Issuu on Google+

Second Harvest North Florida Volume 3 • Issue 1 • November 2010 www.WeNourishHope.org

Feeding Hope

a newsletter for food industry donors

Publix 'Food For All' campaign feeds hungry people Founded in 1930, Publix Super Markets is one of the largest and fastest-growing employee-owned supermarket chains in the United States. Publix and their associates have excelled in community involvement, volunteerism and a commitment to their market areas and beyond. Here’s a list of some awards they have won for community service: • Jacksonville Magazine's top 25 Companies That Care (2000-2010) • America's Second Harvest Grocery Distributor of the Year Award (2001) • Outstanding Industry Partnership Award for contributions to the Food Industry Crusade Against Hunger (1999)

Funds raised stay in the communities in which they were raised. Throughout Publix's campaign, customers can contribute to the fund by purchasing contribution cards in varying amounts. In 2009, Publix customers and associates donated more than $2.4 million to the effort, of which $32,000 went to Second Harvest North Florida. This year’s campaign runs Nov. 15 – Dec. 24. The campaign is simple; customers at the point of sale have the opportunity to scan/contribute $1 or $5 to feed the hungry. These are crucial donations; for every dollar that Second Harvest receives, we can provide enough food for seven meals! Publix and Second Harvest thank you for your continued support.

Donation ABCs: An alphabetical listing of the many different kinds of food industry products that can be donated.

(Letters B-C) Boxes, Packaging and Other Materials • Do you ever have boxes or cases that are discontinued? • What do you do with the inventory on hand? • Do you ever discontinue labels that could be used for brites or relabeling product?

Food For All

Charitable Giving (in-kind product)

During the holiday season, Publix embraces the Food For All campaign. The funds raised are used to support programs designed to fight hunger on a local, regional, national and international level.

• Would your company consider charitable giving in the form of product donations – monthly, quarterly, or as percentage of overall sales – to support your philanthropic priorities?

How to get more healthy food to more people More produce (fruits and vegetables) in our diets improves health; however the myth is that produce is more expensive than fast food/vending/junk food. A recent poll shows that the average cost of one serving of fruits/veggies is less than one dollar (nine servings are suggested per day). Some solutions that are being offered across the country to introduce more produce into communities include: • Doctors offer prescriptions (coupons) to farmers markets in Philadelphia and Massachusetts • Libraries accept grocery orders and make deliveries in Baltimore • New York City offers “green carts” in addition to hot dogs/pretzels • Retailers offer cheaper produce snacks, while increasing vending/junk prices • Coast Produce (California) delivers fruits/

• • • • • •

veggies to work places Peapod (Chicago, Boston, D.C.) provides online access in food deserts (order/delivery service) Salad bars move closer to cash registers; produce sales increase by 250% Blueberry Council donates bushes to school gardens Host field trips connect kids to nutrition Cub Scouts/Brownie program offers nutrition patch USDA team nutrition grants are offered to schools

Elementary schools can apply for free government grants to provide fresh fruit/veggies for their students on a daily basis. More info: http://www. fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/wp-content/ uploads/ProgramTypes/Fresh_Fruit_&_Vegetable_ Program_2.pdf

Customer Returns/Refusals • Do you run into a situation where product is mis-shipped and the customer refuses your shipment or requests a return? • Is there an amount – either in number of cases or dollar value of product/mileage to your customer – that determines when you will pick up the product, or when you allow the customer to make a decision about the product’s disposal? • Do you make a recommendation to your customer – if they are allowed to keep the product – as to how you want the mis-shipment handled?

WE STRUGGLE TO MAKE ENDS MEET. I TRY TO FEED MY KIDS FIRST AND ME LAST.” “I WORK WITH CLIENTS WHO DO NOT ALWAYS HAVE ENOUGH FOOD TO EAT. THEY ARE CHILDREN AND MANY TIMES THEY CAN N ONCENTRATE ON THEIR STUDIES, BECAUSE THEIR PARENTS DO NOT HAVE ENOUGH FOOD IN THE HOME.” “IT DOESN’T HAPPEN OFTEN [THAT WE HAVE TO USE THE FOOD BANK], ONLY WHEN WORK SLOWS DOW WE DO EVERYTHING WE CAN TO AVOID IT.” “WE STRUGGLE TO MAKE ENDS MEET. I TRY TO FEED MY KIDS FIRST AND ME LAST.” “I WORK WITH CLIENTS WHO DO NOT ALWAYS HAVE ENOUGH FOOD TO EAT. THEY A HILDREN AND MANY TIMES THEY CAN NOT CONCENTRATE ON THEIR STUDIES, BECAUSE THEIR PARENTS DO NOT HAVE ENOUGH FOOD IN THE HOME. “IT DOESN’T HAPPEN OFTEN [THAT WE HAVE TO USE THE FO


Non-Profit Org U.S. Postage PAID Jacksonville, FL Permit No. 1610

Second Harvest North Florida 1502 Jessie Street Jacksonville, FL 32206 www.WeNourishHope.org

What would you do if you had to choose between buying medicine for your child and buying food for yourself? The mission of Second Harvest North Florida is to distribute food and grocery products to hungry people and to educate the public about the causes and possible solutions to problems of domestic hunger.

CONTACT US

1502 Jessie Street Jacksonville, FL 32206 Main: 904.353.FOOD www.WeNourishHope.org

To learn more about how to donate food:

Elliot Darkatsh, Food Procurement 904.517.5554 edarkatsh@WeNourishHope.org

To volunteer:

Leah Bezares, Office Manager 904.517.5550 lbezares@WeNourishHope.org

To make financial donations: Karen Rieley, CFRE Vice President for Advancement 904.730.8281 krieley@WeNourishHope.org

26th Annual Empty Bowls Luncheon benefits Second Harvest North Florida, helps feed hungry families One in six adults and one in five children in north Florida are hungry, not just with growling stomachs until their next meal, but hungry because they have no money to buy food or means to get food. The Empty Bowls Luncheon has grown over the years because so many individuals and businesses in Jacksonville have taken the opportunity on this one day to reach out to those who need help. Proceeds from the event will enable Second Harvest North Florida to provide nutritious, healthy food and education to our neighbors who are not able to provide for themselves. Join over 1,500 other attendees on this one day to hear firsthand testimonies about hunger in our community, be served a simple soup and

bread lunch from local celebrities and take away a handmade “empty bowl” as a token of our appreciation and as a constant reminder that there are thousands who are hungry in our community every day. Make it an outing for friends and work colleagues. Tickets are $25 and can be purchased at WeNourishHope.org or by calling 904.739.7074. Table and event sponsorships are also available. Tuesday, Nov. 16 Prime Osborn Convention Center Doors open at 11 a.m. Program is from 12 to 1 p.m.

WESTRUGGLE STRUGGLETO TOMAKE MAKEENDS ENDSMEET. MEET.IITRY TRYTO TOFEED FEEDMY MYKIDS KIDSFIRST FIRSTAND ANDME MELAST. LAST.””“I“IWORK WORKWITH WITHCLIENTS CLIENTSWHO WHODO DONOT NOTALWAYS ALWAYSHAVE HAVEENOUGH ENOUGHFOOD FOODTO TOEAT. EAT.THEY THEYARE ARECHILDREN CHILDRENAND ANDMANY MANYTIMES TIMESTHEY THEYCAN CANNO N WE ONCENTRATEON ONTHEIR THEIRSTUDIES, STUDIES,BECAUSE BECAUSETHEIR THEIRPARENTS PARENTSDO DONOT NOTHAVE HAVEENOUGH ENOUGHFOOD FOODIN INTHE THEHOME. HOME.””“IT “ITDOESN’T DOESN’THAPPEN HAPPENOFTEN OFTEN[THAT [THATWE WEHAVE HAVETO TOUSE USETHE THEFOOD FOODBANK], BANK],ONLY ONLYWHEN WHENWORK WORKSLOWS SLOWSDOW DOW ONCENTRATE WE DO EVERYTHING EVERYTHINGWE WE CAN CANTO TOAVOID AVOID IT. IT.””“WE “WE STRUGGLE STRUGGLETO TO MAKE MAKE ENDS ENDS MEET. MEET.IITRY TRYTO TO FEED FEED MY MY KIDS KIDS FIRST FIRSTAND AND ME ME LAST. LAST.””“I“IWORK WORKWITH WITH CLIENTS CLIENTSWHO WHO DO DO NOT NOTALWAYS ALWAYS HAVE HAVE ENOUGH ENOUGH FOOD FOODTO TO EAT. EAT.THEY THEYAR A E DO HILDRENAND ANDMANY MANYTIMES TIMESTHEY THEYCAN CANNOT NOTCONCENTRATE CONCENTRATEON ONTHEIR THEIRSTUDIES, STUDIES,BECAUSE BECAUSETHEIR THEIRPARENTS PARENTSDO DONOT NOTHAVE HAVEENOUGH ENOUGHFOOD FOODIN INTHE THEHOME. HOME.“IT “ITDOESN’T DOESN’THAPPEN HAPPENOFTEN OFTEN[THAT [THATWE WEHAVE HAVETO TOUSE USETHE THEFOO FO HILDREN


November 2010 Feeding Hope newsletter