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THE BOROUGH MARKET

Chefs’ recipe collection A collection of dishes from some of the talented chefs at Borough Market’s restaurants and street food stands

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RED AGENCY / FRONT COVER: SIM CANETTY-CLARKE


THE BOROUGH MARKET

Chefs’ recipe collection Visit the restaurants and street food stands of Borough Market and you can travel the world in the course of a lunchtime. As befits the Market’s location, right in the heart of a truly global city, our offering could hardly be more cosmopolitan, representing cultures and cuisines from all corners of the world. And it’s diverse not just in origin but in character. Some of our spots are set up for a quick, casual feed, others offer a slower, more sociable dining experience. Some are about big flavours and simple combinations, others emphasise creativity and technique. Thanks to this collection of recipes from some of the Market’s chefs, you can recreate some of their incredible dishes at home. To be clear, though, what you’ll find in here is no more than a taster: a small appetiser from the massive multi-course menu that is Borough Market’s restaurant and street food offering. We could just as easily have included Jamaican jerk, Malaysian clay pot cooking, Jewish salt beef, Japanese skewers, alpine raclette or that most British of inventions, the scotch egg. What we’d really advise you do is look at the pictures, read the descriptions, note the rumble in your stomach, then come here to have those same chefs, and their many equally talented peers, do the cooking for you.

Heirloom tomatoes with za’atar James Walters of Arabica Bar & Kitchen Texas cheese dip Tom Cenci of 26 Grains at Stoney Street Bhelpuri Gaurav Gautam of Horn OK Please Mushroom tostadas, pasilla adobo & goat’s cheese Nicholas Fitzgerald of Padre Prawn shia song bao Erchen Chang of BAO Merluza con guisantes (hake with garden peas) Monika Linton of Brindisa Oysters with dongchimi Pamela Yung of Flor Kubba haleb Philip Juma of KUBBA Chicken larb Worawan Pongpaew of Khanom Krok Rigatoni alla Gricia Giuseppe Palumbo of La Tua Pasta Asam ikan pedas (fish curry) Elizabeth Haigh of Mei Mei Slow-braised lamb neck Mark Jankel of Shuk Courgettes with crispy quinoa & roasted yeast sauce Tomas Lidakevicius of Turnips Restaurant

DINE & DRINK AT BOROUGH MARKET The Borough Market Kitchen is open Monday to Saturday for street food, with many of the stands also offering al fresco dining in the evenings. The Market is surrounded by a complementary mix of restaurants, many of which have outdoor seating. Visit the Borough Market website for a full list of traders: boroughmarket.org.uk/dine-and-drink


HEIRLOOM TOMATOES WITH ZA’ATAR James Walters of Arabica Bar & Kitchen Serves 4

Method

This salad sings loudest during the warmer months, when a colourful array of juicy ripe tomatoes are at their best. It’s a versatile crowd pleaser that comfortably saddles up next to a torched mackerel, a plate of halloumi cheese, a chargrilled steak, or on its own with some fresh crusty bread.

I like to cut the tomatoes into a variety of shapes and sizes to add texture. I normally cut the bigger tomatoes into large chunks and the cherry tomatoes in half or leave some of them whole.

Ingredients 600g heirloom tomatoes ¼ banana shallot, finely sliced discs 1 spring onion, finely sliced discs 1 tbsp flat leaf parsley, finely julienned 80ml extra virgin olive oil 40ml cabernet sauvignon vinegar 1 heaped tbsp za’atar

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Place the tomatoes into a large mixing bowl and add the cut shallots, spring onion and parsley. Dress with the vinegar, olive oil and a splash of water. Season with salt and pepper. Gently toss until everything is evenly coated. Transfer to a serving dish and sprinkle with za’atar.

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JOE WOODHOUSE

The menu at Arabica Bar & Kitchen travels through the fertile valleys of Jordan, the mountain villages of Lebanon, and the vibrant cities of Beirut, Jerusalem and Tel Aviv


TEXAS CHEESE DIP Tom Cenci of 26 Grains at Stoney Street Serves 2-3

Method

From devouring packets in seconds to making crisp sandwiches, crisps are pretty much a part of everyone’s childhood and, well, adulthood too. With this quick and super-easy recipe, you can use any crisp you like as a vessel for the cheese dip.

Begin by blending the cream cheese and yoghurt together in a mixing bowl until smooth.

Ingredients 200g cream cheese 200g Greek yoghurt 1 clove of garlic, chopped 1 shallot, chopped ½ bunch of dill 3g paprika 10g brown sugar 50g parmesan Flour, for dusting ½ bunch of chives A big bag of your favourite crisps, for dipping

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Add the chopped garlic, half of the shallot and the chopped dill and mix through. Add the brown sugar and paprika. Finely grate half of the parmesan into the mix and season with a bit of salt and pepper to taste. Place into a bowl and set aside. Dust the rest of the shallot in a bit of flour and pan fry in oil until crispy, then allow to cool. Finish the dip with chopped chives, the crispy shallots and the rest of the parmesan. Open a bag of your favourite crisps and start to dip.

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Visit The food at 26 Grains at Stoney Street is all about high quality seasonal produce combined simply but inventively with a few complementary ingredients


BHELPURI Gaurav Gautam of Horn OK Please Serves 1

Method

Bhelpuri is a savoury snack served on the streets of India. It originated in Mumbai before spreading rapidly across the country, and you will now find different variants and recipes in different regions of India – in Calcutta, it is known as jhal muri, and in southern India it is known as churmuri. At Horn OK Please, we make ours in the Mumbai style. In essence, it is a dish of puffed rice with loads of vegetables. It can be served dry or wet: wet bhelpuri comes with tangy date & tamarind chutney and little bit of spicy mint & coriander chutney. If you want it dry, just leave the chutneys out. You can find puffed rice and sev in most South Asian grocery stores.

In separate bowls, soak the dates and tamarind in enough water to immerse them completely. Leave for couple of hours. Once soaked, blend the dates and the tamarind to create a paste.

Ingredients For the date & tamarind chutney: 50g pitted dates 50g tamarind 1 tsp cumin powder, dry roasted 1 tsp chilli powder 1 tsp Himalayan rock salt For the mint & coriander chutney: A bunch of coriander, leaves picked and chopped A bunch of mint, leaves picked and chopped 2-3 bird’s eye chillies Juice of 1 lime

Heat 1 tsp cooking oil in a thick-based pot and add the rock salt, cumin powder and chilli powder. Sauté on a low heat for 30 secs, then add the tamarind and date paste. Bring to the boil, then gently simmer for about 30 mins to create a nicely aromatic paste with a slightly thick consistency. Remove from the hob and leave to cool. Place all the mint & coriander chutney ingredients in a blender and blitz to a smooth paste. Add salt to taste. In a big mixing bowl, add the sev mumra, sev, onion, boiled potato and tomatoes. Add 2 tbsp date & tamarind chutney and 2 tbsp mint & coriander chutney and give it all a good mix. Serve with a garnish of pomegranate seeds, chopped coriander and a sprinkle of chaat masala. You give the dish a bit of a twist by adding seasonal fruits such as strawberry or mango, which go amazingly well with bhelpuri.

60g sev mumra (puffed rice) 50g sev (crispy noodles made with gram flour) 1 small onion, finely chopped 1 small potato, peeled, boiled and chopped 50g tomatoes, chopped 1 tsp chaat masala A handful of pomegranate seeds, to garnish A handful of coriander leaves, to garnish

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Visit Horn OK Please showcases the best of Indian vegetarian street food in the Borough Market Kitchen, with fresh, fragrant dishes drawn from all corners of the subcontinent


MUSHROOM TOSTADAS, PASILLA ADOBO & GOAT’S CHEESE Nicholas Fitzgerald of Padre Serves 4

Method

The dried, dark green pasilla chilli is a cornerstone of Mexican cuisine, and the star ingredient in mole, sauces and marinades. The name translates as ‘little raisin’.

First make the adobo. Fry the onion and garlic in a little oil on a medium heat, until they start to colour, then add the tomatoes and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 5 mins, until they soften and start to break down. In a separate frying pan, toast the chillies on both sides, add to the tomato pan with the oregano and cook on a low heat for 15 mins. Blend to a rough paste, season and set aside.

Ingredients For the pasilla adobo: 1 onion, peeled and roughly chopped 4 cloves of garlic, peeled and roughly chopped 4 tomatoes, roughly chopped 4 dried pasilla chillies, halved (and deseeded, if you prefer less heat), or ancho chillies 1 tsp Mexican oregano For the mushrooms: 4 cloves of garlic, peeled and finely chopped 200ml neutral oil 500g mixed wild mushrooms, roughly chopped into equal pieces 2 fresh jalapeño chillies, sliced To serve: 12 corn tortillas 5-6 tbsp (20g) coriander leaves ¼ white onion, sliced 300g soft goat’s cheese 1 lime, quartered

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Now for the mushrooms. Fry the garlic in the oil on a medium heat until it has softened but not coloured, add the mushrooms and jalapeños, and cook until the mushrooms go golden. Season with salt and black pepper to taste. Heat the oven to 110C and toast the tortillas for about 15 mins, turning once, until they crisp up (or dry-fry for 3 mins on each side). Mix the coriander with the sliced onion. Put the still warm pasilla adobo in a shallow serving bowl and arrange the mushrooms and goat’s cheese on top. Finish with the onion and coriander mix and a healthy squeeze of lime juice. Serve with the tostadas.

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ISSY CROKER

The menu at Padre in the Borough Market Kitchen reflects the incredible street food culture encountered by Nicholas Fitzgerald on his many travels around Mexico


PRAWN SHIA SONG BAO Erchen Chang of BAO Serves 6 Ingredients For the prawn shia song mix: 250g prawns 25g carrots, peeled and finely diced 25g celery, finely diced 25g water chestnuts, finely diced 2 cloves of garlic, minced 1 tsp caster sugar ½ tsp salt 7g corn flour 35g egg white A pinch of ground white pepper ¼ tsp fermented chilli To assemble: 6 x hot-dog-shaped bao buns 1 clove of garlic 50g mayonnaise A few coriander stems Method Prepare the prawn mix by peeling and deveining the prawns. Cut them to around 1cm cubes and place in a large mixing bowl. Add the diced veg and minced garlic. Add the salt, sugar, white pepper, corn starch and egg white and use your hands to combine them properly, making especially sure that the salt and sugar are fully incorporated. Leave to sit for 15 mins to let the seasoning and flavours meld together.

need a sieve, placed over a large, wide bowl. Once the oil is heated to 130C, put two ladles of prawn mix into the oil and stir with the slotted spoon or pasta spider. Cook the prawns for 2-3 mins, until their colour turns opaque pink. Drain by pouring them into the sieve over the bowl. Be very careful at this stage, as the oil is very hot. Return the oil to the pan and repeat the process for the next batch of prawn mix. Once all the prawns are cooked, mix through the fermented chilli. Next, fry the bao. Heat the oil to 180C, then gently drop in your bao. Fry on each side for about 30-40 secs. or until golden brown. You will probably need to do this in a couple of batches – you should allow your bao enough space to bob around in the pan. Finely grate a clove of garlic into the mayonnaise and mix thoroughly. Finely chop some coriander stems. Taking care not to cut the bao all the way through, cut a slit lengthways and vertically through each one. Spread some garlic mayo in the middle and fill generously with prawn shia song. Finish with a sprinkling of coriander stems. Enjoy immediately.

Find a wok, or the deepest non-stick frying pan you have. Fill the pan with vegetable oil to a depth of 8-10cm. Heat it up to 130C. While the oil is still heating, set up your frying station. You will need a ladle and either a slotted spoon or a pasta spider. You will also Visit boroughmarket.org.uk for more recipes

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Visit The BAO menu is inspired by the late-night grill establishments often populated by commuters in Asia, as well as by the founders’ own upbringing and travels


MERLUZA CON GUISANTES (HAKE WITH GARDEN PEAS) Monika Linton of Brindisa Serves 1

Method

Ingredients

Blanch the peas in hot water, transfer to iced water, drain and keep refrigerated.

150g Cornish hake fillet 100g garden peas 1 small shallot, finely chopped A clove of garlic, finely chopped 5g butter 4 mint leaves, chopped 20ml vegetable stock 3 pea shoots

In a frying pan, heat some olive oil, add the chopped shallots and garlic and gently cook for a few minutes. Add the fresh peas, then the vegetable stock and reduce a little before adding the butter. Season with salt and pepper and finish with chopped mint. Cook the hake a la plancha on baking paper, skin-side down adding a bit of olive oil and salt and pepper. Cook until the skin is crispy and has a golden colour, then flip over and cook for few mins. Serve on top of the peas with the pea shoots. Recipe from Brindisa: The True Food of Spain, by Monika Linton (Harper Collins)

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STEVEN JOYCE

Tapas Brindisa serves up traditional Spanish dishes made using exceptional ingredients sourced by the stalwart Spanish food and drink importer of the same name


OYSTERS WITH DONGCHIMI Pamela Yung of Flor Serves 4 (with plenty of dongchimi left over for the months to come) When I first experienced the magic of dongchimi, I knew it would make a perfect pairing with briny, sweet oyster meat. I’ve been lucky enough to know some amazing Korean cooks and, under their tutelage, I’ve learned about the ways in which their cuisine follows the garden and its harvest, and how that harvest is preserved in every which way. My friend Amy Yi, a chef in New York, gave me her family recipe for dongchimi, and we’ve adapted it a bit to use at Flor. I usually prepare the dongchimi when the radishes are sweet, juicy and plentiful, although daikon is a good stand-in. The best part, potentially more valuable than the vegetables themselves, is the brine that results from the lacto-fermentation process – it’s an essential ingredient in a cold noodle dish called naengmyeon. I like to age mine for a few months, but even after a week, it’s amazing. Ingredients 1kg radishes, peeled, cut lengthwise, then into half moons 500g napa cabbage, washed and quartered at the root 100g carrots, peeled and sliced on the bias 100g kohlrabi, peeled and cut into wedges 60g salt For the marinade: 4 cloves of garlic, smashed 50g ginger 2½ pears ½ large white onion Yuzu zest, sansho leaves, or other aromatics

Method Salt the vegetables (including in between the cabbage leaves) and pack in a container. Seal and leave to sit in the fridge for 4 days. After 4 days, once the salt has worked its magic, you’ll need to make the marinade. In a food processor, blend the garlic, ginger, pears, white onion and 1 litre of water. Once pureed, add an additional 1.25 litres of water. At this stage, you ought to be able to taste every element, and it should be sweet, as there is currently no acid or salt. Strain, then pour the liquid over the salted vegetables, together with the aromatics. Reseal the container and leave it at room temperature for 2-5 days, temperature depending, before moving it to the fridge. I would suggest you taste it daily to observe how it changes as the lacto-fermentation occurs. I usually move it into the fridge once it’s pleasantly sour and slightly effervescent. I like to serve this dish as a starter for a meal on a hot day. Shuck the oysters and halve each one, reserving their juices. Sieve off some of the dongchimi liquid and season it with a bit of the oyster juice. Spoon out some of the vegetables and slice them into smaller batons. Serve in ice cold bowls, with the vegetable batons layered at the bottom of each bowl, topped with six oyster halves. Garnish with fresh chive batons. At Flor, we also like to scatter over some chive flowers, if in season, and sea campion – a foraged sea vegetable.

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ANTON RODRIGUEZ.

Flor offers plates of carefully put-together, creative modern European dishes that showcase ingredients sourced with the utmost attention to quality and ethics


KUBBA HALEB Philip Juma of KUBBA Makes 30 kubba

Method

Ingredients

To make the shell, soak the rice for 30 mins then rinse thoroughly and drain. Place in a saucepan and pour in almost enough water to cover it. Season with salt and the turmeric. Stir gently so all the grains are covered. Bring to a gentle simmer, cover and keep the lid on. Do not touch it for 20-25 mins. The rice should have absorbed all of the water and taken on a yellow colour. Don’t be frightened to overcook the rice – that’s a good thing. Once the liquid is absorbed, turn the heat off. Keep the rice covered and leave to cool.

300g basmati rice 1 tsp turmeric 400g lamb mince (with fat) 1 small onion, finely chopped Sunflower oil, for frying

Once cool, put the cooked rice through a potato-ricer. Alternatively, you can knead it with your hands or place it in a food processor. You are looking to make a doughlike mix, but don’t over-knead it to the point it turns to a thick puree – you still want some texture in your rice shell. In a separate pan, begin making the filling by frying the onion in a splash of olive oil. Sweat for 5 mins, then add the lamb mince. Season with salt. Set to cool. Begin making the kubba. With damp hands, take a small handful of the rice blend and press it into a disc. Holding the disc in your palm, add the lamb mince to the centre and encase within the rice shell. To follow tradition, you want to shape it like a torpedo. Set aside on greaseproof paper. Allow for the dumplings to air dry for 1 hour. You should prep at least 30 kubba (freeze any that you don’t want to fry immediately). Heat the oil to 180C. Fry until golden brown (around 6 mins). Drain on greaseproof paper and enjoy.

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Visit KUBBA brings a taste of traditional Iraqi cuisine to the Borough Market Kitchen, including the stand’s eponymous signature dish: fried and braised stuffed dumplings


CHICKEN LARB Worawan Pongpaew of Khanom Krok Serves 2

Method

Ingredients

In a small pan over a gentle heat, melt the palm sugar. Transfer to a small bowl to cool down. Once cool, add the lime juice and put aside.

300g minced chicken thigh 2 tbsp unsalted chicken stock 2 tbsp fish sauce 1 small shallot, thinly sliced 55ml lime juice 30g palm sugar 2 tsp Thai chilli powder or to taste 4 leaves of sawtooth coriander, chopped 1 spring onion, chopped A handful of mint leaves, roughly torn For the toasted rice powder: 70g glutinous rice or jasmine rice 1 lime leaf 1 stalk of lemongrass, thinly sliced

Toast the rice, lemongrass and lime leaf in a dry sauté pan over a high heat, stirring constantly, until the rice has a deep brown colour. Remove from the heat immediately and transfer to a mortar and pestle or a coffee grinder. Grind until almost fine, but not completely powder-like. Add the stock to a large pan and bring to a simmer. Add the minced chicken and 1 tbsp fish sauce, then cook, stirring constantly to break up any big lumps, until cooked through. Remove from the heat, add the shallots, and mix well so the shallots begin to wilt slightly. Stir in the palm sugar and lime juice mixture and the rest of the fish sauce, together with the chilli flakes and 2-3 tbsp toasted rice powder. Add the spring onion, sawtooth coriander and mint leaves and give it all another good mix. Serve either warm or at room temperature with sticky rice or jasmine rice and fresh, crunchy vegetables such as iceberg lettuce, cucumber or radish.

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Visit Named after a Thai street snack of small coconut pancakes made in distinctive dimpled pans, Khanom Krok serves up authentic Bangkok street food in the Borough Market Kitchen


RIGATONI ALLA GRICIA Giuseppe Palumbo of La Tua Pasta Serves 2

Method

Pasta alla gricia is another cousin in the creamy family of carbonara and cacio e pepe. It is distinguished by the addition of guanciale, a most delicious form of Italian bacon made from pork jowls. Please only use freshly ground, high-quality pepper – I only use proper Indian malabar pepper, because it’s so lovely and spicy, and I like to gently toast it first to really bring out the flavour.

Combine the two grated cheeses in a bowl and let them come up to room temperature. Bring a large pot of salted water to the boil.

The magic of this dish relies on a few key factors: the cheese being at room temperature, and the pasta at the point the cheese is added being neither too hot (you’ll end up with clumpy mess of cheese) nor too cold (the melt doesn’t occur). Some seasoned pros choose to whisk the pasta water and cheese together before adding to the pasta; if this is your first time, you may find this phased method easier than trying to do everything at once. Either way, it does take a bit of practice to perfect the technique. The good news is that no matter what you do, it’ll still taste great – who doesn’t like pasta, cheese, pepper and crispy bacon? Ingredients 100g guanciale, cut in small cubes 250g fresh egg tonnarelli 60g pecorino romano DOP, grated 60g parmigiano reggiano, grated A few generous cracks of freshly ground black pepper

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In a large pan on a medium heat, cook the cubed guanciale until crispy (but not burned). Fish out the crispy bacon bits and set aside, leaving the rendered fat in the pan. Drop the tonnarelli into the boiling water. Crack the black pepper into the hot pan. After 30 secs, once the pepper is toasted, add 2 ladles of pasta water. Once the pasta is perfectly al dente (approximately 2 mins), scoop it out of the boiling water and add it to the pan of peppery, starchy water. Lower the heat and mix vigorously for 2 mins. Taste the pasta and, if cooked to your preference, remove the pan from the heat and stir vigorously for about 30 secs. This will allow the pasta to cool sufficiently for the cheese not to split. Pour the grated cheeses into the pan and stir powerfully until you encounter a creamy texture. Dish up the pasta and add the crispy Guanciale on top. You can also add a few more sprinkles of grated parmesan if desired.

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Visit La Tua Pasta handmakes its fresh pasta every night just nine miles from the Market, ready to be served hot and freshly cooked the next day in the Borough Market Kitchen


ASAM IKAN PEDAS (FISH CURRY) Elizabeth Haigh of Mei Mei Serves 4

Method

This is a classic Nonya dish, traditionally made with fish steaks. It has lots of gravy with hot and sour notes, so you need a fish that can stand up to this. In Singapore we would ask our local wet market man to cut a couple of steaks from a large Spanish mackerel, but there is an array of other amazing fish that you could use. It doesn’t matter whether it’s a white or oily fish, as long as it can hold its shape. For white fish, go for hake (not cod as it is too flaky) or use whole sea bream, slashed twice on each side to allow the juices to penetrate. Whole mackerel (UK sized) or salmon steaks work well too.

Grind all the rempah ingredients together in a blender (adding them in the order listed) to make a paste. If the paste becomes too thick, add a little water. Set aside.

Ingredients 4 tbsp cooking oil 3 aubergines, cut into 2cm chunks 5 sprigs of laksa leaves (or torch ginger flower buds) 4 kaffir lime leaves 1 quantity tamarind juice (45g pulp soaked for 10 mins in 500ml boiling water and strained) 8 okra, cut into bite-sized pieces 1 medium-sized tomato, cut into bite-sized pieces Caster sugar, to taste 1.2-1.5kg sea bream or mackerel For the rempah: 2 candlenuts or macadamia nuts 3cm piece of fresh galangal, peeled 2 lemongrass stalks, tough outer leaves removed and stalks roughly chopped 4 banana shallots, peeled and roughly chopped 2 garlic cloves, peeled 20 dried, medium-hot red chillies 10g belachan (fermented shrimp paste)

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Heat the oil in a wok over a medium heat then quickly fry the aubergine until golden brown all over. Remove the aubergine pieces with a slotted spoon and set aside on a plate covered in kitchen paper. Keeping the pan on the heat, next sauté the rempah in the oil, stirring constantly, until a richly coloured oil starts to seep from it – about 10 mins. Add the laksa and lime leaves, and continue to sauté for about 30 seconds or until fragrant. Add the tamarind juice and bring to the boil. Add the fried aubergines, okra and tomato. Add sugar and salt to taste. Lay the fish in the sauce and simmer for 10 mins or until the fish is cooked. Remove the laksa stalks, pull off the leaves and tear the leaves roughly into pieces. Sprinkle on to the gravy. Serve with steamed white rice. Recipe from Makan: Recipes from the Heart of Singapore, by Elizabeth Haigh (Bloomsbury Absolute)

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KRIS KIRKHAM

Inspired by Singaporean ‘kopi tiams’ (coffee shops), Mei Mei brings the vibrant smells and flavours of Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia to the Borough Market Kitchen


SLOW-BRAISED LAMB NECK Mark Jankel of Shuk Serves 4-6

Method

Ingredients

Heat the oven to 150C. Place all of the ingredients in an oven-proof casserole with a lid or a deep oven tray covered with foil.

800g lamb neck 3 x 400g tins of Italian plum tomatoes, chopped 3 tbsp date syrup or honey 2 glasses of sweet red wine 1 tsp ground coriander 1 tsp ground cumin 1 tsp ras-el-hanout

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Cook for 4 hours, until the lamb easily flakes into pieces. Once cooked, the lamb will be soft enough to serve with a spoon. Serve with chilli yoghurt, amba tahini, mint, coriander, pickled red cabbage, steamed pita and schug.

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NIC KRILLY-HARGRAVE

Taking its from the Hebrew word for ‘street market’, Shuk in the Borough Market Kitchen offers a menu of stuffed pitas and salads inspired by the food markets of Tel Aviv


COURGETTES WITH CRISPY QUINOA & ROASTED YEAST SAUCE Tomas Lidakevicius of Turnips Restaurant Serves 4

Method

Ingredients

You will need to make the herb oil, roasted yeast and marinade for the courgettes a day before you plan to serve the dish.

For the herb oil: 1 bunch of parsley, leaves picked 1 bunch of chives, roughly chopped 100ml vegetable oil For the barbecued courgettes: 2 courgettes 1 bulb of garlic, cloves peeled 100g ginger, peeled and roughly chopped Olive oil, for blending For the pickled courgettes: 1 yellow courgette 50g caster sugar 100g white wine vinegar For the quinoa: 250g quinoa 250ml vegetable stock Vegetable oil, for deep-frying 1 bunch of chives, finely chopped 1 pinch of salt For the sour cream: 100g sour cream 1 bunch of dill, roughly chopped For the yeast sauce: 100g fresh yeast 1 banana shallot, sliced 3 cloves of garlic, sliced 150g white wine 150g double cream 150g vegetable stock Micro cress, to garnish (optional)

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Start with the herb oil. Place the parsley leaves, chives and oil in a blender and blitz for a few minutes until you have a bright green oil. Place a j-cloth or a piece of muslin into a sieve, set this over a bowl, then pour the oil into the sieve. Leave in the fridge overnight to strain. To make the courgette marinade, add the peeled garlic cloves and chopped ginger to a food processor or blender along with a generous glug of olive oil and a little salt. Blitz to a smooth, loose paste – you may need to add a little more olive oil. Transfer to a jar and store in the fridge. You will have more than you need for this dish, but it will keep for up to a week. Wash, top and tail the green courgettes, then cut each one into four equal pieces. Place them in a container and coat with a few tbsp of the ginger-garlic paste. Cover and leave in the fridge overnight. For the roasted yeast, heat an oven to 180C and place the block of fresh yeast on a tray lined with baking paper. Roast for around 25 mins – the yeast will at first melt and turn liquid, but as the water evaporates will turn into a crispy crumb. Store in an airtight container. On the day you plan to serve the dish, prepare the pickled courgette. Add the sugar, the vinegar and 150ml water to a saucepan and gently bring to the boil. Meanwhile, use a mandoline or vegetable peeler to cut the yellow courgette into thin ribbons. Once @boroughmarket


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SIM CANETTY-CLARKE

By day, Turnips is a high quality greengrocer. By night, the space transforms into an al fresco restaurant, turning whatever’s best on the stall that day into beautiful veg-centric dishes


the pickling liquor is boiling, pour this over the courgette ribbons and set aside at room temperature. Place the sour cream and dill into a blender and blitz until smooth and pale green. Season to taste, transfer to a squeezy bottle and store in the fridge until needed. To make the sauce, sweat the shallots and garlic in a dash of oil with a pinch of salt until soft (around 5 mins). Add the white wine, bring to a simmer and leave to reduce by half. Once reduced, add the vegetable stock and leave to reduce by half once more. Add the cream, bring to a simmer, then blitz in a blender. Add a little of the roasted yeast, blitzing to incorporate, then continue tasting the sauce, adding a little more yeast at a time, until you’re happy with the flavour (you probably won’t need to use all the yeast). Season with salt and lemon juice, then pass through a fine sieve into a clean pan, ready to reheat later.

Heat a griddle pan until smoking hot. Place the marinated courgettes cut-side down on the pan and leave to cook until nicely charred on one side and softened (but not mushy) throughout. While the courgettes cook, stir the chopped chives into the quinoa you haven’t deep-fried and season to taste. Gently reheat the sauce, and roll the pickled courgette ribbons into tight curls. To serve, place a small ring of the non-deepfried quinoa on the base of each plate. Slice the griddled courgettes into pieces, then place these on top of the quinoa along with curls of pickled courgette. Add dots of sour cream, spoon over the crispy quinoa and add micro cress (if using). Finish by splitting the reheated yeast sauce with a spoonful of the herb oil, then pour this into the centre of the plate.

Place the quinoa in a saucepan with the vegetable stock and a pinch of salt. Bring to a simmer and cook for 15 mins, or until just cooked. Use a slotted spoon to remove half of the quinoa and set aside, but continue cooking the remainder for a further 10 mins until overcooked (adding a splash more water if needed). Drain the overcooked quinoa by squeezing it in a j-cloth or tea towel. Bring a deep pan of oil up to 180C. Very carefully lower the overcooked quinoa into the oil – it will splutter. Deep-fry for a few mins until the quinoa crisps up and turns golden in colour, whisking it occasionally so it doesn’t clump up. Once crisp, drain on a j-cloth and season with salt.

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The Borough Market Chefs' Recipe Collection  

A collection of dishes from some of the talented chefs at Borough Market’s restaurants and street food stands

The Borough Market Chefs' Recipe Collection  

A collection of dishes from some of the talented chefs at Borough Market’s restaurants and street food stands

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