase in the percentage of students at or above grade level of 61%.

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DRA - Grade 5 Year 2007-2008 (9/15/2009) 7 6 5 4

Below

3

At

2

Above

1 0 Fifth Grade Fall

Fifth Grade Spring

Students are expected to begin fifth grade at or above a level fifty and make gains throughout the year to end at or above a level fifty. In the fall 60% of the students were below grade level and 40% were at grade level. In the spring 40% of the students were below grade level, 20% were at level and 40% were above grade level; showing an increase of 20% in the students at or above grade level.

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EdPerformance  Victory Academy  Spring Gains Math Expected Growth

Spring Math Scores

Readiing Expected Growth

Spring Reading Scores

196 180

169

178

168

164

126

131

125 102

2nd

158

154

3rd

4th

20

130 94

5th


Multi-Test School Report School: Victory Academy

District: Victory Academy

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Multi-Test School Report School: Victory Academy

District: Victory Academy

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Summary of Student Achievement Data for 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 LANGUAGE ARTS Our students are faced with many challenges – academic, emotional, and social. This creates challenges for our Language Arts program such as lack of retention, comprehension and fluency, as well as low reading engagement and deficiencies in grade-level vocabulary and foundation/experiential knowledge. We compensate for these challenges through the use of real life examples during instruction, implementation of differentiated instruction (workshops), scaffolding, guided practice/modeling, and engaging in best practices and collaboration during instruction. The MEAP data for third through fifth grade, as well as the TerraNova data for first and second grades bears out our primary assumptions that students’ scores fall below the state average. Even though they met a few of the standards, it is our goal to facilitate students meeting or exceeding all of the standards. We have identified two (2) prominent information gaps, all of which are directly influenced by the fact that we are only in our third year of operation: •

We are unaware of our students’ previous educational experiences. Although we have all transferable data from their previous schools, we find that nothing can replace the value of establishing a relationship with a student before they are a member of your class, as well as the ability to conference with a student’s current teacher as a means to preparing for the future. Many students have only been with us for less than two years.

We are unable to effectively measure the long term success of any of our instructional methods for the reasons listed above.

After reviewing the data, we have concluded that three (3) priority items emerge for our continued concentration: •

Implementation of Response to Intervention (RTI) must begin immediately. Training for staff has started and will continue through the next year.

It is imperative that we use differentiated instruction during Language Arts lessons to meet the needs of a student body that varies so widely in knowledge and ability; and

Continued research into and implementation of best practices in Language Arts instruction is necessary in order to enhance and solidify students’ learning experiences.

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In addition to the variety of techniques and instructional methods we currently employ to garner student success, we have also invested funds toward supplemental strategies (during after school programs) in order to raise student achievement. In addition, we intend to bring on more individual and small group support by increasing our number of paraprofessionals. Our staff is determined to continue to develop and implement ways to help meet the needs of our learners. Students who were not at grade level were recommended for the Summer School program and after school tutoring. The emphasis of the programs is on Reading, Writing and Mathematics across the curriculum and the goal is to increase each student’s level of academic achievement. Approximately 30 students attended the program under the instruction of three teachers. MATH After reviewing the MEAP data for third, fourth, and fifth grade as well as the TerraNova and Edperformance data for first and second grades, we have found that our students are below the state average at some grade levels. The school looked at individual student test scores in order to address needs of all students. As a school we are identifying low-achieving students and enrolling them in homework clubs and tutoring to assist their mathematical understandings. We are intensifying our math centers to better equip students with valuable skills that they can apply to math concepts. In addition, we are offering a summer bridge book to students, along with weekly times a certified teacher will be available for tutoring. Victory Academy Charter School met AYP requirements in 2007-2008 and 2008-2009. However, in 2006-2007 we did not meet the requirements because less than 95% of the students were tested. Based on the above summary of achievement data, the Victory Academy SIP team has identified the following goals: •

Each student will show adequate progress in Reading across the curriculum. (Active)

Each student will show adequate progress in Writing across the curriculum. (Active)

Each student will show adequate progress in Mathematics. (Active)

Each student will show adequate progress in science across the curriculum. (Maintenance)

Each student will show adequate progress in social studies across the curriculum. (Maintenance)

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ALTERNATIVE METHODS OF ASSESSMENT Victory Academy relies on a number of assessments of student achievement: assessments that measure skills and competencies beyond the national and state standardized tests. Some of the additional assessment tools are: • • • • • • • •

Teacher Created Tests Teacher Observation and discussions Student projects, presentations and demonstrations Journals Performance-based Assessments Workbooks and Practice Books Portfolios Authentic Assessments

As Victory looks ahead to the next school year, staff will be developing standardized quarterly assessments to effectively monitor students’ growth and needs. DISCIPLINE DATA (REFERRALS TO THE OFFICE) Referral to the office records at the time of this report indicate that during the 2007-08 school year there were a total of 161 referrals to the office. Most of the referrals were either for disruptive classroom behavior or physical fighting. These problems are connected to defiant behavior. Some examples include consistent failure to follow simple directions, inability to follow classroom and school wide rules, and lack of selfcontrol. Some classes behaved significantly better than others, indicating that professional development for staff in classroom management might be appropriate. Many of Victory Academy students are in single parent homes with mothers as the head of household. Routine schedules in the home are disrupted by the challenges of low economic status. The Academy has implemented a program called Positive Action to address appropriate school behaviors. This curriculum was purchased with Safe and Drug Free Grant funds. As a school Victory Academy has also implemented a school wide behavior management system. The management system is known as P.R.I.D.E. P- Position yourself to learn. R- Right ways are used to get attention. I - I keep hands, feet, all objects, and unkind words to myself. D- Directions are followed the first time. E- Every transition is quick and quiet.

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Classroom teachers utilize a five level behavior management system. Students move levels based upon inability to follow school P.R.I.D.E. As classrooms meet set expectations, free days are earned to reward them. Individual classroom success is indicated on a school wide bar graph. The whole school is rewarded when a specified value of free days is reached. Also, PRIDE Bucks are given to individual students as an indication of excellence. Additionally, Victory Academy has adopted the Time To Teach program. In this program students are taught how to act in various situations (hallway, bathroom, asking a question etc.). Then the behavior is modeled by the teacher and finally the students practice the appropriate behavior. Students are told that their actions are either positive, almost, but not quite or negative. Students are then prompted to change their behavior, if necessary, and if they do so no action is taken, but if they do not they are given a sheet called a refocus. The refocus is an opportunity for the student to analyze their behavior (what they did, why they did it, how did it make others feel, will they do something different next time). This helps students to behave appropriately because it makes them aware of their behavior constantly. These three programs, Positive Action, Pride, and Time To Teach, reinforce one another and the school has already seen positive results from these programs. The goal is to improve appropriate behavior skills which in turn will result in increased focus on academic pursuits which finally will result in increased student achievement.

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PERCEPTION DATA (SURVEYS) PARENT SURVEYS (2008-2009) The SIP team reviewed the Parent Survey and first looked at any statements that the parents disagreed with. The staff chose that these areas would be the most significant areas of concern. Statement

% Agree

o Teachers set high but attainable goals for my child.

08-09

94%

o Victory Academy helps my child plan for future classes / jobs

77%

o I attend school meetings/activities

65%

o I help in the classroom or at school activities

45%

o My child uses the tutoring opportunities

66%

The results of this information indicate that Victory Academy needs to increase efforts to increase parent involvement. 34% of the students are not using the after school tutoring program. This probably can be contributed to transportation issues. 23% of the parents felt that their children did not have enough information about future careers that their children could pursue. This indicates that it would be helpful for Victory Academy to include Career Education in their curriculum in the future and make increased efforts at family involvement. Parents indicated positive attitudes about many statements on the survey. Statement

%Agree

o My child is treated with respect at Victory Academy

90%

o I feel Victory Academy is a good school

94%

o I feel my child is safe at Victory Academy

94%

o I feel very positive about having my child at Victory Academy

91%

o Administration is easily accessible

90%

Overall, parents seem to be satisfied with their children attending Victory Academy.

27


TEACHER SURVEYS The SIP team reviewed the teacher surveys and found a greater percentage of disagreeable statements than what parents indicated on their survey. Teachers concluded that the disagreeing factors could be attributable to the fact that Victory Academy was only in it’s third year when this survey was distributed. Statement

% Agree

o Teachers have adequate support in dealing with students who present challenging behaviors .

78%

o We help students plan for future classes/jobs.

89%

o Parents attend school meetings/activities.

11%

o Parents help in the classroom or at school activities.

22%

o I incorporate community resources within classroom activities

57%

The teacher surveys correlated with the parents concerns about parent involvement and career education. Teachers felt very positive about Teacher-Student Relationships, participating in decision making, and feeling appreciated. The 2008-2009 surveys showed improvements in areas of weakness. We still feel we must focus on increasing parent involvement, incorporating career opportunities.

Student Surveys The SIP team reviewed the student surveys and looked at any statements the most students disagreed with. The staff decided that these areas would be the areas of greatest concern. Statement

%Agree

o Students at my school treat me with respect.

53%

o I have help for learning at home.

79%

o I have choices in what I learn.

79%

o I am challenged by the work my teacher asks me to do.

75%

28


The results of this survey indicate that we need to continue in our efforts to help students respect each other. Victory Academy has had various assemblies about bullying as well as discussing it within the classroom and we have a character education program in place to help with this as well. 79% of students felt that they were getting help for learning at home which correlates with the other surveys which stated that there was a need for increased parent involvement. Victory Academy staff will strive to continue to challenge students and give them choices in what they learn. Students indicated positive attitudes about many of the statements on the survey. Statement

%Agree

o My teacher treats me with respect

92%

o My principal treats me with respect

95%

o The work I do in class makes me think

91%

o When I am at school I feel safe

87%

Overall students seem to be satisfied with how they are treated at school.

29


SYSTEM SURVEY (EDUCATION YES)

The SIP team completed the 40 Education YES! Performance Indicators. This document is used to assess the system processes and protocols of practice that are in place to support student academic achievement. The document guides the analysis of five (5) strands with their respective indicators. Strands that are fully implemented are qualities that highly performing schools exhibit. The five strands are listed below with their Standards and Key Characteristics that need improvement. Personnel and Professional Learning Professional Learning

*Partially implemented new staff induction and mentor or coach assigned to new teacher *Partially implemented results-driven School and Community Relations Parent/Family Involvement

*Partially Implemented parent opportunities to participation Having opened in 2006, the school still has work to do to become a highly effective operating school environment. The infrastructure for improving the various systems is in place. The staff is now familiar with what a highly effective school looks like. The following years will include focused effort to increase the quality of all the systems.

30


CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF TITLE I AND 31A STUDENTS The Title I and Section 31A programs are streamed together as there is overlap in programs and services for students who meet the 31a requirements and School Wide Title I programs. There are the basic criteria for identifying At-Risk students at the academy. The criteria listed apply to all grade levels. Section 31A criteria 1. Students who test below the 40th percentile on Terra Nova achievement test (K-2). 2. Any student who receives a 3 or 4 on the MEAP (3rd-5th). 3. Teacher recommendation (K-2) according to student development in the classroom. Title I criteria Receive free or reduce lunch and also meet one or more of the following: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Behavior difficulties Chronic attendance problem Parent neglect or abuse Parent abuse of drugs or alcohol Parent incarcerated

31


GOALS

32


GOAL STATEMENTS:

¾ Each student will show adequate progress in reading across the curriculum for all grade levels. (Active) ¾ Each student will show adequate progress in writing across the curriculum for all grade levels. (Active) ¾ Each student will show adequate progress in mathematics. (Active) ¾ Each student will show adequate progress in science across the curriculum. (Maintain) ¾ Each student will show adequate progress in social studies across the curriculum. (Maintain)

33


Action Plan

34


*SCHOOL-WIDE IMPROVEMENT REFORM STRATEGIES/ACTION PLAN The academic program at Victory Academy provides opportunities for all students to meet the state’s proficient and advanced levels of student academic achievement of the Michigan Curriculum Framework through the use of effective methods and instructional strategies based on scientific research that: •

Strengthens the core academic program in the school.

Increases the amount and quality of learning time.

Provides an enriched and accelerated curriculum.

Includes effective use of technology into all areas of teaching and learning.

Includes strategies for meeting the educational needs of historically underserved populations.


Goal Statement #1: Each student will show adequate progress in ELA (reading) across the curriculum for all grade levels. Essences 1. The students will be able to determine the main idea/theme, identify supporting details, and identify character traits when reading 2. The students will be able to respond to two different texts through the use of comprehension strategies 3. The students will be able to interpret data contained in expository text through the use of secondary information: i.e. graphs, charts, diagrams, headings, captions, illustrations, graphic organizers, and maps.

Rationale and Supporting Data (used in goal selection) 1. MEAP 3rd and 4th grades Reading Scores (5th grade had less than 10 students so data unavailable) 2. EdPerformance Reading Scores for grades 3, 4, and 5

Standardized Assessments:

Local Assessments:

1. MEAP

1. Developmental Reading Assessments

2. TerraNova

2. Teacher observations 3. Curriculum and performance assessments

3. 1st and 2nd grade TerraNova Reading Scores 4. K-5 DIBELS scores

3. EdPerformance

4. DIBELS

5. Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA) Scores Teacher observations K-5th grade 6. Curriculum and performance assessments

First Strategy/Intervention for Reading

Research supporting this strategy/intervention:

Teachers will model and instruct students on how to use comprehension strategies to better explore the meaning of various texts.

Intellectual Character: What It Is, Why It Matters, and How to Get It by Ron Ritchhart Best Practice By Zemelman, Daniels, and Hyde

Measurable Objective Statement: Students overall will show a 10% increase in proficiency in total ELA on the MEAP and the standard items pool on the Edperformance. A minimum 6 point increase on the DRA is expected.

What Works in Schools By Robert Marzano Classroom Instruction that Works by Robert Marzano

36


Activities to implement the intervention (including professional development) such as: • Teachers will model and instruct students on different comprehension strategies; i.e. making connections, asking questions, visualizations, making inferences, determining important ideas, synthesizing, repairing comprehension. • After reading a selected text, students will create a graphic organizer to demonstrate their understanding of the information. • Teachers will instruct students on how to use Thinkmarks or comprehension strategy type bookmarks while reading. • Teachers will develop, demonstrate and instruct students to use descriptive words to help focus discussions of an author’s craft • Students summarize different types of text using the retelling chart. • Students will be exposed to and critique a variety of writing pieces for the purpose of developing a sense of writer’s craft. • Students will write an extended response supporting their position to a statement related to both texts read. Evidence and details from both texts will be included and support the position taken. • Students experiencing difficulty attaining proficiency will be provided with the following accommodations and interventions: o Extended time limits: modified assignments or test taking procedures. o Small group instruction o Guided Reading and or Small group reading o Technology-computer assisted learning. o Team teaching or cooperative teaching. o Mentoring to reinforce skills or assist in gaining mastery of foundational skills. o Differentiated and scaffold instruction. • Child Study Teams are convened for students experiencing difficulty in attaining proficiency or are at risk of failing. • Whenever possible teachers will add multiple intelligence or differentiated choices to assignments or projects. • Teachers will provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum for select students. • Students will construct charts, graphs,

Professional Development

Open Court reading instruction DRA MAPSA Conference Making Meaning Workshop

Evidence and Documentation

Lesson Plans for the Strategies Grade-Level Content Expectations and Objectives

Strategies That Work by Stephanie Harvey Guiding Readers and Writers by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinell

Unit Assessments

Genre in a Binder by Wayne Resa Consultants

Student Portfolios

House Organizer Chart

Using social studies magazines such as Time For Kids or Story Works (lesson plans) and copy of the students’ graphic organizer created.

Retelling Chart

Best Practices Grade-level meetings

Resources

Open Court Reading Program Houghton Mifflin Reading program DRA Kits Making Meaning Program Time For Kids Story Works DIBELS materials

37


diagrams and written summaries explaining results of science investigations and observations. • Students will use narratives and graphic data to compare the past of their local community with present day life.

38


Goal Statement #1: Each student will show adequate progress in ELA (reading) across the curriculum for all grade levels. Essences 1. The students will be able to determine the main idea/theme, identify supporting details, and identify character traits when reading. 2. The students will be able to respond to two different texts through the use of comprehension strategies. 3. The students will be able to interpret data contained in expository text through the use of secondary information: i.e. graphs, charts, diagrams, headings, captions, illustrations, graphic organizers, and maps.

Rationale and Supporting Data (used in goal selection) rd

th

Standardized Assessments:

th

1. MEAP 3 and 4 grades Reading Scores (5 grade had less than 10 students so data unavailable)

2. EdPerformance Reading Scores for grades 3, 4, and 5 3. DIBELS reading scores K-5

1. MEAP

1. Developmental Reading Assessments

2. TerraNova

2. Teacher observations

3. EdPerformance

3. Curriculum and performance assessments

4. 1st and 2nd grade TerraNova Reading Scores 5. Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA) Scores Teacher observations K-5th grade

Local Assessments:

4. DIBELS

6. Curriculum and performance assessments

Second Strategy/Intervention for Reading Teachers will model and instruct students on how to respond to two different texts through the use of comprehension strategies

Research supporting this strategy/intervention: Best Practice By Zemelman, Daniels, and Hyde What Works in Schools

Measurable Objective Statement:

By Robert Marzano

Students overall will show a 10% increase in proficiency in total ELA on the MEAP and the standard items pool on the Edperformance. A minimum 6 point increase on the DRA is expected.

Classroom Instruction that Works by Robert Marzano

39


Activities to implement the intervention (including professional development) such as: • Teachers will model and instruct students on different comprehension strategies; i.e. making connections, asking questions, visualizations, making inferences, determining important ideas, synthesizing, repairing comprehension. • Teachers will model and instruct students on how to analyze character traits. • Students will create graphic organizers to demonstrate their understanding of what they have read. • Teachers will model and integrate higher level thinking skills and questions during class discussions and assessments of students reading. • Teachers will instruct students on how to use Think marks or comprehension strategy type bookmarks while reading. • Teachers will develop, model and educate students on how to use descriptive words when analyzing a character and their traits. • Students will learn to summarize different texts genres by using retelling graphic organizers. • Students experiencing difficulty attaining proficiency will be provided with the following accommodations and interventions: o Extended time limits: modified assignments or test-taking procedures. o Small group instruction, o Guided Reading and or Small group reading o Technology-computer assisted learning. o Team teaching or cooperative teaching. o Mentoring to reinforce skills or assist in gaining mastery of foundational skills. o Differentiated and scaffold instruction. • Child Study Teams are convened for students experiencing difficulty in attaining proficiency or are at risk of failing. • Whenever possible teachers will add multiple 40

Professional Development

Open Court reading instruction DRA MAPSA Conference Making Meaning Workshop Genre in a Binder Best Practices Grade level meetings Training in Teaching for Mastery and Tight Alignment

Evidence and Documentation

Resources

Lesson Plans for Strategies the Strategies That Work by Stephanie Harvey Grade Level Content Expectations Genre in a and Objectives Binder by Wayne RESA Consultants Unit Assessments Guiding Readers and Student Portfolio Writers by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinell Shape Retelling Chart Open Court Reading Program Houghton Mifflin Reading program DRA Kits DIBELS materials


intelligence or differentiated choices to assignments or projects. • Teachers will provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum for select students. • Students will construct charts, graphs, diagrams and written summaries explaining results of science investigations and observations. • Students will use narratives and graphic data to compare the past of their local community with present day life.

41

Making Meaning Program


Goal Statement #1: Each student will show adequate progress in ELA (reading) across the curriculum for all grade levels. Essences 1. The students will be able to determine the main idea/theme, identify supporting details, and identify character traits when reading. 2. The students will be able to respond to two different texts through the use of comprehension strategies. 3. The students will be able to interpret data contained in expository text through the use of secondary information; i.e. graphs, charts, diagrams, headings, captions, illustrations, graphic organizers, and maps.

Rationale and Supporting Data (used in goal selection):

Standardized Assessments:

Local Assessments:

1. MEAP 3rd and 4th grades Reading Scores (5th grade had less than 10 students so data unavailable)

1. MEAP

1. Developmental Reading Assessments

2. TerraNova

2. Teacher observations

2. EdPerformance Reading Scores for grades 3, 4, and 5

3. EdPerformance

3. Curriculum and performance assessments

3. 1st and 2nd grade TerraNova Reading Scores

4. DIBELS

4. DIBELS Reading Scores K-5 5. Developmental Reading Assessment (DRA) Scores Teacher observations K-5th grade 6. Curriculum and performance assessments

Third Strategy/Intervention for Reading Teachers will model and instruct on how to interpret data contained in expository texts through the use of secondary information: i.e. charts, graphs, captions, diagrams, maps and illustrations.

Research supporting this strategy/intervention: Intellectual Character: What It Is, Why It Matters, and How to Get It by Ron Ritchhart Best Practice By Zemelman, Daniels, and Hyde What Works in Schools By Robert Marzano

42


Measurable Objective Statement: Students overall will show a 10% increase in proficiency in total ELA on the MEAP and the standard items pool on the Edperformance. A minimum 6 point increase on the DRA is expected.

Classroom Instruction that Works By Robert Marzano

Activities to implement the intervention (including professional development) such as: •

Teachers will model and instruct students on how to create expository text maps and/or graphic organizers using interactive technology

After reading a selected text, students will create a graphic organizer to demonstrate their understanding of the information

Teacher will demonstrate how to use graphic organizers and then assist the students in using them to better develop their reading comprehension of information

Students experiencing difficulty attaining proficiency will be provided with the following accommodations and interventions:

Professional Development

Evidence and Documentation

Open Court Lesson Plans reading instruction for the Strategies DRA

Resources

Strategies That Work by Stephanie Harvey

MAPSA Conference

Grade Level Content Expectations and Objectives

Guiding Readers and Writers by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinell

Making Meaning Workshop

Unit Assessments

House Organizer Chart

Best Practices

Student Portfolios

Open Court Reading Program

Grade level meetings

o Extended time limits; modified assignments or test taking procedures o Small group instruction o Guided Reading and or Small group reading o Technology-computer assisted learning

Using social studies magazines such as Time For Kids or Story Works (lesson plans) and copy of the students graphic organizer created

Houghton Mifflin Reading program DRA Kits DIBELS materials Making Meaning Program Time For Kids

o Team teaching or cooperative teaching

Story Works

o Mentoring to reinforce skills or assist in gaining mastery of foundational skills 43


o Differentiated and scaffold instruction •

Child Study Teams are convened for students experiencing difficulty in attaining proficiency or are at risk of failing

Whenever possible teachers will add multiple intelligence or differentiated choices to assignments or projects

Teachers will provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum for select students

Students will construct charts, graphs, diagrams and written summaries explaining results of science investigations and observations.

Students will use narratives and graphic data to compare the past of their local community with present day life.

44


Goal Statement #2: Each student will show adequate progress in ELA (writing) across the curriculum for all grade levels. Essences 1. Students will focus on a topic and support it with relative examples and details. 2. Students will demonstrate control over sentence structure, vocabulary, and/or conventions in their writing. 3. Students will be able to organize their work in a coherent manner and/or make connections between ideas.

Rationale and Supporting Data

Standardized Local Assessments: Assessments:

(used in goal selection) 1. MEAP 3rd and 4th grades Writing Scores (5th grade had less than 10 students so data unavailable)

1. MEAP

2. Curriculum and performance assessments

1. Teacher observations

3. Teacher observations 2. Curriculum and performance assessments

First Strategy/Intervention for Writing Teachers will model and instruct students on adding supporting relevant details to improve the quality of their writing.

Research supporting this strategy/intervention:

Measurable Objective Statement:

by Ron Ritchhart

Students overall will show a 10% increase in proficiency in the writing category of the MEAP.

Best Practice

Intellectual Character: What It Is, Why It Matters, and How to Get It

By Zemelman, Daniels, and Hyde What Works in Schools

Teachers will observe students use of supporting details 90% of the time during writing assignments across the curriculum.

45

By Robert Marzano Classroom Instruction that Works By Robert Marzano


Activities to implement the intervention (including professional development) such as: • Teachers will model and instruct students using the Six Traits model to develop word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions and will use interactive technology whenever possible • Teachers will model and instruct students on writing original pieces of various genres (i.e. poetry, legends, fables, etc.) • Teachers will model, instruct and incorporate group conferencing, peer conferencing and one-on-one conferencing to improve student’s writing • Teachers will display, model, and instruct students on using good word choice an sentence structure • Teachers will assign and review language activities on a regular basis • Students experiencing difficulty attaining proficiency will be provided with the following accommodations and interventions: o Extended time limits; modified assignments or test taking procedures o Small group instruction o Guided Reading and or Small group reading o Technology-computer assisted learning o Team teaching or cooperative teaching o Mentoring to reinforce skills or assist in gaining mastery of foundational skills o Differentiated and scaffold instruction • Child Study Teams are convened for students experiencing difficulty in attaining proficiency or are at risk of failing • Teachers will collect student writing samples to use as anchor papers; (i.e. good examples of writing traits or writer’s craft, fair papers, and others) • Teachers will provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum for select students. • Students will construct charts, graphs, diagrams and written summaries

Professional Development

Evidence and Documentation

Open Court writing instruction

Lesson Plans for the 6 traits

6+1 Traits of Writing by Ruth Culham

Grade Level Content Expectations and Objectives

Guiding Readers and Writers by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinell

Unit Assessments

Strategies That Work by Stephanie Harvey

MAPSA Conference Making Meaning Workshop

Best Practices Student Portfolios

Resources

Writing Rubrics

Grade level meetings

Trait-based Mini-Lessons for Teaching Writing by Megan S. Sloan

Genre in a Binder Workshop

Units of Study for Primary Writing by Lucy Calkins

Being a Writer Workshop

Write Source Writing curriculum House Organizer Chart Open Court Writing Program Houghton Mifflin Writing program Making Meaning Program Story Elements Chart

46


explaining results of science investigations and observations. • Students will use narratives and graphic data to compare the past of their local community with present day life.

Being a Writer Program

47


Goal Statement #2: Each student will show adequate progress in ELA (writing) across the curriculum for all grade levels. Essences 1. Students will focus on a topic and support it with relative examples and details 2. Students will demonstrate control over sentence structure, vocabulary, and/or conventions in their writing 3. Students will be able to organize their work in a coherent manner and/or make connections between ideas.

Rationale and Supporting Data

Standardized Local Assessments: Assessments:

(used in goal selection) 1. MEAP 3rd and 4th grades Writing Scores (5th grade had less than 10 students so data unavailable)

1. MEAP

2. Curriculum and performance assessments

1. Teacher observations 2. Curriculum and performance assessments

3. Teacher observations

Second Strategy/Intervention for Writing

Research supporting this strategy/intervention:

Teachers will model and instruct students on the use of writing strategies to improve their control over sentence structure, vocabulary, and/or conventions in their writing

Intellectual Character: What It Is, Why It Matters, and How to Get It by Ron Ritchhart Best Practice By Zemelman, Daniels, and Hyde

Measurable Objective Statement: Students overall will show a 10% increase in proficiency in the writing category of the MEAP. Teachers will observe students use of writing strategies 90% of the time during writing assignments across the curriculum.

48

What Works in Schools By Robert Marzano Classroom Instruction that Works By Robert Marzano


Activities to implement the intervention (including professional development) such as: • Teacher will display and instruct students using the Six Traits model to add details and examples during revision of their writing • Teachers will demonstrate and instruct students on adding supporting and relevant details (RAFTS and retelling charts) • Teachers will model, instruct and implement group conferencing, peer conferencing, and one-on-one conferencing to improve students writing • Teachers will display, model, and instruct students on how to use comprehension strategies in writing; (i.e. adding details and making connections) • Students will use technology to publish their writing • Teachers will incorporate differentiated activities in their assignments whenever possible • Students experiencing difficulty attaining proficiency will be provided with the following accommodations and interventions: o Extended time limits; modified assignments or test taking procedures o Small group instruction o Guided Reading and or Small group reading o Technology-computer assisted learning o Team teaching or cooperative teaching o Mentoring to reinforce skills or assist in gaining mastery of foundational skills. o Differentiated and scaffold instruction • Child Study Teams are convened for students experiencing difficulty in attaining proficiency or are at risk of failing • Teachers will provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum for select students.

Professional Development

Evidence and Documentation

Open Court writing instruction

Lesson Plans for the 6 traits

6+1 Traits of Writing by Ruth Culham

Grade Level Content Expectations and Objectives

Units of Study for Primary Writing by Lucy Calkins

Making Meaning Workshop

Unit Assessments

Best Practices

Student Portfolios

Guiding Readers and Writers by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinell

MAPSA Conference

Grade level meetings

Resources

Strategies That Work by Stephanie Harvey Writing Rubrics

Genre in a Binder Workshop

Trait-based Mini-Lessons for Teaching Writing by Megan S. Sloan

Being a Writer Workshop

Write Source Writing curriculum House Organizer Chart Open Court Writing Program Houghton Mifflin Writing program Making Meaning Program Story elements charts

49


• Students will construct charts, graphs, diagrams and written summaries explaining results of science investigations and observations. • Students will use narratives and graphic data to compare the past of their local community with present day life.

Being a Writer Program

50


Goal Statement #2: Each student will show adequate progress in ELA (writing) across the curriculum for all grade levels. Essences 1. Students will focus on a topic and support it with relative examples and details. 2. Students will demonstrate control over sentence structure, vocabulary, and/or conventions in their writing. 3. Students will be able to organize their work in a coherent manner and/or make connections between ideas.

Rationale and Supporting Data

Standardized Local Assessments: Assessments:

(used in goal selection)

1. MEAP

1. MEAP 3rd and 4th grades Writing Scores (5th grade had less than 10 students so data unavailable)

1. Teacher observations 2. Curriculum and performance assessments

2. Curriculum and performance assessments 3. Teacher observations

Third Strategy/Intervention for Writing

Research supporting this strategy/intervention:

Teachers will model and instruct students on the use of pre-writing strategies to improve organization and connections between ideas in their writing

Best Practice

Measurable Objective Statement:

What Works in Schools

Students overall will show a 10% increase in proficiency in the writing category of the MEAP.

By Robert Marzano

Teachers will observe students use of pre-writing strategies 90% of the time during writing assignments across the curriculum.

By Robert Marzano

By Zemelman, Daniels, and Hyde

Classroom Instruction that Works

51


Activities to implement the intervention Professional (including professional development) Development such as: •

Teacher will model the use of a variety of graphic organizers in order that students may create a bank of organizers for use in writing Teachers will display and instruct students using the Six Traits model to develop ideas and organization (making connections between stories) Teachers will model and instruct students on writing original pieces and different genres (i.e. poetry, legends, fables, etc.) Teachers will model, instruct and incorporate group conferencing, peer conferencing and one-on-one conferencing to improve student’s writing Teachers will display, model, and instruct students on using comprehension strategies to practice adding details and making connections in their writing Students experiencing difficulty attaining proficiency will be provided with the following accommodations and interventions: o Extended time limits; modified assignments or test taking procedures o Small group instruction o Guided Reading and or Small group reading o Technology-computer assisted learning o Team teaching or cooperative teaching o Mentoring to reinforce skills or assist in gaining mastery of foundational skills. o Differentiated and scaffold instruction Child Study Teams are convened for students experiencing difficulty in attaining proficiency or are at risk of failing Teachers will provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum for select students.

Open Court writing instruction MAPSA Conference Making Meaning Workshop

Evidence and Documentation

6+1 Traits of Lesson Plans for Writing by Ruth Culham the 6 traits Grade Level Content Expectations and Objectives Unit Assessments

Best Practices Student Portfolios Grade level meetings Genre in a Binder Workshop Being a Writer Workshop

Resources

Guiding Readers and Writers by Irene C. Fountas and Gay Su Pinell Strategies That Work by Stephanie Harvey Units of Study for Primary Writing by Lucy Calkins Writing Rubrics Trait-based Mini-Lessons for Teaching Writing by Megan S. Sloan Write Source Writing curriculum House Organizer Chart Open Court Writing Program Houghton Mifflin Writing program Making Meaning Program Story elements charts Being a Writer Program

52


•

•

Students will construct charts, graphs, diagrams and written summaries explaining results of science investigations and observations. Students will use narratives and graphic data to compare the past of their local community with present day life.

53


Goal Statement #3: Each student will show adequate progress in mathematics for all grade levels. Essences 1. Students will read, interpret, and create graphs, charts, diagrams, and tables. 2. Students will be able to solve story problems at their ability level using several operations or steps. 3. Students will improve their computational skills.

Rationale and Supporting Data (used in goal selection) 1. MEAP 3rd and 4th grades Mathematics Scores (5th grade had less than 10 students so data unavailable) 2. 1st and 2nd grade TerraNova mathematical. 3. EdPerformance Math Scores for 3rd, 4th and 5th graders. 4. Curriculum and performance assessments.

Standardized Assessments:

Local Assessments:

1. MEAP

1.Teacher observations

2. TerraNova 3. EdPerformance

2.Curriculum and performance assessments

5. Teacher observations.

First Strategy/Intervention for Math

Research supporting this strategy/intervention:

Teachers will model and instruct students on how to read, interpret, and create, a variety of data collection forms – i.e. charts, graphs (picture, tally, bar, circle, line, line plot, stem and leaf), diagrams, and tables.

Intellectual Character: What It Is, Why It Matters, and How to Get It by Ron Ritchhart Best Practice

Measurable Objective Statement:

By Zemelman, Daniels, and Hyde

Students overall will show a 10% increase in proficiency in the math category of the MEAP.

What Works in Schools

Students will read graphs, charts, diagrams, and tables on local assessments at 90% accuracy.

54

By Robert Marzano Classroom Instruction that Works By Robert Marzano


Activities to implement the intervention (including professional development) such as: •

Teachers and students will read and interpret different types of graphs drawing conclusions.

Students will use a table or chart to create a bar or line graph.

• •

Teachers and students will create, read, and explain a variety of graphs. Students will use information from graphs to ask higher-level thinking questions (Analyze, Evaluate, Synthesize).

Professional Development

MAPSA Conference

Grade level meetings

o Small group instruction o Team teaching or cooperative teaching o Mentoring to reinforce skills or assist in gaining mastery of foundational skills. o Differentiated and scaffolded instruction.

Teachers will provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum for select students.

Students will construct charts, graphs, diagrams and written summaries explaining results of science investigations and observations. 55

Resources

Glory Math Achievement Series Edperformance

Unit Assessments Everyday Mathematics Student Portfolios

o Extended time limits; modified assignments or test taking procedures.

Child Study Teams are convened for students experiencing difficulty in attaining proficiency or are at risk of failing.

Grade Level Content Expectations and Objectives

Best Practices

Students experiencing difficulty attaining proficiency will be provided with the following accommodations and interventions:

Evidence and Documentation


•

Students will use narratives and graphic data to compare the past of their local community with present day life.

56


Goal Statement #3: Each student will show adequate progress in mathematics for all grade levels. Essences 1. Students will read, interpret, and create graphs, charts, diagrams, and tables. 2. Students will be able to solve story problems at their ability level using several operations or steps. 3. Students will improve their computational skills.

Rationale and Supporting Data (used in goal selection) 1. MEAP 3rd and 4th grades Mathematics Scores (5th grade had less than 10 students so data unavailable)

Standardized Assessments:

Local Assessments:

1. MEAP

1. Teacher observations

2. 1st and 2nd grade TerraNova mathematical. 3. EdPerformance Math Scores for 3rd, 4th and 5th graders.

2. TerraNova

4. Curriculum and performance assessments.

3. EdPerformance

2. Curriculum and performance assessments

5. Teacher observations

Second Strategy/Intervention for Math

Research supporting this strategy/intervention:

Teachers will model and instruct students on how to read, interpret, and solve story problems at their respective ability levels moving from simple to complex multi-step problems.

Intellectual Character: What It Is, Why It Matters, and How to Get It by Ron Ritchhart Best Practice By Zemelman, Daniels, and Hyde What Works in Schools

Measurable Objective Statement:

By Robert Marzano

Students overall will show a 10% increase in proficiency in the math category of the MEAP.

Classroom Instruction that Works

Students will identify key words by underlining or highlighting in story problems on local assessments at 90% accuracy.

57

By Robert Marzano


Activities to implement the intervention (including professional development) such as: • Teachers will model and instruct students on identifying key words in word problems to identify the operation required.

Professional Development

Evidence and Documentation

MAPSA Conference

Grade Level Content Expectations and Objectives

Resources

• Teachers will use interactive technology in all aspects of teaching and learning. • Students will create word problems for the different operations at their specific grade levels. • Teachers will instruct and review the fact families for the different operations assisting students in making connections. Students experiencing difficulty attaining proficiency will be provided with the following accommodations and interventions:

Best Practices Unit Assessments Grade level meetings Student Portfolios

o Extended time limits; modified assignments or test taking procedures.

Lesson Plans

o Small group instruction o Team teaching or cooperative teaching. o Mentoring to reinforce skills or assist in gaining mastery of foundational skills. o Differentiated and scaffold instruction. • Child Study Teams are convened for students experiencing difficulty in attaining proficiency or are at risk of failing • Teachers will provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum for select students. • Students will construct charts, graphs, diagrams and written summaries explaining results of science 58

Glory Math Achievement Series Edperformance Everyday Mathematics


investigations and observations. • Students will use narratives and graphic data to compare the past of their local community with present day life.

59


Goal Statement #3: Each student will show adequate progress in mathematics for all grade levels. Essences 1. Students will read, interpret, and create graphs, charts, diagrams, and tables. 2. Students will be able to solve story problems at their ability level using several operations or steps. 3. Students will improve their computational skills.

Rationale and Supporting Data (used in goal selection) rd

th

1. MEAP 3 and 4 grades Mathematics Scores (5th grade had less than 10 students so data unavailable) 2. 1st and 2nd grade TerraNova mathematical.

Standardized Assessments:

Local Assessments:

1. MEAP

1. Teacher observations

3. EdPerformance Math Scores for 3rd, 4th and 5th graders.

2. TerraNova

4. Curriculum and performance assessments

3. EdPerformance

2. Curriculum and performance assessments

5. Teacher observations

Third Strategy/Intervention for Math

Research supporting this strategy/intervention:

Students will practice computational skills daily in a variety of ways

Best Practice By Zemelman, Daniels, and Hyde What Works in Schools

Measurable Objective Statement:

By Robert Marzano Students overall will show a 10% increase in Classroom Instruction that Works proficiency in the math category of the By Robert Marzano MEAP.

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Activities to implement the intervention (including professional development) such as: • Students will take basis facts tests at their grade level. • Teachers will model and instruct students on using diagrams to solve basic operation problems. • Teachers will model and instruct students on beginning multiplication, equal groups, and building arrays.

Professional Development

MAPSA Conference

Evidence and Documentation

Grade Level Content Expectations and Objectives

Best Practices Grade level meetings

Students experiencing difficulty attaining proficiency will be provided with the following accommodations and interventions:

Team teaching or cooperative teaching. Mentoring to reinforce skills or assist in gaining mastery of foundational skills. Differentiated and scaffold instruction. • Child Study Teams are convened for students experiencing difficulty in attaining proficiency or are at risk of failing. • Teachers will provide an enriched and accelerated curriculum for select students.

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Achievement Series Edperformance Everyday Mathematics

Lesson Plans

Small-group instruction

Glory Math

Unit Assessments Student Portfolios

Extended time limits; modified assignments or test taking procedures.

Resources


*INSTRUCTION BY HIGHLY QUALIFIED PROFESSIONAL STAFF (TEACHERS AND INSTRUCTIONAL PARAPROFESSIONALS) All teachers and paraprofessionals must meet Title I requirements. The Human Resources department is currently only hiring teachers who possess the certification that qualifies teachers as highly qualified. Procedures are in place to document and record certifications. Teachers currently employed are assigned to positions that reflect certification of the teachers. Procedures are in place that place laid off and surplus teachers in only positions for which they would be considered highly qualified. The teacher contract for teachers includes extra compensation for degrees earned and is a motivator for teachers to continue their education. The Human Resources Department advertises and recruits for hard-to-hire positions. Human Resources Department has a website for job listings and for potential candidates to post a resume and fill out applications. TEACHER CERTIFICATION Subject

Certification

Degree

Third Grade

Elementary K- 5 All Subj (K -8 Self CC)

Kindergarten Physical Education

Elementary K- 5 All Subj (K -8 Self CC) Secondary Health (MA) 6 -12 Physical Education (MB) K-12 Elementary K- 5 All Subj (K -8 Self CC) Cognitive (Mental) Impairment (SA) K-12 Early Childhood Education Pre K - K

Special Education Second Grade First Grade Reading Fifth Grade Fourth Grade

Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science

Elementary K- 5 All Subj (K -8 Self CC)

Bachelor of Science

Elementary K- 5 All Subj (K -8 Self CC) Elementary K- 5 All Subj (K -8 Self CC) Reading (BT) 6- 8 Science (DX) 6 -8 Elementary K- 5 All Subj (K -8 Self CC) Mathematics (EX) 6 -8 Elementary K- 5 All Subj (K -8 Self CC) Music Education (JQ) K -12

Bachelor of Science

Parapro Parapro Spanish

Bachelor of Science Master of Art Bachelor of Science

Elementary K- 5 All Subj (K -8 Self CC) Bilingual Spanish K-6

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Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Bachelor of Science Master of Arts 65 credit hours Bachelor of Arts


*STRATEGIES TO ATTRACT HIGH-QUALITY, HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS TO HIGH-NEED SCHOOLS The academy is a one-building public school academy that utilizes a variety of strategies to attract high quality teachers. These strategies include: •

Offering a competitive salary and benefits package.

Providing a comprehensive orientation that facilitates a successful transition into teaching.

Providing opportunities for teachers to improve their instructional skills through a comprehensive professional development program.

Including teachers in the continuous improvement planning process, and other school initiatives and activities.

On-line job recruitment and application

Attendance at University job fairs and advertisement in local newspapers Currently teacher retention has been positive-100%.

*HIGH-QUALITY AND ONGOING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT In accordance with section 1119 and subsection (a)(4), the academy provides highquality and ongoing professional development for teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals and, if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents, and other staff to enable all children in the school to meet the state’s student academic achievement standards. The results of the comprehensive needs assessment serve as the basis for the development and delivery of the professional development plan. •

The process to determine the developmental needs of teachers stems from our Professional Development Plan that teachers and paraprofessionals complete at the beginning of each school year. This plan includes: goals, objectives, and correlated professional development interests.

There are a variety of professional development opportunities offered to teachers and paraprofessionals. All training must be based upon individual goals and the school’s School Improvement Plan.

Professional Development is mandatory and all teachers participate. Every Friday afternoon is set aside for staff development. These PD days correlate to the needs assessed in the classroom & the requirements of the state. The 63


information gained from these professional development days are shared throughout the staff both during the sessions and as follow-ups. •

Professional Development opportunities are provided by Wayne RESA, Global Educational Excellence, MAPSA, as well as internally within the school setting. Occasionally, external sources are used for staff development.

The common planning time per grade level is limited since there is only one teacher per grade level. If possible, teachers collaborate & share ideas depending upon weekly schedule.

Professional Development is evaluated through successful direct application of the concept in the classroom with demonstrated increased student achievement or improvement in systems processes

Improvement Strategies Research Based

Person(s) Responsible

Resources to be Used

Timeline

Integration of Technology

Ayman Basal

NextK12

TBD

EdPerformance

Wael Youseff

On-line

TBD

Ruby Payne

SIP Leaders

TBD

Aha Process Glory Math

Tracy Stoermer

Dr. Jonathon Lin

MEAP Language Arts Training

SIP

MEAP Test

Learning Styles

Wayne Resa

TBD

Wayne RESA

TBD

N/A

TBD

Workshop Inclusion

CST

TBD

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ELA-

Victory Staff

Lucy Calkins

Phonics First Training

June 2009

MEAP Test

TBD

Orton Gillingham MEAP Preparation: SIP Helping Teachers Administer the Test Classroom Management Best Practices Meeting: Challenges and Struggles

Wayne Resa

Administration

TBD

N/A

Ongoing/ November 2008, 2009

Education YES and SI conference School Improvement

Advance Ed

TBD

Six Traits plus One

SIP

Curriculum/MEAP

TBD

SIP

Curriculum/MEAP

TBD

Guided Reading Instruction

SIP Leaders

Leveled Readers

TBD

Special Education

Kathy-SPED

CIMS

August 09

Victory Staff, MAPSA Conference

Writing 4 Blocks Reading

Training

IEP

Positive Behavior Support Plan

Victory Staff

N/A

TBD

Differentiated Instruction

Wayne Resa

Curriculum

Fall 09

Teacher Support Team Program

CS Partners

N/A

TBD

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Brain Based Learning Science, Social Studies

Victory Staff

Math Support

Victory Staff

Teaching African American Learners

TBD SIP

TBD

Dr. Moorman

TBD

Being a Writer

Victory Staff

Becoming a Writer

TBD

Time To Teach: Classroom Management

Victory Staff

Time To Teach

TBD

Teacher Observation

Victory Staff

Victory and other staff

TBD

Everyday Math

Staff

Everyday Math

TBD

Bala-VisX

CST

Katy Held

August 09

Michigan Health Model

Carolyn

Wayne RESA

TBD

MAHPERD Convention

Carolyn

Principal Coaching

Greg Bishop, coach

Sept 2009

Differentiated Instruction

Kathleen Kryza, trainer

Sept 2009

Implementation of strategies and activities in SIP

Amy Strauss

RTI, Title I programs and materials

September 2009

Classroom Management

Principal

Resources from Dennis Irelan

September 2009

MDE MAHPERD

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November 2009


TECHNOLOGY PLAN

Victory Academy is equipped with two to three computers in each classroom. In addition, there is a mobile computer lab with 25 laptops available for classroom use. The school also has a video projector and digital cameras available for use. Technology will be embedded into the curriculum. Technology will target specific learning goals for special education students. It will challenge and stimulate a higher level of learning among the gifted and talented population of students at Victory Academy. The Technology and Curriculum Committees will work to identify curricula and teaching strategies that integrate technology effectively into curricula and instruction by focusing on the areas of need among the students. These needs will be assessed by the MEAP standardized test, EdPerformance assessments, Michigan Literacy Progress Profile, Quantitative Reading Inventory, Terra Nova, and classroom student performance. In order to promote the integration of technology effectively into the curricula and instruction, the Victory Academy staff will continue to attend workshops and seminars. They will also provide the technology integration components for the students that link to the activities that are aligned with the benchmarks and assessments. Technology will be integrated into curricula and instructions within the content areas. In the mathematics curriculum, the students will use Microsoft Excel to compute functions and create graphs, Glory Math online program as well as other online educational resources. They will be exposed to Power Point presentations and will eventually present their own Power Point presentations. In the science curriculum, students will use Microsoft Excel to graph data from experiments. They will use Power Point and other future software to present research. The students will use the Harcourt complimentary CD and website to support their science explorations and understanding of concepts. They will use Encarta and the Internet for research purposes in science. In the language arts curriculum, students will use Power Point and other future software to highlight the life of a particular author or illustrator. Students will use Microsoft Word to produce written narratives, expository essays, persuasive writing pieces, and other forms of writing. Students will explore various online language activities that will further their language arts understandings.

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In the social studies curriculum, the students will use Power Point and future software programs to present research on historical figures and events, economic principles, geography, and/or government. The students will use Microsoft Word to create written forms based on social studies content. The students will use Encarta and the Internet for research purposes in social studies. The teachers will use various online and supplemental resources to reinforce social studies content areas. Victory Academy currently uses a mobile computer lab which is in addition to the desktop computers located in each classroom. Teachers are also being continuously trained on implementing the K to the 8th Power curriculum that combines all four core content areas with computer literacy. All grades have incorporated additional resources and programs to assist in developing a greater knowledge of technology as well as supplementing our core academics.

*STRATEGIES TO INCREASE PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT School Board Policy RELATIONS WITH PARENTS The Board of Directors believes that the education of children is a joint responsibility, one it shares with the parents of the Academy. To ensure that the best interests of the child are served in this process, a strong program of communication between home and the Academy must be maintained. The parents have the right to participate in the education of their children as well as the ultimate responsibility for their children’s in-school behavior, including the behavior of students who have reached the legal age of majority, but are still, for all practical purposes, under parental authority. In accordance with Board policies and administrative guidelines 2240 (Opt-Out), 2413/14 (Health/Sex Education), and 9150 (Academy Visitors), the Academy shall provide the opportunity for parents to review curriculum and instructional materials and to visit the Academy to observe the instructional process.

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With regard to student behavior, during school hours, the Board, through the Educational Service Provider/School Leader, acts in loco parentis or in place of the parents. The Board recommends that the following activities be implemented to encourage parent-Academy cooperation: A. parent-teacher conferences to permit two-way communication between home and school: B. meetings of staff members and parents of those students having special abilities, disabilities, needs, or problems; and C. open houses to provide parents with the opportunity to see the Academy facilities, meet the faculty, and sample the program on a first hand basis. For the benefit of children, the Board believes that parents have a responsibility to encourage their child’s career in school by: A. supporting the Academy in requiring that the children observe all Academy rules and regulations and by accepting their own responsibility for children’s willful inbehavior; B. sending children to school with proper attention to their health, personal cleanliness, and dress; C. maintaining an active interest in the student’s daily work and making it possible for the student to complete assigned homework by providing a quiet place and suitable conditions for study; D. reading all communications from the Academy, signing, and returning them promptly when required; and E. cooperating with the Academy in attending conferences set up for the exchange of information of the child’s progress in school.

PARENT TEACHER INVOLVEMENT COMMITTEE Research indicates that the leading predictor of student success is parental involvement. As such, the academy includes parents in every aspect of the education program. The school governance structure relies on significant parental input and cultivates a close working partnership between staff and parents. In addition, parents are asked to volunteer time in various ways, including classroom, as well as membership in various school committees.

69


Parent – Teacher conferences permit two-way communication between home and school

Meetings of staff members and groups of parents of those students having special abilities, disabilities, needs, or problems

Special events of a cultural, ethnic, or topical nature which are initiated by parent groups, involve the cooperative effort of students and parents, and are of general interest to the school or community.

Annual open house to provide parents with the opportunity to see the school facilities, meet the faculty

Parent liaison to involve parents in an organized, on going and timely way in the development, review, and improvement of parent involvement activities by way of the Parent Teacher Involvement Committee (PTIC)

ƒ

Coffee and Donuts with the principal, and school assemblies PARENT *COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT

Since Victory Academy is a new institution the staff is just beginning to establish relationships with the parents and the surrounding community of our school. The staff has held four Open House events to welcome the community and plan annual open house events. We also have scheduled two sessions of Parent Teacher Conferences for the school year. Administrators and teachers continue to meet and communicate with parents to inform them and involve them of school activities and the activities of their students. Victory Academy also employs several staff including teachers, paraprofessional, clerical, and janitorial positions held by residents of Ypsilanti and the surrounding community. In addition, we offer an after school program to assist the working parents of our community. This program offers students different extracurricular activities including: sign language, dance, art, sports, safety practices, as well as academic support. Other community resources which Victory Academy has utilized are listed below: Foster Grandparents

Barnes and Noble

Detroit Symphony Orchestra

Ypsilanti Fire Department

Washtenaw Community College

Ypsilanti Police Department

Eastern Michigan University

United Way

University of Michigan

Community Collaborative Outreach

University Musical Society

NED

Community Storyteller

Mobile Dentist

Detroit Institute of Arts

University of Michigan Dental School

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PARENT INVOLVEMENT COMMITTEE As the school year is progressing the parents are becoming more involved in the school. There is an established Parent Involvement Committee, which meets the first Thursday of each month. It is our hope to involve even more parents and community members in the 2008-2009 school year. In cooperation with the Parent Involvement Committee, the school desires to promote parental participation. Some options that have been introduced are membership on the school improvement team, room parent, tutoring, coaching athletics, assisting with field trips, creating relationships with the business community, donating materials to the school, and fundraising. •

Teachers communicate with parents and families both formally and informally. Through progress reports, report cards, weekly letters, and notes home, parents are notified of academic progress as well as behaviors. Likewise, teachers communicate in person directly and by phone.

Parents are invited to participate and/or volunteer in their child’s classroom. In addition, the Parent Involvement Committee allows parents to make suggestions and meet as a group.

Health and human services are made available through direct communication in newsletters home and specific postings on the community board. For example, Washtenaw Community Services group makes hearing and vision screening available to students.

Translators and written communications are available for all of Victory Academy’s ESL students and families.

Adult Education programs are made available to the families of the school through postings on the community board and newsletters home.

Victory Academy participates in community involvement through activities like: Cinco de Mayo, Kid’s Night Out, Field day, Spring Sing and raising money for various causes (tragedies, food, clothing, and financial assistance)

Local Businesses have partnered with us including: Barnes and Noble and Washtenaw Community Services Outreach Program, Foster Grandparents.

Community involvement strategies are evaluated through conducting and evaluating surveys.

Parent Involvement strategies are evaluated by attendance at parent teacher conferences, attendance at Parent Teacher Involvement Committee meetings, and parent surveys.

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PARENT/STUDENT/TEACHER COMPACT We, the Victory Academy staff, parents, and community guide each child in achieving his or her greatest potential by providing a diversity of experiences which integrates excellence in education with the child’s individual abilities and unique talents. We share the responsibility, in a safe and secure environment, for student acquisition of academic, creative, emotional, physical and social skills necessary for entering society as contributing members. We strive to enhance each child’s experience at Victory Academy by continually assessing and evaluating out attainment of these goals as measured by descriptive outcomes. Parent/Guardian Agreement It is important to have my child reach his/her full academic potential and succeed. Therefore, I will encourage him/her by doing the following items that are checked: ___ see that my child attends school regularly and is punctual. ___ establish a time and a place for homework. ___ supervise the completion of homework and home activities with my child. ___ support the school staff and respect the diverse cultures of the school. ___ promote an environment at home so my child understands that living in a group, whether it be a family or classroom, requires standards of behavior and cooperation, and that one must accept the consequences of one’s actions ___ model respect by going to the teacher first about any concerns, trying to keep lines of communication open, and understanding that there are two sides to every issue ___ limit and monitor my child’s TV and movie watching ___ encourage daily reading at home Comments: ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

________________________________________: Parent/Guardian Signature

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PARENT/STUDENT/TEACHER COMPACT We, the Victory Academy staff, parents, and community guide each child in achieving his or her greatest potential by providing a diversity of experiences which integrates excellence in education with the child’s individual abilities and unique talents. We share the responsibility, in a safe and secure environment, for student acquisition of academic, creative, emotional, physical and social skills necessary for entering society as contributing members. We strive to enhance each child’s experience at Victory Academy by continually assessing and evaluating out attainment of these goals as measured by descriptive outcomes. Parent/Guardian Agreement It is important to have my child reach his/her full academic potential and succeed. Therefore, I will encourage him/her by doing the following items that are checked: ___ see that my child attends school regularly and is punctual. ___ establish a time and a place for homework. ___ supervise the completion of homework and home activities with my child. ___ support the school staff and respect the diverse cultures of the school. ___ promote an environment at home so my child understands that living in a group, whether it be a family or classroom, requires standards of behavior and cooperation, and that one must accept the consequences of one’s actions ___ model respect by going to the teacher first about any concerns, trying to keep lines of communication open, and understanding that there are two sides to every issue ___ limit and monitor my child’s TV and movie watching ___ encourage daily reading at home Comments: ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

________________________________________: Parent/Guardian Signature

73


Student Agreement I believe it is important that I work to the best of my ability. Therefore, I will: ___ come to school every day and be in class on time ___ have quality homework completed and turned in on time ___ bring the materials that I need to every class ___ always try to work to the best of my ability and ask for help when I need it ___ show respect for myself, my school, other students, and belongings ___ follow the rules at my home and school ___ believe that I can learn and I will learn _______________________________________: Student Signature Professional Educators As a professional educator, I will do the following, along with all other Victory Academy staff: ___ provide an environment conducive to learning. ___ have high expectations for me and my students, by using methods and techniques that work for my classroom. ___ maintain open lines of effective communication with my students and their parents, in order to support student learning. ___ seek ways to involve parents in classroom activities. ___ provide enriched and challenging instruction that is aligned with state core curriculum. ___ respect the students, their parents, and the diverse cultures of the school.

________________________________________: Professional Educator Signature The School Improvement Team will evaluate the quality of parent involvement at the end of each school year. The team will look at attendance rates at parent/teacher conferences; collect a count of the number of parents volunteering at the school, and collect parent perception surveys each year. Data will be compared to the previous school year hoping to see improvement in all data collected.

74


ROLE OF ADULT AND COMMUNITY EDUCATION, LIBRARIES AND COMMUNITY COLLEGES Victory Academy is striving to expand the use of community education and local colleges and universities. So far, we have built relations with Wayne RESA, Eastern Michigan University, and Washtenaw Community College to provide our students with more options and opportunities with one-on-one learning. In addition to local educational entities, our students have had many learning opportunities in the community. For instance, we have taken field trips to the Ypsilanti District Library, a local museum (Ann Arbor Hands-on Museum), and a local apple orchard.

OPPORTUNITIES FOR STRUCTURED ON THE JOB LEARNING Victory Academy is dedicated to not only educating students in academics, but also preparing them for the world outside of school. Therefore, Victory Academy will strive to make meaningful ties between academics and the real world. In the curriculum, ties are made between what the students are learning and how it relates to the real world. For example, in math class students are not only taught multiplication but how the concepts of multiplication apply to everyday living. Throughout the year, the school and its teachers will be inviting different career professionals to visit and introduce different career paths.

*PRESCHOOL TRANSITION STRATEGIES The Kindergarten Teacher serves as the transition coordinator for the Academy. The Advisory Council for Kindergarten Transition facilitates regular planning meetings. The Principal and Early Childhood Education Consultant are members of the advisory council along with a parent representative and a member of the community. The tasks of the advisory council include: •

The planning of transition activities;

Creation of a timeline;

The sharing of resources for parents with children entering kindergarten;

Assessment and evaluation of the transition plan with the use of parent and staff surveys; 75


Revisions to the transition plan to assure that activities are well planned and effectively evaluated, based on mutual trust and respect, and rely on reciprocal communication;

Kindergarten Transition activities for staff include: •

Maintaining positive and effective working relationships with staff of programs from which children will transition;

Scheduling a personal visit with the parents and new Kindergarten students;

Holding a Kindergarten Open House;

Making a photo album of the new staff the child will see at the their new school;

Working with parents to set goals for their students;

Assisting with the completion of necessary paperwork, such as birth certificate, social security card, immunization record;

Talking with parents about practicing new routines for bedtime, waking up, eating breakfast

Kindergarten Transition activities for parents include: •

Participation on Advisory Council transition committee;

Accompanying their children on kindergarten visits or open house;

Reading books about going to kindergarten;

• Attending a personal visit with their child and the Kindergarten Teacher

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*TEACHER PARTICIPATION IN MAKING ASSESSMENT DECISIONS Our teachers: •

Work toward developing classroom assessments in each content area, via district committees, and building grade level and staff meetings and professional development sessions.

Participate in instructional dialogues three times annually to discuss student achievement results (local, state, and standardized) and derive implications for differentiating instruction.

Participate in MEAP, Terra Nova and Ed Performance Item analysis and curriculum alignment for ELA, Math, Science and Social Studies.

BUILDING LEVEL DECISION MAKING Through partnership with parents, teachers and staff, the principal will make decisions that will better the overall school environment. The principal of Victory Academy and the school committees work side by side for continuous self-reflection, goal setting, and the overall betterment of the school. Due to the immense involvement of the staff, and the excellent communication of committee leaders, Victory will be in a constant state of enrichment and transmission of new ideas. Victory Academy uses collaborative teams to focus on particular areas of improvement and analyze data to help make appropriate decisions that affect the school. All faculty members’ opinions are valued and addressed before a final decision is made.

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*TIMELY AND ADDITIONAL ASSISTANCE TO STUDENTS HAVING DIFFICULTY MASTERING THE STANDARDS We offer: •

Individualized placement for newcomers to the school, based on English Language Proficiency levels or other special needs.

Support to accelerate individual student’s progress including the ones within the bottom category of achievement as well as the top tier of achievement (use of resource teachers, paraprofessionals, extended day and year.

Differentiation of instruction, grouping and re-grouping, and a leveled curriculum.

Teacher Assistance Team which may include teacher, social worker, and other support/resource staff.

*COORDINATION AND INTEGRATION OF FEDERAL, STATE AND LOCAL PROGRAMS AND RESOURCES We coordinate all the different funds/resources the school receives to fulfill the implementation needs of the School-wide Improvement Plan. The following chart describes all the funds available to the school.

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RESOURCE INTEGRATION

Grant

Services Provided

Grades Served

Total Amount of Funding

*** Special Ed. Headlee

Not Available at this time

K-6

$

Special Ed

Contracted Services for Special Ed. Students

K-6

$15,979

Positive Action Curriculum

K-6

$1,169

Summer School Program and Paraprofessionals

K-6

$52,527

After school programming, Supplemental Reading Programs,

K-6

$138,888

Safe and Drug Free Schools 31A

Title I

Extended day Kindergarten, Character Education Program, Paraprofessionals Title II A

Professional Development

K-6

$57,503

Title II D

Computer Software

K-6

$1,365

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Programs for Differentiated Instruction Title V

Computer Software for assessment data and Differentiated Instruction

Total

K-6

$901

K-6

$268,332

REQUIRED STAKEHOLDERS The community of interest in Victory Academy is broad and in order to move effectively toward unified interests of all the affected members must be included in the creation, reviewing and implementation of the School Improvement Plan. Our stakeholders include parents, teachers, students, school board members and administrators of Victory Academy. We recognize that a successful implementation requires the input of all of these groups. When the collaborative and deep connection is made with all of these communities, they can help us ensure that the standards and benchmarks of the core curriculum are observed in our school improvement plan.

*EVALUATION The staff will collect and monitor data throughout the school year to determine the progress of students throughout the implementation of the School Improvement Plan to determine if the strategies embedded in the plan are realistic and effective. Victory Academy will administer a more formalized annual review of the School Improvement Plan through the use of the State’s annual assessments and other indicators of academic achievement. All stakeholders will participate in the evaluation process. The staff will revise the plan as necessary in order to ensure continuous improvement of students in the program.

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Victory Academy SIP09