Page 294

the end of the year saw Ghosh become an official Rico UK Artist. Ghosh is one of the BT Celebrity Storytellers for the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics and will also appear as a featured artist for the BT River of Music events as part of the 2012 Cultural Olympiad. Arun Ghosh’s music embodies a seamless syncretism of blues and beats indigenous to North Indian rāgas. Ghosh takes this fusion and adds to it a splash of urban funk, postmodern punk, and the contemporary groove of rock ‘n roll set amidst a precipitation of dub bass and his rāg explorations. Together this confluence of various musical forms creates a sub-genre reminiscent of Coletrane’s harmonically static style which allows for rhythmic and melodic improvisation. Arun Ghosh’s second album, Primal Odyssey, was released in October 2011 on camoci records and represents his exploration of the sound of the classical jazz ensemble with his Horn E Bass Quintet. Recently I met up with Arun Ghosh in a coffee shop around the corner from the BBC Broadcasting House where he had just come from a live interview with Cerys Mathews. Arun generously shared his time to participate in a second interview that morning with me.

own tunes. I started playing the clarinet when I was twelve or thirteen. That was partly because I was told it was a good instrument for jazz. By that point I was into jazz. I was listening to Courtney Pine playing on the television at the Free Nelson Mandela concert and I was really taken with it. I realised that the music I liked had that kind of sound—that Arun, thank you for meeting with me this sort of jazz thing. I started making up my own morning. Could you begin by talking a bit music and improvising a little bit, not really about your background and introduction to working too hard on it. I was still playing music? classical music really and I thought of myself as...well, I was learning from the instrument I grew up in the north of England in a in this way. In the meantime I was growing up town called Bolton. It’s a small town near Manchester. My dad is from West Bengal and and listening to all sorts of music, all the music you are exposed to in Britain—Indie music, my mum is Sindhi, from Sindh, which later hip-hop, rock, all sorts of things, but I was still became a part of Pakistan. And I grew up in always into jazz. And as I got older and started Britain. There was no real music in the family but I was always encouraged to play. I started performing more jazz, I realised that I was from a young age playing music in school—the looking for new forms of improvisation and went back into Indian music. I had listened recorder and the violin and instruments like to Indian music when I was growing up, that. I knew right away that music was the real driving force in my life and from that time taken by my family to concerts and there was and I just carried on playing and making up my always Indian music being played at home.

Profile for LSD Magazine

LSD Magazine - Issue 9 - Chasing Dragons  

Issue 9 of LSD Magazine is out now. Bursting at the digital seams with sizzling art, searching interviews, slamming music, a dash of politi...

LSD Magazine - Issue 9 - Chasing Dragons  

Issue 9 of LSD Magazine is out now. Bursting at the digital seams with sizzling art, searching interviews, slamming music, a dash of politi...

Advertisement