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Communications Technology TGJ3M Student Learning Modules for Video Production

C : Mr. Nathan Shrubsole, Mr. Bill Street, Mr. Greg Woods & Mr. Luis Zuniga S : Mr. Bernie Burns I: OISE/UT D: Feb. 20, 2008 M C   P 1. Colour Theory for Video Production 2. Typography for Video Credits 3. Introduction to Script Writing for PSA 4. Introduction to Storyboarding 5. Introduction to Camera Operation 6. Introduction to Audio Production 7. Introduction to Lighting 8. Video Editing 9. Adding Sound Effects 10. Introduction to Foley


Communications Technology TGJ3M Course of Study Department:

Technological Education

Course Title:

Communications Technology — Video Production

Course Modules:

1. Colour eory for Video Production, 2. Typography for Video Credits, 3. Introduction to Script Writing for PSA, 4. Introduction to Storyboarding, 5. Introduction to Camera Operation, 6. Introduction to Audio Production, 7. Introduction to Lighting, 8. Video Editing, 9. Adding Sound Effects, 10. Introduction to Foley.

Course Code:

TGJ3M

Type/Destination:

Senior

Grade:

Eleven

Level:

University/College Preparation

Ministry Guidelines:

e Ontario Curriculum Grades 11 and 12, Technological Education, 2000 Catholic Curriculum Cooperative Writing Partnership, Course Profile Communications Technology, Grade 11 University/College Preparation, 2001

Approved Textbooks:

Video Basics 5, Herbert Zettl, 2006

Other Materials:

Various Video Production Texts and Magazines, Video Editing Tutorials, Related Web Sites

Credit (110 hrs):

One

Pre-requisite(s):

None

Date Created:

Feb. 20, 2008

Authors:

Mr. Nathan Shrubsole, Mr. Bill Street, Mr. Greg Woods, Mr. Luis Zuniga

Course Description is course examines communications systems and design and production processes in the areas of electronic, live, recorded, and graphic communications. Students will develop knowledge and skills relating to the assembly, operation, maintenance, and repair of the basic and more complex components of a range of communications systems. Students will also study industry standards and regulations and health and safety issues, and will explore careers, the importance of lifelong learning, and the impact of communications technology on society and the environment.

Breakdown of Units and Modules e final culminating project in this theoretical Broad Based Grade 11 Video Production course is a 10-minute Public Service Announcement. e 10 modules in this course lead in to each other and are designed to be completed in order. ey comprise 85 hours of a theoretical 110-hour course. e remaining 25 hours are divided between the first week (5 hours) being dedicated as an introduction/overview of the culminating Public Service Announcement video, with the final 4 weeks (20 hours) being devoted to the students working on and completing their PSA projects.

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


About the Authors Mr. Nathan Shrubsole After graduating from Centennial College’s Book & Magazine Publishing program in Toronto, Ontario, Mr. Shrubsole worked as a prepress operator for Webcom Limited, Canada’s largest black-text book manufacturer. After leaving Webcom, Mr. Shrubsole worked as a freelance graphic designer and assumed the role of head graphic designer for the Upstart Crow eatre Group (Toronto) in addition to serving as their video production manager, videotaping each performance and editing and authoring the shows for distribution on DVD. Mr. Bill Street Mr. Street has been employed in the field of radio and television broadcasting in Toronto for over 12 years. He has held various positions in radio operations at e Pelmorex Radio Network, as well as e CHUM Radio Network. Mr. Street’s work has crossed mediums into television broadcasting as well, working for Corus Entertainment, and his contributions assisted in the launch of Toronto’s newest television station in 2003, Toronto 1 (renamed SUN TV in 2005). He remains a part of the broadcast industry while currently working as a secondary school teacher in the field of Communications Technology. Mr. Greg Woods Mr. Woods has worked in the Television Animation Industry for the past fifteen years. He has held a number of different titles including Director, Overseas Supervisor, Designer, Storyboard Artist and Animator. He has worked on a diverse range of programs from Children’s and Young Adult’s programming to Television Commercials and Feature Films. Mr. Woods has spent most of his career working for studios in Toronto, but contracts have led him as far away as Vancouver, Dublin Ireland and Mainland China. Mr. Luis Zuniga Mr. Zuniga has worked in the telecommunications industry as a media and I.T. consultant for over 15 years. His experience is complemented by two college degrees completed in Audio Engineering and Audio & Visual Technologies. As a technology consultant, Mr. Zuniga has had the opportunity to develop and deliver many training seminars for both technical and professional services audiences.

Acknowledgments e authors of this series of Broad Based Technology modules would like to thank the following for their undying support: M. B B, OISE/UT, Toronto, ON M. M P, OISE/UT, Toronto, ON M. M T, OISE/UT, Toronto, ON M. D R, OISE/UT, Toronto, ON M. B C, OISE/UT, Toronto, ON M. R R, OISE/UT, Toronto, ON ______________________________________ Mr. Nathan Shrubsole

_________________ Date

______________________________________ Mr. Bill Street

_________________ Date

______________________________________ Mr. Greg Woods

_________________ Date

______________________________________ Mr. Luis Zuniga

_________________ Date

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


~ Table of Contents ~ Course Data Sheet...................................................... i Course Description .................................................... i Breakdown of Units and Modules .............................. i About the Authors..................................................... ii Acknowledgments ..................................................... ii Table of Contents..................................................... iii Unit and Module Positionings................................... v Course Expectations................................................ vii Module #1: Colour î ’eory ....................................... 1 Module #2: Typography ............................................ 7 Module #3: Script Writing ...................................... 15 Module #4: Storyboarding ...................................... 23 Module #5: Camera Operation ............................... 31 Module #6: Audio Production................................. 41 Module #7: Lighting ............................................... 51 Module #8: Video Editing....................................... 61 Module #9: Sound Effects ....................................... 69 Module #10: Foley .................................................. 77 Self Assessment Strategy .......................................... 83

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Communications Technology TGJ 3M — Daily Breakdown

V

Unit and Module Positioning in Relation to the Course Summary e following theoretical daily breakdown of this Gr. 11 ComTech, Broad-Based Technology course outlines the positioning of the Units, and the Modules found within each Unit. For theoretical purposes, holidays, PA/PD Days, etc., are not taken into account in its structuring.

Monday Day 1

Introduction to PSA and Overview of Course

Day 6

Colour Theory Module

Day 11

Typography Module

Day 16

Script Writing Module

Day 21

Script Writing Module

Day 26

Script Writing Module

Day 31

Storyboarding Module

Day 36

Storyboarding Module

Day 41

Camera Operation Module

Tuesday Day 2

Introduction to PSA and Overview of Course

Day 7

Colour Theory Module

Day 12

Typography Module

Day 17

Script Writing Module

Day 22

Script Writing Module

Day 27

Script Writing Module

Day 32

Storyboarding Module

Day 37

Storyboarding Module

Day 42

Camera Operation Module

Wednesday Day 3

Introduction to PSA and Overview of Course

Day 8

Colour Theory Module

Day 13

Typography Module

Day 18

Script Writing Module

Day 23

Script Writing Module

Day 28

Storyboarding Module

Day 33

Storyboarding Module

Day 38

Storyboarding Module

Day 43

Camera Operation Module

Thursday Day 4

Introduction to PSA and Overview of Course

Day 9

Colour Theory Module

Day 14

Typography Module

Day 19

Script Writing Module

Day 24

Script Writing Module

Day 29

Storyboarding Module

Day 34

Storyboarding Module

Day 39

Storyboarding Module

Day 44

Camera Operation Module

Friday Day 5

Introduction to PSA and Overview of Course

Day 10

Colour Theory Module

Day 15

Typography Module

Day 20

Script Writing Module

Day 25

Script Writing Module

Day 30

Storyboarding Module

Day 35

Storyboarding Module

Day 40

Storyboarding Module

Day 45

Camera Operation Module

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Monday Day 46

Tuesday Day 47

Wednesday Day 48

Camera Operation

Camera Operation

Camera Operation

Module

Module

Module

Day 51

Audio Production Module

Day 56

Audio Production Module

Day 61

Lighting Module

Day 66

Video Editing Module

Day 71

Video Editing Module

Day 76

Video Editing Module

Day 81

Sound Effects Module

Day 86

Foley Module

Day 91

Day 52

Audio Production Module

Day 57

Audio Production Module

Day 62

Lighting Module

Day 67

Video Editing Module

Day 72

Video Editing Module

Day 77

Video Editing Module

Day 82

Sound Effects Module

Day 87

Day 53

Audio Production Module

Day 58

Lighting Module

Day 63

Lighting Module

Day 68

Video Editing Module

Day 73

Video Editing Module

Day 78

Video Editing Module

Day 83

Sound Effects Module

Day 88

Thursday Day 49

Camera Operation Module

Day 54

Audio Production Module

Day 59

Lighting Module

Day 64

Lighting Module

Day 69

Video Editing Module

Day 74

Video Editing Module

Day 79

Video Editing Module

Day 84

Sound Effects Module

Day 89

Friday Day 50

Audio Production Module

Day 55

Audio Production Module

Day 60

Lighting Module

Day 65

Lighting Module

Day 70

Video Editing Module

Day 75

Video Editing Module

Day 80

Video Editing Module

Day 85

Sound Effects Module

Day 90

Foley Module

Foley Module

Foley Module

Foley Module

Day 92

PSA ASSIGNMENT

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 93

Day 94

Day 95

PSA ASSIGNMENT

PSA ASSIGNMENT

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 96

Day 97

Day 98

PSA ASSIGNMENT

PSA ASSIGNMENT

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 101

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 106

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 102

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 107

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 103

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 108

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 99

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 104

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 109

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 100

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 105

PSA ASSIGNMENT

Day 110

PSA ASSIGNMENT


VII

Course Expectations is course enables students to understand the technological and computer concepts they will need in order to design, develop, and build usable products or to deliver services, as well as to pursue further technological studies. Students will use the technological design process and a variety of tools and software to solve problems, complete projects, and strengthen their communication skills.

Theory and Foundation Overall Expectations By the end of this course, students will: TFV.01

Apply the design process to develop solutions, products, processes, or services in response to challenges or problems in electronic, live, or recorded communications;

TFV.02

Identify and describe the components and processes that make up each of the following: electronic, live, and recorded communications;

TFV.03

Explain how basic communications systems function and describe the knowledge required to manage a range of communications systems;

TFV.04

Describe industry standards, regulations, and formats that apply to communications technology.

Specific Expectations By the end of this course, students will: T D P TF1.01

Explain how a human need or want can be met through a new or improved product;

TF1.02

Apply the following steps of the design process to solve a variety of communications technology challenges or problems: • identify what has to be accomplished (the problem); • gather and record information, and establish a plan of procedures; • brainstorm a list of as many solutions as possible; • identify the resources required for each suggested solution, and compare each solution to the design criteria, refining and modifying it as required; • evaluate the solutions (e.g. testing, modelling, and documenting results) and choose the best one; • produce a drawing, model, or prototype of the best solution; • evaluate the prototype and what is required to produce it; • communicate the solution, using one or more of the following: final drawings, technical reports, electronic presentations, flow charts, storyboards, mock-ups, prototypes, and so on; • obtain feedback on the final solution and repeat the design process if necessary to refine or improve the solution.

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


VIII

C, S,  P TF2.05

Identify the advantages of various formats for specific applications;

TF2.06

Summarize the configurations for a variety of electronic, live, and recorded systems, and develop a plan to set up and manage the systems.

S TF3.01

Outline guidelines, conventions, and rules used in the composition and design of a communications process;

TF3.02

Research appropriate production techniques and recommend processes that adhere to industry standards;

TF3.03

Select the appropriate formats for electronic, live, and recorded productions.

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


IX

Skills and Processes Overall Expectations By the end of this course, students will: SPV.01

Effectively plan, organize, direct, and control a variety of communications activities;

SPV.02

Use current technology and production skills to develop a process or a product in response to a communications challenge or problem;

SPV.03

Set up, operate, and maintain a communications system and analyse its efficiency;

SPV.04

Use effective techniques to carry out and document the steps in pre-production, production, and post-production;

SPV.05

Use mathematical and language skills effectively and apply scientific principles in the design of electronic, live, and recorded communications systems.

Specific Expectations By the end of this course, students will: O S SP1.01

Demonstrate the interpersonal skills required for effective teamwork;

SP1.02

Function effectively as individuals and as members of a cooperative team to produce a product or service;

SP1.03

Demonstrate the time management and problem-solving skills required to complete projects;

SP1.04

Accurately document planning and production processes;

SP1.05

Effectively apply a variety of planning tools (e.g., storyboards, flow charts, schematic diagrams);

SP1.06

Select and use appropriate software to manage the production process;

SP1.07

Use time management schemes to ensure that their productions meet client deadlines.

P S SP2.01

Set up and correctly operate the equipment and accessories required to create and modify environments for communications productions (e.g., video and audio editing suites, live and recorded productions, electronic communication systems);

SP2.02

Select and use tools and equipment to solve a communications problem;

SP2.03

Operate control devices and components to manipulate or create communications technology projects;

SP2.04

Develop and interpret technical and artistic drawings, reports, instructions, manuals, on-line documentation, and specifications to help solve a communications problem;

SP2.05

Set up and operate communications equipment;

SP2.06

Troubleshoot a communications system to remove any obstacles to its effective operation;

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


X

SP2.07

Design and set up a communications system (e.g., audio and video editing systems, lighting grids) to perform production and post-production processes.

D  S SP3.01

Use a variety of methods to document the planning and production processes;

SP3.03

Use industry-standard guidelines, conventions, and rules for composition and design;

SP3.04

Use colour theory and colour standards to create presentations that adhere to industry standards.

I A SP4.02

Use appropriate language in flow charts, storyboards, operation charts, scripts, and presentations;

SP4.03

Use terminology that is recognized by the communications industry.

Impact and Consequences Overall Expectations By the end of this course, students will: ICV.01

Describe the social, environmental, and economic impacts of communications technology;

ICV.02

Demonstrate an understanding of the health and safety rules and regulations applicable to a communications technology program.

Specific Expectations By the end of this course, students will: S  L IC2.01

Apply safe work practices when performing communications processes.

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Communications Technology TGJ3M ~Student Learning Module

Red Red-orange

Red-violet

Violet

Orange

Blue-violet

Yellow-orange

Blue

Yellow

Blue-green

Yellow-green

Green

V P M : C T M O  C:    E C T:  C . C T  V P 2. Typography for Video Credits 3. Introduction to Script Writing for PSA 4. Introduction to Storyboarding 5. Introduction to Camera Operation 6. Introduction to Audio Production 7. Introduction to Lighting 8. Video Editing 9. Adding Sound Effects 10. Introduction to Foley

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


PAGE 3

Module #1: Exploring Colour for Video Production Activities in Series: 1

The Situation Which colours work best together? Why are certain colour combinations consistently seen throughout several mediums of communication technologies? Colour can set the mood and tone of a video production throughout the production process. Whether a conscious decision is made while videotaping a production with regard to lighting, gels, in-camera filters, costumes, makeup, set dressings, etc., or in the editing stage during post-production through colour correction, digital filters, effects, and title credits, colour can play a prominent role in defining a video production.

The Challenge To explore colour combinations and examine their practical application, you will form groups of two to search through magazines to find examples that identify how the four basic colour combinations covered in class (1. Monochromatic, 2. Analogous, 3. Complimentary, 4. Triadic) have been specifically utilized by designers in advertisements. Your group will post each ad on a chart sheet of paper, identifying and defining each colour combination, and stating how each colour combination has effectively been used. Afterward, your group will present your advertisements and the rationale behind the choices that you have made. Your group will also state two instances in video production where you feel that colour would play a key role. It will be expected that you will apply the colour knowledge that you will learn in this module towards the final PSA project.

Expectations (taken from MOE, Gr. 11 and 12) Overall Expectations By the end of this module, students will... TFV.01

Apply the design process to develop solutions, products, processes, or services in response to challenges or problems in electronic, live, or recorded communications;

SPV.02

Use current technology and production skills to develop a process or a product in response to a communications challenge or problem.

Specific Expectations By the end of this module, students will... TF1.01

Explain how a human need or want can be met through a new or improved product;

TF3.01

Outline guidelines, conventions, and rules used in the composition and design of a communications process;

SP1.01

Demonstrate the interpersonal skills required for effective teamwork;

SP1.02

Function effectively as individuals and as members of a cooperative team to produce a product or service;

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


PAGE 4

SP1.03

Demonstrate the time management and problem-solving skills required to complete projects;

SP3.04

Use colour theory and colour standards to create presentations that adhere to industry standards.

SP4.02

Use appropriate language in flow charts, storyboards, operation charts, scripts, and presentations;

SP4.03

Use terminology that is recognized by the communications industry.

Performance Indicators When you finish this module your work will be evaluated on… 1. Correctly identifying the four colour combinations covered in class. 2. Accurately defining each colour combination. 3. Effectively describing how each advertisement uses each colour combination. 4. Clearly communicating your rationale to the class in a presentation. 5. Stating two instances in video production that colour would play a key role.

Resource Sheet (listing resources to help you complete this module) Please refer to the following colour theory web sites for further information: W C T: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_theory C M: http://www.colormatters.com/colortheory.html C W P: http://www.color-wheel-pro.com/color-theory-basics.html D A: http://www.digitalanarchy.com/theory/theory_tutes.html A.: http://webdesign.about.com/cs/color/a/aacolortheory.htm D C P: http://digitalcontentproducer.com/di/depth/video_nbspcolor_theory/

Key Terms and Definitions 1. Monochromatic 2. Analogous 3. Complimentary 4. Split Complimentary 5. Triadic 6. Colour Spectrum 7. Primary Colours 8. Secondary Colours 9. Tertiary Colours 10. Additive Colour Model 11. Subtractive Colour Model

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PAGE 5

Activities 1. Form groups of two. 2. Search through various magazines. 3. Find four separate advertisements that exemplify designers using each of the four colour combinations. 4. Post each ad onto a chart sheet of paper, identifying and defining each colour combination. 5. Write a rationale for each ad, identifying how you feel that the colour combination being demonstrated has been effectively utilized by the designer. 6. As a group, present your advertisements and rationale to the class. 7. As a group, present two instances in video production where you feel that colour would play a key role.

Evaluation Students will be evaluated at the conclusion of this Module using the Rubric provided below. CATEGORIES KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

(50%)

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

e student:

Understanding of Identifying Colour Combinations in Ads

- demonstrates limited understanding

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

Understanding of Defining Colour Combinations

- demonstrates limited understanding

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

- uses thinking skills with moderate effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with considerable effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with a high degree of effectiveness

- communicates information with moderate clarity

- communicates information with considerable clarity

- communicates information with a high degree of clarity

THINKING/INQUIRY (10%) e student: inking Skills for - uses thinking skills Instances in Video with limited effectiveProduction Where ness Colour Plays Key Role COMMUNICATION

(40%)

e student:

Effective Communica- - communicates infortion of Rationale mation with limited clarity

Module #1: Exploring Colour for Video Production Evaluation Breakdown Knowledge & Understanding

50%

inking & Inquiry

10%

Communication

40%

TOTAL

100% Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


PAGE 6

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Communications Technology TGJ3M ~Student Learning Module

V P M : T M O  C:    E C T:  C 1. Colour Theory for Video Production . T  V C 3. Introduction to Script Writing for PSA 4. Introduction to Storyboarding 5. Introduction to Camera Operation 6. Introduction to Audio Production 7. Introduction to Lighting 8. Video Editing 9. Adding Sound Effects 10. Introduction to Foley

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


PAGE 9

Module #2: Exploring Typography for Video Credits Activities in Series: 1

The Situation Type can be creatively incorporated into video productions through such means as intro/end credits, subtitles, or overlays throughout the production. As with the choice of colour for video productions covered in the previous module, the choice of type can add a dramatic, and dynamic, appeal. Font choice, colour, size and positioning all play into effectively communicating your message or theme.

The Challenge To explore the basic elements of typography, students will first complete an elements of typography handout, listing the various components that comprise type. ey will then use Microsoft Word for the duration of this module, first familiarizing themselves with the fonts available on the computers in the lab, and then typing their name three times choosing three different fonts for each that best reflect their personality. Students will then write a rationale as to why they chose the fonts that they did. Next, students will create examples of Conflicting, Contrasting and Concordant typeface relationships. irdly, students will demonstrate examples of the major typeface classifications covered in class. To complete this Exploring Typography module, students will then download the “title_overlay.doc” file from the school server, and proceed to complete that assignment, demonstrating their ability to select appropriate fonts and colours to overlay on top of screen captures from various video productions. Students may refer to the websites listed in the Resources section as part of this module for further information.

Expectations (taken from MOE, Gr. 11 and 12) Overall Expectations By the end of this module, students will... TFV.01

Apply the design process to develop solutions, products, processes, or services in response to challenges or problems in electronic, live, or recorded communications;

SPV.02

Use current technology and production skills to develop a process or a product in response to a communications challenge or problem.

Specific Expectations By the end of this module, students will... TF1.01

Explain how a human need or want can be met through a new or improved product;

TF3.01

Outline guidelines, conventions, and rules used in the composition and design of a communications process;

SP1.03

Demonstrate the time management and problem-solving skills required to complete projects;

SP2.02

Select and use tools and equipment to solve a communications problem;

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SP3.03

Use industry-standard guidelines, conventions, and rules for composition and design;

SP3.04

Use colour theory and colour standards to create presentations that adhere to industry standards.

SP4.03

Use terminology that is recognized by the communications industry.

Performance Indicators When you finish this module your work will be evaluated on… 1. Correctly identifying the elements of typography on the handout. 2. Appropriately choosing three fonts that match your personality and effectively communicating the rationale behind your choices. 3. Effectively creating examples of Conflicting, Contrasting and Concordant typeface relationships. 4. Effectively demonstrating examples of the major typeface classifications. 5. Effectively choosing appropriate fonts/colours to overlay on top of screen captures from video production examples.

Resource Sheet (listing resources to help you complete this module) Please refer to the following typography web sites for further information: V R: http://www.videoresources.com/tips/typographyanddesign.html G C C: http://teched.vt.edu/gcc/HTML/VirtualTextbook/VirtualArticles/ VATypography.html P T: http://www.planet-typography.com/ A.: http://desktoppub.about.com/od/typography/Typography.htm O D: http://www.dmoz.org/Arts/Graphic_Design/Typography/ T C: http://pirate.shu.edu/~mckenndo/Typography%20home%20page.htm

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Key Terms and Definitions 1. Point size

12. Sans serif

2. Uppercase

13. Conflicting

3. Lowercase

14. Contrasting

4. x-height

15. Concordant

5. Baseline

16. Oldstyle

6. Ascender

17. Modern

7. Descender

18. Blackletter

8. Leading

19. Decorative

9. Kerning

20. Bold

10. Tracking

21. Italic

11. Serif

22. Small Caps

Activities 1. Complete the elements of typography handout. 2. In Microsoft Word, familiarize yourself with the fonts available on the computers in the lab, and write your name three times, choosing three different fonts that reflect your personality. Along with each name, state the chose font used. Underneath, write a rationale outlining why you chose the fonts that you did and how they match your personality. 3. Using Microsoft Word, type paragraphs to use to create examples of Conflicting, Contrasting and Concordant typeface relationships. 3. Using Microsoft Word, choose fonts to create examples that exemplify the major typeface classifications covered in class. 4. Download the “title_overlay.doc� file from the school server, and use that file to overlay text of your choice on top of the screen captures from various video productions, selecting appropriate fonts and colours to match the screen captures.

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Evaluation Students will be evaluated at the conclusion of this Module using the Rubric provided below. CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

(50%)

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

e student:

Understanding of Identifying Elements of Typography

- demonstrates limited understanding

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

Understanding of Selecting Appropriate Fonts to Match Your Personality

- demonstrates limited understanding

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

Understanding of - demonstrates limited Exemplifying Typeface understanding Classifications

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

- applies overlays with moderate effectiveness

- applies overlays with considerable effectiveness

- applies overlays with a high degree of effectiveness

- communicates information with moderate clarity

- communicates information with considerable clarity

- communicates information with a high degree of clarity

APPLICATION

(30%)

e student:

Application of Effectively Overlaying Credits

- applies overlays with limited effectiveness

COMMUNICATION

e student:

(20%)

Effective Communica- - communicates infortion of Rationale mation with limited clarity

Module #2: Exploring Typography for Video Credits Evaluation Breakdown Knowledge & Understanding

50%

Application

30%

Communication

20%

TOTAL

100%

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Communications Technology TGJ3M ~Student Learning Module

V P M : S W M O  C:    E C T:  C 1. Colour Theory for Video Production 2. Typography for Video Credits . I  S W  PSA 4. Introduction to Storyboarding 5. Introduction to Camera Operation 6. Introduction to Audio Production 7. Introduction to Lighting 8. Video Editing 9. Adding Sound Effects 10. Introduction to Foley

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Module #3: Introduction to Script Writing for PSA Activities in Series: 5

The Situation A script is a written plan, authored by a screenwriter, specifically targeted at the visual, narrative arts such as film and television. Scripts can be original works or adaptations from existing works such as novels. A script is a blueprint of what happens within the production. e major components of a script are action and dialogue, with the action being “what we see happening” and dialogue being “what we hear” (i.e., what the characters say).

The Challenge is module will help you understand how to effectively write a script that will be visually developed into a storyboard for your PSA. You will first learn basic film terminology that will be of use in describing screen action in your script. You will then learn how to write a “Treatment” of your script, describing the PSA in medium detail in order to get the overall “concept” or “tone” across. You will also learn script formatting, and why scripts are arranged in a certain way. Students will also begin research for possible PSA topics pertaining to “School Life.” Once obtaining approval from their teacher, students will proceed in the development of their Script Treatment, and will then further develop the Treatment into a “Shooting Script.” Students will then take part in a “read-through” in order to receive formative feedback from their peers and teacher.

Expectations (taken from MOE, Gr. 11 and 12) Overall Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T  F TFV.01

Apply the design process to develop solutions, products, processes, or services in response to challenges or problems in electronic, live, or recorded communications;

TFV.02

Identify and describe the components and processes that make up each of the following: electronic, live, and recorded communications.

S  P SPV.01

Effectively plan, organize, direct, and control a variety of communications activities;

SPV.02

Use current technology and production skills to develop a process or a product in response to a communications challenge or problem;

SPV.04

Use effective techniques to carry out and document the steps in pre-production.

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Specific Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T D P TF1.01

Explain how a human need or want can be met through a new or improved product;

TF1.02

Apply the following steps of the design process to solve a variety of communications technology challenges or problems.

S TF3.01

Outline guidelines, conventions, and rules used in the composition and design of a communications process;

TF3.02

Research appropriate production techniques and recommend processes that adhere to industry standards;

TF3.03

Select the appropriate formats for electronic, live, and recorded productions.

O S SP1.01

Demonstrate the interpersonal skills required for effective teamwork;

SP1.02

Function effectively as individuals and as members of a cooperative team to produce a product or service;

SP1.03

Demonstrate the time management and problem-solving skills required to complete projects;

SP1.04

Accurately document planning and production processes;

SP1.05

Effectively apply a variety of planning tools (e.g., storyboards, flow charts, schematic diagrams);

SP1.06

Select and use appropriate software to manage the production process.

P S SP2.01

Set up and correctly operate the equipment and accessories required to create and modify environments for communications productions (e.g., video and audio editing suites, live and recorded productions, electronic communication systems);

SP2.02

Select and use tools and equipment to solve a communications problem;

SP2.03

Operate control devices and components to manipulate or create communications technology projects;

SP2.04

Develop and interpret technical and artistic drawings, reports, instructions, manuals, on-line documentation, and specifications to help solve a communications problem;

SP2.05

Set up and operate communications equipment;

SP3.01

Use a variety of methods to document the planning and production processes;

SP3.03

Use industry-standard guidelines, conventions, and rules for composition and design;

SP3.04

Use colour theory and colour standards to create presentations that adhere to industry standards.

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I A SP4.02

Use appropriate language in flow charts, storyboards, operation charts, scripts, and presentations;

SP4.03

Use terminology that is recognized by the communications industry.

S  L IC2.01

Apply safe work practices when performing communications processes.

Performance Indicators When you finish this module your work will be evaluated on… 1. Knowledge of basic film terminology. 2. Completion of research on PSA topic. 3. Descriptive completion of script treatment. 4. Descriptive development and completion of shooting script. 5. Participation in peer evaluated script read-through.

Resource Sheet (listing resources to help you complete this module) Please refer to the following texts and web sites for further information: Screenplay, e Foundations of Screenwriting, Syd Field, Dell Publishing Co. Ltd. 1976 Video Basics 5, Herbert Zettl, Wadsworth Publishing, 2006 B C–S W  D: http://www.britfilms.com/resources/scriptwriting S W: http://www.breakingin.net

Key Terms and Definitions 1. Fade in 2. Fade out 3. Cut 4. Wipe 5. Dissolve 6. Pan 7. Zoom 8. Wide shot 9. Medium shot 10. Close-up 11. Script treatment 12. Shooting script

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Activity #1 — Online Safety Module 1. is activity is online. Go to: www.ourschool.ca/CT/modules/TG3J3MGb/act1.htm 2. Follow the instructions online to complete the module. 3. When you complete the module, check off Activity #1 on your module checklist.

Activity #2 — Basic Film Terminology Lecture and Screening 1. Students will learn basic film terms from the Film Glossary handout and script examples from the documentaries “Sicko” and “An Inconvenient Truth.” 2. Students will refer to their “Script to Screen” examples that illustrate how shooting scripts play out in the final product. Students will view sequences from “Sicko” and “An Inconvenient Truth.” 3. Students will be given an example of a script treatment and will learn what is required to complete a script treatment for their PSA project. 4. Students will be given an example of a properly formatted shooting script and learn what is required in completing a shooting script for their PSA project. 5. Once you have completed the Basic Film Terminology Lecture and Screening portion of this module, check off Activity #2 on your module checklist.

Activity #3 — Research and Development — The Script Treatment 1. Using the research information that has been gathered outside of class time, students will begin to write the script treatment for their PSA project. 2. Each group must prepare a one page, single-spaced script treatment outlining the plans for their PSA project. ese plans must include specific interviews and locations related to the PSA. It must also describe the “look” and “tone” of the project, as well as music that might suit the subject matter. Comparisons to other PSAs or documentaries are welcome. 3. A representative from each group will present their PSA script treatment during a peer evaluation session in order to obtain formative feedback from students and teacher. 4. Once you have completed the Research and Development — e Script Treatment portion of this module, check off Activity #3 on your module checklist.

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Activity #4 — The Shooting Script 1. Using your PSA script treatment and the feedback obtained from your peer evaluation, students will write their shooting script. 2. Students will follow standard script format in writing the shooting script. 3. Students will describe all camera related action(s) using terminology from the Film Glossary handout. 4. A representative from each group will present their PSA shooting script during a second peer evaluation session in order to receive feedback from students and teacher. 5. Students will incorporate any revisions into their shooting script that they wish to as a result of the peer and teacher feedback obtained in class. 6. Once you have completed e Shooting Script portion of this module, check off Activity #4 on your module checklist.

Activity #5 — Online Quiz — Script Treatment and Shooting Scripts 1. Complete the “Script Treatment and Shooting Scripts” Quiz found at: www.ourschool.ca/CT/modules/ TJ3MGb/quiz.htm. Your mark will be automatically submitted. NOTE: You cannot begin the quiz unless activities 1 through 4 have been completed. 2. Follow the online instructions to complete the quiz. Your mark will be automatically submitted. 3. After you complete the quiz, check off Activity #5 on the module checklist.

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Evaluation Students will be evaluated at the conclusion of each Activity of this Module using the Rubrics and evaluation breakdowns provided below. CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

A  — B F T L  S (10% OF MODULE) KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

e student:

Understanding of - demonstrates limited How Written Scripts understanding Translate to the Screen

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

Understanding How to Properly Construct a Script Treatment

- demonstrates limited understanding

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

Knowledge of Basic Film Terms

- demonstrates limited knowledge

- demonstrates some knowledge

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able knowledge knowledge

A  — R  D — T S T THINKING/INQUIRY

e student:

inking Skills to Gather and Compile Research

- uses thinking skills with limited effectiveness

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Procedures in Preparing Script Treatment

- makes connections with limited effectiveness

COMMUNICATION

e student:

Effective Communica- - communicates infortion of Information in mation with limited Script Treatment clarity

(30% OF MODULE)

- uses thinking skills with moderate effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with considerable effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with a high degree of effectiveness

- makes connections with moderate effectiveness

- makes connections with considerable effectiveness

- makes connections with a high degree of effectiveness

- communicates information with moderate clarity

- communicates information with considerable clarity

- communicates information with a high degree of clarity

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CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

A  — T S S

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

- uses thinking skills with moderate effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with considerable effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with a high degree of effectiveness

- makes connections with moderate effectiveness

- makes connections with considerable effectiveness

- makes connections with a high degree of effectiveness

- communicates information with moderate clarity

- communicates information with considerable clarity

- communicates information with a high degree of clarity

(50% OF MODULE)

THINKING/INQUIRY

e student:

inking Skills in Incorporating Feedback from Peer Evaluations

- uses thinking skills with limited effectiveness

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Writing Shooting Script Following Standard Script Format

- makes connections with limited effectiveness

COMMUNICATION

e student:

Effective Communica- - communicates infortion of PSA Shooting mation with limited Script clarity

A  — Q

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

(10% OF MODULE)

e culminating quiz for this module will be evaluated with a mark based on the grade value assigned to each question.

Module #3: Introduction to Script Writing for PSA Evaluation Breakdown ACTIVITY Activity #1 — Online Safety Module

WEIGHTING no mark

Activity #2 — Basic Film Terminology Lecture and Screening

10%

Activity #3 — Research and Development — e Script Treatment

30%

Activity #4 — e Shooting Script

50%

Activity #5 — Online Quiz

10%

TOTAL

100%

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Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Communications Technology TGJ3M ~Student Learning Module

V P M : S M O  C:    E C T:  C 1. Colour Theory for Video Production 2. Typography for Video Credits 3. Introduction to Script Writing for PSA . I  S 5. Introduction to Camera Operation 6. Introduction to Audio Production 7. Introduction to Lighting 8. Video Editing 9. Adding Sound Effects 10. Introduction to Foley

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Module #4: Introduction to Storyboarding Activities in Series: 4

The Situation e storyboard is a visual representation of a script. It is a blueprint from which a Director or Cinematographer will shoot a film/video. Next to the script, the storyboard is the most important visual guide that all the different departments of a production can reference in order to better understand their tasks.

The Challenge is module will help you understand how to effectively render sequential storyboard panels from your shot list that will aid as a visual guide when shooting your PSA. You will learn about shot composition (rule of thirds, etc.), the 180-degree rule, camera moves and cutting technique. You will also learn drawing shortcuts that allow you to describe camera angles and moves, and character poses and perspective, in a simple yet useful manner. Finally, you will “pitch” your storyboards to the class in order to obtain feedback.

Expectations (taken from MOE, Gr. 11 and 12) Overall Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T  F TFV.01

Apply the design process to develop solutions, products, processes, or services in response to challenges or problems in electronic, live, or recorded communications;

TFV.02

Identify and describe the components and processes that make up each of the following: electronic, live, and recorded communications.

S  P SPV.01

Effectively plan, organize, direct, and control a variety of communications activities;

SPV.02

Use current technology and production skills to develop a process or a product in response to a communications challenge or problem;

SPV.04

Use effective techniques to carry out and document the steps in pre-production.

Specific Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T D P TF1.01

Explain how a human need or want can be met through a new or improved product;

TF1.02

Apply the following steps of the design process to solve a variety of communications technology challenges or problems.

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S TF3.01

Outline guidelines, conventions, and rules used in the composition and design of a communications process;

TF3.02

Research appropriate production techniques and recommend processes that adhere to industry standards;

TF3.03

Select the appropriate formats for electronic, live, and recorded productions.

O S SP1.01

Demonstrate the interpersonal skills required for effective teamwork;

SP1.02

Function effectively as individuals and as members of a cooperative team to produce a product or service;

SP1.03

Demonstrate the time management and problem-solving skills required to complete projects;

SP1.04

Accurately document planning and production processes;

SP1.05

Effectively apply a variety of planning tools (e.g., storyboards, flow charts, schematic diagrams);

SP1.06

Select and use appropriate software to manage the production process.

P S SP2.01

Set up and correctly operate the equipment and accessories required to create and modify environments for communications productions (e.g., video and audio editing suites, live and recorded productions, electronic communication systems);

SP2.02

Select and use tools and equipment to solve a communications problem;

SP2.03

Operate control devices and components to manipulate or create communications technology projects;

SP2.04

Develop and interpret technical and artistic drawings, reports, instructions, manuals, on-line documentation, and specifications to help solve a communications problem;

SP2.05

Set up and operate communications equipment;

SP3.01

Use a variety of methods to document the planning and production processes;

SP3.03

Use industry-standard guidelines, conventions, and rules for composition and design;

SP3.04

Use colour theory and colour standards to create presentations that adhere to industry standards.

I A SP4.02

Use appropriate language in flow charts, storyboards, operation charts, scripts, and presentations;

SP4.03

Use terminology that is recognized by the communications industry.

S  L IC2.01

Apply safe work practices when performing communications processes.

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Performance Indicators When you finish this module your work will be evaluated on… 1. Effective creation of a shot list from the script. 2. Incorporating a variety of shot types intended to hold viewers interest. 3. Clear and communicative renderings on storyboard panels. 4. Clear descriptions of action and dialogue on storyboard. 5. Proper use of terminology on storyboard. 6. Effectively communicating the storyboard pitch to peers.

Resource Sheet (listing resources to help you complete this module) Please refer to the following texts and web sites for further information: Storyboarding 101: A Crash Course in Professional Storyboarding, Michael Wise, MWP Publishing, 2000 Exploring Storyboarding, Wendy Tumminello, TDL Publishing, 2005 Don Bluth’s Art of Storyboard, Don Bluth and Gary Goldman, DH Press, 2004 Paper Dreams — e Art and Artists of Disney Storyboards, John Canemaker, New York Hyperion, 1999 C  S  V P: http://www2.hawaii.edu/%7Ericky/etec/ storyboarding.html Video Basics 5, Herbert Zettl, Wadsworth Publishing, 2006

Key Terms and Definitions 1. Shot composition

14. Zip pan

2. Rule of thirds

15. Rotate

3. Wide shot

16. Tilt

4. Group shot

17. Truck

5. Over-shoulder shot

18. Dolly

6. POV shot

19. Zoom

7. One shot

20. Crane

8. Two shot

21. Transition

9. Medium shot

22. Cut

10. Close-up

23. Dissolve

11. Extreme close-up

24. Fade up

12. 180-degree rule

25. Fade to black

13. Pan

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Activity #1 — Create a Shot List from Your Script 1. Download and print your PSA script from your class folder. 2. Writing directly on your script, break each scene into separate shots. Make camera indications using film terminology. Be as descriptive as possible. 3. Create a new Microsoft Word document titled “Shot List.doc.” 4. Create a title page with the name of your PSA, your name and class number. 5. List all the shots, their camera indications, who is in each shot, the location of the shot and the estimated length (duration) of each shot. Include an estimated time per shot (in seconds) adding up to a total of no more than 10 minutes. 6. Once your Shot List is completed, check off Activity #1 on your module checklist.

Activity #2 — Create the Storyboard 1. Download and print several copies (start with 10) of the Storyboard template found in the class folder. 2. Using the information from your Script and your Shot List: a) Fill in the dialogue and action boxes on your storyboard template. Do this before starting any drawing (make sure you estimate how many panels it will take to illustrate the action taking place in each shot). b) List the scene and shot number in the box on the top right of each storyboard panel. c) At the bottom of each action box, include the estimated time (duration), in seconds, that each shot should take. 3. Using an HB or B pencil, render the camera information, actors and action that is described in the action box. Provide strong character posing to better illustrate dialogue scenes. 4. Once your Storyboard is complete, check off Activity #2 on your module checklist.

Activity #3 — The Storyboard Pitch 1. Using thumbtacks, pin Storyboard sheets on the corkboard in sequential order from left to right. 2. Have one or two designated members of your group walk the class through the storyboard, providing as much descriptive information, animated movement and sound effects as possible. e idea is to sell the audience on your ideas. 3. Have another group member take notes regarding any feedback or changes suggested during the Storyboard pitch. 4. Consult with your group and teacher before implementing the feedback into your Storyboard. 5. Once you have made any necessary revisions to your Storyboard, check off Activity #3 on your module checklist. Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


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Activity #4 — Online Quiz — Shot Lists and Storyboarding 1. Complete the Shot Lists and Storyboarding Quiz found at: www.ourschool.ca/CT/modules/TJ3MGb/ quiz.htm. Your mark will be automatically submitted. NOTE: You cannot begin the quiz unless activities 1 through 4 have been completed. 2. Follow the online instructions to complete the quiz. Your mark will be automatically submitted. 3. After you complete the quiz, check off Activity #5 on the module checklist. 4. Consult with the teacher to determine whether you have time to tackle the Additional Challenge.

Evaluation Students will be evaluated at the conclusion of each Activity of this Module using the Rubrics and evaluation breakdowns provided below. CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

A  — C  S L F Y S (20% OF MODULE) KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

e student:

Understanding of Script Breakdown

- demonstrates limited understanding

THINKING/INQUIRY

e student:

Knowledge of Shot - demonstrates limited Types and Terminology knowledge

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

- demonstrates some knowledge

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able knowledge knowledge

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Creating Shot List

- applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts with limited effectivewith moderate effecwith considerable efwith a high degree of ness tiveness fectiveness effectiveness

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CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

A  — C  S KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING Understanding of Compiling Script and Shot List Notes Into Storyboard

- demonstrates limited understanding

e student:

Application of Creating Drawings from Shot List Notes

- makes connections with limited effectiveness

A  — T S P

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

(50% OF MODULE)

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

- makes connections with moderate effectiveness

- makes connections with considerable effectiveness

- makes connections with a high degree of effectiveness

- communicates information with considerable clarity

- communicates information with a high degree of clarity

(20% OF MODULE)

e student:

Effective Communica- - communicates infortion of Storyboard mation with limited Pitch to Class clarity

A  — Q

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

e student:

APPLICATION

COMMUNICATION

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

- communicates information with moderate clarity

(10% OF MODULE)

e culminating quiz for this module will be evaluated with a mark based on the grade value assigned to each question.

Module #4: Introduction to Storyboarding Evaluation Breakdown ACTIVITY

WEIGHTING

Activity #1 — Create a Shot List From Your Script

20%

Activity #2 — Create the Storyboard

50%

Activity #3 — e Storyboard Pitch

20%

Activity #4 — Quiz

10%

TOTAL

100%

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Communications Technology TGJ3M ~Student Learning Module

V P M : C O M O  C:    E C T:  C 1. Colour Theory for Video Production 2. Typography for Video Credits 3. Introduction to Script Writing for PSA 4. Introduction to Storyboarding . I  C O 6. Introduction to Audio Production 7. Introduction to Lighting 8. Video Editing 9. Adding Sound Effects 10. Introduction to Foley

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Module #5: Introduction to Camera Operation Activities in Series: 5

The Situation Effective camera operation is an essential element of video production. In filmmaking, multiple cameras (or, multiple camera positions of a single camera) are often used. When cinematographers frame a shot, several key factors are taken into consideration, including whether movement of the camera should be added to the shot, and if so, what dramatic appeal would result.

The Challenge is module is designed to provide you with knowledge and skills to effectively improve every aspect of your camera work in preparation to videotape your PSA. You will learn basic camera terminology, after which you will learn and then videotape 5-10 different types of camera composition techniques (shots and movements).

Expectations (taken from MOE, Gr. 11 and 12) Overall Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T  F TFV.02

Identify and describe the components and processes that make up each of the following: electronic, live, and recorded communications;

TFV.03

Explain how basic communications systems function and describe the knowledge required to manage a range of communications systems;

TFV.04

Describe industry standards, regulations, and formats that apply to communications technology.

S  P SPV.01

Effectively plan, organize, direct, and control a variety of communications activities;

SPV.02

Use current technology and production skills to develop a process or a product in response to a communications challenge or problem;

SPV.04

Use effective techniques to carry out and document the steps in pre-production.

Specific Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T D P TF1.01

Explain how a human need or want can be met through a new or improved product;

TF1.02

Apply the following steps of the design process to solve a variety of communications technology challenges or problems.

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TF2.05

Identify the advantages of various formats for specific applications;

TF2.06

Summarize the configurations for a variety of electronic, live, and recorded systems, and develop a plan to set up and manage the systems.

S TF3.01

Outline guidelines, conventions, and rules used in the composition and design of a communications process;

TF3.02

Research appropriate production techniques and recommend processes that adhere to industry standards;

TF3.03

Select the appropriate formats for electronic, live, and recorded productions.

O S SP1.01

Demonstrate the interpersonal skills required for effective teamwork;

SP1.02

Function effectively as individuals and as members of a cooperative team to produce a product or service;

SP1.03

Demonstrate the time management and problem-solving skills required to complete projects;

SP1.04

Accurately document planning and production processes;

SP1.05

Effectively apply a variety of planning tools (e.g., storyboards, flow charts, schematic diagrams);

SP1.06

Select and use appropriate software to manage the production process.

P S SP2.01

Set up and correctly operate the equipment and accessories required to create and modify environments for communications productions (e.g., video and audio editing suites, live and recorded productions, electronic communication systems);

SP2.02

Select and use tools and equipment to solve a communications problem;

SP2.03

Operate control devices and components to manipulate or create communications technology projects;

SP2.04

Develop and interpret technical and artistic drawings, reports, instructions, manuals, on-line documentation, and specifications to help solve a communications problem;

SP2.05

Set up and operate communications equipment;

SP3.01

Use a variety of methods to document the planning and production processes;

SP3.03

Use industry-standard guidelines, conventions, and rules for composition and design;

SP3.04

Use colour theory and colour standards to create presentations that adhere to industry standards.

I A SP4.02

Use appropriate language in flow charts, storyboards, operation charts, scripts, and presentations;

SP4.03

Use terminology that is recognized by the communications industry.

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S  L IC2.01

Apply safe work practices when performing communications processes.

Performance Indicators When you finish this module your work will be evaluated on… 1. Effective selection of video camera shots and movements. 2. Effective selection of lighting. 3. Effective creation and application combining both video and lighting components. 4. Understanding the basics of sound theory, sound equipment, microphone stands, mounts, clamps and audio work. 5. Submission and completion of the Module Checklist/Self Evaluation Form.

Resource Sheet (listing resources to help you complete this module) Please refer to the following texts and web sites for further information: C C: www.cybercollege.com M C: www.mediacollege.com P L: http://www.eusd4kids.org/edtech/project_live.html#camera T G  TV  F: http://www.aber.ac.uk/media/Documents/short/gramtv.html Video Basics 5, Herbert Zettl, Wadsworth Publishing, 2006

Key Terms and Definitions 1. Camcorder

12. Zoom

2. Chroma Key

13. Floor Manager

3. Colour Bars

14. Head

4. Cut

15. Hi8

5. Dissolve

16. mini-DV

6. Fade

17. Hot

7. Dolly

18. Iris

8. Truck

19. Optical Zoom

9. Arc

20. Rule of irds

10. Pan

21. Scene

11. Tilt

22. Shot

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Activity #1 — Online Video Production Safety Module 1. is activity is online. Go to: www.ourschool.ca/CT/modules/TG3J3MGb/act1.htm 2. Follow the instructions online to complete the module. 3. When you complete the module, check off Activity #1 on your module checklist.

Activity #2 — Video Production Terminology 1. Students will browse the “Who Does What — Television Jobs” page on www.cybercollege.com, and be required to define the video production terms listed there. 2. Students will complete the glossary handout and camera composition shots and angles examples from the TV show “e X-Files.” 3. Students will outline the procedures required to create audio-video production. 4. Students will identify different parts and different functions of a video camera. As well, different tape formats i.e. SP, SX, IMX and D-Beta. 5. Students will be provided examples that illustrate how shooting scripts play out in the final product. Students will view sequences from “e X-Files.” 6. Students will be given an example of camera composition and will learn what is required to identify the type of camera shots for their PSA project. Students will describe various video recording techniques. 7. Once you have completed Basic Video Production Terminology Lecture and Camera Composition module, check off Activity #2 on your module checklist.

Activity #3 — Research and Development — The Production Analysis 1. Using the research information, why do we need to know about camera shots and movements? As well, what is the importance of understanding camera shots and movements in preparation for your PSA project? What is the meaning behind each shot? 2. How are the XCU, CU, MS, LS shots composed, and what are the benefits of using each? Student must show samples through an X-Files overhead presentation. 3. Camera composition exercise: Students will form groups of three and record the following camera shots and movements with the use of a tripod and without: High angle, low angle, eye-level, reverse-angle, canted angle, bird’s eye, worm’s eye, pan, tilt, zoom, dolly shot, trucking shot, arcing shot. e students will then explain the shots and movements and state the benefit of using each. 4. Each group must prepare a one page, single spaced production analysis outlining the plans for their PSA project based on their script/storyboard as developed earlier in the course. ese plans must include specific interviews and locations related to your PSA. It must also describe the “look” and “tone” of the project, as well as music that might suit the subject matter. Comparisons to other PSAs or documentaries

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are welcome. 5. A representative from each group will present their PSA production analysis during a peer evaluation session in order to obtain feedback from students and teacher. 6. Once you have completed Research and Development - e Production Analysis module, check off Activity #3 on your module checklist.

Activity #4 — Camera Shots and Movements 1. Using your X-Files production analysis and feedback obtained from your peer evaluation, students will explain each and describe the effect of each type of camera shot and movement from Activity #3 2. Students will follow standard production set-up in pre-production preparation. 3. Students will describe all camera-related action using terminology from the Glossary handout obtained from www.mediacollege.com. 4. A representative from each group will present their PSA production analysis based on the pre-production presentation, focusing on different camera movements during a second peer evaluation session, in order to receive further feedback from students and teacher. 5. Once you have completed e Video Production module, check off Activity #4 on your module checklist.

Activity #5 — Online Quiz — Video Production 1. Complete the Video Production Quiz. Go to: www.ourschool.ca/CT/modules/TJ3MGb/quiz.htm. NOTE: You cannot begin the quiz unless activities 1 through 4 have been completed. 2. Follow the online instructions to complete the quiz. Your mark will be automatically submitted. 3. After you complete the quiz, check off Activity #5 on the module checklist.

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Evaluation Students will be evaluated at the conclusion of each Activity of this Module using the Rubrics and evaluation breakdowns provided below. CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

A  — V P T (10% OF MODULE) KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

e student:

Understanding of - demonstrates limited How Video Production understanding Translates to Screen

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

Understanding How to Properly Construct a Video Production

- demonstrates limited understanding

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

Knowledge of Video Production Terms

- demonstrates limited knowledge

- demonstrates some knowledge

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able knowledge knowledge

A  — R  D — T P A THINKING/INQUIRY

e student:

inking Skills to Gather and Compile Research

- uses thinking skills with limited effectiveness

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Procedures in Preparing Video Production

- makes connections with limited effectiveness

COMMUNICATION

e student:

Effective Communica- - communicates infortion of Information mation with limited on Video Production clarity

(30% OF MODULE)

- uses thinking skills with moderate effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with considerable effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with a high degree of effectiveness

- makes connections with moderate effectiveness

- makes connections with considerable effectiveness

- makes connections with a high degree of effectiveness

- communicates information with moderate clarity

- communicates information with considerable clarity

- communicates information with a high degree of clarity

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CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

A  — C S  M THINKING/INQUIRY

e student:

inking Skills in Incorporating Feedback from Peer Evaluations

- uses thinking skills with limited effectiveness

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Camera - makes connections Shots and Movements with limited effectiveness COMMUNICATION

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

(50% OF MODULE)

- uses thinking skills with moderate effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with considerable effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with a high degree of effectiveness

- makes connections with moderate effectiveness

- makes connections with considerable effectiveness

- makes connections with a high degree of effectiveness

- communicates information with moderate clarity

- communicates information with considerable clarity

- communicates information with a high degree of clarity

e student:

Effective Communica- - communicates infortion of Camera Shots mation with limited and Movements clarity

A  — Q

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

(10% OF MODULE)

e culminating quiz for this module will be evaluated with a mark based on the grade value assigned to each question.

Module #5: Introduction to Camera Operation Evaluation Breakdown ACTIVITY Activity #1 — Online Safety Module

WEIGHTING no mark

Activity #2 — Video Production Terminology

10%

Activity #3 — Research and Development — e Production Analysis

30%

Activity #4 — Camera Shots and Movements

50%

Activity #5 — Online Quiz

10%

TOTAL

100%

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Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Communications Technology TGJ3M ~Student Learning Module

V P M : A P M O  C:    E C T:  C 1. Colour Theory for Video Production 2. Typography for Video Credits 3. Introduction to Script Writing for PSA 4. Introduction to Storyboarding 5. Introduction to Camera Operation . I  A P 7. Introduction to Lighting 8. Video Editing 9. Adding Sound Effects 10. Introduction to Foley

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Module #6: Introduction to Audio Production Activities in Series: 5

The Situation Audio is a key element in video production, at times overlooked as being secondary in importance to video. Next to the video production, audio is the most important guide in aiding all the different departments of a production process.

The Challenge is module will assist you in understanding what effective audio production is and will challenge you to demonstrate your knowledge and experience with audio production assignments. You will learn about different types of audio, as well as different equipment in which to record audio for your PSA.

Expectations (taken from MOE, Gr. 11 and 12) Overall Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T  F TFV.02

Identify and describe the components and processes that make up each of the following: electronic, live, and recorded communications;

TFV.03

Explain how basic communications systems function and describe the knowledge required to manage a range of communications systems;

TFV.04

Describe industry standards, regulations, and formats that apply to communications technology.

S  P SPV.01

Effectively plan, organize, direct, and control a variety of communications activities;

SPV.02

Use current technology and production skills to develop a process or a product in response to a communications challenge or problem;

SPV.04

Use effective techniques to carry out and document the steps in pre-production.

Specific Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T D P TF1.01

Explain how a human need or want can be met through a new or improved product;

TF1.02

Apply the following steps of the design process to solve a variety of communications technology challenges or problems.

TF2.05

Identify the advantages of various formats for specific applications;

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TF2.06

Summarize the configurations for a variety of electronic, live, and recorded systems, and develop a plan to set up and manage the systems.

S TF3.01

Outline guidelines, conventions, and rules used in the composition and design of a communications process;

TF3.02

Research appropriate production techniques and recommend processes that adhere to industry standards;

TF3.03

Select the appropriate formats for electronic, live, and recorded productions.

O S SP1.01

Demonstrate the interpersonal skills required for effective teamwork;

SP1.02

Function effectively as individuals and as members of a cooperative team to produce a product or service;

SP1.03

Demonstrate the time management and problem-solving skills required to complete projects;

SP1.04

Accurately document planning and production processes;

SP1.05

Effectively apply a variety of planning tools (e.g., storyboards, flow charts, schematic diagrams);

SP1.06

Select and use appropriate software to manage the production process.

P S SP2.01

Set up and correctly operate the equipment and accessories required to create and modify environments for communications productions (e.g., video and audio editing suites, live and recorded productions, electronic communication systems);

SP2.02

Select and use tools and equipment to solve a communications problem;

SP2.03

Operate control devices and components to manipulate or create communications technology projects;

SP2.04

Develop and interpret technical and artistic drawings, reports, instructions, manuals, on-line documentation, and specifications to help solve a communications problem;

SP2.05

Set up and operate communications equipment;

SP3.01

Use a variety of methods to document the planning and production processes;

SP3.03

Use industry-standard guidelines, conventions, and rules for composition and design;

SP3.04

Use colour theory and colour standards to create presentations that adhere to industry standards.

I A SP4.02

Use appropriate language in flow charts, storyboards, operation charts, scripts, and presentations;

SP4.03

Use terminology that is recognized by the communications industry.

S  L IC2.01

Apply safe work practices when performing communications processes.

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Performance Indicators When you finish this module your work will be evaluated on… 1. Effective creation of an audio list from the script. 2. Variety of audio equipment intended to assist video production. 3. Proper use of audio terminology.

Resource Sheet (listing resources to help you complete this module) Please refer to the following texts and web sites for further information: C C: www.cybercollege.com M C: www.mediacollege.com P L: http://www.eusd4kids.org/edtech/project_live.html#camera Video Basics 5, Herbert Zettl, Wadsworth Publishing, 2006

Key Terms and Definitions 1. Audio Dub

14. Hand held

2. Boom mike (shotgun)

15. Headset: broadcaster

3. Bidirectional

16. Jack

4. Cardiod

17. Omni directional

5. Channel

18. Parabolic Reflector

6. Condenser Microphones

19. Sound Reinforcement

7. Cross fade

20. Stereo

8. Desk stand

21. Supercardiod

9. Directional properties

22. Tone

10. Dynamic Range

23. White noise

11. Dynamic Microphones

24. Ambience

12. Fade

25. Wireless

13. Floor stand

26. Zoom Microphone

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Activity #1 — Create an Audio Cue List From Your Script 1. Download and print your PSA script from your class folder. 2. Create a list of the types of microphones and equipment needed for your production shoot. 2. Write directly on your script: break each scene into separate audio shots and list the potential types of audio equipment required for production recording. Make audio indications using film terminology. Be as descriptive as possible (i.e. shot requires a lapel mike for 1 or 2 people). 3. Create a new Microsoft Word document titled: “Audio List.doc.” 4. Create a title page with the name of your PSA, your name and your class number. 5. List all the audio recordings, their camera recording indications, which are in each shot, what location the shot takes place in and the estimated length of each shot. 6. Once your Audio List is completed, check off Activity #1 on your module checklist.

Activity #2 — Audio Production Terminology 1. Review audio board, microphones, and cables. 2. In-depth look at types of microphones (hand held, PZM, lavalieres) and Microphone construction. 3. Discuss omni directional, directional & unidirectional formats in audio & video production. 4. Discuss microphone placements. 5. Complete the glossary handout. 6. Students will outline the procedures required in audio production. 7. Students will be provided examples that illustrate how recording audio contributes to the final product. Students will view sequences from “e X-Files.” 8. Students will be required to identify the types of audio used for their PSA project. Students will describe various audio recording techniques. 9. Students will learn what is required in completing an audio record for their PSA project.

Activity #3 — Research and Development — Audio Production Analysis 1. Using the research information, why do we need audio? List the importance of understanding audio production in preparation for your PSA project. 2. List your observation of microphone placements and microphones used. Show samples: X-Files overhead presentation. 3. Audio production exercise: Students will demonstrate and record various audio samples using various recording equipment (i.e. mike boom, hand-held and lapel). Explain each and their implied benefits using samples from the X-Files overhead.

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4. Each group must prepare a one page, single-spaced audio production analysis outlining the plans for their PSA project based on the script/storyboard and production provided. ese plans must include specific interviews and locations related to your PSA. Indicate the type of audio equipment to be considered for your production. Comparisons to other PSAs or documentaries are welcome. 5. A representative from each group will present their PSA audio production analysis during a peer evaluation session in order to obtain feedback from students and teacher. 6. Once you have completed Research and Development —Audio Production Analysis module, check off Activity #3 on your module checklist.

Activity #4 — Audio Effects Analysis 1. Using the X-Files audio production analysis and feedback obtained from your peer evaluation, students will explain each type of audio recording and describe the effect of each from Activity #3 2. Students will follow standard audio production set-up in pre-production preparation. 3. Students will describe all audio related action using terminology from the Glossary handout obtained from www.mediacollege.com. 4. A representative from each group will present their PSA audio production analysis based on pre-production presentation, focusing on different audio setups during a second peer evaluation session, in order to receive feedback from students and teacher. 5. Students will implement feedback into their production analysis. 6. Once you have completed e Audio Production module, check off Activity #4 on your module checklist.

Activity #5 — Online Quiz — Audio Production 1. Complete the Audio Production Quiz. Go to: www.ourschool.ca/CT/modules/TJ3MGb/quiz.htm. NOTE: You cannot begin the quiz unless activities 1 through 4 have been completed. 2. Follow the online instructions to complete the quiz. Your mark will be automatically submitted. 3. After you complete the quiz, check off Activity #5 on the module checklist.

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Evaluation Students will be evaluated at the conclusion of each Activity of this Module using the Rubrics and evaluation breakdowns provided below. CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

A  — C  A C L F Y S (20% OF MODULE) KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

e student:

Understanding of - demonstrates limited How Audio Production understanding Translates to Screen

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

- demonstrates limited understanding

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

Understanding How to Properly Construct Audio Techniques

A  — A P T KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

e student:

Knowledge of Audio Production Terms

- demonstrates limited knowledge

(10% OF MODULE)

- demonstrates some knowledge

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able knowledge knowledge

A  — R  D — A P A THINKING/INQUIRY

e student:

inking Skills to Gather and Compile Research

- uses thinking skills with limited effectiveness

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Procedures in Preparing Audio Production

- makes connections with limited effectiveness

COMMUNICATION

e student:

Effective Communica- - communicates infortion of Information mation with limited on Audio Production clarity

(30% OF MODULE)

- uses thinking skills with moderate effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with considerable effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with a high degree of effectiveness

- makes connections with moderate effectiveness

- makes connections with considerable effectiveness

- makes connections with a high degree of effectiveness

- communicates information with moderate clarity

- communicates information with considerable clarity

- communicates information with a high degree of clarity

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CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

A  — A E A THINKING/INQUIRY

e student:

inking Skills in Incorporating Feedback from Peer Evaluations

- uses thinking skills with limited effectiveness

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Audio Effects

- makes connections with limited effectiveness

COMMUNICATION

e student:

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

- uses thinking skills with moderate effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with considerable effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with a high degree of effectiveness

- makes connections with moderate effectiveness

- makes connections with considerable effectiveness

- makes connections with a high degree of effectiveness

- communicates information with moderate clarity

- communicates information with considerable clarity

- communicates information with a high degree of clarity

(30% OF MODULE)

Effective Communica- - communicates infortion of Audio Effects mation with limited clarity

A  — Q

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

(10% OF MODULE)

e culminating quiz for this module will be evaluated with a mark based on the grade value assigned to each question.

Module #6: Introduction to Audio Production Evaluation Breakdown ACTIVITY

WEIGHTING

Activity #1 — Create an Audio Cue List From Your Script

20%

Activity #2 — Audio Production Terminology

10%

Activity #3 — Research and Development — Audio Production Analysis

30%

Activity #4 — Audio Effects Analysis

30%

Activity #5 — Online Quiz

10%

TOTAL

100%

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Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Communications Technology TGJ3M ~Student Learning Module

V P M : L M O  C:    E C T:  C 1. Colour Theory for Video Production 2. Typography for Video Credits 3. Introduction to Script Writing for PSA 4. Introduction to Storyboarding 5. Introduction to Camera Operation 6. Introduction to Audio Production . I  L 8. Video Editing 9. Adding Sound Effects 10. Introduction to Foley

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Module #7: Introduction to Lighting Activities in Series: 5

The Situation Lighting is a crucial element in video production. Next to the video and audio, lighting is the most significant production aspect aiding all the departments of a production process. Light is the “raw material” for creating visual images. Everything related to vision is related to light. Whether the medium is still photography, motion film, video or computer-generated images, light forms the basis of everything we see. It is important to think of lighting not as something extra added in some situations, but as a fundamental part of all visual media production.

The Challenge is module will assist you in understanding how effective lighting is to video productions and will challenge you to demonstrate your knowledge in lighting. You will learn about different types of lighting, as well as the different lighting equipment that you will have available to use for your PSA.

Expectations (taken from MOE, Gr. 11 and 12) Overall Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T  F TFV.02

Identify and describe the components and processes that make up each of the following: electronic, live, and recorded communications;

TFV.03

Explain how basic communications systems function and describe the knowledge required to manage a range of communications systems;

TFV.04

Describe industry standards, regulations, and formats that apply to communications technology.

S  P SPV.01

Effectively plan, organize, direct, and control a variety of communications activities;

SPV.02

Use current technology and production skills to develop a process or a product in response to a communications challenge or problem;

SPV.04

Use effective techniques to carry out and document the steps in pre-production.

Specific Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T D P TF1.01

Explain how a human need or want can be met through a new or improved product;

TF1.02

Apply the following steps of the design process to solve a variety of communications technology challenges or problems.

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TF2.05

Identify the advantages of various formats for specific applications;

TF2.06

Summarize the configurations for a variety of electronic, live, and recorded systems, and develop a plan to set up and manage the systems.

S TF3.01

Outline guidelines, conventions, and rules used in the composition and design of a communications process;

TF3.02

Research appropriate production techniques and recommend processes that adhere to industry standards;

TF3.03

Select the appropriate formats for electronic, live, and recorded productions.

O S SP1.01

Demonstrate the interpersonal skills required for effective teamwork;

SP1.02

Function effectively as individuals and as members of a cooperative team to produce a product or service;

SP1.03

Demonstrate the time management and problem-solving skills required to complete projects;

SP1.04

Accurately document planning and production processes;

SP1.05

Effectively apply a variety of planning tools (e.g., storyboards, flow charts, schematic diagrams);

SP1.06

Select and use appropriate software to manage the production process.

P S SP2.01

Set up and correctly operate the equipment and accessories required to create and modify environments for communications productions (e.g., video and audio editing suites, live and recorded productions, electronic communication systems);

SP2.02

Select and use tools and equipment to solve a communications problem;

SP2.03

Operate control devices and components to manipulate or create communications technology projects;

SP2.04

Develop and interpret technical and artistic drawings, reports, instructions, manuals, on-line documentation, and specifications to help solve a communications problem;

SP2.05

Set up and operate communications equipment;

SP3.01

Use a variety of methods to document the planning and production processes;

SP3.03

Use industry-standard guidelines, conventions, and rules for composition and design;

SP3.04

Use colour theory and colour standards to create presentations that adhere to industry standards.

I A SP4.02

Use appropriate language in flow charts, storyboards, operation charts, scripts, and presentations;

SP4.03

Use terminology that is recognized by the communications industry.

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S  L IC2.01

Apply safe work practices when performing communications processes.

Performance Indicators When you finish this module your work will be evaluated on… 1. Effective creation of lighting setups. 2. Effective use of a variety of lighting equipment. 3. Your understanding of lighting terminology.

Resource Sheet (listing resources to help you complete this module) Please refer to the following texts and web sites for further information: C C: www.cybercollege.com M C: www.mediacollege.com P L: http://www.eusd4kids.org/edtech/project_live.html#camera Video Basics 5, Herbert Zettl, Wadsworth Publishing, 2006

Key Terms and Definitions 1. Ambient Light

15. Incandescent

2. Incident Light

16. 3-Point Lighting

3. Reflected Light

17. Blonde

4. Colour Temperature

18. Red Head

5. Key Light

19. Pepper Light

6. Fill Light

20. Consoles

7. Back Light

21. Light Meter

8. Hard Light

22. Reflector Board

9. Soft Light

23. Flags, Stands and Clamps

10. Spot

24. Camera-Mounted Lights

11. Flood

25. Night-Mode Video Shooting

12. Tungsten

26. Moonlight

13. Halogen

27. Firelight

14. Fresnel

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Safety (See Video Production Module) 1. Keep bystanders away from lights — they are notorious for knocking them over. 2. Always be extremely careful with the heat created by lights. e barn doors can burn your fingers. Wait until lights cool down before touching or moving them. 3. Don’t handle bulbs with your fingers — use a piece of cloth or gloves. 4. Only use material for gels specifically designed for lighting. Don’t use paper, tracing paper, baking paper, plastic, etc. Never attach anything to a light that isn’t designed for the application. 5. Make sure stands are stable and loose cables are taped to the ground. 6. Lights are power-hungry — don’t overload sockets. Never plug more than 2Kw of lighting into a domestic power point. 7. Make sure all lights have adequate ventilation and never cover them.

Activity #1 — Create an Lighting Cue List From Your Script 1. Download and print your PSA script from your class folder. 2. Create a list of the types of lighting and equipment needed for a production shoot. 3. Write directly on your script: Break each scene into separate light shots and list the potential types of lighting equipment required for production. Make lighting indications using film terminology. Be as descriptive as possible (i.e. shot requires 3-point lighting for 1 or 2 people). 4. Create a new Microsoft Word document titled: “Lighting List.doc” 5. Create a title page with the name of your PSA, your name and your class number. 6. Once your Audio List is completed, check off Activity #1 on your module checklist.

Activity #2 — Lighting Terminology 1. Review lighting, camera-mounted lights, stands and clamps and other terminology. 2. In-depth look at types of lighting and lighting placements. 3. Complete the glossary handout. 4. Outline the procedures required to create lighting production. 5. Students will be provided examples that illustrate how lighting contributes towards the final product. Students will view sequences from “e X-Files.” 6. Identify the type of lighting used for your PSA project. Describe various lighting techniques. 7. Students will learn what is required in completing effective lighting for their PSA project.

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Activity #3 — Research and Development — Lighting Analysis 1. Using the research information, why do we need lighting? State the importance of understanding lighting production in preparation for your PSA project. 2. List your observation of lighting placements and use and show samples using the X-Files overhead presentation. 3. Lighting production exercise: Demonstrate various lighting shots and angles using various lighting equipment. Explain each and their implied benefits. Show samples using the X-Files overhead. 4. Each group must prepare a one page, single-spaced lighting production analysis outlining the plans for their PSA project based on script/storyboard and production provided. Comparisons to other PSAs or documentaries are welcome. 5. A representative from each group will present their PSA lighting production analysis during a peer evaluation session in order to obtain feedback from students and teacher. 6. Once you have completed Research and Development — e Lighting Production Analysis module, check off Activity #3 on your module checklist.

Activity #4 — Lighting Effects Analysis 1. Using your X-Files lighting production analysis and feedback obtained from your peer evaluation, students will explain the effect of each type of lighting. 2. Students will follow standard lighting production set-up in pre-production preparation. 3. Students will describe all lighting-related action using terminology from the Glossary handout obtained from www.mediacollege.com. 4. A representative from each group will present their lighting production analysis based on pre-production presentation, focusing on different lighting setups during a second peer evaluation session, in order to receive feedback from students and teacher. 5. Students will implement feedback into their lighting production analysis. 6. Once you have completed e Lighting Production module, check off Activity #4 on your module checklist.

Activity #5 — Online Quiz — Lighting 1. Complete the Lighting Production Quiz. Go to: www.ourschool.ca/CT/modules/TJ3MGb/quiz.htm NOTE: You cannot begin the quiz unless activities 1 through 4 have been completed. 2. Follow the online instructions to complete the quiz. Your mark will be automatically submitted. 3. After you complete the quiz, check off Activity #5 on the module checklist.

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Evaluation Students will be evaluated at the conclusion of each Activity of this Module using the Rubrics and evaluation breakdowns provided below. CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

A  — C  L C L F Y S (20% OF MODULE) KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

e student:

Understanding of How Lighting Translates to Screen

- demonstrates limited understanding

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

Understanding How to Properly Construct Lighting Techniques

- demonstrates limited understanding

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

A  — L T KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

e student:

Knowledge of Lighting Terms

- demonstrates limited knowledge

(10% OF MODULE)

- demonstrates some knowledge

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able knowledge knowledge

A  — R  D — L A THINKING/INQUIRY

e student:

inking Skills to Gather and Compile Research

- uses thinking skills with limited effectiveness

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Procedures in Preparing Lighting

- makes connections with limited effectiveness

COMMUNICATION

e student:

Effective Communica- - communicates infortion of Information mation with limited on Lighting clarity

(30% OF MODULE)

- uses thinking skills with moderate effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with considerable effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with a high degree of effectiveness

- makes connections with moderate effectiveness

- makes connections with considerable effectiveness

- makes connections with a high degree of effectiveness

- communicates information with moderate clarity

- communicates information with considerable clarity

- communicates information with a high degree of clarity

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CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

A  — L E A THINKING/INQUIRY

e student:

inking Skills in Incorporating Feedback from Peer Evaluations

- uses thinking skills with limited effectiveness

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Lighting Effects

- makes connections with limited effectiveness

COMMUNICATION

e student:

Effective Communication of Lighting Effects

- communicates information with limited clarity

A  — Q

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

- uses thinking skills with moderate effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with considerable effectiveness

- uses thinking skills with a high degree of effectiveness

- makes connections with moderate effectiveness

- makes connections with considerable effectiveness

- makes connections with a high degree of effectiveness

- communicates information with moderate clarity

- communicates information with considerable clarity

- communicates information with a high degree of clarity

(30% OF MODULE)

(10% OF MODULE)

e culminating quiz for this module will be evaluated with a mark based on the grade value assigned to each question.

Module #7: Introduction to Lighting Evaluation Breakdown ACTIVITY

WEIGHTING

Activity #1 — Create a Lighting Cue List From Your Script

20%

Activity #2 — Lighting Terminology

10%

Activity #3 — Research and Development — Lighting Analysis

30%

Activity #4 — Lighting Effects Analysis

30%

Activity #5 — Online Quiz

10%

TOTAL

100%

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Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Communications Technology TGJ3M ~Student Learning Module

V P M : V E M O  C:    E C T:  C 1. Colour Theory for Video Production 2. Typography for Video Credits 3. Introduction to Script Writing for PSA 4. Introduction to Storyboarding 5. Introduction to Camera Operation 6. Introduction to Audio Production 7. Introduction to Lighting . V E 9. Adding Sound Effects 10. Introduction to Foley

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Module #8: Video Editing Activities in Series: 4

The Situation e post-production stages of the video production process involve compiling together all of the previous elements previously covered in this course to produce a “finished” piece. After the production has been planned and shot, the focus turns to manipulating the video and audio through various editing techniques, splicing the footage together in a cohesive manner to tell a story or communicate a message.

The Challenge is module will introduce you to working within the video editing program Adobe Premiere. You will learn about capturing video from a digital video camera, importing video clips into Premiere, cutting the video clips together, adding transitions, adding filters, and adding titles.

Expectations (taken from MOE, Gr. 11 and 12) Overall Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T  F TFV.02

Identify and describe the components and processes that make up each of the following: electronic, live, and recorded communications;

TFV.03

Explain how basic communications systems function and describe the knowledge required to manage a range of communications systems;

TFV.04

Describe industry standards, regulations, and formats that apply to communications technology.

S  P SPV.01

Effectively plan, organize, direct, and control a variety of communications activities;

SPV.02

Use current technology and production skills to develop a process or a product in response to a communications challenge or problem;

SPV.04

Use effective techniques to carry out and document the steps in pre-production.

Specific Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T D P TF1.01

Explain how a human need or want can be met through a new or improved product;

TF1.02

Apply the following steps of the design process to solve a variety of communications technology challenges or problems.

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TF2.05

Identify the advantages of various formats for specific applications;

TF2.06

Summarize the configurations for a variety of electronic, live, and recorded systems, and develop a plan to set up and manage the systems.

S TF3.01

Outline guidelines, conventions, and rules used in the composition and design of a communications process;

TF3.02

Research appropriate production techniques and recommend processes that adhere to industry standards;

TF3.03

Select the appropriate formats for electronic, live, and recorded productions.

O S SP1.01

Demonstrate the interpersonal skills required for effective teamwork;

SP1.02

Function effectively as individuals and as members of a cooperative team to produce a product or service;

SP1.03

Demonstrate the time management and problem-solving skills required to complete projects;

SP1.04

Accurately document planning and production processes;

SP1.05

Effectively apply a variety of planning tools (e.g., storyboards, flow charts, schematic diagrams);

SP1.06

Select and use appropriate software to manage the production process.

P S SP2.01

Set up and correctly operate the equipment and accessories required to create and modify environments for communications productions (e.g., video and audio editing suites, live and recorded productions, electronic communication systems);

SP2.02

Select and use tools and equipment to solve a communications problem;

SP2.03

Operate control devices and components to manipulate or create communications technology projects;

SP2.04

Develop and interpret technical and artistic drawings, reports, instructions, manuals, on-line documentation, and specifications to help solve a communications problem;

SP2.05

Set up and operate communications equipment;

SP3.01

Use a variety of methods to document the planning and production processes;

SP3.03

Use industry-standard guidelines, conventions, and rules for composition and design;

SP3.04

Use colour theory and colour standards to create presentations that adhere to industry standards.

I A SP4.02

Use appropriate language in flow charts, storyboards, operation charts, scripts, and presentations;

SP4.03

Use terminology that is recognized by the communications industry.

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S  L IC2.01

Apply safe work practices when performing communications processes.

Performance Indicators When you finish this module your work will be evaluated on… 1. Your cuts between shots are precise and logical. 2. You have effectively used transitions and filters. 3. You have creatively incorporated titles. 4. Your music has been effectively incorporated.

Resource Sheet (listing resources to help you complete this module) Please refer to the following texts and web sites for further information: C C: www.cybercollege.com M C: www.mediacollege.com P L: http://www.eusd4kids.org/edtech/project_live.html#camera Video Basics 5, Herbert Zettl, Wadsworth Publishing, 2006

Key Terms and Definitions 1. Firewire

11. Filter

2. USB

12. Effects

3. Capture

13. Keyframes

4. Import

14. Markers

5. Collections Bin

15. Work Area Bar

6. Preview Window

16. Ripple Delete

7. Edit Window

17. Rolling Edit

8. Timeline

18. Opacity

9. Timecode

19. Matte

10. Transition

20. Scrub

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Activity #1 — Video Editing Terminology 1. Students will refer to the web sites listed in the Reference section of this module to complete the Video Editing Terminology handout.

Activity #2 — Final Cut Pro Tutorials 1. Students will complete the three Adobe Premiere tutorials listed on the handout.

Activity #3 — Elements of Principles of Video Editing in Final Cut Pro 1. Capture footage to the computer in Premiere. 2. Place the captured clips onto the timeline. 3. Apply transitions between clips of your choice. 4. Apply filters to clips of your choice. 5. Apply effects to clips of your choice. 6. Experiment using keyframes. 7. Add music clips to your video. Fade music in and out. 8. Add intro, end, and overlay credits. 9. Import still images and place them onto the timeline. 10. Export your completed video.

Activity #4 — Online Quiz — Editing in Final Cut Pro 1. Complete the Final Cut Pro Editing Quiz. Go to: www.ourschool.ca/CT/modules/TJ3MGb/quiz.htm

Evaluation Students will be evaluated at the conclusion of each Activity of this Module using the Rubrics and evaluation breakdowns provided below. CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

A  — V E T KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

e student:

Knowledge of Video Editing Terms

- demonstrates limited knowledge

A  — F C P T

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

(20% OF MODULE)

- demonstrates some knowledge

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able knowledge knowledge

(10% OF MODULE)

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Ideas and Skills in Familiar Contexts

- applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts with limited effectivewith moderate effecwith considerable efwith a high degree of ness tiveness fectiveness effectiveness

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CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

A  — E  P  V E  F C P

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

(60% OF MODULE)

KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

e student:

Understanding of Principles of Editing

- demonstrates limited understanding

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Ideas and Skills in Familiar Contexts

- applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts with limited effectivewith moderate effecwith considerable efwith a high degree of ness tiveness fectiveness effectiveness

A  — Q

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

(10% OF MODULE)

e culminating quiz for this module will be evaluated with a mark based on the grade value assigned to each question.

Module #8: Video Editing Evaluation Breakdown ACTIVITY

WEIGHTING

Activity #1 — Video Editing Terminology

20%

Activity #2 — Final Cut Pro Tutorials

10%

Activity #3 — Elements and Principles of Editing in Final Cut Pro

60%

Activity #4 — Online Quiz

10%

TOTAL

100%

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Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Communications Technology TGJ3M ~Student Learning Module

V P M : S E M O  C:    E C T:  C 1. Colour Theory for Video Production 2. Typography for Video Credits 3. Introduction to Script Writing for PSA 4. Introduction to Storyboarding 5. Introduction to Camera Operation 6. Introduction to Audio Production 7. Introduction to Lighting 8. Video Editing . A S E 10. Introduction to Foley

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Module #9: Adding Sound Effects Activities in Series: 4

The Situation As mentioned in an earlier module, the effective addition of sound in video productions is of the utmost importance, and its significance can be erroneously overlooked at times. Sound effects can greatly enhance the visual appeal of what is happening on screen, and can be used to strongly emphasize a visual cue.

The Challenge is module will introduce you to working with adding audio effects to strengthen a video production. You will experiment adding various sound effects to existing video footage to exemplify sound’s importance.

Expectations (taken from MOE, Gr. 11 and 12) Overall Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T  F TFV.02

Identify and describe the components and processes that make up each of the following: electronic, live, and recorded communications;

TFV.03

Explain how basic communications systems function and describe the knowledge required to manage a range of communications systems;

TFV.04

Describe industry standards, regulations, and formats that apply to communications technology.

S  P SPV.01

Effectively plan, organize, direct, and control a variety of communications activities;

SPV.02

Use current technology and production skills to develop a process or a product in response to a communications challenge or problem;

SPV.04

Use effective techniques to carry out and document the steps in pre-production.

Specific Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T D P TF1.01

Explain how a human need or want can be met through a new or improved product;

TF1.02

Apply the following steps of the design process to solve a variety of communications technology challenges or problems.

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TF2.05

Identify the advantages of various formats for specific applications;

TF2.06

Summarize the configurations for a variety of electronic, live, and recorded systems, and develop a plan to set up and manage the systems.

S TF3.01

Outline guidelines, conventions, and rules used in the composition and design of a communications process;

TF3.02

Research appropriate production techniques and recommend processes that adhere to industry standards;

TF3.03

Select the appropriate formats for electronic, live, and recorded productions.

O S SP1.01

Demonstrate the interpersonal skills required for effective teamwork;

SP1.02

Function effectively as individuals and as members of a cooperative team to produce a product or service;

SP1.03

Demonstrate the time management and problem-solving skills required to complete projects;

SP1.04

Accurately document planning and production processes;

SP1.05

Effectively apply a variety of planning tools (e.g., storyboards, flow charts, schematic diagrams);

SP1.06

Select and use appropriate software to manage the production process.

P S SP2.01

Set up and correctly operate the equipment and accessories required to create and modify environments for communications productions (e.g., video and audio editing suites, live and recorded productions, electronic communication systems);

SP2.02

Select and use tools and equipment to solve a communications problem;

SP2.03

Operate control devices and components to manipulate or create communications technology projects;

SP2.04

Develop and interpret technical and artistic drawings, reports, instructions, manuals, on-line documentation, and specifications to help solve a communications problem;

SP2.05

Set up and operate communications equipment;

SP3.01

Use a variety of methods to document the planning and production processes;

SP3.03

Use industry-standard guidelines, conventions, and rules for composition and design;

SP3.04

Use colour theory and colour standards to create presentations that adhere to industry standards.

I A SP4.02

Use appropriate language in flow charts, storyboards, operation charts, scripts, and presentations;

SP4.03

Use terminology that is recognized by the communications industry.

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S  L IC2.01

Apply safe work practices when performing communications processes.

Performance Indicators When you finish this module your work will be evaluated on… 1. Your understanding of the impact of sound as a supporting element of video.

Resource Sheet (listing resources to help you complete this module) Please refer to the following texts and web sites for further information: P   : http://www.pcmus.com/AudioTips.htm S   A G B: www.apple.com/support/garageband PSA    I: www.mypsacontest.com Exemplars from the class folder – previous years final works Video Basics 5, Herbert Zettl, Wadsworth Publishing, 2006

Key Terms and Definitions 1. ADR 2. Sound levels 3. Amplitude 4. Modulation 5. Decibels 6. SPL 7. Clipping 8. Peak 9. Envelope 10. Loop

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Activity #1 — Audio Effects Terminology 1. Students will refer to the web sites listed in the Reference section of this module to complete the Audio Terminology handout.

Activity #2 — GarageBand Tutorial 1. Students will complete the Garage Band tutorial listed on the handout.

Activity #3 — Adding Sound Effects in Final Cut Pro 1. Import sound effects into your Final Cut Pro project from the previous module. 2. Place the sound effects onto the timeline. 3. Sync the sound effects with portions of the video. 4. Set levels. 5. Apply transitions between audio clips. 6. Apply filters to audio clips of your choice. 7. Export your project.

Activity #4 — Online Quiz — Audio Effects 1. Complete the Audio Effects Quiz. Go to: www.ourschool.ca/CT/modules/TJ3MGb/quiz.htm

Evaluation Students will be evaluated at the conclusion of each Activity of this Module using the Rubrics and evaluation breakdowns provided below. CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

A  — A E T KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

e student:

Knowledge of Audio Effects Terms

- demonstrates limited knowledge

A  — GB T

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

(20% OF MODULE)

- demonstrates some knowledge

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able knowledge knowledge

(10% OF MODULE)

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Ideas and Skills in Familiar Contexts

- applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts with limited effectivewith moderate effecwith considerable efwith a high degree of ness tiveness fectiveness effectiveness

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CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

A  — A S E  F C P

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

(60% OF MODULE)

KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING

e student:

Understanding of Principles of Editing

- demonstrates limited understanding

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Ideas and Skills in Familiar Contexts

- applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts with limited effectivewith moderate effecwith considerable efwith a high degree of ness tiveness fectiveness effectiveness

A  — Q

- demonstrates some understanding

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able understanding understanding

(10% OF MODULE)

e culminating quiz for this module will be evaluated with a mark based on the grade value assigned to each question.

Module #9: Adding Sound Effects Evaluation Breakdown ACTIVITY

WEIGHTING

Activity #1 — Audio Effects Terminology

20%

Activity #2 — GarageBand Tutorial

10%

Activity #3 — Adding Sound Effects in Final Cut Pro

60%

Activity #4 — Online Quiz

10%

TOTAL

100%

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Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


Communications Technology TGJ3M ~Student Learning Module

V P M : F M O  C:    E C T:  C 1. Colour Theory for Video Production 2. Typography for Video Credits 3. Introduction to Script Writing for PSA 4. Introduction to Storyboarding 5. Introduction to Camera Operation 6. Introduction to Audio Production 7. Introduction to Lighting 8. Video Editing 9. Adding Sound Effects . I  F

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Module #10: Introduction to Foley Activities in Series: 4

The Situation Foley artists play a large role in the video production industry. Often, having subtle nuances such as an actor’s feet loudly hitting the ground as they walk can make for dramatic appeal. When recording live audio on a video production set, a majority of the sounds that video production artists would like to have emphasized are difficult to capture on the spot. To compensate for this, Foley artists capture those sounds on a sound stage, using a variety of tools.

The Challenge is module will introduce you to creating Foley sound effects that you can use to emphasize aspects of your PSA. You will be using common instruments to simulate sound effects found in video productions, and in doing so exemplify the importance of a Foley artist’s work.

Expectations (taken from MOE, Gr. 11 and 12) Overall Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T  F TFV.02

Identify and describe the components and processes that make up each of the following: electronic, live, and recorded communications;

TFV.03

Explain how basic communications systems function and describe the knowledge required to manage a range of communications systems;

TFV.04

Describe industry standards, regulations, and formats that apply to communications technology.

S  P SPV.01

Effectively plan, organize, direct, and control a variety of communications activities;

SPV.02

Use current technology and production skills to develop a process or a product in response to a communications challenge or problem;

SPV.04

Use effective techniques to carry out and document the steps in pre-production.

Specific Expectations By the end of this module, students will... T D P TF1.01

Explain how a human need or want can be met through a new or improved product;

TF1.02

Apply the following steps of the design process to solve a variety of communications technology challenges or problems.

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TF2.05

Identify the advantages of various formats for specific applications;

TF2.06

Summarize the configurations for a variety of electronic, live, and recorded systems, and develop a plan to set up and manage the systems.

S TF3.01

Outline guidelines, conventions, and rules used in the composition and design of a communications process;

TF3.02

Research appropriate production techniques and recommend processes that adhere to industry standards;

TF3.03

Select the appropriate formats for electronic, live, and recorded productions.

O S SP1.01

Demonstrate the interpersonal skills required for effective teamwork;

SP1.02

Function effectively as individuals and as members of a cooperative team to produce a product or service;

SP1.03

Demonstrate the time management and problem-solving skills required to complete projects;

SP1.04

Accurately document planning and production processes;

SP1.05

Effectively apply a variety of planning tools (e.g., storyboards, flow charts, schematic diagrams);

SP1.06

Select and use appropriate software to manage the production process.

P S SP2.01

Set up and correctly operate the equipment and accessories required to create and modify environments for communications productions (e.g., video and audio editing suites, live and recorded productions, electronic communication systems);

SP2.02

Select and use tools and equipment to solve a communications problem;

SP2.03

Operate control devices and components to manipulate or create communications technology projects;

SP2.04

Develop and interpret technical and artistic drawings, reports, instructions, manuals, on-line documentation, and specifications to help solve a communications problem;

SP2.05

Set up and operate communications equipment;

SP3.01

Use a variety of methods to document the planning and production processes;

SP3.03

Use industry-standard guidelines, conventions, and rules for composition and design;

SP3.04

Use colour theory and colour standards to create presentations that adhere to industry standards.

I A SP4.02

Use appropriate language in flow charts, storyboards, operation charts, scripts, and presentations;

SP4.03

Use terminology that is recognized by the communications industry.

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S  L IC2.01

Apply safe work practices when performing communications processes.

Performance Indicators When you finish this module your work will be evaluated on… 1. Your understanding of the impact of sound as a supporting element of video.

Resource Sheet (listing resources to help you complete this module) Please refer to the following texts and web sites for further information: P   : http://www.pcmus.com/AudioTips.htm S   A G B: www.apple.com/support/garageband PSA    I: www.mypsacontest.com Exemplars from the class folder – previous years final works Video Basics 5, Herbert Zettl, Wadsworth Publishing, 2006

Key Terms and Definitions (same as previous module)

Activity #1 — Researching Foley 1. Students are to go to the website http://www.marblehead.net/foley/ and use the information found there to complete the handout on Foley.

Activity #2 — Creating Foley 1. Students will use a variety of instruments to create Foley. 2. Students will use the microphones in the classroom to record directly into GarageBand.

Activity #4 — Online Quiz — Foley 1. Complete the Audio Effects Quiz. Go to: www.ourschool.ca/CT/modules/TJ3MGb/quiz.htm

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


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Evaluation Students will be evaluated at the conclusion of each Activity of this Module using the Rubrics and evaluation breakdowns provided below. CATEGORIES

LEVEL 1 – 50-59%

A  — R F KNOWLEDGE/ UNDERSTANDING Knowledge of Foley

LEVEL 2 – 60-69%

LEVEL 3 – 70-79%

LEVEL 4 – 80-100%

(30% OF MODULE)

e student: - demonstrates limited knowledge

A  — C F

- demonstrates some knowledge

- demonstrates consider- - demonstrates thorough able knowledge knowledge

(60% OF MODULE)

APPLICATION

e student:

Application of Ideas and Skills in Familiar Contexts

- applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills - applies ideas and skills in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts in familiar contexts with limited effectivewith moderate effecwith considerable efwith a high degree of ness tiveness fectiveness effectiveness

A  — Q

(10% OF MODULE)

e culminating quiz for this module will be evaluated with a mark based on the grade value assigned to each question.

Module #10: Introduction to Foley Evaluation Breakdown ACTIVITY

WEIGHTING

Activity #1 — Researching Foley

30%

Activity #2 — Creating Foley

60%

Activity #3 — Online Quiz

10%

TOTAL

100%

Additional Challenge 1. Replace the audio for an existing movie. 2. Select a movie that has had all its audio removed and recreate from scratch, including dialogue. 3. Open the Challenge folder on the shared drive and select a movie. 4. Using the Sound Library CD, select appropriate sound clips, sound effects and background music tracks. 5. Using the recording studio, record the dialogue and synchronize with the video in GarageBand. 6. Save the file and show your teacher.

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga


PAGE 83

Self Assessment Strategy Over of the course of this semester, all students will write summative self assessments at the conclusion of each module as journal entries, reflecting back upon each of the modules and their effectiveness in achieving the stated criteria. e students will keep these assessments in an assessment journal to be handed in at the conclusion of the semester. e philosophical approach to the assessments will be a combination of a holistic and analytic self assessment, with the students first taking an overall, wide-angled generalized approach to how well they feel that they did (holistic) for each module, followed by a more targeted breakdown (analytic), with specific reference to how well they met the established criteria in each module. At the end of the semester, students will be expected to therefore have ten subheadings, listing each module, with holistic and analytic assessments listed there under. For example, if we were to take the 3rd module to complete a self assessment on, we would list the module number and name, followed by each type of assessment.

Module #3, Introduction to Script Writing H A I was happy with what I achieved in this module. My script treatment flowed together nicely, and Mr. xxxxxx seemed happy with my work. I could have done a stronger job with my presentation, as I didn’t clearly get all that I wanted to across that I had down in paper, but overall, I feel that I achieved what I wanted to from this module and it allowed me to take my script and adequately move forward onto the next module of Storyboarding. I enjoyed this module. A A In Activity #2, Film Terminology, I got about three quarters of the questions right, and I could have scored higher there, so I would receive a 3 on the Rubric scale. In Activity #3, I feel that I did adequately meet the expectations of “gathering and compiling my research,” and I would score myself a 4 on the Rubric in that category. Under the “application of procedures in preparing a script treatment” criteria, I as well would score myself a 4 in that category, as I feel that I did “make connections with a high degree of effectiveness.” Under communication, I would say that I communicated my information with “considerable” clarity more so than with a “high degree” of clarity, so I would assess my performance with a 3 in this category. Etc… e teacher will provide formative feedback on the effectiveness of the first three self assessment journals to ensure that all students understand the process behind writing them. After that, students will be required to share their self assessment journal entries with their peers to receive peer feedback.

Course of Study Communications Technology TGJ3M N. Shrubsole B. Street G. Woods L. Zuniga

BBT Project  

BBT Project

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