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Lincoln Southwest H igh School

PLANNING GUIDE 2011-2012


Dear Student and Parent, As we look forward to the 2011-2012 school year at Southwest High School, it is important to remember that the key to student achievement and success is proper course selection. The Planning Guide was developed to help you select courses of interest and meet the Lincoln Public Schools graduation requirements. The Guide includes a brief overview of the Southwest High School curriculum, an outline of credit requirements for graduation, and NCAA Division I and II requirements. More detailed course descriptions are available in the Southwest office. Southwest High School is a comprehensive high school that offers a wide variety of course selections. It helps to create your personalized learning plan when selecting courses, please keep in mind your interests, abilities, and post-secondary goals. The Southwest staff will be happy to assist you should you have questions. The class schedule you will receive is based upon the registration process. Parents, students and the school must consider the registration process as being one of a near contractual agreement. We are extremely tight with class sizes and available classroom spaces for students for this upcoming school year. As has been the practice in the past, we do not have the space or ability to make changes in your student’s schedule for the upcoming year. Therefore, class schedules are not subject to change in terms of courses selected or class periods scheduled. Work schedules, jobs, open campus privileges, or before and after school responsibilities must be worked around your class schedule. Over 1800 students have been scheduled for the next school year, and changing schedules for things such as transportation, work schedules, or to move a class to another period or a different teacher causes class load unbalances for both other students and teaching staff. It is imperative that we have everyone’s cooperation in this matter as we begin the 2011-12 school year. We are excited to work with you at Southwest High School and are committed to supporting you in academic and co-curricular achievement. Please contact us if we can be of any assistance during the registration process. Sincerely, Rob Slauson Principal

Administrators

Guidance Counselors

Rob Slauson

Principal

Tim Ernst

Counselor

Keri Applebee

Associate Principal

Eric Feeken

Counselor

John Hastings

Associate Principal

Colleen Finkhouse

Counselor

Susette Taylor

Associate Principal

Joyce Lehn

Counselor/Department Chair

Dave Gillespie

Athletic Director

Dolores Simpson-Kirkland Counselor

Kim Carson

Asst. Athletic Director

Peggy Volker

Duane Baack

Attendance Coordinator

Sara Mann

Special Education Coordinator

Virginia Geiger

Instructional/Assessment Coordinator

1

Counselor


Block Scheduling Information/Registration Information

4

Computing Class Rank/ HS Athletic Eligibility/NCAA Eligibility 5 Student Check of Graduation Credits for Classes 2011-2014

6

Student Check of Graduation Credits for Class 2015

7

Graduation Demonstration Requirements

8

4 Year Course Plan

9

4 Year Colleges

10

Courses with Weighted Grades

11

LSW Course Offerings

12

Departments Art

15

Business & Marketing

18

Career Education/Communications

20

Drama/Performing Arts

21

Economic Education

22

English

23

Family and Consumer Science

26

Human Behavior

27

Industrial Technology

28

Mathematics

29

Music

31

Physical Education/Health

33 2


Science

34

Social Studies

37

Special Education

39

Technology/Computer Education

42

World Language

44

Articulation Agreements

45

3


At Lincoln Southwest High School students have 4 blocks each day and 4 terms a year. Term 1:

August

October

Term 2:

October

January

Term 3:

January

March

Term 4:

March

May

Course Length Most courses are either one or two terms in length. Please note the length and credit amount in the course description. T = course which lasts for one term (9 weeks) 2T = course which lasts for two consecutive terms (18 weeks)

1. Normal Class Load – Because the graduation requirements prescribe a minimum of 230 credit hours, it is important that you register for the correct number of courses each term. If you are in doubt and have questions about the number of classes you should have, see your school counselor. 2. Electives – It is through the wise selection of elective courses that students are able to personalize their educational plan. Elective courses should be perceived as opportunities for: 1) adding depth and breadth to an intended area of specialization, 2) expanding existing interests and discovering new ones, and 3) providing diversity or a change of pace that can refresh and invigorate. 3. College Preparatory Courses – Students should consider the admission requirements for the college/university in which they are interested before registering for their high school courses. Many colleges and universities require courses beyond what LPS requires for graduation.

4


The question of how class rank is determined is frequently asked by students. Class rank can affect college admissions and grant and/or scholarship qualification. Class rank will be determined only by class rank points. All courses a student takes will be assigned class rank points. Earned class rank points will be determined by the grade the student receives in a course and the number of credit hours the course is worth. Weighted courses will receive more class rank points than non-weighted courses. Class rank will be determined by the total of a student’s class rank points. A cap of 35 hours per semester will be used to calculate rank points. If a student earns more than 35 hours in one semester, courses with the lowest grades and hours will be dropped from the class rank calculation. A class rank point system rewards students for taking weighted courses as well as a full schedule of classes.

Lincoln Southwest High School students planning to participate in varsity level sports must have passed at least 20 credits the previous semester to their sport season and be currently enrolled in at least 15 credits during the term(s) of their sport season.

Students planning to attend an NCAA Division I or II school on an athletic scholarship must meet certain academic requirements. Not all courses at Lincoln Southwest qualify as NCAA core courses. Students should consult with a counselor and the NCAA Guide for the College-Bound StudentAthlete to make sure they meet all requirements for graduation and NCAA eligibility. The NCAA guide is located at http://www.ncaapublications.com /also on the LSW Counseling Center’s website.

The NCAA Eligibility Center’s service web site is http://eligibilitycenter.com. Use this site to access information needed to understand the Division I and II eligibility requirements, register with the Eligibility Center, and to access individual Eligibility Center records.

5


Class of 2012-2014 230 CREDITS NEEDED TO GRADUATE

CREDITS EARNED OR ENROLLED

GENERAL ELECTIVES: 77.5 APPLIED ARTS/FINE ARTS: 15 CREDITS •

At least 5 credits in Fine Arts & 5 credits in Applied Arts

Fine Arts: Dramatic Arts, Music & Visual Arts

Applied Arts: Business, Industrial Tech, Family & Consumer Science

CAREER EDUCATION & PLANNING: 5 CREDITS ECONOMICS: 5 CREDITS ENGLISH: 30 CREDITS ORAL COMMUNICATION: 5 CREDITS HUMAN BEHAVIOR: 5 CREDITS MATHEMATICS: 20 CREDITS HEALTH: 5.0 CREDITS PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 7.5 CREDITS SCIENCE: 20 CREDITS •

GeoScience (Earth Science) – 5 credits

Physical Science – 5 credits

Life Science (Biology) – 10 credits

SOCIAL STUDIES: 30 CREDITS •

Civics – 5 credits

Geography – 5 credits

Government & Politics – 5 credits

Global Studies (World History) – 5 credits

US History – 10 credits

TECHNOLOGY: 10 CREDITS

6

CREDITS NEEDED


Class of 2015 245 CREDITS NEEDED TO GRADUATE

CREDITS EARNED OR ENROLLED

GENERAL ELECTIVES: 62.5 CTE (Career & Technical Education): 20 CREDITS •

At least 5 credits in Fine Arts & 5 credits in Applied Arts

Fine Arts: Dramatic Arts, Music & Visual Arts

CTE: Business, Industrial Tech, Family & Consumer Science

CAREER EDUCATION & PLANNING: 5 CREDITS ECONOMICS: 5 CREDITS ENGLISH: 40 CREDITS HUMAN BEHAVIOR: 5 CREDITS MATHEMATICS: 30 CREDITS •

Algebra – 10 credits

Geometry – 10 credits

HEALTH: 5.0 CREDITS PHYSICAL EDUCATION: 10.0 CREDITS SCIENCE: 30 CREDITS •

GeoScience (Earth Science) – 5 credits

Physical Science – 5 credits

Life Science (Biology) – 10 credits

SOCIAL STUDIES: 30 CREDITS •

Civics – 5 credits

Geography – 5 credits

Government & Politics – 5 credits

Global Studies (World History) – 5 credits

US History – 10 credits

TECHNOLOGY: 5 CREDITS

7

CREDITS NEEDED


All students are required to pass graduation demonstrations in reading and writing in order to graduate. What are graduation demonstrations? They are evidence that a student has reached an expected high school level of achievement prior to graduation. Options for students in each subject areas include passing a graduation demonstration examination, reaching predetermined scores on other tests, or completing coursework. Students begin to have opportunities to pass the demonstrations in ninth grade. All ninth graders must take the Reading and Writing Graduation Demonstration Exams (GDE). Students in the special education program should participate according to their IEP’s. Students who take the exams will receive a letter for each exam stating whether they have passed it. Passage of the demonstrations is also reflected on semester grade reports. Students who do not pass the exams can take them in the spring and fall each year until they pass the exams or meet the demonstrations through other means. READING DEMONSTRATION The reading demonstration verifies student’s vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension skills. Students may meet the requirements in one of four ways: • Pass the Reading Graduation Demonstration Exam (RGDE) • Score at or above the 70th percentile rank in the Reading subtest of the tenth grade PLAN test • Receive a C+ or better in “Reading Advancement” course (juniors or seniors) The reading exam consists of three newspaper selections and 30 multiple-choice questions. WRITING DEMONSTRATION A student must show writing and editing skills. Students may meet the requirements in one of two ways: • Pass the Writing Graduation Demonstration Exam (WGDE) • Complete designated writing assignments at a satisfactory level in the “Composition” Course or General English Course (juniors/seniors only). The three parts of the writing exam include editing paragraphs (proofreading), writing a story, and writing to explain. A practice test is available to students.

8


For admission to UNL, you must graduate in the upper one-half of your class or have an ACT composite of 20 or higher or an SAT Verbal plus Numerical score of 950 or higher. You must also have completed the following requirements: (A unit equals 10 credits in the LPS system)

• • • • • •

4 units of English (all units must include intensive reading & writing experiences) 2 units of one World Language 4 units of Math (must include 2 units of algebra, geometry and one additional unit that builds on a knowledge of algebra) 3 units of Natural Sciences (must include at least 2 units selected from biology, chemistry, physics and earth science. One unit must include laboratory instruction) 3 units of Social Sciences (at least one unit of American and/or world history and one additional unit of history, American government and/or geography) All Colleges within the UNL system have entrance requirements identical to UNL’s general requirements, with these exceptions: College of Architecture

College of Engineering & Technology

ACT of 22, SAT of 1030

ACT of 24, SAT of 1110

UNK & UNO have the same admission requirements as UNL with the exception of requiring 3 units of Math.

10


A limited number of classes in the Lincoln Public Schools curriculum provide for weighted grades. In these courses, only a grade of “C” and above is weighted. A

-

5.0

B+

-

4.5

B

-

4.0

C+

-

3.5

C

-

3.0

The grade point average on a student’s transcript will carry both a “regular” GPA and a “weighted” GPA. The following will be offered at Southwest next year as courses carrying weighted grades: The courses below have been identified because they may offer compacted, abstract material, complex writing and thinking skills, and higher reading levels. This is a good time to consider them for next year. If you have questions about courses with weighted grades, be sure to ask a counselor. ART SCIENCE AP Drawing Portfolio Diff Chemistry AP 2D Design Portfolio Diff Physics AP 3-D Design Portfolio Diff Biology Diff Anatomy & Physiology Advanced Chemistry BUSINESS College Accounting AP Advanced Physics ENGLISH Diff English 10 AP Language/Composition AP Literature/Composition Shakespearean Drama INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY Adv CAD CEA MATH Diff Advanced Algebra Diff Pre-Calculus AP Diff Calculus AP Calculus AP Statistics

SOCIAL STUDIES AP Macro Economics AP Human Geography AP Government & Politics AP Psychology Diff Sociology AP World History AP U.S. History WORLD LANGUAGE AP Spanish AP French AP German

11


Art 0140 0142 0145 0146 0150 0151 0152 0153 0154 0160 0161 0162 0163 0170 0171 0172 0180 0181 0182 0183 0190 0191 0192 0200 0301 0302

2-D Design: 9-12, T 3-D Design: 9-12, T AP 2-D Design Portfolio 11-12, T AP 3-D Design Portfolio 11-12, T Beginning Drawing: 9-12, T Drawing Applications & Ideas: 10-12, T Drawing Styles: 11-12, T Drawing Studio/Portfolio: 10-12, T Advanced Placement Drawing Portfolio: 11-12, T Beginning Painting: 9-12, T Painting Applications and Ideas: 10-12, T Painting Styles/Ideas: 11-12, T Painting Studio/Portfolio: 11-12, T Beginning Pottery: 9-12, T Pottery Techniques: 10-12, T Pottery Styles: 11-12, T Beginning Photography: 10-12, T Photographic Techniques: 10-12, T Photographic Styles: 11-12, T Photographic Portfolio: 11-12, T Beginning Jewelry: 9-12, T Jewelry Design & Application: 10-12, T Jewelry Styles: 11-12, T Beginning Sculpture: 9-12, T Beg Digital Arts/Commercial Design: 9-12, T Digital Art Techniques (2): 10-12, T

2340 2100 2130 2250 2270 2400 2440 2500 2502 2520 2527 2530 2550 2600 2625 2630 2660 2668 2670 2680 2700 2710 2730 2740

High School Reading Ideas: 9-12, T Reading Investigations: 9-12, T Reading Advancement: 11-12, T English 9: 2T English 9 D: 9, 2T English 10: 10, 2T English 10 D: 10, 2T General English: 11-12, 2T General Literature: 11-12, T Literature of the Holocaust: 11-12, T Science Fiction: 11-12, T Fantasy Literature: 11-12 T Contemporary Literature: 11-12, T Sports Literature: 11-12, T Women’s Literature: 11-12, T Shakespearean Drama: 11-12, T Composition: 11-12, T Creative Writing: 10-12, T Adv. Creative Writing: 11-12, T Journalism: 9-12, T Photo Journalism: 9-12, T Newspaper: 9-12, 2T Yearbook: 10-12, 2T American Literature & Comp: 11, 2T English (British Lit)/Lit /Composition: 9-12, T AP Lang & Comp: 11, 2T AP Lit & Comp: 12, 2T

Business

Family & Consumer Science

0600 0620 0630 0710 0720 0760 0770 0780 0810 9350

3600 3650 3700 3750 3760 3770 3800 3810 3910 3920 3930

World of Business: 9-10, T Business Management: 10-12, T Business Law: 10-12, T Accounting: 10-12, 2T College Accounting: 11-12, 2T Sports & Entertainment Marketing: 10-12 T Marketing: 10-12, T Promotional Marketing: 10-12, T Keyboarding: 9-12, T Work Experience: 11-12, T

Family & Consumer Sciences Introduction: 9,T Creative Clothing & Design: 9-12, T Interior Design: 10-12, T Teen Issues: 9-10, T Independent Living: 11-12, T Relationships: 11-12, T Infants & Toddlers: 10-12, T Preschool & School Age Children: 10-12, T Foods & Wellness: 10, T Cultural Foods: 12, T Culinary Skills: 11-12, T

Career Education and Planning 1100

Human Behavior

Career Education; 10-12, T

4100 4200 4310 4337 4400 4410

Communication 2825 2830 2850 2851 2852

Adv. Debate: 10-12, T Competitive Forensics: 9-12, T Oral Communications: 9-10, T Oral Communications Forensics: 9-10, T Oral Communications Debate: 9-10, T

Industrial Technology 4600 4610 4620 4625 4615 46401 4650 4660 4670 4820

Drama/Performing Arts 2920 2925 2950

Theatre: 9-12, T Advanced Theatre: 9-12, T Technical Theatre: 9-12, T

Economics 1610 1710 1750

Human Behavior: 10-12, T Families & Crises: 10-12, T Psychology: 11-12, T AP Psychology: 11-12, 2T Sociology: 11-12, T Sociology D: 11-12, T

Econ. Perspectives: 10-12, T Economics: 11-12, T AP Macro Economics: 11-12, T

CAD IED 1: 9-12, T CAD IED 2: 10-12, T CAD Architecture: 10-12, T Advanced CAD CEA: 11-12, 2T Landscape Design and Management: 10-12, T Foundations of Industrial Tech: 9-10, T Intro to Woods & Const: 10-12, T Furniture Construction & Design: 10-12, T Advanced Cabinet & Finish Const: 10-12, 2T Manufacturing & Welding: 9-12, T

Mathematics English

5201L

High School Reading Elements: 9-12, T

12

Algebra Block 1 & 2: 12, 4T Algebra: 2T


5251L 5255L 5257L 5260L 5300

5310 5355 53651 53652 5400 5410 5450 5460

Geometry: 2T Geometry Block I: 2T Geometry Block II: 2T Geometry D: 2T Advanced Algebra: 2T Adv Algebra Block I: 2T Adv Algebra Block II: 2T Advanced Algebra D: 2T AP Statistics: 2T Problem Solving A: T (Term 2 only) Problem Solving B: T (Term 4 only) Pre-Calculus: 2T Pre-Calculus D: 2T AP Calculus: 2T AP Calculus D: 2T

6755 6770 6785 6790 6795 6825 6830 6835 6840 6845 6855 6860 6865 6875 6876 6878 6880 6965 9143 9145

Music 5660 5670 5680 5700 57009 57007 5730 5740 5750 5830 5840 5850 5855 5860 5875 5940

Concert Band: 9 Symphonic Band: 10-12 Wind Ensemble: 11-12 Varsity Orchestra: 11-12 Freshman Orchestra: 9 Sophomore Orchestra: 10 Prep Jazz Band: 10-12 Varsity Jazz Band: 10-12 Freshman Chorus: 9 Concert Choir: 10-12 Prep Show Choir: 10-12 Varsity Concert Choir: 11-12 Varsity Chamber Choir: 11-12 Varsity Show Choir: 11-12 Varsity Musical Arts: 11-12 Music Technology/Theory: 10-12

Social Studies 7125 7130 7132 7140 7142 7170 7200L 7220L 7272 7282 7300 7310 7350 7355 7396

Physical Education & Health 6110 6250 6265 6350 6355 6365 6375 6415 6420 6425 64500 64501 64502 64503 64504 64600 64601 64602 64603 64604 6480 6486

Health Education: 10-12, T Team Sports: 10-12, T Officiating Team Sports: 11-12, T Beginning Swimming: 9-12, T Inter/Adv Swim: 10-12, T Water Games: 10-12, T Lifeguard Training: 10-12, T Aerobic Cross Training: 10-12, T Modern Jazz/Aerobics: 10-12, T Ballroom Dancing: 10-12, T ZERO HOUR Weight Training: 9-12, T Term 1 Weight Training: 9-12, T Term 2 Weight Training: 9-12, T Term 3 Weight Training: 9-12, T Term 4 Weight Training: 9-12, T ZERO HOUR Adv. Weight Training: 9-12, T Term 1 Adv. Wght Trng: 9-12, T Term 2 Adv. Wght Trng: 9-12, T Term 3 Adv. Wght Trng: 9-12, T Term 4 Adv. Wght Trng: 9-12, T Lifetime Sports: 11-12, T Fitness for Life: 9, T

AP Comparative Government: 12, T Civics: 9, T Civics D: 9, T Geography: 9, T Geography D: 9, T AP Human Geography: 10-12, 2T World History: 10-12, 2T AP World History: 10-12, 2T U.S. History: 11-12, 2T AP U.S. History: 11-12, 2T Government & Politics: 12, T AP Government & Politics: 12, T Criminal Justice: 10-12, T Modern US Military History: 10-12, T History of the Holocaust: 11-12, T

Special Education 7620 7630 7680 7690 7695 7700 7705 7710 7715 7725 7736 7737 7738 7760 7765 7780 7791 7830 7833 7836 7840 7845 7865 7870 7880 7882 7885 7888 7903

Science 6710 6720 6731 6740 6750

Animal Behavior: 10-12, T Environmental Studies: 10-12, T Genetics: 10-12, T Anatomy & Physiology: 11-12, 2T Anatomy & Physiology D: 11-12, 2T Physical Science: 9, T Applied Chemistry: 10-12, 2T Chemistry: 10-12, 2T Chemistry D: 10-12, 2T Advanced Chemistry: 11-12, 2T Physics: 11-12, 2T Physics D: 11-12, 2T AP Adv Physics: 11-12, 2T Geoscience: 9, T Geoscience D: 9, T Earth Systems: 10-12, T Astronomy: 11-12, T Forensic Science: 11-12, T Medical Terminology: 11-12, T Intro to Health Occupations; 10-12, T

Biology: 10, 2T Biology D: 10, 2T AP Biology: 11-12, 2T Botany: 10-12, T Zoology: 10-12 T

13

Resource: 9-12, T &Basic Academic Core: 9-12, T &Keyboarding: 9-12, T &Career Education: 10-12, T &Intro to Economic Perspectives: 11-12, T &Intro to English 9: 9, T &Intro to English 10: 10, T &Intro to Composition: 11-12, T &Intro to Communication Skills: 10-12, T &Intro to Literature: 10-12, T &Reading I: 9-12, T &Reading II: 9-12, T &Reading Preskills; 9-12, T &On Your Own: 11-12, T &Recreation and Leisure: 9-12, T &Personal/Soc Development: 11-12, T &Independent Living Skills: 9-12, T &Practical Math: 9-12, T &Basic Math: 9-12, 2T &High School Math Concepts: 9-12, 2T &Beginning Algebra: 9-12, T &Geometry: 10-12, T &Health Skills: 10-12, T &Adapted PE: 9-12, T &Intro to Life Science: 10-12, T &Intro to Body Systems: 9-12, T &Intro to Physical Science: 9-12, T &Intro to Geoscience: 9-12, T &Intro to Civics: 9, T


7904 7905 7910 7915 7920 7922 7948 7950 7970

&Intro to Geography: 9, T &Intro to World Geography: 12, T &Intro to U.S. History: 10, T &Intro to Government & Politics: 12, T &Intro to Computer Applications: 9-12, T &Computer Applications II: 9-12, T &Structured Learning: 9-12, T &Independent Job Practice: 10-12, T &Work Skills: 9-12, T

Technology/Computer Education 8110 8120 8200 8250 8253 8310 8330

Computer Applications: 9-10, T Adv. Computer Applications: 10-12, T Desktop Publishing, 10-12, T Digital Media 1, 10-12, T Digital Media 2, 10-12, T BASIC Computer: 9-12, T Web Page Programming: 10-12, T

World Languages ----

----

-------

---8870

Level 1: French (8610), German (8710), Japanese (8941), Latin (8931), Spanish (8810): 9-12, 2T Level 2: French (8620), German (8720), Japanese (8942), Latin (8932), Spanish (8820): 9-12, 2T Level 3: French (8630), German (8730), Japanese (8943), Spanish (8830): 10-12, 2T Level 4: French (8640), German (8740), Japanese (8944), Spanish (8840): 11-12, 2T Spanish (8840): 11-12, 2T Level 5: AP French (8650), AP German (8750): AP Spanish (8852): 11-12, 2T Conversational Spanish: 11-12, T

Miscellaneous 9350 ___

Work Experience eLearning

******COURSES WITHOUT A NUMBER ARE COUNSELOR ASSIGNED

14


COURSE TITLE 2-D Design 5 Credits – 1 Term

RECOMMENDED GRADE PREREQUISITES 9-12 None

0140 3-D Design 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

**AP 2-D Design Portfolio 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

**AP 3D Design Portfolio 5 credits – 1 Term

11-12

Beginning Drawing

9-12

None 0142

0145

0146 None

5 Credits – 1 Term Drawing Applications & Ideas 5 Credits – 1 Term Drawing Styles 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Drawing Studio/Portfolio 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

**Advanced Placement Drawing Portfolio 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

Beginning Painting 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

Painting Applications & Ideas 5 Credits – 1 Term Painting Styles/Ideas 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

11-12

0150 Beginning Drawing with a C or better 0151 Beg. Drawing, Drawing Applications & Ideas 0152

11-12

Beg. Drawing, Drawing Applications & Ideas, Drawing Styles

0153 Beg. Drawing, Drawing Applications & Ideas, Drawing Styles, Drawing Studio/Portfolio. Teacher Recommendation 0154 None

0160 Beginning Painting with a C or better 0161 Beg. Painting, Painting Applications & Ideas

0162

15

COMMENTS Art fundamentals will be applied in drawing, painting, printmaking, collage and mixed media. Ways in which different cultures use design in traditional art forms will be studied. Art fundamentals will be applied in pottery, jewelry making, and sculpture. Ways in which different cultures use design in traditional art forms will be studied. This course is for advanced drawing, painting or, digital art students through special arrangement with the instructor. Extensive outside classroom time will be needed for the preparation of your portfolio. This portfolio may be submitted for potential College Board review and elective college credit. This course is available to advanced sculpture, jewelry or pottery students through special arrangement with the instructor. Extensive outside classroom time will be needed for the preparation of your portfolio. This portfolio may be submitted for potential College Board review and elective college credit. Art fundamentals applied in drawing experiences. Emphasis upon media, techniques and composition. Introduction to the place of drawing in the history of art. Emphasis upon color & ink techniques, and observation skills. Refine composition skills. Investigate drawing across cultures and time. Refine drawing skills and continue development of ideas and personal approach to drawing. Students will investigate contemporary drawing styles and trends. Critique becomes essential for individual growth. Designed for serious minded students. Student portfolios for post-secondary work will be prepared. This is a studio approach with attention to more fully developing personal artistic expression. Students are required to perform research, attend galleries, and host a solo exhibit. A studio approach to refinement of drawing skills with attention to more fully developing personal artistic expression. Students prepare a college entry level portfolio, host a solo exhibit and prepare for the AP exam. Introduction to painting materials, tools and composition. Art fundamentals applied in painting experiences. Exploration of the history of painting. Emphasis upon color & composition. Media and techniques more fully explored. Investigate painting across cultures and time. Refine painting techniques. Emphasis on development of ideas and investigation of contemporary painting styles.


Painting Studio/Portfolio 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

Beg. Painting, Paint Applications & Ideas, Painting Styles

Beginning Pottery 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

None

Pottery Techniques 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Pottery Styles 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

0170 Beginning Pottery with a C or better 0171 Pottery Techniques

Beginning Photography 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

Photographic Techniques 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Photographic Styles 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

Photographic Portfolio 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

Beginning Jewelry 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

None

Jewelry Design & Application 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

0190 Beginning Jewelry and 3-D Design with a C or better

0163

0172

0180 Beginning Photography with a C or better /Teacher recommendation 0181 Photographic Techniques/ Teacher recommendation

0182 Photo Tech and Photo Styles or Department Chair permission.

0183

0191

16

Designed for serious minded students. Student portfolios for post-secondary work will be prepared. This is a studio approach with attention to more fully developing personal artistic expression. Students are required to perform research, attend galleries, and host a solo exhibit. Introduction to hand-built and wheel thrown pottery. Art fundamentals applied in pottery experiences. Exploration of the history of pottery.

Refine wheel & hand-building skills. Gain kiln and glaze knowledge and experience. Investigate pottery across cultures and time. A comprehensive study of pottery. Students will investigate contemporary pottery styles as it relates to more fully developed artistic ideas for their own work. Critique becomes essential for individual growth. Introduction to photography theory & application. Art fundamentals applied in photography experiences. Exploration of the history of photography. Supplies and equipment provided Students will explore various photographic techniques and special effects. Vocational applications of photographic methods such as portraiture and commercial photography. Additional personal costs may be applied A studio approach for the serious student. Students will be required to demonstrate a sophisticated use of a variety of camera, lighting and darkroom techniques. Students will explore contemporary photography styles as it relates to more fully developed artistic ideas for their own work. Critique becomes essential for individual growth. Student portfolios for post-secondary work will be prepared. Students will host a solo exhibit. Additional personal costs may be involved. This course prepares students to pursue careers in photography. The curriculum encourages students’ creativity while stressing strong technical skills. Participants will continue to use 35mm cameras with manual capabilities. Students are encouraged to develop new forms of output for their traditional photographic images by way of using digital cameras. Explorations of digital and computer programs are added tools for those pursuing a career in this profession while still continuing to develop their artistic vision. Art fundamentals applied to design work and construction. Exploration of the history of jewelry making and personal decoration. Introduction to fabrication and casting. Refine skills in fabrication & casting. More fully develop a sense of design in jewelry making. Explore use of personal decoration across cultures and time.


Jewelry Styles 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

Beg. Jewelry, Jewelry Design

Beginning Sculpture 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

None

Beginning Digital Art/Commercial Design 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

None

Digital Art Techniques (2) 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Beginning Digital Art

Emphasis will be upon developing a larger repertoire of fabrication and casting techniques. Students will explore contemporary jewelry styles as it relates to more fully developed artistic ideas for their own work. Critique becomes essential for individual growth.

0192 Introduction to history & techniques of sculpture. Art fundamentals applied to sculpture experiences. 0200

0301

0302

** Weighted class

17

An exploration of visual design as a communication tool. Art fundamentals are applied to a series of communication/design problems. Students use software programs that are considered the industry standard. This art tech class will satisfy technology credits for graduation. The Digital Art Techniques course focuses on the mastery of digital techniques to accomplish refined designs.


COURSE TITLE World of Business 5 Credits – 1 Term

RECOMMENDED GRADE PREREQUISITES 9-10 None

0600 ***Business Management 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

Business Law 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

Accounting 10 Credits – 2 Term

10-12

None

**College Accounting 10 Credits – 2 Term

11-12

None

Sports & Entertainment Marketing 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

***Marketing 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

***Promotional Marketing 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

0620

COMMENTS Explore various areas of business such as money management, marketing, accounting, basic business management, entrepreneurship and also apply basic skills necessary to succeed in the work world. Designed to provide students with information about what business is, how it is organized, how it operates, and how it is managed. Students learn what managers do, how they do it, and what factors determine whether or not they will be successful. Resources include guest speakers, projects, simulations, and decision-making cases. Students will ultimately create a business plan. The course is recommended for all job-conscious students who are entering business as beginning employees, those who are exploring the possibilities of a career in business, and those who have expectations of managing a business career for other or for themselves. Articulates with SCC when taken with Economic Perspectives. Students will learn about law for business and personal use through the study of constitutional rights, the court system, contract fundamentals, sales , contractual situations and property ownership.

0630

0710

0720

0760

0770

0780

18

Prepares students with a basic knowledge of the accounting cycle and business reports. Recommended for students interested in a business career or college business major. This two-term weighted course presents basic structure and procedures of the accounting cycle. Students have the opportunity to take this course for SCC Accounting credit. A beginning marketing course for students interested in the sports and entertainment industry. Will examine sports, entertainment, and recreation careers. A beginning marketing course that focuses on product development, market research, and market segments as well as the 4 P’s of marketing. Foundation for all marketing courses and/or careers. For students interested in the world of promotion, advertising, display, personal selling, and publicity.


Keyboarding 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

None

Economic Perspectives 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

Work Experience 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

Currently employed

0810

1610

9350

** Weighted class *** Meets DECA membership requirement

19

Every student needs proficient computer keyboarding skills for personal, academic and employment use. Keyboarding develops touch control of the keyboard, proper keyboarding techniques, basic speed and accuracy, word processing, and computer operation skills. Class covers personal finances and basic economic theory. Units include savings and investing, banking, budgeting, credit, insurance, and taxes. Meets economics graduation requirement and articulates with SCC when taken with Business Management. Students who are employed have the opportunity to earn school credit for work experience. Must maintain employment, attend required meetings before or after school, complete required written assignments and check in weekly with Work Experience teacher.


COURSE TITLE Career Education 5 Credits – 1 Term

RECOMMENDED GRADE PREREQUISITES 10-12 None

1100

COURSE TITLE Advanced Debate 5 Credits – 1 Term

GRADE 10-12

Competitive Forensics 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

Oral Communications 5 Credits – 1 Term Oral CommunicationsForensics 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-10

Oral CommunicationsDebate 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-10

RECOMMENDED PREREQUISITES Oral CommunicationsDebate or Debate Team experience 2825 Oral Communications Forensics or Speech Team experience 2830 2850

9-10

2851

2852

20

COMMENTS Students assess their individual interests, goals, and values as they relate to the world of work, career choices, education planning and preparation for post secondary education. Students complete job applications and resumes as they prepare for a job interview. Students are required to job shadow a career of their choice from all assessment testing completed in class. Graduation requirement.

COMMENTS Students are provided the opportunity for a more in-depth consideration of the topics presented in Debate. Research, analysis methods and case construction methods are applied to national topics. Develops performance skills necessary for competition in speech/debate. May be repeated. Develops public speaking and presentation skills Graduation requirement. This course is similar to the basic oral communications class, but is designed for gifted and high achievers in the area of communication. The class will be of particular interest to those wanting to join the speech team, as it will have an emphasis on competitive speaking events. Participation in speech competition is encouraged. Meets graduation requirement. This course is similar to the basic oral communications class, but is designed for gifted and high achievers in the area of communication. The class will be of particular interest to those wanting to join the debate team, as it will have an emphasis on competitive debate events. Participation in debate competition is encouraged. Meets graduation requirement.


COURSE TITLE Theatre 5 Credits – 1 Term

RECOMMENDED GRADE PREREQUISITES 9-12 None

Advanced Theatre 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

2920 Theatre with a C+ or better

Technical Theatre 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

None

2925

2950

21

COMMENTS Students participate in improvisation, stage movement, voice/ dictation/character development, stage combat, and a variety of performance opportunities. Students study challenging plays and playwrights and explore various aspects of dramatic productions. For the student who wants to learn the technical side of planning & producing plays. The course applies to Applied Art credit and may be repeated.


COURSE TITLE Economic Perspectives 5 Credits – 1 Term

RECOMMENDED GRADE PREREQUISITES 10-12 None

1610 Economics 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

None

**AP Macro Economics 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

Counselor, teacher recommendation

1710

1750

** Weighted class

22

COMMENTS Class covers personal finances and basic economic theory. Units include saving and investing, banking, budgeting, credit, insurance, and taxes. Meets economics graduation requirement and articulates with SCC when taken with Business Management. Economic theory and management of finances. Meets economics graduation requirement. Will give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both as consumers and producers, within the economic system. Meets economics graduation requirement.


COURSE TITLE Reading Elements 5 Credits – 1 Term

GRADE 9-12

RECOMMENDED PREREQUISITES Placement according to reading proficiency

Reading Ideas 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

Placement according to reading proficiency

Reading Investigations 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

Placement according to reading proficiency

English 9 10 Credits – 2 Terms English 9 Differentiated 10 Credits – 2 Terms

9

None

9

None

English 10 10 Credits – 2 Terms **English 10 Differentiated 10 Credits – 2 Terms

10

None

10

None

COMMENTS Instruction in basic fluency and comprehension. Preparation for Reading Graduation Exam. May be repeated. Vocabulary building and application of reading strategies. Preparation for Reading Graduation Exam. May be repeated. Instruction to increase comprehension, vocabulary and research skills. Preparation for Reading Graduation Exam. May be repeated. For all 9th grade students.

2100

2130

For gifted and high achievers in English. Recommended for students with reading scores of 80% or above or 8th stanine or higher. For all 10th grade students.

2250

2270 Teacher Recommendation only.

General English 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11-12

Reading Advancement 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

General Literature 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

Placement according to performance & teacher recommendation 2340 English 10

Literature of the Holocaust 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

English 10

Science Fiction 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

English 10

Fantasy Literature 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

English 10

Contemporary Literature 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

English 10

2400

2440

2500

2502

2520

23

For gifted and high achievers in English. Recommended for students with reading scores of 80% or above or 8th stanine or higher. Juniors and seniors who have not yet met the District writing requirement will be placed in this class. Students have the opportunity to take the WGDE at the end of each term. Can be taken more than once for LPS English credit. This course is an alternative to meeting the Reading Graduation Demonstration requirement. Students read and respond orally and in writing to various kinds of written and visual literature. Summaries and interpretations will be written. Students explore a variety of contemporary social issues of intolerance through literature from the Holocaust. Both fiction and nonfiction works in the study of antiSemitism. The reading in the course also extends to the contemporary study of genocide in Darfur. Student work includes reading, research, writing and oral analysis. Optional trip to Washington DC. Students study the work of a variety of science fiction authors, past and present. Students also write summary/opinion papers based on scientific research and innovations. Students read and discuss ancient and modern fantasy texts and write in a variety of modes in response to the literature. This course engages students in a focused study of literature written over the last century, representative of different genres. Reading six to eight novels over the course of the term, students will use prior knowledge to respond to what they read-making connections between the text, their lives, and the larger world.


Sports Literature 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

English 10

Women’s Literature 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

English 10

**Shakespearean Drama 5 Credits – 1 Term Composition 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

English 10

11-12

English 10

Creative Writing 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

Advanced Creative Writing 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

Journalism 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

Photo Journalism 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

Newspaper 10 Credits – 2-4 Terms

9-12

Yearbook 10 Credits – 2-4 Terms

10-12

2527

2530 2550

2600

2625 Creative Writing, Journalism or Teacher recommendation 2630 None

2660

American Literature & Composition 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11

English (British Literature) Literature/Composition 10 Credits – 2 Terms

12

2668 Teacher permission and/or Journalism or Photo Journalism strongly recommended. 2670 Teacher permission and/or Journalism/or Photo Journalism strongly recommended. 2680 English 10; WGD and RGD met 2700 English 10; WGD and RGD met

2710

24

This class is a study of sports literature and sports issues through reading novels, short stories, essays, poetry, and journals. While reading and studying sports in literature, students will concentrate on themes including perseverance, overcoming challenges, teamwork, goal setting, reaching success, coaching, etc. along with gender, race and stereotypes. Writing includes research, informal responses and narratives. This class is a cross-cultural study of women’s lives and cultures through reading novels, short stories, essays, poetry, journals and letters. Writing includes research, informal responses, and narratives. Students discover the relationship of the classical tragedians and comic dramatists to Shakespeare. Through study and guided practice, students focus their reading and writing on narration, exposition, and persuasion. This course may serve as an alternative to the WGDE. Can be taken more than once for LPS English credit; NOTE, UNL counts the class only once. For highly motivated writers willing to share their work in a writers’ workshop setting. Can be taken more than once. Students focus on writing and reading original works that have thoughtful content and display a sense of style. This class produces the school’s literary magazine. This course is offered in Term 3 only. Learn how to use some of the latest technology to create journalistic products (with emphasis on writing) for a variety of media. Strongly recommended for leadership positions on newspaper or yearbook staffs. Counts for English credit. This class focuses on the techniques of journalistic photography and journalistic writing in publications such as newspapers and yearbooks. Basic computer skills are helpful. Technology credit. Students work cooperatively to produce all aspects of print and online version of the school newspaper. Strong writing and computer skills suggested. Minimum 2 term required but encouraged to do 4 terms. This course counts for English or technology credit. Students work cooperatively to produce all aspects of the school yearbook. Strong writing, computer skills and/or photography skills suggested. Minimum 2 terms required but encouraged to do 4 terms. This course counts for technology credit. For students planning to attend college, this course focuses on the literature of a diverse America. The composition element of the class includes narrative and expository writing as well as research synthesis. For students planning to attend college, this course focuses on the literature of Great Britain, from literature of the Anglo/Saxons to modern British literature. The composition element of the class includes narrative and expository writing as well as research synthesis.


**Advanced Placement Language & Composition 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11

**Advanced Placement Literature & Composition 10 Credits – 2 Terms

12

English 10D is not required but is highly recommended as prerequisite.

2730 AP Language & Composition is not required but is highly recommended as a prerequisite. 2740

25

In addition, In this college-level course students learn rhetorical principles, sharpen critical reading and analytical writing skills. Additionally, students gather and synthesize various kinds of research. Taking the AP Language exam is an option for students in this class. In addition, students may be eligible to receive college credit from NWU.

This college-level course is an intensive study of sophisticated literature-historical and modern. Students analyze literature through various social, political and aesthetic lenses. Taking the AP Literature exam is an option for students in this class. In addition, students may be eligible to receive college credit from NWU.


COURSE TITLE

GRADE

RECOMMENDED PREREQUISITES

9

None

9-12

None

Interior Design 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

Teen Issues 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-10

None

Independent Living 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

None

Relationships 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

None

Infants & Toddlers 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

Preschool & School Age Children 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

Foods & Wellness 5 Credits – 1 Term

10

None

Cultural Foods 5 Credits – 1 Term

12

Culinary Skills 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

Family & Consumer Sciences Introduction 5 Credits – 1 Term Creative Clothing & Design 5 Credits – 1 Term

COMMENTS

Students learn about the areas of food preparation, child care, sewing, housing, and interacting with others. 3600

3650

Individualized class lets students explore historical and multicultural aspects of clothing & fabric design. Students design and construct projects using computerized sewing machines & sergers. Students learn about housing needs, architectural styles, and elements of design and furniture styles. Students design projects and tour local homes & businesses.

3700

3750

3760

3770

3800

3810

3910 Food & Wellness, Culinary Skills 3920 None

3930

26

Study teen issues of communication, problem-solving, relationships, and some controversial issues such as, racism, sexism, addictions, and abuse. Learn the basic skills to live on your own. Know what is involved in food, clothing, housing, employment, and financial decisions. Learn about multiple viewpoints of humans on various topics and ways to resolve recurring issues that exist in relationships at home, work and society. Study pregnancy, infants and toddlers; birth to 3 years. Activities included field site placement at local child care facilities. Enrollment includes personal background checks. A portfolio assessment is used for a primary grade and this class articulates to SCC. Study of children from age 4 to 12. Activities included field site placement at local child care facilities. Enrollment includes personal background checks. A portfolio assessment is used for a primary grade and this class articulates to SCC. Learn about current food trends related to individual and family eating habits. Food prep labs help students plan, prepare & serve nutritious meals. National Restaurant Association materials and resources supplement and provide additional opportunities for students. Students will be able to test for a food servsafe certificate in this class and compete in a prostart competition. Food customs, social expectations, interactions of major cultural groups in the U.S. and world are studied. Learn about the preparation of ethnic cuisine. Culinary skills help students understand recipes by working with mixtures, following directions, and preparing a wide variety of food products. Students apply knowledge of nutrients to foods prepared while examining the methods and origin of those foods. Exploration of culinary careers will be supported through use of the National Restaurant Association materials and resources. Students will be able to test for a servsafe certificate in this class and compete in a prostart competition.


COURSE TITLE Human Behavior 5 Credits – 1 Term

RECOMMENDED GRADE PREREQUISITES 10-12 None

4100 Families & Crisis 5 Credits – 1 Term Psychology 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

11-12

None

**Advanced Placement Psychology 10 Credits – 2 Term

11-12

Teacher/Counselor recommendation

Sociology 5 Credits – 1 Term **Sociology Differentiated 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

None

11-12

Teacher/Counselor recommendation

4200

4310

4337 4400

** Weighted class

27

4410

COMMENTS Study of human development and behavior of individuals in relationships with others. Communication, decision making, conflict resolution and sexuality discussed. Study of various types of crises, stress & coping skills for use with self & others. This class is a study of how humans develop, learn, and relate to others. The five required units of study include: how humans learn, role of memory, how humans grow and develop, social psychology, stress affects human activities. This course meets UNL requirements in Social Sciences and for programs requiring Psychology, as well as addressing national and state standards through CRT assessment. This class is intended for students who have above average skills in reading and writing and can work independently. This course is designed to prepare students to take the AP Psychology exam. The study of human behavior in groups and the forces that influence that behavior. An in-depth study of sociology that includes research using sociologists’ methodology.


COURSE TITLE CAD IED 1 5 Credits – 1 Term

RECOMMENDED GRADE PREREQUISITES 9-12 None

4600 CAD IED 2 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

CAD Tech Design

CAD Architecture 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

CAD Tech Design

** Advanced CAD CEA 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11-12

Landscape Design and Management 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

4620 CAD Engineering or CAD Architecture with a C or better-Highly recommended to take both classes 4625 None

Foundations of Industrial Technology (Exploring Engineering & Technology)

9-10

None

10-12

None

4610

4615

5 Credits – 1 Term Introduction to Woods and Construction 5 Credits – 1 Term

46401

Furniture Construction Design 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Advanced Cabinet and Finish Construction 10 Credits – 2 Terms

10-12

Manufacturing & Welding 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

4650 Introduction to Woods and Construction with a C or better. 4660 Furniture Construction Design with a C or better

COMMENTS A must for all engineering, architecture, construction, interior design and art bound students. Learn the basics of computer-aided drawing. Meets Technology Requirement; prerequisite for all other CAD classes. In-depth study of design with CAD with an emphasis on Engineering. Meets Technology Requirement. A similar class to CAD Engineering with an emphasis toward Architecture. Meets Technology Requirement. For those students interested in engineering, architecture, construction, and interior design. Indepth study with CAD. Meets Technology Requirement. Articulates with SCC. This class prepares students to design, modify, and maintain planted areas and devices for the beautification of home grounds, commercial properties, recreation areas and wildlife management. Students may select and rotate through different modular stations such as robotics, rocketry, flight simulator, aerodynamics, CNC, electronics, mechanical systems, graphics, research and design. Meets Technology Requirement. This is the first machine woods class for students interested in furniture construction and cabinet making. Learn about basic woodworking/construction safety, tools and equipment. This class is recommended before taking Furniture Construction Design. Students will design and build a cabinet, desk, coffee table, or furniture related project. You will learn basic woodworking techniques as well as the safe use of power tools and hand tools. Experience with materials, tools, machines and process used in the production of cabinets and advanced furniture products.

4670 None 4820

** Weighted class

28

Intro to manufacturing process including ARC & MIG welding, machine tool, CNC programming, small engines, and sheet metal.


COURSE TITLE Algebra 10 Credits – 2 Terms Algebra Block I Credits – 2 Terms Algebra Block II 10 Credits – 2 Terms (A full year course)

PREREQUISITES Math 8 5201L Counselor assigned/ Teacher recommendation

COMMENTS A first-year Algebra course required for graduation (and college).

Geometry 10 Credits – 2 Terms Geometry Block I 10 Credits – 2 Terms Geometry Block II 10 Credits – 2Terms (A full year course)

Algebra

Geometry Differentiated 10 Credits – 2 Terms

C+ or better in Diff Algebra in 8th grade or teacher recommendation 5260L

An introductory Geometry course required for graduation (and college) that integrates formal proof with concept development. This is the regular Geometry curriculum extended over four terms to allow for further exploration and development of Geometry topics. Students must have passed four terms of “Algebra Block” to enroll in the class. Due to the extended nature, grades will not be assigned after the first 9 weeks or third 9 weeks. Grades (and 10 credits) will only be given after the completion of an 18 week semester. This differentiated course explores additional topics and investigates topics in greater depth than the regular course. In addition, the differentiated course includes a more substantial study of Algebra and proof through out the course.

Advanced Algebra 10 Credits – 2 Terms

Geometry

5251L Counselor assigned/ Teacher recommendation

This is the regular Algebra curriculum extended over four terms to allow for further development of the required algebra topics. Due to the extended nature, grades will not be assigned after the first 9 weeks or third 9 weeks Grades (and 10 credits) will only be given after the completion of an 18 week semester.

5300 Counselor assigned/ Teacher recommendation

Advanced Algebra is essential for most colleges and many vocational programs. Core topics of first-year algebra are again explored through use of higher-level applications. Advanced topics of algebra are also introduced. This is the regular advanced algebra curriculum extended over four terms to allow for further exploration and development of advanced algebra topics. Due to the extended nature, grades will not be assigned after the first 9 weeks or third 9 weeks. Grades (and 10 credits) will only be given after the completion of an 18-week semester.

**Advanced Algebra Differentiated 10 Credits – 2 Terms

C+ or better in Diff. Geometry or teacher recommendation 5310

The differentiated course explores additional topics and investigates topics in greater depth than the regular course. The pace is more rapid than the regular course.

Problem Solving A 5 Credits – 1 Term

Advanced Algebra

Problem Solving B 5 Credits – 1 Term

Advanced Algebra

Are you inquisitive, do you like brainteasers, or do you like the process of solving problems? Do you want to improve your ability to analyze situations and solve multi-step problems? Problem solving is for you. Note: Students can enroll in Problem Solving A (Term 2 ONLY), Problem Solving B (Term 4 ONLY), or BOTH. Are you inquisitive, do you like brainteasers, or do you like the process of solving problems? Do you want to improve your ability to analyze situations and solve multi-step problems? Problem solving is for you. Note: Students can enroll in Problem Solving A (Term 2 ONLY), Problem Solving B (Term 4 ONLY), or BOTH.

Advanced Algebra Block I 10 Credits – 2 Terms Advanced Algebra Block II 10 Credits – 2 Terms

53651

53652

29


**AP Statistics 10 Credits – 2 Terms

Advanced Algebra

Pre-Calculus 10 Credits – 2 Terms

Advanced Algebra

5355

** Pre-Calculus Differentiated 10 Credits – 2 Terms

5400 C+ or better in Differentiated Advanced Algebra or teacher recommendation 5410

**AP Calculus 10 Credits – 2 Terms

Pre-Calculus or PreCalculus D

**AP Calculus Differentiated 10 Credits – 2 Terms

Pre-Calculus or PreCalculus D

5450

5460

Do you have an interest in Business, Psychology, the Social Sciences, or Economics? Are you interested in data and how to describe data graphically and numerically? Are you going to college? If, yes AP Statistics is for you. At the completion of the course, students would be able to take the AP Statistics exam. In addition, students may be eligible to earn college credit from SCC. Pre-Calculus is designed for those students who intend to continue their study of mathematics in the traditional Calculus sequence. This course is a combination of two separate college courses: College Algebra and College Trigonometry. Students may be eligible to receive college credit for College Algebra from SCC. The differentiated course explores additional topics and investigates topics in greater depth than the regular course. The pace is more rapid than the regular course.

This course is a college-level course using the same text and syllabus as UNL. Calculus covers topics that are normally studied during the first two semesters of a three-semester college Calculus sequence. At the completion of the course, students would be able to take the AP Calculus exam, version AB. In addition, students may be eligible to receive college credit from NWU and/or SCC. This is a college-level course using the same text and syllabus as UNL. Calculus Dif covers topics that are normally studied during the first two semesters of a three-semester college calculus sequence. At the completion of the course, students would be able to take the AP Calculus exam, version AB or BC. In addition, students may be eligible to receive college credit from NWU and/or SCC.

** Weighted classes Enrollment notes: • Most post secondary colleges and universities require 4 years of Math. •

Students wanting to repeat a class to improve their skills in a prerequisite class should consult with a math teacher.

Following Advanced Algebra, there are many options for students wanting a fourth year of mathematics: o Students going into a math, science, engineering, or business field should continue with Pre-calculus (or Pre-Calculus D), and then take AP Calculus (or AP Calculus D). o Students wanting a fourth year of math without taking Pre-Calculus can take AP Statistics or both terms of Problem Solving. o AP Statistics is not necessarily an “easier” course than Pre-Calculus.

The LSW Mathematics department encourages that all students take four years of math.

If you have any questions, please contact your guidance counselor.

30


COURSE TITLE Concert Band 2.5 Credits Per Term

RECOMMENDED GRADE PREREQUISITES 9 Teacher permission

5660 *Symphonic Band 2.5 Credits Per Term

10-12

Teacher permission Audition required

*Wind Ensemble 2.5 Credits Per Term

10-12

Teacher permission Audition required

*Varsity Orchestra 2.5 Credits Per Term

11-12

Teacher permission

*Freshman Orchestra 2.5 Credits Per Term

9

Teacher permission

*Sophomore Orchestra 2.5 Credits Per Term

10

Teacher permission

5670

5680

5700

57009

*Prep Jazz Band 2.5 Credits Per Term

10-12

*Varsity Jazz Band 2.5 Credits Per Term

10-12

Music Technology/Theory 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

*Freshman Chorus 2.5 Credits Per Term

9

*Concert Choir 2.5 Credits Per Term *Prep Show Choir 2.5 Credits Per Term

10-12

57007 Audition required and enrollment in Symphonic Band or other Large Ensemble 5730 Audition required and enrollment in Wind Ensemble or other Large Ensemble 5740

5940 None 5750

10-12

Teacher permission 5830 Audition required and enrollment in Concert Choir or other Large Ensemble 5840

31

COMMENTS For wind, brass, and percussion players who are interested in band performance and improving musicianship. This includes marching band, pep band, and concert band. Enrollment for all 4 terms is encouraged. Do not enroll in any zero hour course Term 1. For wind, brass, and percussion players who are interested in band performance and improving musicianship. This includes marching band, pep band, and concert band. Enrollment for all 4 terms is encouraged. Do not enroll in any zero hour course Term 1. For wind, brass, and percussion players who are interested in band performance and improving musicianship at the highest level. This includes marching band, pep band, and concert band. Enrollment for all 4 terms is encouraged. Do not enroll in any zero hour course Term 1. For string players who are interested in orchestral performance and improving musicianship. Enrollment for all 4 terms is encouraged. For string players who are interested in orchestral performance and improving musicianship. Enrollment for all 4 terms is encouraged. For string players who are interested in orchestral performance and improving musicianship. Enrollment for all 4 terms is expected. For instrumentalists who want to perform jazz literature, develop jazz performance skills, and improvisation. Enrollment for all 4 terms is expected. For instrumentalists who want to perform jazz literature, develop jazz performance skills, and improvisation. Enrollment for all 4 terms is expected. For students interested in creating music using computers, synthesizers, and other electronic media. This will be incorporated with basic knowledge and mechanics of music theory. NO prior music knowledge is required. For vocalists interested in choral performance and improving musicianship. This is NOT an auditioned choir. Enrollment for all 4 terms is encouraged. For vocalists interested in choral performance and improving musicianship. Enrollment for all 4 terms is encouraged. For vocalists interested in performing and competing against other show choirs while singing and dancing to music in the styles or: Rock, Pop, Jazz, Swing, Ballad, and other styles as determined by the director. Enrollment for all 4 terms is expected due to the nature of the course.


*Varsity Concert Choir 2.5 Credits Per Term

10-12

*Varsity Chamber Choir 2.5 Credits Per Term

10-12

*Varsity Show Choir 2.5 Credits Per Term

10-12

*Varsity Musical Arts 2.5 Credits Per Term

10-12

Teacher permission Audition required 5850 Teacher permission Audition required & enrollment in Varsity Choir or other Large Ensemble 5855 Audition required and enrollment in Varsity Choir or Large Ensemble 5860 Teacher permission

5875

For vocalists interested in choral performance and improving musicianship at an advanced level. May involve performances at the state and national level. Enrollment for all 4 terms is encouraged. For vocalists interested in a highly select group choral performance with varying styles. This choir serves as the Choral Ambassador of LSW by performing at various community and state events during the school year. Enrollment for all 4 terms is expected. For vocalists interested in performing and competing against other show choirs while singing and dancing to music in the styles of: Rock, Pop, Jazz, Swing, Ballad, and other styles as determined by the director. Enrollment for all 4 terms is expected due to the nature of the course.. For instrumentalists who want to pursue small group & solo performance skills. Students perform a variety of chamber ensemble literature with the infusion of music history and theory. This course also contains Jazz Ensemble II. Students selected for that ensemble should sign up for this course.

*These classes must be paired with another ½ block course: 9th -Computer Applications (8110AB), Fitness for Life (6486AB) or Oral Communications (2850AB) or another music ½ block course 10th –Health (6110AB), Career Ed (1100AB) or another 1/2 block Music class 11th & 12th -1/2 block Music class

32


COURSE TITLE Health Education 5 Credits – 1 Term Fitness for Life 5 Credits – 1 Term

GRADE 10-12

RECOMMENDED PREREQUISITES None 6110

9

None

6486 Team Sports 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Fitness for Life

Officiating Team Sports 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

Fitness for Life

Beginning Swimming 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

Fitness for Life

Inter/Advanced Swim 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Beginning swimming ability/Fitness for Life

Water Games 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

6250

6265

6350

10-12

6355 Beginning/Intermediate swimming ability and Fitness for Life 6365 Intermediate swimming ability/swim test. Fitness for Life 6375 Fitness for Life 6415 Fitness for Life

Ballroom Dance 5 Credits – 1 Term Weight Training 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Fitness for Life

9-12

Fitness for Life

Zero Hour Weight Training 2.5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

64501,64502,64503,64504 Fitness for Life

Advanced Weight Training 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

Zero Hour Advanced Weight Training 2.5 Credits – 1 Term Lifetime Sports 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

Lifeguard Training 5 Credits – 1 Term Aerobic Training 5 Credits – 1 Term Modern Jazz/Aerobics

Must be 15 yrs. or older 10-12

6420 6425

11-12

64500 Weight Training or Teacher Permission. Fitness for Life 64601,64602,64603,64604 Weight Training or Teacher Permission. Fitness for Life 64600 Fitness for Life

6480

33

COMMENTS Graduation Requirement. Addresses major teen health issues. Freshman must enroll in a Fitness for Life class during their 9th grade year. They may take additional PE classes during the 9th grade as long as they are enrolled in Fitness for Life. Students develop sports skills, knowledge, and strategies, as well as physical fitness, through participation in a variety of team sports, such as basketball, flag football ultimate, and softball. Students develop the skills and knowledge needed to officiate a team sports such as basketball, football, soccer, volleyball and softball. Designed for those with little or no swim experience. Students learn basic swim strokes and water safety skills. Basic and advanced swimming water games. Also water safety knowledge. For students with at least beginning swim levels or above. Includes various recreational and fitness activities. Red Cross certification for life guarding. Includes CPR and First Aid. A certification fee is required (est. $30). Students participate in a variety of activities with a focus on improving cardiovascular fitness. Students develop skills and knowledge in a variety of dance forms, as well as physical fitness. No prior dance training is needed. Students learn a variety of partner and line dances. No experience needed. Muscular fitness development through weight training and conditioning activities. Muscular fitness development through weight training and conditioning activities. The class meets from 7:15-8:00 each morning. Advanced strength and fitness development.

Advanced strength and fitness development. The class meets from 7:15-8:00 each morning. Students develop skills and knowledge in a variety of lifetime recreational activities. Minimal fee is charged for off-campus activities. Students must have own transportation.


COURSE TITLE Biology 10 Credits -2 Terms

RECOMMENDED GRADE PREREQUISITES 10 None

6710 **Biology Differentiated 10 Credits – 2 Terms

9-10

None

Botany 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Biology

Zoology 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Biology

Animal Behavior 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Biology

**AP Biology 10 Credits -2 Terms

11-12

6755 Biology or Biology Diff

Environmental Studies 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Biology

Genetics 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Biology

6720

6740

6750

6731

6770

6785

34

COMMENTS Introduces concepts of the characteristics of all living things including ecology, taxonomy, evolution, cellular organization, metabolism, and genetics. Scientific problem solving is a cornerstone to the course methodology. Introduces concepts of cellular organization, metabolism, genetics, ecology, taxonomy, evolution and the six life kingdoms. Scientific problem solving is a cornerstone to the course methodology. This is a rigorous course for students interested in extensive future science pursuits. 9th graders must fill out application for this class. An introductory level botany course, topics will include structure, function, growth processes, reproduction, ecology, genetics, and resources derived from the plant world. The course also examines the impact of plant life on society using examples from major agriculture crops. Students will investigate live specimens of plans with a strong hands-on laboratory component. Designed to acquaint students with the diversity of animal life by studying the structure, function and behavior patterns of members of the animal kingdom. This course builds an evolutionary framework for understanding why animals exhibit particular patterns of behavior. Animal behavior is investigated through both the ecological processes that have driven the evolution of behavior and the physiological mechanisms that allow behavior to be performed. Topics covered include genetics and behavior, learning, organization of behavior, communication, mating systems, and cooperation. Students will investigate live animals with a strong hands-on laboratory component. This course offers an overview of topics and disciplines needed to unde3rstand the environmental issues and challenges of today’s world. The course will integrate aspects of biology, earth science, and policy. Specific topics will include preserving biodiversity, nature preserve management, human population growth, energy, pollution, and sustainability. Students will investigate living systems inside and outside of the classroom with a strong handson laboratory component. This course offers an overview of topics and disciplines needed to understand the environmental issues and challenges of today’s world. The course will integrate aspects of biology, earth science, and policy. Specific topics will include preserving biodiversity, nature preserve management, human population growth, energy, pollution, and sustainability. Students will investigate living systems inside and outside of the classroom with a strong handson laboratory component. Genetics is a study in heredity, DNA Structure and Expression and Biotechnology. This is a rigorous course that focuses on laboratory investigation of the inheritance patterns of characteristics from parents to offspring and the chemical nature of heredity.


Anatomy & Physiology 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11-12

**Anatomy & Physiology Differentiated 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11-12

Biology or Biology Diff.

6790 Biology or Biology Diff.

6795 Physical Science 5 Credits – 1 Term

9

None

Applied Chemistry 10 Credits – 2 Terms Chemistry 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11

Algebra

Anatomy is the study of structures of the human body; Physiology deals with the functions of these structures. Students will acquire an appreciation and understanding of how structures and functions are related in major body systems. They will engage in lab work, hands-on activities, research projects, fieldwork and presentations with emphasis on the development of critical thinking and science inquiry skill. For students with high interest and ability in science and interested in health related fields, athletics training or science. Anatomy is the study of structures of the human body; Physiology deals with the functions of these structures. Students will acquire an appreciation and understanding of how structures and functions are related in major body systems. They will engage in lab work, hands-on activities, research projects, fieldwork and presentations with emphasis on the development of critical thinking and science inquiry skill. Introduction to topics in physic. Students who are not taking Physics and Physics D typically take this course.

6825

10-12

**Chemistry Differentiated 10 Credits – 2 Terms **Advanced Chemistry 10 Credits – 2 Terms

10-12

Physics 10 Credits – 2 Terms **Physics Differentiated 10 Credits – 2 Terms **AP Advanced Physics 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11-12

11-12

11-12 11-12

6830 Geometry (may be concurrent) 6835 Adv. Algebra (may be concurrent) 6840 Chemistry or Diff Chemistry 6845 Geometry or higher 6855 Advanced Algebra or higher 6860 Physics or Physics D 6865

Geoscience 5 Credits – 1 Term Diff Geoscience 5 Credits – 1 Term

9

None

9

None

Earth Systems 5 Credits – 1 Term Astronomy 5 Credits –1 Term Forensic Science 5 Credits –1 Term

10-12

None

11-12

Geoscience

6875

6876

Introduction to topics in Chemistry. Students who are not taking Chemistry and Chemistry D typically take this course. For students interested in chemistry, medicine, engineering, technology and teaching. For students with high interest and ability in science and sciencerelated careers. This laboratory-centered class offers students an opportunity to investigate chemical reactions and processes in depth. A second year chemistry class. For students interested in engineering, architecture, medicine, math or teaching. For students with high ability and motivation, interested in engineering, architecture, medicine, math or teaching. This class is the second year of physics for the student interested in physical science or engineering at the college level. Students may take the AP test for college. Introduction to topics in earth science. This course is typically taken in the 9th grade year. This rigorous course is designed to challenge motivated students. More in depth laboratory experiments will be performed and analyzed. The significance of previously studied environmental and physical concepts will be related to the Earth System. Current geological and weather-related events will be investigated. Scientific study of earth processes, changes and composition.

6878 Introductory course in astronomy and sky study. 6880 11-12

Biology & Chemistry

This class uses concepts in Biology and Chemistry to investigate, reconstruct the event scene and solve crime mystery.

6965

35


Medical Terminology 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

None

Intro to Health & Occupation 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

9143

9145

** Weighted class

36

This course will provide an introduction to medical terms used in multiple health occupations career pathways. Course instruction will provide a system for building a basic structure of medical terms. Pronouncing, spelling, defining terms and common medical abbreviations included. Recommended for anyone interested in the health field. This course has an Articulated credit agreement at SECC for Med Terms I with a minimum passing grade of a B. This is a non-departmental elective credit course. Introduces students to the many career opportunities in the areas of Health Occupations including therapeutic, diagnostic, research and development and support systems. Students will have the opportunity to become certified in CPR and First Aid. This is a non-departmental elective credit course.


COURSE TITLE **AP Comparative Government 5 Credits – 1 Term

GRADE 12

RECOMMENDED PREREQUISITES Civics: Counselor/Teacher recommendation

7125 Civics 5 Credits – 1 Term

9

None

Civics Differentiated 5 Credits – 1 Term Geography 5 Credits – 1 Term

9

Counselor/Teacher Recommendation None

Geography Differentiated 5 Credits – 1 Term **AP Human Geography 10 Credits – 2 Term

9

Counselor/Teacher recommendation

10-12

Counselor/Teacher recommendation

World History 10 Credits – 2 Terms

10 - 12

None

**AP World History 10 Credits – 2 Terms

10-12

Counselor/Teacher Recommendation

United States History 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11-12

Civics/Intro to Geography

**Advanced Placement United States History 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11-12

7130

9

7132

7140

COMMENTS This course gives highly motivated students an opportunity for a college-level learning experience leading to possible college credit. Students will use their understanding of U.S. government to compare and contrast major political concepts and patterns of political processes in China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, and Iran. The differences between stable democracies and other forms of government will be analyzed. Participating colleges grant credit and appropriate placement to those students who have completed the course and have been found qualified by the Advanced Placement Examination. A study of the role of a citizen in a democratic government, the US Constitution and Federal government, and Nebraska, tribal and local governments. For high achieving students who desire an accelerated course in government. This course provides an introduction to the five themes of Geography by having students explore the world through spatial terms. Students will study the world by concentrating on five major areas: Latin America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Pacific World. For high achieving students who desire an accelerated course in physical geography.

7142

7170

7200L

7220L

7272 Counselor/Teacher recommendation; Civics, Intro to Geography

7282

37

A rigorous, college-level study of human geography. Student may, after completion of this class, take the AP College Exam in May for possible college credit. Study of the great range of human experiences in Europe, Asia, Africa and America from the end of the ancient world to modern time. This course includes modifications in: the products expected from students, content objectives, and instructional strategies. This is a rigorous course with extensive reading. A two-term study of United States history from 1877 to the present.

Designed to give high ability students an opportunity to take a college-level learning experience. Students are encouraged to take the AP College Exam in May. In addition, students may be eligible to receive college credit from NWU.


Government & Politics 5 Credits – 1 Term

12

Civics

**AP Government & Politics 5 Credits – 1 Term

12

Civics; Counselor/Teacher recommendation

7300

7310 Criminal Justice 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

Modern U.S. Military History 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

None

History of Holocaust 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

None

7350

7355

7396

**Weighted

class

38

This course provides students with a study of, and applications experiences with, the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights. Political science issues, foreign policy development, and regular analysis of current events provide interactive opportunities to practice participatory democracy. Students are required to complete 20 hours of community service outside the school day as an integral part of the course. Provides students with a critical perspective on politics and government. The course will involve both the study of general concepts used to interpret US politics and the analysis of specific case studies. This class fulfills Government & Politics requirements. This class deals with the many phases of our criminal justice system on the national, state and local levels. Students will study 20th century military history including WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam and other global conflicts in which the United States is engaged. Cultural contributions as well as gender roles will be focal points in each area of study. National and global policies, political and economic contexts, battle strategy and general tactics will be explored. Students will study genocidal actions of governments with special emphasis on Jews in Europe prior to and during WWII. Students will examine significant historical and current events that have universal implications regarding prejudicial attitudes, discriminatory practices, and racism.


COURSE TITLE &Intervention & Strategies 5 Credits – 1 Term

&Basic Academic Core 5 Credits –1 Term

RECOMMENDED GRADE PREREQUISITES 9-12 For students who have a learning need in the areas of math, reading and/or writing. This course is not a study hall. It is a course to improve self-advocacy and study skill development. Considerations for this class will be based on the recommendations of the IEP team. 7620 9-12 Determined appropriate by IEP team.

&Keyboarding 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

&Career & Educational Plan 5 Credits – 1 Term &Intro to Economics Perspectives 5 Credits – 1 Term &Intro to English 9 10 Credits – 2 Terms &Intro to English 10 10 Credits –2 Terms &Intro to Composition 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

&Communication Skills 5 Credits – 1 Term &Intro to Literature 5 Credits – 1 Term &Reading I 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

&Reading II 5 Credits–1 Term &Reading Preskills 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

9 10 11-12

11-12 9-12

9-12 9-12

7630 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7680 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7690 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7695 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7700 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7705 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7710 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7715 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7725 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7736 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7737 Determined district reading score and IEP team

7738

39

COMMENTS Structured class that focuses on skill building, organization and assignment completion. May enroll for one or more terms as needed for support in the general education curriculum.

Course provides instruction in appropriate social interactions. Intended for students whose behaviors significantly interfere with classroom management and impede progress in the general education curriculum. May enroll in one or more terms as needed. Course is designed to introduce students with moderate disabilities to basic keyboarding skills. Adapted course for post secondary planning.

Focus on development of consumer skills.

Course will focus on the development of reading and writing skills. Course will focus on the development of reading and writing skills. Further development of writing skills with an emphasis on writing ideas, organization and mechanics. This class can meet the requirements for WGDE Focuses on building public speaking and communication skills. Encompasses a survey of literature through novels and short stories. Reading instruction related to recognition and comprehension of survival words. Reading instruction related to sight words and/or letter and sound relationship. This is the first course in the district reading sequence. It is based on phonics and provides reading. Instruction in letter sounds and word recognition. Course must be repeated until mastery is achieved.


&On Your Own 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

&Recreation and Leisure 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

&Personal/Social Development 5 Credits – 1 Term &Independent Living Skills 5 Credits – 1 Term &Practical Math 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

&Basic Math 10 Credits – 2 Terms

9-12

&High School Math Concepts 10 Credits – 2 Terms

9-12

&Beginning Algebra 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

&Geometry 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

&Health Skills 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

&Adapted PE 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

&Intro to Life Science 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

&Intro to Body Systems 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

11-12

9-12

Determined appropriate by IEP team.

7760 Determined appropriate by IEP team.

7765 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7780 Determined appropriate by IEP team 7791 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7830 Determined appropriate by IEP team.

7833 Determined appropriate by IEP team 7836 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7840 Determined appropriate by IEP team.

Course focuses o four distinct areas to prepare students for independent living. Term 1-World Language Exploration Term 2-Art Exploration Term 3-Music Exploration Term 4-Transportation. Course is divided into four distinct unites. Students may enroll in one or more terms. Term 1/Domestics Term 2/Hygiene Term 3/Cooking Term 4/Health Course is designed to help students develop and awareness of human behavior and how it affects our life in our families, with our friends, and relationships on the job. Course teaches students the skills of budgeting, wellness, nutrition, setting up a home, and community involvement. Math instruction in identification and use of coins and bills, clocks and basic measurement. Skills embedded are related to use in the community. Basic math skills with whole numbers to 100,000 and in fractions, decimals, and percents. Community math skills include banking services, to gain independence, smart shopping and consumer skills.. Course may be repeated for credit in order to gain skill mastery. Basic math skills with whole numbers to 1,000,000 and in fractions, decimals, and percents. Continue community math skills from Basic Math course. Course may be repeated for credit in order to gain skill mastery. Basic study of Pre-Algebra concepts (basic processes with variables). Basic study of Geometry concepts (area, angles, lines and polygons).

7845 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7865 Determined appropriate by IEP team.

7870 For students needing Science credit in an inclusive setting. It is designed for kids with learning needs in the area of reading and currently enrolled in Reading Elements or Reading Skills 7880 For students needing Science credit in an inclusive setting. It is designed for kids with learning needs in the area of reading and currently enrolled in Reading Elements or Reading Skills 7882

40

Course is designed to develop a healthy approach to both physical and mental health. Students will address healthy lifestyles and health issues in today’s society. Adapted course which focuses on a variety of lifetime recreational activities with an emphasis on strength and fitness development. Designed for students with severe cognitive or physical impairments. Term 3 & 4 focus on preparation for Special Olympics. Can be repeated for credit. Basic study of plants and animals.

Study the Systems of the Human Body.


&Intro to Physical Science 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

&Intro to Geoscience 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

&Intro to Civics 5 Credits – 1 Term

9

&Intro to Geography 5 Credits – 1 Term &Intro to World History 5 Credits – 1 Term &Intro to US History 10 Credits – 2 Terms &Intro to Government & Politics 5 Credits – 1 Term &Intro to Computer Application 5 Credits – 1 Term &Computer Application II 5 Credits – 1 Term &Structured Learning 5 Credits – 1 Term &Independent Job Practice (IJP) 5 Credits – 1 Term

9

&Work Skills 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

10-12

12

9-12

9-12

9-12

10-12

9-12

For students needing Science credit in an inclusive setting. It is designed for kids with learning needs in the area of reading and currently enrolled in Reading Elements or Reading Skills 7885 For students needing Science credit in an inclusive setting. It is designed for kids with learning needs in the area of reading and currently enrolled in Reading Elements or Reading Skills 7888 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7903 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7904 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7905 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7910 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7915 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7920 Determined appropriate by IEP team 7922 Determined appropriate by IEP team. 7948 Determined appropriate by IEP team

7950 Determined appropriate by IEP team 7970

Basic study of topics in Physics and Chemistry.

Basic study of topics in Earth Science.

Study of citizenship and civic responsibility.

Basic geography skills that include map reading, study of regions and cultures. Focus on North America. Study of the great range of human experiences in Europe, Asia, Africa and America. Overview of US from depression to the present.

Citizenship and government issues. Requires the completion of 20 volunteer hours.

Instruction in word processing, database and spreadsheet skills. Designed for students with significantly impaired keyboarding/computer skills. Further instruction into software application programs such as multimedia and graphic programs. For students with significantly impaired computer skills. Designed to provide a structured visual routine for students with severely impaired language and interpersonal skills. Supported job practice for students who can work independently, either in the building or in the Community. Opportunities for paid IJP are available to students who secure their own position outside of school and wish to gain credit. Course can be repeated for credit. Multilevel experience intended to develop work skills. Level 1- Classroom related supported jobs Level 2- Building related supported jobs Level 3- Building related independent but monitored jobs.

**Designed for students whose reading, writing, and/or math skills that are significantly below grade level. +++ Designed for students with moderate to severe cognitive impairment. These classes may be repeated for credit.

41


COURSE TITLE Computer Applications 5 Credits – 1 Term Advanced Computer Applications 5 Credits – 1 Term

GRADE 9-10 10-12

RECOMMENDED PREREQUISITES Keyboarding skills highly recommended 8110 Computer Applications

8120 Desktop Publishing 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Digital Media 1 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

Digital Media 2 5 Credits – 1 Term

10-12

BASIC Computer Programming 5 Credits – 1 Term Web Page Programming 5 Credits – 1 Term

9-12

8200

8250 Digital Media 1

8253 Computer Applications, Geometry (may be concurrent) 8310

10-12

COMMENTS Introduction to word processing, database, spreadsheet, and presentation software. Provides advanced technology skills using Windows Office 2007 for Access, Excel and Word. Students will develop skills leading to an opportunity for advanced placement at SCC and UNL. Using industry-standard Adobe software such as InDesign, Illustrator and PhotoShop, students will learn to manipulate graphics and text in preparing professionally written business documents such as newsletters, brochures, business cards, flyers, booklets, resumes, etc. Element of graphic design ill be introduced and these skills will be valuable in all areas of business careers. Students create digital media including videos, animations, graphics, and web pages. Students use Adobe Master Collection (Photoshop, Premiere Pro, SoundBooth, Dreamweaver, Fireworks, Flash, Encore) in this class. Digital Media 1 provides opportunities for students to combine their creative talents and technology skills. Digital Media 2 builds upon the foundational skills developed in Digital Media 1 (prerequisite). Students will focus on the advanced features of Adobe Premiere Pro and AfterEffects to create advanced digital video projects. Introduction to structured programming language. Students will learn the object oriented programming language Visual Basic. Learn to use HTML and XHTML, and CSS to develop and publish advanced web pages

8330 Photo Journalism, Newspaper, Yearbook, Commercial Art Technology, Music Theory/Electronic Music Foundations of ITE, All CAD classes

These courses meet the technology credit.

These courses meet the technology credit. See page 28 for more details.

42


eLearning

Students have the opportunity at LSW to enroll in the online “eLearning� classes which are monitored and facilitated in a computer lab at the high school. The courses are web based through Apex Learning Company. Students can register for courses in Math, Social Studies, Science, English and Health; all are available for both general courses of study and college-bound credits. This opportunity is open to juniors and seniors only. Registration for eLearning courses is not available online; To see a complete list of courses and for a registration form, students are encouraged to see their counselor. Does NOT meet technology requirement.

43


COURSE TITLES Level 1 French, German, Japanese, Latin, Spanish 10 Credits – 2 Terms Level 2 French, German, Japanese, Latin, Spanish 10 Credits – 2 Terms

RECOMMENDED GRADE PREREQUISITES 9-12 None – must pass 1st term to continue to 2nd term

9-12

Level 3 French, German, Japanese, Spanish 10 Credits – 2 Terms

10-12

Level 4 French, German, Japanese, Spanish 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11-12

Level 5 ** AP French, AP German, AP Spanish 10 Credits – 2 Terms

11-12

Conversational Spanish 5 Credits – 1 Term

11-12

8610/8710/8941/8931/8810 Level 1 (must have passed 2 terms and a grade of C is recommended for advancement)

8620/8720/8942/8932/8820 Level 2 (must have passed 2 terms and a grade of C is recommended for advancement) or special department permission 8630/8730/8943/8830 Level 3 (must have passed 2 terms and a grade of C is recommended for advancement) or special department permission 8640/8740/8944/8840 Level 4 year (must have passed 2 terms and a grade of C is recommended for advancement) or department permission 8650/8750/8852 Level 4 year (must have passed 2 terms and a grade of C is recommended for advancement) or special department permission 8870

**WEIGHTED CLASSES

44

COMMENTS General foundations in listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills of the language. Contemporary cultures of countries studied.

Additional emphasis on building basic language skills and cultural foundation.

Increased emphasis on reading, speaking, and writing the language. Continued building of cultural background.

Specially designed curriculum with emphasis on complex structure. Continued cultural emphases for advanced students.

Increased proficiency in sustaining communication. Almost exclusive use of speaking and writing in target language and reading selected literature in the language. AP language classes are taught as preparation for the Advanced Placement exam. This course offers students the opportunity to improve Spanish language skills through contemporary issues and culture using films, current events, and other media with emphasis placed on verbal communication. Students must actively participate using Spanish in all activities daily.


Lincoln Public Schools and Southeast Community College CONCURRENT /DUAL CREDIT: (college tuition, high school & college transcript) Student is enrolled both at

the high school and at SCC. The students’ records are reflected both on the high school and SCC college transcript. Concurrent/Dual credit courses follow all the college guidelines for tuition, credits, fees, withdrawals, etc. 1. Complete paperwork, to become concurrently/dually enrolled at the high school and SCC, while in the high school class. 2. Pay tuition and fees, or apply scholarships to SCC. 3. Complete college competencies for the course (grade C or better, must be junior or senior, and may require specific testing). 4. Earn a high school diploma. 5. Credit reflected on both high school and SCC college transcript. Credit can possibly transfer to other colleges and universities. 6. Withdrawals from course must follow SCC guidelines and timelines. A failing grade will be recorded on SCC college transcript if these procedures are not followed. Withdrawing students are responsible for completing the withdrawal at SCC. Please note that all concurrent/dual credit courses may not be offered at all Lincoln Public School locations. Please work with your high school.

Concurrent/Dual Credit Course Listing (college tuition) 7205

LPS Cours e#

College Accounting I & II (2 Sem) LPS Course

East Northeast North Star Southeast Southwest

Advanced Placement Macroeconomics

East Northeast

ACCT1200

SCC Course #

Principles of Accounting I SCC

4.5

Course Name

SCC Cr. Hrs.

Please view the SCC College Catalog or visit the Programs of Study Web page for more information. SCC Accepting Program

Macroeconomics

4.5

See SCC Catalog or Web page.

Offered at

1750

8327 2622 0657

0655 7282 7280 8332

Advanced Programming Languages (ITFP only) Intro to Entrepreneurship (EFP only) College Composition Entrepreneurship Feasibility Study (EFP only) AP U.S. History 2 second semester AP U.S. History 1 Adv. Web Page Development (ITFP only)

8327

Adv. Programming Languages (ITFP only)

5355

AP Statistics

5450 5460

AP Calculus AP Calculus D

5450 5460

AP Calculus AP Calculus D

ITFP Northeast

ECON 2110

ELEC 2755 ENGL 1010

Structured Programming for Electronic Technicians Intro to Entrepreneurship (fall) Composition I

4.5 4.5 4.5

Electronic Systems Technology Business Administration (Entrepreneurship Focus) Business Administration (General Business Focus) See SCC Catalog or Web page. Business Administration (Entrepreneurship Focus) Business Administration (General Business Focus) See SCC Catalog or Web page. See SCC Catalog or Web page.

EFP

ENTR1050

EFP

ENTR2040

Entrepreneurship Feasibility Study (spring)

East East

HIST 2020 HIST 2010

American History II American History I

ITFP

INFO1431 INFO1325

Web Page Fundamentals Internet Scripting

2.0 3.0

ITFP

INFO 1111

Logic and Design

5

MATH 1180

Elementary Statistics

See SCC Catalog or Web page.

MATH 1600

Calculus

See SCC Catalog or Web page.

MATH 1700

Calculus II

See SCC Catalog or Web page.

Northeast Southeast Southwest Northeast North Star Southeast Southwest Northeast North Star

4.5

Computer Information Technology Computer Programming Technology Computer Information Technology Computer Programming Technology Electronic Systems Technology

45

LPS/SCC Articulated and Dual Credit Chart -Page 1 of 4


Concurrent/Dual Credit Course Listing (college tuition) 0914 9 LPS

Cours e#

Fundamentals of Health Careers LPS

Course

East Northeast North Star Southeast Southwest

NURA1401

Nursing Assistant

East

PSYC 1810

Introduction to Psychology

SCC Course #

SCC Course Name

6.5

SCC Cr. Hrs.

Practical Nursing (Prerequisite) Nursing Assistant (Continuing Education) SCC Accepting Program

Offered at

4337

AP Psychology

See SCC Catalog or Web page.

>>Lincoln Public Schools’ Dual credit Web page: http://www.lps.org/instruction/curriculum/collegecredits >>Southeast Community College’s high school Web page: http://www.southeast.edu/programs/highschools For more information on concurrent/dual credit courses contact: Dr. Barb Jacobson, Curriculum Director, bjacob@lps.org, 402-436-1634 Randy Hiatt, Assistant Director, rhiatt@southeast.edu, 402228-8270; 800-233-5027, ext. 1270 Notes: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

ARTICULATED CREDIT: (no tuition, h.s. transcript, “credit by waiver”) Use your high school transcript when

enrolling at SCC and request a “credit by waiver” to receive college credit. Student must: 1 Successfully complete the articulated high school class with a “B” or better (or other specified testing in high school class as determined by SCC agreement). 2 No tuition. 3 Earn a high school diploma. 4 Be accepted in a program of study at SCC within one year of graduation from high school or as soon as space is available where a waiting list exists. 5 Complete a SCC Credit by Waiver form for the articulated class upon enrollment at SCC. 6 Exceptions to these guidelines can be made with SCC administrative approval.

46

LPS/SCC Articulated and Dual Credit Chart -Page 2 of 4


47


>>Lincoln Public Schools’ Career & Technical Education Web page: http://www.lps.org/instruction/curriculum/cte/college >>Southeast Community College’s high school Web page: http://www.southeast.edu/programs/highschools For more information on articulated courses contact: Carol Andringa, Curriculum Specialist, candrin@lps.org , 402-436-1819 Jan Claassen, Assistant Director, jclaasse@southeast.edu, 402-228-3468 ext. 1320; 800-233-5027, ext. 1320

48

Notes: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

LPS/SCC Articulated and Dual Credit Chart -Page 4 of 4


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