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Resident Professional Company of The College of Wooster Freedlander Theatre

TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome..........................................................................5 Annual Fund Donors...................................................9 Endowment Gifts........................................................ 12 The James F. Stuart Legacy................................... 13

Everything. Right where you need it.®

Frank Knorr Memorial...............................................14 Our Mission................................................................... 15 Kiss Me, Kate................................................................ 16 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background

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Annie Get Your Gun..................................................20 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background The Mikado................................................................... 24 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background

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“God Save the Queen”............................................ 27 Have a Heart................................................................30 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background

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La Vie Parisienne....................................................... 34 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background The Dancing Years.................................................... 38 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background The Little Dutch Girl................................................. 42 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background Festival Staff............................................................... 48 Festival Cast................................................................ 56 Festival Orchestra..................................................... 66 Festival Technical and Artistic Staff.................. 72 Acknowledgments..................................................... 81 Festival Symposium................................................. 82 Taking Light Opera Seriously The College of Wooster......................................... 88 Dining, Accommodations & Shopping.............90 Complete Repertoire............................................... 93 2016 Schedule............................................................94

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Out of respect to the performers, the use of cell phones, cameras, or any other electronic device is prohibited in the theatre. We ask that you please turn all these devices off completely for the duration of the performance, so that you and those around you can enjoy the show.

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BED, BREAKFAST, and BRAVO!

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Box Office: 330.263.2345

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149 E. Liberty Street Wooster, OH 44691

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THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA WELCOME

Steven A. Daigle Artistic Director

Laura Neill Executive Director

Welcome to the celebration of our 38th festival season! On behalf of 140+ members of The Ohio Light Opera, we want you to know how grateful we are for your patronage and support. Thank You! It is you, our dedicated patrons, who provide the company with financial stability as we plan for and experience another exciting season in 2016. As America’s Premier Lyric Theater Festival, The Ohio Light Opera presents outstanding productions of classic operettas and musicals, including shows not staged for many years. The repertoire for our 38th season features works of famous composers of Golden Age musicals, renowned 19th-century operetta masters, and one of the most popular British entertainers of the early 20th century. The works produced during the summer season offer our patrons high-level musical artistry (from both the performers and the orchestra) and visually engaging theatrical values (from sets, costumes, lights, and the actors themselves). Most importantly, through an historical musical journey, whimsical dialogue, satirical plots, memorable melodies, rousing choruses, lovable characters, and full orchestrations, our festival season offers a chance for patrons to escape, be entertained, be amused, and discover the intimate environment of Wooster and Freedlander Theatre. Building on the success of and enthusiastic response to the 2014 and 2015 events, there will be a Festival Symposium on the Lyric Theater Tradition in the 2016 season. It is scheduled for August 2nd through 5th and will feature new lectures, events, and guest speakers. We at OLO are excited to welcome to campus the College of Wooster’s new president, Sarah Bolton, and look forward to hosting you at Freedlander Theatre as often as possible this summer. Thank you all for your loyal support of The Ohio Light Opera. Your generosity and the continuing “in-kind” support from The College of Wooster make each season possible, and we look forward to entertaining you again this summer. As one of nearly 750,000 patrons who have attended OLO performances, please take pride in your service and contribution to this unique company. In no small way, your attendance has allowed the company to grow into one of the nation’s premier summer festivals.

Artistic Director

Executive Director

THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Michael Miller, Chair Steven A. Daigle, Artistic Director and Vice Chair Marlene Kanipe, Treasurer, ex officio Nan Miller, Secretary

Ronald Holtman The Honorable John D. Ong Sara L. Patton John Schambach Richard N. Seaman Laura M. Neill, Executive Director

Honorary Members Bill & Marilyn Blanchard Lois Freedlander Jean W. Knorr Boyd & Eloise Mackus Barbara Robinson David Sherck Ernie Stein ohiolightopera.org

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MUSIC FESTIVAL

SUMMER HOME OF

THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA

JUL

28

PM

1812 OVERTURE

DEBUS

SSAT ATU URRD DAY AY

The Cleveland Orchestra Johannes Debus, conductor

M MO ON ND DAY AY

JUL

48

PM

A SALUTE TO AMERICA Blossom Festival Band Loras John Schissel, conductor

SCHISSEL

2O16 BLOSSOM

FFO OU UR RTTH H--O OFF--JJ

P R E S E N T E D BY

JU

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TICKETS:

Box Office: 330.263.2345

800-686-1141

JUL

98

PM

BEETHOVEN’S HEROIC SYMPHONY

WELSER-MÖST

SSAT ATU URRD DAY AY

The Cleveland Orchestra Franz Welser-Möst, conductor

JUL

16 8

PM

A LONDON SYMPHONY

The Cleveland Orchestra Michael Francis, conductor David Fung, piano

23 8

PM

THIBAUDET PLAYS GRIEG The Cleveland Orchestra Jahja Ling, conductor Jean-Yves Thibaudet, piano

JUL

30 7

PM

ZUKERMAN PLAYS MOZART

THIBAUDET

JUL

ZUKERMAN

Blossom Music Center has provided an inviting and gracious summer home for The Cleveland Orchestra since it opened in 1968. Located just north of Akron, Ohio, and about 25 miles south of Cleveland, Blossom is situated on 200 acres of rolling hills surrounded by the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Its beautiful outdoor setting is an integral part of the Blossom experience — and unrivaled among America’s summer music festival parks for the clear sightlines from across Blossom’s expansive Lawn and the superb acoustics and architectural beauty of the famed Blossom Pavilion. Come early to savor the summer weather. Bring your own picnic, or purchase from a variety of onsite options available, including a wide selection of wines, spirits, and beers. Once again this summer, The Cleveland Orchestra is offering free Lawn tickets to young people ages 17 and under for all Blossom Festival concerts. Two “under 18s” will be admitted with each paid adult admission. “Under 18s Free” is a program of The Cleveland Orchestra’s Center for Future Audiences, an initiative endowed by the Maltz Family Foundation to engage and expand the Orchestra’s audience for symphonic music.

The Cleveland Orchestra Hans Graf, conductor Pinchas Zukerman, violin

with Kent/Blossom Chamber Orchestra

==includes includesfireworks, fireworks,weather weatherpermitting permitting


AUGUST

U ULY LY--W WEEEEK KEEN ND D

JUL

38

PM

1812 OVERTURE

DEBUS

SSU UN ND DAY AY

S AT U R D AY

The Cleveland Orchestra Johannes Debus, conductor

S U N D AY

AUG

77

PM

MENDELSSOHN’S SCOTTISH The Cleveland Orchestra Nicholas McGegan, conductor Jeffrey Rathbun, oboe

AUG

13 8

PM

SILK ROAD ENSEMBLE with YO-YO MA Silk Road Ensemble Yo-Yo Ma, cello

ULY LY

AUG

SSU UN ND DAY AY

20 8

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LED ZEPPELIN: A ROCK SYMPHONY Windborne’s Music of Led Zeppelin Blossom Festival Orchestra Brent Havens, conductor Randy Jackson, vocalist

AUG

27 8

PM

BACH’S BRANDENBURG CONCERTOS Orpheus Chamber Orchestra

JUL

177

PM

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS The Cleveland Orchestra Bramwell Tovey, conductor Javier Perianes, piano

JUL

24 7

SEPTEMBER

PM

MAGIC OF THE MOVIES

The Cleveland Orchestra Michael Krajewski, conductor Capathia Jenkins, vocalist Blossom Festival Chorus

317

PM

FEINSTEIN’S BROADWAY

FEINSTEIN

JUL

S AT U R D AY

The Cleveland Orchestra Jack Everly, conductor Michael Feinstein, vocalist

TICKETS:

SEP

3 8:30

PM

S U N D AY

SEP

4 8:30

PM

AT THE MOVIES:

AT THE MOVIES:

The Cleveland Orchestra Brett Mitchell, conductor

The Cleveland Orchestra Brett Mitchell, conductor

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK

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THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA

2016 ANNUAL FUND We are grateful for the generosity of the following donors to the 2016 Ohio Light Opera Annual Fund.

Lord Chancellors ($10,000 and above) Don & Shirley Buehler Joan M. Buehler Stanley C. Gault

The Burton D. Morgan Foundation Michael & Nan Miller

Seaman Corporation Mary Alice Streeter Live Publishing Company Ohio Arts Council

Ron & Prue Holtman Ralph R. & Grace B. Jones Foundation Norman K. Keller Dr. & Mrs. Joseph E. Loewenstein

The Hon. & Mrs. John Doyle Ong Sara L. Patton Dee & Mary Vaidya

Joe & Mary Dulle Glen & Lisa Grumbling John F. Herrmann Mr. & Mrs. Tim Smucker

Andrea Traubner in Memory of Richard Traubner Laura B. Frick Foundation J.D. & Arlene Milliken

Christina & Dwight McCawley Betty & Dick McNutt Gordon F. Musch John Schambach

Richard Springman & Pamela Elsass Jean Wingate Certified Angus Beef

Michael Acree Mrs. Elsa G. Anderson Henrietta Baramki in Memory of Costi Baramki Robert Bendall Bill & Marilyn Blanchard Phil Bowers David & Carol Briggs Terry & Evan Buck Bob Baer & Judy Cohen-Baer The J.M. Smucker Company The Commercial & Savings Bank Mr. Eugene L. Cox Marian T. Cropp

Bill & Claudette Finke Marvin Fletcher Eleanor & Joseph Hingtgen Pamela Everett in Memory of Lillian Bunge Diane M. & R. Stanton Hales David James Mr. & Mrs. Michael Kennedy Mr. David Knapp Frank & Jean Knorr Dick & Mimi Lewellen Luke & Nita Lovell Clark & Joyce Neill Steve & Chris Matthew

Allen G. & Jane W. Noble Jonathan F. Orser Wally & Diane Pretzer Ward Randol Stanley Ransom Prof. Alan Miles Ruben & Judge Betty Willis Ruben Kenneth E. Shafer Geri Sherman Janis & Gardnar Stevens Dr. & Mrs. Sigel G. Stocker Cyndy & Lynn Willett Wiley & Karen Wilson

Peers or Peris ($350 to $599) Anonymous (2) Dr. & Mrs. James C. Abbott Cornelia V. Albert Julius L. Amling Steven & Lisa Armstrong Ed Andrews Julia & Bruce Bain Charles & Norma Baker

Barbara Barna Dr. Lee & Susan Beall Rodney Bealls Mike & Judy Berliner Sally Bernhardt Debora Bittaker & A.V. Shirk Bill & Pauline Bittner Dennis C. Bond

Robert & Constance Bouchard Mr. & Mrs. Carl Bowers Linda Bromund in Memory of Martin Baskin Dan & Elizabeth Candler & Frank L. Skillern Robert & Virginia Cassady Lynn Ellen Catlos

Mikados ($5,000 to $9,999) Edith G. Andrew Bradley Bennett Tom & Lois Bruch David & Linda Bush Lois Freedlander Sorcerers ($2,500 to $4,999) Ken Bogucki Rudolf & Shirley Bredenbeck Jayne & Alan Churchmack Clarence & Connie Drennon

Pirate Kings ($1,250 to $2,499) Briggs Financial Group Ann Fox Stan & Diane Hales Chuck & Dawn McCaghy

Englishmen ($600 to $1,249)

The Ohio Arts Council helped fund this program with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, educational excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. The Ohio Arts Council is committed to the economic, educational, and cultural development of the state. The Council believes the arts should be shared by the people of Ohio. The arts arise from public, individual, and organizational efforts. The OAC supports and encourages these efforts.

ohiolightopera.org

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Dick & Lois Clemmer Marilyn & Dave Cooper David Copper Ruth & Paul Crowley Tom & Patsy Doak Linda Earley Mr. & Mrs. William H. Edgerton Anne & Tom Engel Mr. & Mrs. Ramsey H. Fahim Patricia Fodor Mya L. Gosling Dave & Pam Grant Louise E. Hamel Ivan & Alicia Handwerk, Father & Daughter Thomas M. Donnan & Lee Helsby Sheila & Roger Hollenbaugh Karen Hunter & Pat Bowen Pamela & Edward Jajko in Memory of Costi Baramki Jim & Mary Jicha Gail Jones-Nemeth & Gary Nemeth Jane Kenan Byron & Sue Kentner Sharna & Bruce Kinsel Mary Knox Richard LeSueur Anne R. Lewellen Oliver & Pat Lugibihl Anne Carey & Berry Lyons Kay Marshall Bob & Pauline McWhorter Stephen Miles Bill & Jane Miller Robert E. Miller Phyllis Miller Tammy Mitchell in Memory of Joan Strope Karen & Ed Moore Roy & Cindy Moore Paul Morton Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey M. Nicholls Richard Nottingham & Patricia Harrell Richard & JoAnne Orr Joan Lee Parsons David Patton in Memory of Maggie Patton Maria & Leroy Parks Michael & Barbara Porte Egidijus & Vida Radvenis Jodie & Linn Raney Harold J. Reese John D. Regetz Bun Rhea Mary & Den Rich Tom D. Rose, OD Harvey & Edna Rosen Andy & Cindy Ruckman Dr. & Mrs. Douglas W. Sanders Roger Simmons Mr. & Mrs. Robert Slagle

James Smith Jean Soper Mr. & Mrs. Vernon Sponseller Talia Starr Larry & Carol Stewart Phil Sticksel Timothy Strope L. Gordon Tait Mr. J. Patrick Tatum Dr. & Mrs. H. Reid Wagstaff Janet Welty Evelyn White Lorraine M. Wright John & Linda Zimmermann Yeomen ($250 to $349) Cornelia V. Albert Steven & Lisa Armstrong Elaine Arnold Sam & Lois Billig Mr. & Mrs. Walter Bixler Carl & Lucille Bowers Bill & Janet Burkholder Mrs. Charles D. Celmer Charles Cureton in Memory of Mary Cureton David Dalrymple John & Adriana Dryer Anne Dunipace Howard & Terry Epstein Jon & Mary Fancher Mrs. Raymond Gallo, Jr. Hope Gertler Sally & Richard Gillmore Catherine & Tom Graves Ruth & Roy Hanes Nancy Harmelink Roy & Ruth Haynes Ray & Carol Hils Robert & Elizabeth Hooker Katherine M. Hull Rolland & Anne King Sally Kreuger Charles & Connie Lepold Bill & Donna Loeb Michael & Kelly Lukuch Judy Penn Mallonn Dr. & Mrs. William R. McGraw Sandy & John McIlvaine Robert McInnes Elizabeth Mitchell Karen & Ed Moore Dr. & Mrs. Paul Morton Evelyn Moser Dr. Michael Nichols in Memory of Susan Davis Nichols Rita & Roger Park David B. Patton Gunther & Dorothy Piepke

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph B. Price Jane Richardson John & Nancy Maria Schuesselin Ken & Rita Schuesselin Jack & Ruth Severiens Mr. & Mrs. Robert Slagle Larry & Carol Stewart Alan & Phyllis Syverud James & Martha Taggart Sheldon & Rebecca Taft Bonnie Thurston David Tovey Dr. & Mrs. H. Reid Wagstaff Doug Walker Karl R. Warner Dr. & Mrs. George T. Wiley Joseph H. Warren Dr. Harold E. Wilson June & Joseph Yanick Dorothy Zellers Flowers of Progress ($125 to $249) Anonymous (2) Barbara Adams Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Anderson Elaine Arnold & Barbara Ada Shirley M. Ashby Patricia Ashton Gilbert Aumiller Barbara Barna Donald Beane Mr. & Mrs. Brian W. Bishop Marlene S. Blackford John & Mary Boenke Albert Borowitz Clarendia Brown Viginia Buerki Nancy Burcham Roy & Joan Burgess Ken & Polly Burns Grace Chamberlin Kelly Wendell & Ruth Cole Mr. & Mrs. John Connelly Dolores Crane Riegelmayer Robert & Mary Crumm Dorothy Daugherty Ruth Ann Davis Mrs. Herbert C. Douglas Sarah Douglas Judith K. Driskell Joe & Dee Durbin Judy & John Edsall Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Efremoff Mr. & Mrs. Bill Elliott Bob & Lori Everett in Memory of Harold K. Ewald, Jr. Dr. Charles & Mrs. Carole Faiman Susan Ferguson Dr. Ron Fleming

The Ohio Light Opera Annual Fund provides essential financing for each OLO season, and we are grateful for the loyal support of so many donors through the years. If you want to help ensure that the unique mission of The Ohio Light Opera continues, we ask that you make a gift to the 2016 Ohio Light Opera Fund. Please contact: Laura Neill at 330-263-2090, lneill@wooster.edu for information on how to make a gift to The Ohio Light Opera Annual Fund.

10 Box Office: 330.263.2345


Suzanne Fligiel Todd & Kemper Florin Dr. & Mrs. James W. Flowers Bill Freeh George & Catherine Frey Jeff & Marcia Freyman Barbara J. Garris Frank & Linda Gollinger Ray & Marge Gunther Mr. & Mrs. Richard Gunther Nancy Hachtel William & Dorothea Hailer Melinda Heineking in Memory of Janice M. Ladd Eric & Carol Henderson Fred & Caroline Hendra Suzanne R. & Douglas M. Hicks Stefani & Ira Hinden Ken & Phyllis Hoepfl Ron & Mary F. Hooker Ron Howard Evelyn Howell Marcia & Stanley Jaffe John & Elizabeth Jarvey Ray & Mary Lou Jasko Mr. & Mrs. Richard D. Johnson Willard H. Johnson Arnold Kanter E. & M. Katz Grace Chamberlin Kelly Charles & Patricia Kennedy E.A. Kindel, Jr. Michael & Penny Kinter Dr. Roy G. Klotz, Jr. Marilyn Wilka Kornowski Bob & Marilyn Kuhn Henry & Pat Kurdziel

Robert Lakey Esther & Joe Lawson Joan & Stan Levy Dick & Mimi Lewellen in Memory of Bill Johnson Dick & Mimi Lewellen in Memory of Victoria (Tori) Bowers Mr. & Mrs. R. J. Linderman Dr. John Madison W. Peter Marwede, M.D. Beverly McCall Bob Michel, David Kotick The Mersol Family Robert Michel, David Kotick & Jeremy Barken Marc Miller Mr. & Mrs. Robert Mindek Beth Ann & Mark Mitchell Jane Moore & Audrey Moore Dr. Philip S. Nash Daniel Neer Kenneth Nuzum David & Pamela Oliver Robert & Anne Olson Ann & David Olszewski Clara S. Patton David Pozorski & Anna Romanski Jacob Pollock Jerry & Leona Pollock Mr. & Mrs. Bruno Putze Asher Quell Dr. Frank W. Quillen Betty & John Raber Dr. & Mrs. Robert P. Raker Dr. David & Hope Reynolds Esther & Sam Root Jacob & Marjorie Rosenbaum

Chris Saylor Rachel Schneider Sanford Schwartz Rose Ella Sears Dr. Michael Seider George & Joan Seiple Jean Selig Barbara M. Sharp Jack Shepherd Wes & Conne Shilling Mark Silbersack & Ruth Schwallie Kent & Judy Smith Monica Smolka Doris Sopher Linda Spear & Jeffery Wanser George & Marilyn Spencer Mr. & Mrs. Hugh Spencer Karen & Phil Steiger Mary Stockton & Jeff Perkins Sheldon & Rebecca Taft Joseph Tatnall & Daniel Colburn Brant & Mary Tedrow J. Lynn & Adelia Thompson Mr. & Mrs. E. B. Tichener Richard & Claire Troha Gerald Turbow Joyce Turin Larry Wallerstein Wayland Wong Mr. Gerald E. Yaffee Bob & Diane Yates IN MEMORY OF MARY LOU STEIN Dick & Mimi Lewellen Lynn & Cyndy Willett Jean L. Wingate

The donor list includes gifts received prior to May 30th. Please let us know if your name has been inadvertently omitted or incorrectly listed.

The Ohio Light Opera gratefully acknowledges a grant from the Laura B. Frick Charitable Trust to help underwrite the distribution of complimentary tickets to local social service agencies for use by persons who otherwise could not attend OLO performances. Corporate Matching Gifts Eli Lilly & Company

Rockwell Automation

Emerson

Production Sponsors The Ohio Light Opera appreciates the generous support from the following corporations, foundations, and individuals who have helped underwrite production costs for the 2016 season: Edith G. Andrew Bradley Bennett Briggs Financial Group, Inc. David & Carol Briggs Tom & Lois Bruch Don & Shirley Buehler Joan Buehler David & Linda Bush

The Commercial & Savings Bank Lois Freedlander Stanley C. Gault Ron & Prue Holtman Ralph & Grace Jones Foundation Norman K. Keller Live Publishing Company Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Loewenstein

Michael & Nan Miller Burton D. Morgan Foundation Ambassador and Mrs. John D. Ong Seaman Corporation Mary Alice Streeter Dee & Mary Vaidya WCLV WKSU

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THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA ENDOWMENT The Ohio Light Opera Endowment was established in 1993 by a generous gift from founding Artistic Director James F. Stuart. Additional gifts have helped ensure the current and future financial stability of the Company. A restricted fund in The College of Wooster’s endowment, the Ohio Light Opera Endowment is managed professionally and provides support for a portion of annual OLO expenses. We encourage you to consider making a gift or estate commitment to the Ohio Light Opera Endowment. Please contact Laura Neill at 330-263-2090, lneill@wooster.edu to receive information on how to make an endowment gift.

The Brian Woods Award Eleven years ago, the company lost one of its most talented and supportive young company members. Tenor Brian Woods exemplified in so many ways the best that the Ohio Light Opera has to offer. He was a devoted and enthusiastic supporter of this company’s unique mission. Brian’s love for operetta extended far beyond this company. As a performer and educator, he gave selfless hours to bringing his love for operetta into the the hearts of thousands of patrons and to many students. As part of his legacy, the company (along with his widow, Jessie Wright Martin) established an endowment in his honor. As part of this endowment, each year a company member is presented the Brian Woods Award. This is given to a returning company member who exemplifies some of the qualities that made Brian a champion for this company and the lyric theater art form. Last year, it was decided that in the future the award would be vetted by past award winners who are presently in residency (six performers), along with key artistic and administrative personnel. Although the majority of awards have been given to singers in the past, any company member may receive the award. Past Recipients of The Brian Woods Award:

’07 Peter Nathan Foltz – singer ’08 Todd Strange – singer ’09 Stephen Carr – stage director ’10 Boyd Mackus – singer ’11 Ted Christopher – singer and stage director

’12 Nathan Brian – singer ’13 Benjamin Krumreig – singer ’14 Stephen Faulk – singer ’15 Eric Andries – Coach/Accompanist

The 2016 recipient of the Brian Woods Award:

JACOB ALLEN In Memory Of Frank Knorr Ms. Ellen S. Alter Bill & Marilyn Blanchard Linda Bromund Jean Coleman Mr. & Mrs. Henry J. Copeland Mr. & Mrs. Richard M. DeLon Mr. & Mrs. Floyd L. Downs Lois Freedlander Dr. & Mrs. Thomas M. Graves Mr. & Mrs. Walter C. Grosjean

Mr. & Mrs. David T. Grube Stan & Diane Hales Ron & Prue Holtman Elizabeth & Bob Hooker Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Hurst Jean Knorr Dick & Mimi Lewellen Dr. & Mrs. Joseph E. Loewenstein Mr. E.M. Lukuch Dr. & Mrs. Richard W. Martin

Michael & Nan Miller Mr. & Mrs. Robert Mindek Jon & Laura Neill Mr. & Mrs. Frank Rasmussen Larry & Carol Stewart Dr. & Mrs. Douglas C. Topping Mr. & Mrs. Robert Treece Mr. & Mrs. Vernon Sponseller Mr. & Mrs. David J. Wilkin The Wooster Rotary Foundation

Victoria (Tori) Bowers May 9, 1989 – May 30, 2016 Tori passed away in her sleep from a rare heart condition. She worked with Ohio Light Opera from 2004 to 2012. During those years, she was a spot operator, house manager, and box office assistant. Both Tori and her sister, Kalina Schloneger, were grateful to be a part of the OLO family.  The sisters grew as young women at OLO and particularly enjoyed working together in the box office for two years.  Tori made lifelong friends at OLO, and treasured those relationships.  Tori’s husband Myles and her family have requested that any gifts made in her name to the Ohio Light Opera be directed to the box office or to Executive Director Laura Neill. 12 Box Office: 330.263.2345


TAKING LIGHT OPERA SERIOUSLY!

THE LEGACY OF OLO FOUNDER

S JAMES F. STUART S

“I had long realized that operetta requires no less a commitment to quality than does grand opera, both in front of and behind the curtain. My objective from the beginning with OLO was to return artistic integrity to operetta. Through coaching on the importance of taking light opera seriously, the company has nurtured an audience that has itself gained a new appreciation for a once seemingly moribund art form.” James F. Stuart

James F. Stuart Founding Artistic Director 1928-2005

When James Stuart, in 1979, began The Ohio Light Opera at The College of Wooster, he had already built a successful career as a musical and theatrical educator, producer, director, and performing artist. Born in Baton Rouge in 1928, he studied at LSU and earned a doctor of musical arts degree at the Eastman School of Music. For seven seasons, he performed the principal tenor roles with Dorothy Raedler’s American Savoyards and the Martyn Green Gilbert and Sullivan Company. Over several decades, he appeared with opera companies in New York, Boston, Cleveland, Chautauqua, Atlanta, and New Orleans. He sang the Husband in the world premiere of Raffaelo de Banfield’s Lord Byron’s Love Letter, opposite Patricia Neway, and performed the title role in the American premiere of Rameau’s Platée. Among the distinguished musical artists with whom Stuart performed are singers Beverly Sills, Joan Sutherland, Richard Tucker, and Robert Merrill; and conductors Franz Allers, Richard Bonynge, Boris Goldovsky, Louis Lane, Julius Rudel, and Robert Shaw. Under Stuart’s vision and guidance, The Ohio Light Opera evolved into the nation’s premier venue for the presentation of both the masterworks and forgotten gems of the lyric theater repertoire. His translations for the Company include those for Auber’s Fra Diavolo, Lecocq’s La fille de Madame Angot, Hahn’s Ciboulette, Kálmán’s Die Bajadere and Der Zigeunerprimás, Strauss’ Der lustige Krieg, and Offenbach’s Monsieur Choufleuri. In recognition of his contributions to lyric theater, he was awarded an honorary doctorate by The College of Wooster, and was invested in the College of Fellows of the American Theatre in a ceremony at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. Stuart was further honored by his inclusion in several standard biographical works: Dictionary of International Biography, International Who’s Who in Music, Who’s Who in America, and International Who’s Who of Intellectuals. James Stuart in The Gondoliers, 1996

S To make a lasting gift to The Ohio Light Opera, contact Executive Director Laura Neill at 330-263-2090.

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Frank Knorr July 25, 1937-April 18, 2016 From the beginning Frank knew, along with key colleagues at the College of Wooster, that having a performing arts company as a part of an independent college was both unprecedented and visionary.  He also believed it would be a good fit. Laura Neill, Executive Director, Ohio Light Opera In the years following his early role with OLO, he was a tireless promoter of the entire operation and became an energetic member of the advisory committee in the mid 1990s. Frank and Jean were ambassadors of the highest order in promoting OLO’s growth and thriving. R. Stanton Hales, Former President, The College of Wooster

Friends and colleagues of the late Frank Knorr remember him as a man committed to his community, and particularly to The College of Wooster and The Ohio Light Opera. Knorr, who served The College of Wooster for 31 years in the offices of development and alumni relations prior to his retirement in 2005, died on April 18 at LifeCare Hospice after a brief illness. “He bled gold and black and was always an advocate for The College of Wooster,” said Sara Patton, the college’s former vice president for development and current executive director of the Wayne County Community Foundation. “Frank was absolutely devoted to The College of Wooster. He knew hundreds of alumni and always was encouraging them to do their best for Wooster.” Knorr received a bachelor’s degree in economics from the college in 1959 and served as a teacher, assistant superintendent, and coordinator of professional personnel in Rochester, NY area schools before returning to Wooster in 1974 to serve as the college’s director of alumni relations. Eight years later, he was named director of development. It was during Knorr’s time in alumni relations that James Stuart’s then-Kent State Light Opera first performed at new Freedlander Theatre in Wooster. The company was invited back the following year to perform as part of Wooster’s Alumni College and, finding it in need of a permanent home, Knorr drafted a proposal to bring the company to Wooster. He served as the company’s producer from 1979—when The Ohio Light Opera opened its first five-week season with a production of Gilbert & Sullivan’s The Gondoliers—through 1983. He continued his association with the company as a long-time board member, attending a meeting about the upcoming OLO season and the company’s bright future just a few days before his death. “It is not an exaggeration to state that Frank’s passion for The College of Wooster and The Ohio Light Opera was unparalleled,” said current OLO executive director Laura Neill. “Frank believed in the educational mission of OLO as part of The College of Wooster, and was excit-

14 Box Office: 330.263.2345

ed to see how it grew into one of Wooster/Wayne County’s greatest cultural and economic assets. Frank’s intelligence, keen insight, directness, and strong work ethic will be missed by all of us associated with Ohio Light Opera.” OLO artistic director Steven Daigle agreed: “I was fortunate to have spent time with Frank right before his passing,” he said. “His passion for The Ohio Light Opera was as strong, if not stronger, than it was 37 years ago.” And Daigle, who also serves as head of Eastman Opera Theatre at the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music, said Knorr’s influence reached much farther than Wooster. “Over the years, as a resident of Rochester,” he said, “I have discovered through chance meetings many people who knew Frank from his past work with The College of Wooster and many friends of his who had attended OLO performances.” Beyond OLO, Knorr also initiated the Scot Band’s annual spring concert tour and launched Wooster’s alumni admissions program. In addition to his professional responsibilities, Knorr was one of the Fighting Scots’ most knowledgeable and enthusiastic sports fans. He served as treasurer of the W Association for almost 30 years and also was a longtime member of the Rotary Club of Wooster. Assistant director of alumni relations Sharon Rice worked with Knorr for five years prior to his retirement and collaborated with him for 50th-reunion celebrations, in which Knorr oversaw the fundraising while Rice attended to event planning and logistics. “I learned a lot from Frank, really,” Rice said, noting that he was “one of those unique people who could work in both alumni relations and fundraising, which is a rare commodity to find in an employee.” In fact, she said, when the division went through a program review a year ago, Knorr’s name was still coming up. Alumni were surveyed to determine how alumni relations could improve and one response, Rice said, was “hire more people like Frank Knorr.” Written by Tami Mosser at The Daily Record (Wednesday, April 21, 2016)


AMERICA’S PREMIER LYRIC THEATER FESTIVAL

Can-Can, OLO 2015

OUR MISSION For thirty-seven seasons, The Ohio Light Opera has dedicated itself to the exploration and production of the best of traditional operetta and musical theater. Founded by James Stuart as a Gilbert and Sullivan repertory summer festival, the company has grown to encompass all forms in the light opera canon. This includes the complete Gilbert and Sullivan repertoire, as well as the recognized treasures from the Viennese, French, Hungarian, German, British, and American repertoire. Along with this unique mission, the company also reconstructs and produces those rare operetta titles of artistic value that were popular in their own times but have long since been forgotten. The historical performance practices of each work premiered are delicately balanced with the resources of a state-of-theart theater and engaging and entertaining performance values. Each summer, between seven and nine titles are presented in a revolving format of approximately 60 performances over a seven-week period. Nearly 20,000 patrons each season see productions in The College of

Wooster’s intimate Freedlander Theatre. Over 100 company members from around the United States are selected each year to become a part of our residency program. The 38 performing artists who make up the vocal ensemble are chosen for their abilities to perform and work at the highest level in all disciplines demanded by the company’s specialized repertoire: singing, acting, and dancing. With over 125 titles produced, over 250 productions, and 750,000 patrons watching, The Ohio Light Opera has become the forerunner in promoting the light opera genre. The company’s contribution to the preservation and promotion of traditional lyric theater has received recognition in prominent national and international publications and its work is frequently cited by leading scholars of operetta and light opera. In residency on The College of Wooster campus, the summer festival offers a country setting with an inviting community that is proud of the unique service this company has given to its many patrons and to the art form. —Steven A. Daigle

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1494 E. Smithville Western Rd. • Wooster, Ohio 44691 • 330-601-1027 • Between Rt. 83N & Rt. 3N ohiolightopera.org 15


Premiere

Music & Lyrics by....................................... Cole Porter Book by......................... Bella and Samuel Spewack Conductor........................................................... Steven Byess Stage Director................................................... Stephen Carr Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer............................................................ Ken Martin Costume Designer.......................................Stefanie Genda Lighting Designer........................................... Kent Sprague Fred Graham............................................................ Ted Christopher* .................................................................................Brad Baron** Lilli Vanessi.......................................................................... Sarah Best* ........................................................................... Tanya Roberts** Lois Lane..........................................................................Hannah Kurth Bill Calhoun....................................................................Stephen Faulk Harrison Howell....................................................... Clark Sturdevant First Man (Gangster).....................................................Kyle Yampiro Second Man (Gangster).............................................. Royce Strider Harry Trevor................................................................. Samus Haddad Hattie................................................................................... Alexa Devlin Ralph...................................................................................... David Geist Stage Doorman...................................................... Bailey Cummings Paul.................................................................................. Spencer Reese Gremio.....................................................................Cameron Brownell Hortensio.............................................................................. Isaac Assor Haberdasher........................................................ Benjamin Krumreig Nathaniel..................................................................Matthew Brennan Gregory.................................................................................... Matt Kelly Phillip........................................................................................ Tom Carle Lilli Vanessi (cover)................................................Hilary Koolhoven Paul (cover)...........................................................Cameron Brownell Ensemble Jessamyn Anderson, Isaac Assor, Matthew Brennan, Cameron Brownell, Alexandra Camastro, Tom Carle, Jacob Clanton, Katherine Corle, Bailey Cummings, Alexa Devlin, Hannah Gauthier, David Geist, Samus Haddad, Matt Kelly, Hilary Koolhoven, Benjamin Krumreig, Amy Livingston, Hannah Miller, Emily Nelson, Katharine Nunn, Spencer Reese, Meagan Sill, Gretchen Windt *6/18, 6/25, 7/1, 7/14, 7/26, 8/3, 8/7 **6/22, 6/28, 7/6, 7/20, 7/30, 8/6, 8/12

This production of Kiss Me, Kate has been partially underwritten by gifts from: Tom & Lois Bruch • Don & Shirley Buehler • David & Linda Bush • Stanley C. Gault

16 Box Office: 330.263.2345


SETTING

ACT II

ACT I

Scene 1............... Stage of Ford Theatre, Baltimore Scene 2................................. The corridor backstage Scene 3....... Dressing rooms of Fred Graham and ........................................................................ Lilli Vanessi Scene 4............................... Before the show curtain Scene 5........................................ Street scene, Padua Scene 6.......................................................... Backstage Scene 7................ Fred’s and Lilli’s dressing rooms Scene 8............................... Before the show curtain Scene 9........................................... Exterior of church

Scene Scene Scene Scene Scene Scene Scene Scene

1.......................................... During intermission 2................................ Before the show curtain 3.............................................Petruchio’s house 4................................ The corridor backstage 5................ Fred’s and Lilli’s dressing rooms 6................................ The corridor backstage 7................................ Before the show curtain 8........................................... Exterior of church

Intermission

MUSICAL NUMBERS ACT I

Another Op’nin’, Another Show.........................................................................................................Hattie, Chorus Why Can’t You Behave?....................................................................................................................................Lois, Bill Wunderbar............................................................................................................................................................ Lilli, Fred So in Love..........................................................................................................................................................................Lilli We Open in Venice..................................................................................Katharine, Bianca, Lucentio, Petruchio Padua Street Scene (Dance) Tom, Dick or Harry....................................................................................... Bianca, Hortensio, Lucentio, Gremio I’ve Come to Wive It Wealthily in Padua....................................................................................... Petruchio, Men I Hate Men............................................................................................................................................................ Katharine Were Thine that Special Face...................................................................................................................... Petruchio I Sing of Love........................................................................................................................Bianca, Lucentio, Chorus Tarantella Finale......................................................................................................................... Katharine, Petruchio, Ensemble

ACT II

Too Darn Hot......................................................................................................................................................Paul, Boys Where Is the Life that Late I Led?.............................................................................................................. Petruchio Always True to You in My Fashion......................................................................................................................... Lois Bianca.......................................................................................................................................................... Bill, Girls, Boys So in Love (reprise).................................................................................................................................................... Fred Brush Up Your Shakespeare..............................................................................First Gunman, Second Gunman Pavane I Am Ashamed that Women Are So Simple........................................................................................... Katharine Finale......................................................................................................................... Katharine, Petruchio, Ensemble

S

“Another op’nin’, another show” S KISS ME, KATE is presented by arrangement with Tams-Witmark Music Library, Inc., 560 Lexington Avenue, New York, New York 10022.

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ARGUMENT

ACT I: At Ford’s Theatre in Baltimore, actor Fred Graham and his movie-star ex-wife Lilli Vanessi have just finished rehearsing for a musical version of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew. Lilli becomes outraged and storms off when Fred ignores her and focuses his attention on cheeky cabaret performer Lois Lane, who is playing the role of Bianca. Lilli’s assistant Hattie rallies the actors in anticipation of “Another Op’nin’, Another Show.” Lois’ old cabaret partner, Bill Calhoun, cast in the role of Lucentio, has missed the rehearsal, informing Lois that he has been playing cards, lost big, and signed an I.O.U. using Fred’s name. Lois chides him—she doesn’t want anything to foul up her chances for a big career on the stage. On opening night, in their dressing rooms, Lilli is on the phone with her wealthy fiancé and show financer, Harrison Howell, as the jealous Fred listens in. Tensions thaw, however, as Fred and Lilli recall an earlier time together when they sang in the chorus of a Viennese operetta. As Fred readies to go on stage, two imposing men enter his dressing room, inquiring about an I.O.U., of which Fred claims to know nothing. Meanwhile, flowers from Fred arrive for Lilli, who confesses that, despite all their constant squabbling, she still loves her ex-husband. Although Lilli has not yet read the accompanying card, Fred is aghast—the flowers were intended for Lois. The curtain goes up on The Taming of the Shrew, with Fred as Petruchio and Lilli as Katharine. While offstage for a moment, Katharine finally takes a look at the card, and returns to the stage incensed, as the play begins to deviate from the script. At intermission, Lilli phones Harrison, tells him that she is leaving the show, and that she wants to marry immediately. When the two tough men return to collect on the I.O.U., Fred hatches a plan—he admits to owing them the money, which he will turn over at the end of the week, when he is paid. But, as part of the agreement, so that the show continues, they must convince his costar to stay—an easy task once the two gangsters begin intimidating Lilli. Back on stage, the show continues with the wedding scene of Katharine and Petruchio. The curtain falls as he drags her offstage, kicking and screaming.

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ACT II: During intermission, Fred’s dresser Paul and his friends bemoan the muggy weather and its effect on their interest in romancing their sweethearts. As the show continues inside, Petruchio, now a married man, laments the loss of the life that late he led, with girls in towns across Italy. Meanwhile, Harrison has arrived at the theater with an ambulance for Lilli, who he assumes has been assaulted by Fred. He crosses paths with Lois, who reminds him of a weekend that they once spent in Atlantic City. She has her hands full when Bill pops in and she has to assure him that she loves him alone and is always “true to him in her fashion.” When the two gangsters phone their “boss” and learn that he can be found floating in the river, they release Fred from his debt obligation, which means that Lilli is free to go—she wastes no time in hailing a cab. The two bumbling hoods get lost on their way out of the theater, wind up on the stage, and, as the show must go on, launch into a duet. The final act of the play begins with the wedding of Bianca and Lucentio, but Katharine fails to enter for her fountain speech. Suddenly, Lilli appears, picks right up with the lines of Katharine, extends her hand to Petruchio … but offers her lips to Fred.

BACKGROUND

Rarely has a musical garnered such unanimously stellar reviews as Cole Porter’s Kiss Me, Kate, which opened at Broadway’s Century Theatre on December 30, 1948. One need only quote the newspaper accounts of opening night to begin to grasp the magnitude of the achievement of Porter and his librettists Sam and Bella Spewack: New York Times—“By some baffling miracle, everything seems to drop gracefully into its appointed place”; Journal American—“A show of shows”; New York Post—“A smash hit of epic proportions”; Daily News—“The sprightliest, handsomest, most tuneful musical imaginable”; Herald Tribune—“Bewitching entertainment.” Even four weeks before, when it premiered as a tryout in Philadelphia, there was little doubt that the show would become an instant classic. “Make way for a new team of titans—William Shakespeare and Cole Porter … It’s safe to suggest that the New York banking institutions better enlarge some of those vaults to house all the green lettuce that Kiss Me, Kate is going to grab,” wrote Billboard. “Here is a show that can’t miss … Kate’s powerhouse


appeal is the almost miraculous harnessing of book and score,” added Variety. The public wholeheartedly agreed with the critics, propelling the show to 1077 performances and the first-ever Tony Award for best musical, as well as awards for best score, best script, best produced show, and best costumes. The cast included Alfred Drake, Patricia Morison (still with us at age 101), and Lisa Kirk. The producers were Arnold Saint Subber and Lemuel Ayers, the former claiming that the motivation for the show came from his experience working on the set of The Taming of the Shrew and seeing stars Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne in constant argument. Kiss Me, Kate was the first Broadway show whose cast album appeared on long-playing records and the first American musical to fully captivate and capture a truly international audience; it has been translated, performed, and recorded in countless languages. Cole Porter, whose Broadway fortunes had sunk quite a bit with his two failed previous shows—Seven Lively Arts and Around the World—was back on top, with Out of This World, Can-Can, and Silk Stockings still to come. There is little question, in writing Kiss Me, Kate, that Porter had taken due note of the groundbreaking innovations of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s 1943 Oklahoma!, whose integration of music, lyrics, book, and dance had solidified a new paradigm in musical comedy. Porter’s greatest successes of the late 1930s and early 1940s, including Dubarry Was a Lady, Panama Hattie, Let’s Face It, Something for the Boys, and Mexican Hayride, had all been basically song-and-dance shows whose storylines, albeit engaging, lent little dramatic impulse to the music (and vice versa). In Kiss Me, Kate—with, of course, Shakespeare as added inspiration—that all changed. The Spewacks, who achieved fame writing plays and movie scripts, ventured into musical theater only twice: first, in 1938, with Porter’s Leave It to Me and then in 1948 with Kiss Me, Kate. Rehearsals for Kate began in October and were anything but harmonious. Bella Spewack and Saint Subber had an intense dislike for one another and were incessantly bickering; Sam had walked out on Bella and taken up with a ballerina; and Cole’s wife Linda was terribly ill, spending much of her time in an iron lung. But none of this seemed to matter: once tryouts began on December 2, not a single song was added, dropped, or shifted,

nor the book significantly altered, before the Broadway opening. For few, if any, of the 3000 musicals to have played Broadway can that claim be made. Throughout his career, Cole Porter delighted in innuendo, double entendres, and risqué allusions, many of his references so clever and hidden as to sail right over the heads of the censors into the laps of his audience. Examples abound in his early shows (Paris, Fifty Million Frenchmen, The New Yorkers) and are perhaps less prominent in his middle-period musicals. But he came back full-force in Kiss Me, Kate. Since this is a G-rated article, we will not attempt to point out the most blatant examples. But … if you so choose … listen carefully to the words accompanying Porter’s glorious tunes. A bit naughty at times, but done with such subtlety and wit as to bring a smile to even the most ardent morals gatekeeper. Michael D. Miller

ohiolightopera.org 19


Premiere

Music & Lyrics by..................................... Irving Berlin Book by........................ Herbert and Dorothy Fields Conductor................................................. J. Lynn Thompson Stage Director...................................................... Jacob Allen Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer.......................................................... Kim Powers Costume Designer............................................Myron Elliott Lighting Designer.................................. Brittany Shemuga Annie Oakley..................................................................... Alexa Devlin Frank Butler...................................................................... Nathan Brian Mr. Clay....................................................................Cameron Brownell Minnie................................................................................Emily Hagens Dolly Tate...............................................................Julie Wright Costa Buffalo Bill Cody.................................................................Brad Baron Charlie Davenport..........................................................Kyle Yampiro Chief Sitting Bull......................................................... Samus Haddad Pawnee Bill............................................................... Clark Sturdevant Mac................................................................................... Jacob Clanton Foster Wilson......................................................................... Matt Kelly Conductor............................................................................... Tom Carle Porters............................... Matthew Brennan, Christopher Sapp, .............................................................................. Jacob Clanton Mrs. Potter-Porter............................................................... Sarah Best Mr. Schuyler Adams............................................................. Tom Carle Mrs. Schuyler Adams......................................Jessamyn Anderson Mr. Percy Ferguson............................................... Bailey Cummings Mrs. Percy Ferguson..................................................... Emily Nelson Mr. Henderson................................................................ Royce Strider Mrs. Henderson..........................................................Katherine Corle Messenger............................................................................ David Geist Little Jake................................................................. Madi Christopher Mary............................................................................Anna Christopher Jessie.......................................................................... Madison Mitchell Nellie.......................................................................... Elizabeth Perkins Annie Oakley (cover)...............................................Katharine Nunn Ensemble Jessamyn Anderson, Sarah Best, Matthew Brennan, Alexandra Camastro, Tom Carle, Jacob Clanton, Katherine Corle, Bailey Cummings, Hannah Gauthier, David Geist, Matt Kelly, Adam Kirk, Hannah Kurth, Audrey Lee,

This production of Annie Get Your Gun has been partially underwritten by gifts from: Dee & Mary Vaidya 20 Box Office: 330.263.2345


Amy Livingston, Hannah Miller, Emily Nelson, Spencer Reese, Christopher Sapp, Meagan Sill, Royce Strider, Kyle Yampiro

SETTING ACT I Scene Scene Scene Scene Scene

1.............................The Wilson House, a summer hotel on the outskirts of Cincinnati, Ohio—July 2.............................................................A Pullman parlor in an overland steam train—six weeks later 2a..........................................................The fairgrounds at Minneapolis, Minnesota—a few days later 3.............................................................................Main ticket gate for the Buffalo Bill Wild West Show 4........................................................................................................ Annie’s dressing tent—later that night

Intermission

ACT II Scene Scene Scene Scene

1........................................................................................... The deck of a cattle boat—eight months later 2............................................. The ballroom of the Hotel Brevoort (New York City)—the next night 3.....................................................Aboard a ferry, en route to Governor’s Island—the next morning 4.................................................................... Governor’s Island, near the Fort—immediately following

MUSICAL NUMBERS ACT I

Overture Colonel Buffalo Bill.............................................................................................................. Charlie, Dolly, Ensemble I’m a Bad, Bad Man........................................................................................................................................Frank, Girls Doin’ What Comes Naturally.............................................................................................Annie, Children, Wilson The Girl that I Marry................................................................................................................................................. Frank You Can’t Get a Man with a Gun.........................................................................................................................Annie There’s No Business like Show Business....................................................Annie, Frank, Buffalo Bill, Charlie They Say It’s Wonderful............................................................................................................................ Annie, Frank Moonshine Lullaby...................................................................................................................................... Annie, Frank Wild West Ballet There’s No Business like Show Business (reprise)........................................................................................Annie My Defenses Are Down.............................................................................................................................. Frank, Boys Finale.............................................................................................................................................................................Annie

ACT II

Entr’acte I Got Lost in His Arms............................................................................................................................ Annie, Chorus There’s No Business like Show Business (reprise)........................... Frank, Dolly, Pawnee Bill, Mr. Adams I Got the Sun in the Morning..........................................................................................................Annie, Ensemble An Old Fashioned Wedding.................................................................................................................... Annie, Frank The Girl that I Marry (reprise)............................................................................................................................... Frank Anything You Can Do................................................................................................................................ Annie, Frank Finale.....................................................................................................................................................................Ensemble

S “The thing that’s known as romance is wonderful … wonderful in every way, so they say” S ANNIE GET YOUR GUN is presented through special arrangement with R & H Theatricals: www.rnh.com.

ohiolightopera.org 21


ARGUMENT

ACT I: Charlie Davenport, manager of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, is at the Wilson House, a hotel near Cincinnati, trying to drum up business for the show’s approaching four-day visit. Proprietor Foster Wilson refuses to give his consent for a contest between the show’s sharpshooter Frank and the best of the local marksmen. Despite pleas from his assistant Dolly Tate, and from Frank himself, Wilson refuses to host such a showdown. As the local girls fawn over Frank, he reminds them that they are playing with fire and liable to get burned. Suddenly, as Dolly is seated on a bench, a rifle shot is heard and the bird on her hat falls to the ground. Annie Oakley appears and claims her prey. She has come to the hotel with her brothers and sisters to sell her game. She confesses to little education, but has no problem “Doin’ what comes natur’lly.” After a quick demonstration of her shooting antics, Annie accepts Wilson’s offer to pay her for competing against Frank. Annie is awestruck when the handsome Frank appears. He dismisses her advances, however—the girl that he marries will wear satin and laces. Dejected, Annie realizes that it takes more than a gun to get a man. When Annie emerges as the winner of the shooting match, Frank’s pride is wounded, even more so when Charlie suggests that she join the Wild West Show as Frank’s assistant. Although she admits to knowing nothing about show business, she accepts—she will do anything just to be with Frank. On a steam train between show stops, Dolly makes it clear that she doesn’t relish having Annie around as her replacement in assisting Frank. Annie, meanwhile, is trying to shed her backwoods image so as to make a better impression with Frank. For the stop in Minneapolis, where they will be in competition with Pawnee Bill’s show and his honored guest, Chief Sitting Bull, Buffalo Bill has asked Annie to perform some daredevilry on a motor bicycle. Convinced by Charlie that such a display will dazzle Frank and lead to marriage, Annie accepts. The plan backfires—although Sitting Bull has been enchanted by Annie, the incensed Frank, along with Dolly, is quitting Buffalo Bill’s show and joining Pawnee’s Bill’s troupe.

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ACT II: On a cattle boat returning to New York after a successful, but financially draining, European tour, Annie, Buffalo Bill, Charlie, and Sitting Bull ponder their future. News that Pawnee Bill’s show, with Frank as its big draw and catnip for the society ladies, has been playing to sellout crowds at Madison Square Garden inspires an idea among the group—what about a merger? Back in New York, they meet with Pawnee Bill, who reveals to Frank that he too is near broke—a merger with the assumed wealthy Buffalo Bill seems advantageous. When it comes out that both sides are broke, the merger seems pointless. But … Sitting Bull has an idea: Annie has a trove of jeweled medals from her triumphs in Europe; she could sell them to raise cash for a merger and join up again with Frank. When Annie and Frank finally meet, he extends to her an offer of marriage and his three gold medals as a gift. No sooner has she opened her coat to reveal her dozens of medals than they are bickering again and agree to another shootout. Dolly’s plans to sabotage Annie’s guns are thwarted by Charlie and Sitting Bull, but when the latter realizes that such sabotage is the only way for Annie to win Frank, the pair take over the dirty work. When the competition begins, Annie, to her great horror, misses her first targets, but soon recaptures her winning style. But, in the nick of time, Sitting Bull intervenes with some wise advice …

BACKGROUND

It would have been a much different show, but nobody is complaining. In September of 1945, Rodgers and Hammerstein signed Jerome Kern to write the score for a musical that they were producing, to star Ethel Merman, and based on the life of legendary sharpshooter Annie Oakley. On November 5, Kern suffered a cerebral hemorrhage in New York City and died six days later. Within a week, the producers had hired songwriting legend Irving Berlin as a replacement. With only four book musicals to his credit—most of his Broadway exposure had been through revues—Berlin was at first reluctant, claiming that he was tired after two years of wartime travel promoting his revue This Is the Army and, in any case, perhaps not the best choice to write “hillbilly” tunes. But, invigorated by the opportunity to work for R&H, to fashion songs for the script of Herbert and Dorothy Fields and the voice of Merman, and to work with


director Joshua Logan, Berlin disappeared for a weekend (November 17-18) and returned with as many as five songs (depending on whose account one believes). When Rodgers and Hammerstein voiced total approval, Berlin was on board. Within a few weeks, hoofer George Murphy had been hired to play Frank Butler; within a month, however, he had been replaced by Ray Middleton. By February, the title had been changed from Annie Oakley to Annie Get Your Gun. On March 25, 1946, the show opened in a wellreceived pre-Broadway tryout in New Haven. In its review of the April 8 opening of the two-week Boston tryout, Billboard opined: “The musical will become something for which people sell their souls to get a ticket … one show-stopping number after another.” After a final tryout period in Philadelphia, the show opened at Broadway’s Imperial Theatre on May 16. By the time of its closing on February 12, 1949, it had become, at 1147 performances, the second-longestrunning book musical in Broadway history (after Oklahoma!). Surprisingly—perhaps because of the homespun plot or “old-fashioned” music— reviews were far from unanimously rave. In fact, it was the most prestigious of the reviewers— Louis Kronenberger (“Berlin’s score is musically not exciting”), Ward Morehouse (“Berlin’s score is not a notable one”), George Jean Nathan (“hardly notable for any excess of wit”), and Brooks Atkinson (“undistinguished tunes”)—who were most dismissive of Berlin’s music and lyrics. But what do they know? Let’s pay more attention to, for example, New York Post reviewer Vernon Rice (“Seldom is seen in the theater an offering in which everything is just as it should be, but such a show arrived last night … Berlin has outdone himself”), who got it right and who confirms the judgment of 70 years of history.

There have been two major Broadway revivals of Annie Get Your Gun: a 1966 production that began at Lincoln Center and eventually moved to the Broadway Theatre, and a 1999 production featuring Bernadette Peters (and later Reba McEntire) that ran for over 1000 performances. For the 1966 version, Merman reprised her role as Annie, this time against the Frank Butler of Bruce Yarnell. The characters of Tommy and Winnie were eliminated, as well as their two duets. Berlin wrote two new songs: “Who Needs the Birds and Bees?” and “An Old-Fashioned Wedding.” The first was dropped before the opening, but the second became an instant hit. Perhaps sensing, at age 77, that this was his last foray into Broadway, he turned to his trademark musical device: a counterpoint duet in the spirit of those that he had begun writing more than half a century earlier in Watch Your Step (1914—“Play a Simple Melody”) and had employed strategically throughout his career, most notably in Call Me Madam (1950—“You’re Just in Love”) and Mr. President (1962—“Empty Pockets Filled with Love”). “An Old-Fashioned Wedding” stopped the show every night, sometimes with as many as four encores. Berlin was the supreme master of this musical form—nobody else has come close. Annie Get Your Gun was filmed in 1950 by M-G-M and featured Howard Keel and Betty Hutton, replacing Judy Garland, who had been fired for failing, time and time again, to appear for work on the film. In 1957, NBC broadcast a television version starring Mary Martin and John Raitt; in 1967 the network broadcast the Lincoln Center production with Merman and Yarnell. Amazingly, and regrettably, no copy of this latter showing is known to exist. Michael D. Miller

ohiolightopera.org 23


or The Town of Titipu Music by.................................................Arthur Sullivan Libretto by.................................................. W.S. Gilbert Conductor................................................. J. Lynn Thompson Stage Director............................................. Ted Christopher Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer................................................... Charlene Gross Costume Designer....................................... Charlene Gross Lighting Designer...........................................Daniel Huston The Mikado of Japan................................................ Samus Haddad Nanki-­Poo.......................................................... Benjamin Krumreig* ........................................................................... Stephen Faulk** A Noble............................................................................. Royce Strider Ko-­Ko.................................................................................. Nathan Brian Pooh-­Bah...............................................................................Brad Baron Pish-­Tush............................................................................... Isaac Assor Yum-­Yum......................................................................... Emily Nelson* ............................................................................ Emily Hagens** Pitti-­Sing...................................................................... Gretchen Windt Peep-­Bo.....................................................................Hilary Koolhoven Katisha................................................................................. Alexa Devlin Nanki-Poo (cover)................................................................ Matt Kelly Pish-Tush (cover)........................................................... Royce Strider Ensemble Jessamyn Anderson, Isaac Assor, Matthew Brennan, Cameron Brownell, Tom Carle, Katherine Corle, Bailey Cummings, Hannah Gauthier, Matt Kelly, Hilary Koolhoven, Audrey Lee, Amy Livingston, Katharine Nunn, Tanya Roberts, Christopher Sapp, Meagan Sill, Mark Snyder, Royce Strider, Clark Sturdevant, Gretchen Windt *6/30, 7/8, 7/21, 8/3 **7/2, 7/16, 7/30, 8/13

This production of The Mikado has been partially underwritten by gifts from: Lois Freedlander • Norman K. Keller

24 Box Office: 330.263.2345


SETTING ACT I

Courtyard of Ko-Ko’s official residence

ACT II

Ko-Ko’s garden

Intermission

MUSICAL NUMBERS Overture

ACT I

If You Want to Know Who We Are................................................................................................. Nanki Poo, Men A Wand’ring Minstrel, I........................................................................................................................Nanki-Poo, Men Our Great Mikado, Virtuous Man.......................................................................................................Pish-Tush, Men Young Man, Despair............................................................................................ Pooh-Bah, Nanki-Poo, Pish-Tush And Have I Journeyed for a Month.................................................................................... Nanki-Poo, Pooh-Bah Behold the Lord High Executioner......................................................................................................... Ko-Ko, Men I’ve Got a Little List...................................................................................................................................... Ko-Ko, Men Comes a Train of Little Ladies................................................................................................................................ Girls Three Little Maids from School Are We............................................... Yum-Yum, Peep-Bo, Pitti-Sing, Girls So Please You, Sir, We Much Regret................................ Yum-Yum, Peep-Bo, Pitti-Sing, Pooh-Bah, Girls Were You Not to Ko-Ko Plighted.........................................................................................Yum-Yum, Nanki-Poo I Am So Proud................................................................................................................Pooh-Bah, Ko-Ko, Pish-Tush Finale: With Aspect Stern and Gloomy Stride.....................................................................................Ensemble

ACT II

Braid the Raven Hair............................................................................................................................. Pitti-Sing, Girls The Sun, Whose Rays Are All Ablaze........................................................................................................ Yum-Yum Brightly Dawns Our Wedding Day............................................Yum-Yum, Pitti-Sing, Nanki-Poo, Pish-Tush Here’s A How-De-Do!................................................................................................ Yum-Yum, Nanki-Poo, Ko-Ko Miya Sama, Miya Sama....................................................................................................... Mikado, Katisha, Chorus A More Humane Mikado..................................................................................................................... Mikado, Chorus The Criminal Cried....................................................................................... Ko-Ko, Pitti-Sing, Pooh-Bah, Chorus See How the Fates Their Gifts Allot..................................... Mikado, Pitti-Sing, Pooh-Bah, Ko-Ko, Katisha The Flowers That Bloom in the Spring....................Nanki-Poo, Ko-Ko, Yum-Yum, Pitti-Sing, Pooh-Bah Alone and Yet Alive!..............................................................................................................................................Katisha On a Tree by a River................................................................................................................................................Ko-Ko There is Beauty in the Bellow of the Blast....................................................................................Katisha, Ko-Ko Finale: For He’s Gone and Married........................................................................................ Yum-Yum Ensemble

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ARGUMENT

The noble lord Pish-Tush relates that, under the Mikado’s law, the tailor Ko-Ko has been condemned to death for flirting, but has been reprieved at the last moment and appointed Lord High Executioner of Titipu. All other duties will be assumed by Pooh-Bah, the Lord High Everything Else. Ko-Ko is betrothed to his ward Yum-Yum, but she has fallen in love with the strolling musician Nanki-Poo. She and her sisters, Peep-Bo and Pitti-Sing, have recently left the confines of the ladies’ seminary, see life as a source of fun, and wonder what the world has in store for them. Nanki-Poo reveals to Yum-Yum that he is, in fact, the Mikado’s son and has fled from court to escape the marital ambitions of the elderly Katisha. The Mikado sends word of his displeasure that no executions have yet taken place in Titipu, and orders that the situation be rectified soon. Nanki-Poo, in despair and on the verge of suicide because he cannot marry Yum-Yum, agrees to be executed in a month, provided that he can marry her in the meantime. Ko-Ko cannot bring himself to kill anyone; he falsifies an affidavit of execution. The Mikado, accompanied by Katisha, arrives in Titipu in search of his son. When Katisha sees Nanki-Poo’s name on the affidavit, the Mikado condemns Ko-Ko to death for compassing the death of the heir-apparent. It is only after KoKo persuades Katisha to love him, she pleads for mercy with the Mikado, and emperor and son are reunited that all ends happily in Titipu.

BACKGROUND

In January 1884, during the run of Princess Ida, Arthur Sullivan told impresario Richard D’Oyly Carte that he would write no more operettas for the Savoy: “My tunes are in danger of becoming mere repetitions of my former pieces, my concerted movements are getting to possess a family resemblance, and I have wrung all the changes possible in the way of variety and rhythm.” In poor health and stung by critics’

charges that he had failed to advance the cause of serious English music, Sullivan was no less despondent when Gilbert submitted to him another “lozenge plot” (a story in which a magical device compels a character to act differently from his or her nature). Gilbert alternated between outrage at Sullivan’s attitude and efforts at compromise, even offering to step aside as writer for the next contractually obligated operetta, and suggesting that he would write the libretto for a grand opera if the composer so desired. Tempers cooled and Sullivan agreed to accept a text if it contained nothing of the supernatural. Gilbert, capitalizing on the vogue for Japanese fashions, told Sullivan his idea for The Mikado on May 20, and the partnership was on track again. A Japanese exhibition in Knightsbridge coincided with the early rehearsals of The Mikado and gave Gilbert the opportunity to hire three young Japanese women to instruct his “three little maids” in the proper way to walk and to manipulate fans. Ruthlessly precise in his stage directions, he also decided to cut “My Object All Sublime,” only to reverse himself on appeal from members of the chorus. Sullivan, engaged in rehearsals and concerts with the London Philharmonic as well as those for The Mikado, put the final touches on his score just two days before the Savoy premiere, which he conducted on March 14, 1885. The composer wrote in his diary for that night: “Tremendous reception ... A treble encore for ‘Three Little Maids’ and for ‘The Flowers that Bloom in the Spring.’ Seven encores taken?—might have taken twelve ... All went very well except Grossmith [as Ko-Ko], whose nervousness nearly upset the piece.” In the days following, two major changes were made: Yum-Yum’s “The Sun, Whose Rays” was shifted from Act One to its present position near the start of Act Two, and Ko-Ko’s “I’ve Got a Little List” was moved back to follow shortly after his entrance song.

Wayne County, Ohio Downtown Dazzle to Country Calm

Adapted from the original of Raymond McCall

For more information, please contact

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God Save The Queen In keeping with the tradition established at the Savoy Theatre in London, we will sing God Save the Queen before each Gilbert & Sullivan performance.

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God save our gracious Queen, Long live our noble Queen, God save the Queen: Send her victorious, Happy and glorious, Long to reign over us: God save the Queen. S Queen Victoria attending a performance of The Mikado. Photo by Matt Dilyard, from the 2012 Ohio Light Opera production.

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October 23, 2016 November 13, 2016 December 11, 2016 January 29, 2017 February 26, 2017 April 2, 2017

SERIES

Juilliard String Quartet American Chamber Players Chiara String Quartet Trio Solisti St Lawrence String Quartet Emerson String Quartet

All concerts are Sundays, at Gault Recital Hall, Scheide Music Center,at The College of Wooster. Tickets: $25.00 general admission / $125 Season Tickets, students: free, available at the Wilson Bookstore on The College of Wooster Campus, ompa or at the door. The Wooster Book Company, mation, phone ph For additional information, 330-263-2115 www.woosterchambermusic.com woosterchambermus

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Premiere

Music by..................................................... Jerome Kern Book and Lyrics by...........................Guy Bolton and ..............................................................P. G. Wodehouse Original Orchestration and Supporting Material Supplied by The Packard Humanities Institute

Conductor................................................. J. Lynn Thompson Stage Director..................................................Steven Daigle Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer.......................................................Daniel Hobbs Costume Designer.........................................Hali Hutchison Lighting Designer.................................. Brittany Shemuga Rutherford “Ruddy” Schoonmaker......................... Nathan Brian Peggy....................................................................................... Sarah Best Dolly Brabazon..............................................................Tanya Roberts Henry..................................................................................Kyle Yampiro Lizzie..................................................................................Emily Hagens Ted.....................................................................................Stephen Faulk Mrs. Pyne (Aunt).................................................Julie Wright Costa Matthew Pyne (Uncle)................................................... Mark Snyder Chick Owen.................................................................. Spencer Reese Detective Baker............................................................. Royce Strider Maitre d’Hotel..................................................................... David Geist The Turk................................................................................ Isaac Assor Floor Walker........................................................................... Matt Kelly Man of Quartette......................................................... Jacob Clanton Sales Girls....... Katherine Corle, Meagan Sill, Hannah Kurth, ........................................... Amy Livingston, Katharine Nunn Women Shoppers...............Hilary Koolhoven, Hannah Miller, .................................................................Alexandra Camastro Waitresses.......................................... Hannah Kurth, Meagan Sill Bell Boys................................................ Matt Kelly, Daniel Huston Ensemble Isaac Assor, Cameron Brownell, Alexandra Camastro, Jacob Clanton, Katherine Corle, Bailey Cummings, David Geist, Daniel Huston, Matt Kelly, Adam Kirk, Hilary Koolhoven, Hannah Kurth, Amy Livingston, Hannah Miller, Katharine Nunn, Christopher Sapp, Meagan Sill

This production of Have a Heart has been partially underwritten by gifts from: David & Carol Briggs The Commercial & Savings Bank • Ron & Prue Holtman 30 Box Office: 330.263.2345


SETTING

Blueport, Rhode Island—1917

ACT I

Lingerie Room at Schoonmaker’s Department Store Intermission

ACT II

Scene 1...................................................................................................... Lounge of the Ocean View Hotel—night Scene 2........................................................................................................................... The same—the next morning

MUSICAL NUMBERS Overture

ACT I

Shop....................................................................................................................................................................... Salesgirls You Can’t Keep A Good Man Down............................................................................................. Henry, Shoppers I’m So Busy........................................................................................................................................................ Lizzie, Ted Have a Heart............................................................................................................................................................. Ruddy Look in His Eyes....................................................................................................................................... Peggy, Chorus And I Am All Alone.................................................................................................................................. Ruddy, Peggy I’m Here, Little Girls, I’m Here........................................................................................................................ Ted, Girls Bright Lights.................................................................................................................................................. Dolly, Henry The Road that Lies Before.................................................................................................................... Ruddy, Peggy Finale........................................................................................Henry, Lizzie, Owen, Uncle, Aunt, Peggy, Chorus

ACT II

The Weary Sun Has Fled......................................................................................................................................Guests Samarkand............................................................................................................................................Yussuf, Ensemble Honeymoon Inn..................................................................................................................................Peggy, Ensemble Can the Cabaret..............................................................................................................Henry, Dolly, Maitre d’Hotel It’s a Sure, Sure Sign................................................................................................................................................. Dolly My Wife, My Man...................................................................................................................................... Peggy, Ruddy You Said Something....................................................................................................................................... Ted, Lizzie Peter Pan.....................................................................................................................................................................Peggy Napoleon..................................................................................................................................................Henry, Flunkeys Daisy..................................................................................................................................................................Peggy, Girls Reminiscences Finale Ultimo.............................................................................................................................. Ruddy, Peggy, Chorus

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ARGUMENT

ACT I: Shoppers at Schoonmaker’s Department Store are outraged when there is not a salesgirl to be found. When the staff finally shows up, they are none too happy about having to cut short their break to serve the customers. Ted Sheldon quizzes elevator boy Henry about any openings for employment—he would give anything to work at the same job as his paramour Lizzie O’Brien, who appears and immediately begins bickering with Ted. Detective Baker arrives seeking a counterfeiter; he has come to meet up with his counterpart investigator Lizzie. Left alone with Ted, Lizzie makes it clear what he must do—namely make her a fortune—if they are ever to wed. No sooner has proprietor Ruddy Schoonmaker appeared than Ted inquires about a job. Ruddy hires him to deal with complaints—not those of the customers, which don’t interest him, but rather those of the salesgirls, whose condition he is trying to better. Ruddy’s estranged wife Peggy enters and runs into Captain Owen, a confidence man who has come to repay a debt to Ruddy, but winds up trying—albeit unsuccessfully—to convince Peggy that he is the one for her. Meanwhile, Ted asks Ruddy about the reasons behind the divorce. Ruddy explains that Peggy caught him at the Ocean View Hotel with former employee Dolly Brabazon and assumed the worst. Owen corners Ruddy, pays back the money owed, and tells him that he is planning to marry a girl whose soon-tobe former husband was a jerk. After the others have exited, Peggy and Ruddy begin reminiscing about earlier good times together. Ruddy reveals to Ted that Dolly, now a movie star in Hollywood and believing that Ruddy is in love with her, is coming to the store later that day—big trouble for Ruddy. Peggy’s aunt and uncle arrive and ask

Henry for the whereabouts of Lizzie, whom they have engaged to spy on Ruddy. When Henry confesses to Ruddy that he himself is in love with Dolly, Ruddy does everything to convince the elevator boy to court the film star and get her out of his hair. Peggy, convinced by Ruddy that he has not seen Dolly since that evening at the hotel, agrees to cancel the divorce proceedings and elope with him to the Ocean View Hotel. But when Dolly arrives with a stack of letters that Ruddy has sent her, and Peggy’s aunt and uncle catch Ruddy and Dolly in an apparent embrace, chaos ensues. ACT II: Ocean View Hotel entertainer Yossuf regales the guests with an exotic tale of love in far-away Samarkand. Ruddy and Peggy arrive and register under the name “Smith,” ready to start their second honeymoon. Unbeknownst to them, however, Henry and Dolly have taken a table in the restaurant and are mistaken for the Smiths by the maitre d’hotel. Peggy’s aunt and uncle arrive in search of Ruddy and Peggy; they are assigned the room adjacent to that of the couple. And, to further complicate matters, Detective Baker shows up, as well as Owen, who tries to convince Baker that Ruddy is the counterfeiter. Left alone for a moment, Ruddy and Peggy confirm their reignited love and look forward to life’s road ahead. Ruddy, recognizing the dire need to get his letters back from Dolly, enlists Henry’s help in setting up a secret meeting with Dolly. Meanwhile, at Lizzie’s request, Ted has brought her to the hotel. Still bickering, they nevertheless admit to being unable to live without one another. Finally, aunt and uncle, in the presence of their niece Peggy, accuse Ruddy of infidelity. Despite Ruddy’s denial, Peggy is confused—she seeks comfort in the dream playmates of her childhood. When she catches Ruddy and Dolly in their rendezvous, the situation seems even more hopeless. But, as usual … Henry to the rescue.

The Jewel of Ashland County The Jewel of Ashland County Arie Lipsky, Music Director & Conductor Arie Lipsky, Music Director & Conductor

BACKGROUND 401 College Avenue Although they worked together on only five 401 College AvenueAshland shows OH over 44805 seven years, the influence of “Bolton, Ashland, OH 44805 Wodehouse, 419-289-5115 and Kern” on the development of American musical 419-289-5115 www.ashlandsymphony.org theater was monumental.

Sensing perhaps a need to fill the vacuum created by the10% war-induced www.ashlandsymphony.org Mention “Ohio Light Opera” and receive off absence of the Viennese and Hungarian operetta imports that had filled the purchase of a single adult or senior ticket. Broadway theaters since even before The Merry 32 Box Office: 330.263.2345


Widow, their shows featured not the exotic locales and the dukes and duchesses of operetta, nor the lavish spectacle of the Ziegfeld Follies, but rather the romantic and comic entanglements of everyday Americans, in current dress and modern dialogue. These shows forever changed the landscape of Broadway; Richard Rodgers, Cole Porter, George Gershwin, and numerous others credited these musicals with inspiring their own development and quest for a theatrical style. Although only two of the five shows actually premiered at the 299-seat Princess Theatre on 39th St., they are all referred to as “Princess musicals.” Jerome Kern was born in New York City on Mozart’s birthday (January 27) in 1885. His earliest theatrical compositions were songs written for interpolation into Broadway and London West End musicals, more often than not for imported operettas for which the producer sought to add local musical color. His first complete Broadway score was The Red Petticoat in 1912; over the next quarter century, he penned music for more than 40 shows, including Sally, Show Boat, The Cat and the Fiddle, and Roberta. Pelham Grenville (P. G.) Wodehouse was born just outside London in 1881. While honing his comic prose writing, which led in 1915 to the first appearance of his lovable and enduring Jeeves character, he wrote lyrics for West End musicals, including one in 1905 for a song, “Mr. Chamberlain,” with music by Kern. His first full Broadway assignment was the English lyrics for Emmerich Kálmán’s Miss Springtime, in 1916. Guy Bolton was born to American parents in 1882, just northeast of London. With only straight plays thus far to his credit, he teamed with Jerome Kern in 1915 for the musical Ninety in the Shade, which closed after only 40 performances. At the opening night of the next Bolton/Kern collaboration, Very Good Eddie, the composer introduced Bolton to his former collaborator Wodehouse. By the end of the evening, the three had agreed to work together. Their first full-show collaboration was Have a Heart, which opened at the Liberty Theatre on January 11, 1917. For Jerome Kern, it kicked off what theatre historian Gerald Bordman called his annus mirabilis—five musical openings in less than eight months, including Oh, Boy! and Leave It to Jane. The comparatively short 76-performance run

of Have a Heart tells only part of the story. In the two years following its Broadway opening, with a Company A and a Company B touring simultaneously, it played in no fewer than 36 states and five Canadian provinces. It is arguably the most musically engaging of Kern’s Princess-style shows, with a dazzling succession of winsome tunes, many quite innovative in their melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic palettes. The hit song was the irresistibly catchy second-act duet “You Said Something” for characters Ted and Lizzie. But historians and Kern himself have singled out “And I Am All Alone,” sung by the estranged couple Ruddy and Peggy. In its unexpected harmonic progressions and intensity of feeling, it is in a class with Kern’s groundbreaking 1914 “They Didn’t Believe Me.” As an embarrassment of riches, this Ohio Light Opera production includes several songs—all of them gems—that were cut, or not yet present, in the Broadway opening: “You Can’t Keep a Good Man Down,” “Look in His Eyes,” “Can the Cabaret,” “It’s a Sure, Sure Sign,” and the haunting “Peter Pan.” Michael D. Miller

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Music by........................................ Jacques Offenbach Libretto by.....Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy English Translation by................. Richard Traubner Conductor..............................................Wilson Southerland Stage Director........................................ Julie Wright Costa Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer.......................................................Daniel Hobbs Costume Designer.......................................Stefanie Genda Lighting Designer...........................................Daniel Huston Bobinet...............................................................................Kyle Yampiro Un Employé (Porter)............................................ Bailey Cummings Raoul De Gardefeu........................................... Benjamin Krumreig Métella.......................................................................... Gretchen Windt Gontran.................................................................................... Matt Kelly Joseph............................................................................. Jacob Clanton Le Baron de Gondremarck...................................Ted Christopher La Baronne de Gondremarck....................................... Meagan Sill Le Brésilien............................................................... Clark Sturdevant Alphonse................................................................................. Tom Carle Frick................................................................................ Spencer Reese Gabrielle..........................................................................Tanya Roberts Pauline........................................................................Hilary Koolhoven Prosper......................................................................Matthew Brennan Urbain.................................................................................... Isaac Assor Clara...............................................................................Katherine Corle Léonie............................................................................Katharine Nunn Louise.................................................................. Alexandra Camastro Gardefeu (cover).................................................................. Tom Carle Ensemble Jessamyn Anderson, Isaac Assor, Brad Baron, Sarah Best, Matthew Brennan, Alexandra Camastro, Tom Carle, Jacob Clanton, Katherine Corle, Bailey Cummings, Alexa Devlin, Hannah Gauthier, David Geist, Emily Hagens, Matt Kelly, Hilary Koolhoven, Hannah Kurth, Audrey Lee, Hannah Miller, Emily Nelson, Katharine Nunn, Christopher Sapp, Royce Strider, Clark Sturdevant

This production of La Vie Parisienne has been partially underwritten by gifts from: Joan Buehler • Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Loewenstein • Mary Alice Streeter

34 Box Office: 330.263.2345


SETTING

ACT III

A salon in the Quimper-Karadec mansion— the following evening

Paris—1889

ACT I

Gare de l’Ouest—one morning

Intermission

ACT II

ACT IV

A salon in Gardefeu’s house—later that afternoon

Café des Anglais—the next evening

Intermission

MUSICAL NUMBERS Overture

ACT I

Our Trains Have Just Pulled In...................................................................................................................................................... Chorus Five Minutes More, It’s Going to Pour..............................................................Métella, Gardefeu, Bobinet, Gontran, Chorus They Are So Angry, Those Marquises...................................................................................................................Bobinet, Gardefeu Ah, Life’s a Funny Proposition..................................................................................................................................................Gardefeu Nowhere I Can Quite Assure You.......................................................................................................... Baroness, Gardefeu, Baron Finale:............................................................................................................ Le Brésilien, Baron, Baronness, Gardefeu, Ensemble To Paree I’m Brazilian Paris, Paris, Paris!

ACT II

Entr’acte Come In, Fräulein with the Blue Eyes......................................................................................................................... Frick, Gabrielle In This Romantic, Lovely City......................................................................................................................................Baron, Gardefeu Perhaps You May Recall.................................................................................................................................................................. Métella Who Is the Best at Carving Roasts?................................................................................................................................................Frick Finale.............................................................................................................................................................................Gabrielle, Ensemble We’ve Arrived at Seven Precisely I’m a General’s Widow The Tyrolean Song

ACT III

Entr’acte Mop and Dust, Be Nice and Neatish......................................................................................................................................Ensemble Well Then, Can I Rely on You?.......................................................Bobinet, Pauline, Prosper, Clara, Urbain, Leonie, Louise The Ladder of Love Is Tremendously High................................................................................................................Pauline, Baron When She Goes Out, She Hops About..................................................................................................................... Pauline, Chorus Sir, Your Coat Is Splitting Down the Back...........................................................................................................................Ensemble Finale.................................................................................................................................................................................................Ensemble Supper! Supper! Supper Is Served I’m a Dashing “Hail Fellow, Well Met”

ACT IV

Entr’acte Discreetly Dressed, Our Aprons Pressed........................................................................................................................................ Men A Waiter at a Grand Café Is Absolutely Serious...........................................................................................................Urbain, Men Here We Are: The Place that Is Feared by Mothers.............................................................................................................. Métella All the Boulevards Are Crowded.....................................................................................................Le Brésilien, Gabrielle, Chorus Finale: Articulate and Sing with Me, Celebrate Paree....................................................... Gabrielle, Le Brésilien, Ensemble

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ARGUMENT

At the Gare de l’Ouest in Paris one morning in 1889, Bobinet and Gardefeu await the train from Rambouillet that is bringing Métella, a demimondaine they are both wooing. Métella arrives with a new boyfriend and refuses to acknowledge them, as Bobinet realizes that he will have better luck pursuing the fashionable ladies of St. Germain des Prés. Gardefeu is about to follow him when he encounters Joseph, his former servant, now a Grand Hotel guide, who has come to the station to meet the Baron and Baroness of Gondremarck from Sweden. Gardefeu, determined to seduce the Baroness, bribes Joseph and takes his place as guide. When the Swedish couple arrive, they make it clear that they would prefer to savor Parisian delights separately. As Gardefeu leads them off to the Grand Hotel (actually his own house), a rich Brazilian playboy announces to other incoming tourists his intent to squander all his gold on the ladies of Paris—all agree that they are ready for dancing, eating, singing, and heavy romancing. At Gardefeu’s house, the German shoemaker Frick declares his passion for Gabrielle, a beautiful glove maker. When the Baron insists on having a table d’hôte served, Gardefeu recruits

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Frick, Gabrielle, and their friends to impersonate hotel guests. He also agrees to deliver a letter of introduction from the Baron to Métella. Bobinet offers to assist Gardefeu in continuing the ruse by arranging a reception the following night at his aunt’s vacant flat, where his servants will pretend to be aristocratic guests. Métella arrives, reads the letter, but keeps the Baron on tenterhooks. When dinner time approaches, Frick enters as a major and Gabrielle as a general’s widow. They and their friends, ravenous and in high spirits at the thought of a free meal, raucously demand to be fed. The next night at the flat of Bobinet’s aunt, the Dowager Countess of Quimper-Karadec, the servants assure Bobinet that they will impress the Baron as the crème de la crème of society, and indeed the Baron is impressed, especially by Pauline, who poses as Admiral Walter’s wife. Bobinet, as the Swiss admiral, causes much amusement when he enters with his coat splitting down the back. At supper the guests determine to get the Baron drunk so that Gardefeu can enjoy the Baroness’ company that evening. The following evening, at the Café des Anglais, the waiters prepare for a party ordered by Le Brésilien. When the Baron arrives for a tête-à-tête with Métella, she spurns him and introduces him to a masked lady, the Baroness, whom she has rescued from Gardefeu’s clutches. The Baron, having discovered the trick that Gardefeu has played on him, challenges Gardefeu to a duel, but then thinks better of it. The Baroness reveals her identity, and the Baron submits to her. Gardefeu and Bobinet profess their love to Métella, who accepts them both. The Brazilian, who has claimed Gabrielle, insists that the champagne corks pop all night, as the partygoers enthusiastically proclaim the delights of Parisian life.

BACKGROUND

Pioneering Industrial Fabric Technology For Over Half A Century • Roofing Systems • Architectural Structures • Geomembrane Applications • Truck Tarps 1000 Venture Boulevard Wooster, Ohio 44691 www.seamancorp.com

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800-927-8578 • 330-262-1111 Fax: 330-263-6950

Visitors to Wooster who, in recent years, have seen Jacques Offenbach’s La belle Hélène or The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein, will be encountering another sub-species of French operetta in La vie parisienne. Whereas most of the composer’s fulllength opéras-bouffes were set in the mythological or fantastical-historical past, La vie parisienne (1866) had a very timely, modern setting and a story that to this day typifies the “gay Paree” of the Second Empire. Certainly M. Plunkett, director of the Théâtre du Palais-Royal (which still stands in very much its original state in back of


the Comédie-Française and remains one of Paris’ one pair of gloves applauding the adorable most beautiful theatres), did not think he would things I have done in our La vie parisienne.” receive anything like the modern-dress, five-act Any anguish was unnecessary as the show was vaudeville that he received from Offenbach and a sensation from the first act. Even the severest his librettists Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy. critics were intoxicated—one remarked on the When he commissioned Offenbach for a new piece operetta’s effect on the audience as if “the whole that would be attractive enough to lure customers house had been taking hashish.” The Emperor through the winter of 1866-67 right up to the time and Eugénie attended the 58th performance of the Paris Exposition of 1867, Plunkett expected and the piece ran more than a year, a very long an opéra-bouffe along the lines of the wildly run for that time. The first English-language successful La belle Hélène or Barbe-Bleue, both London production appeared March 30, 1872 at of which had been produced at the Variétés. But the Holborn Theatre. New York saw it at the the Palais-Royal had always been known for its Théâtre Français on March 29, 1869, in French. comedies (it still is) and vaudevilles—farces with There have been several notable Paris revivals. little songs. Thus, Meilhac and Halévy decided The first, under the direction of the composer to greatly expand into an opera-bouffe a one- in 1873, reduced the original five acts to four. act effort that they had produced for the same In 1911 at the Variétés, the up-and-coming theatre in 1864, The Photographer. And this Mistinguett appeared as Pauline. The celebrated was to be performed by a company known for 1958 Jean-Louis Barrault production returned its comedy prowess rather than its singing ability, the operetta to the Palais-Royal and a troupe of which delighted Offenbach: “It’s charming! It’s actors, and a 1980s spectacular at the Théâtre exquisite! They don’t need to know how to sing Musical de Paris (the former, and now-again, … We’re not the Opéra-Comique!” However, Théâtre du Châtelet) featured a functional train what passed for non-singing in those days might and a three-story Paris mansion. be considered passable musical comedy singing Adapted from the original of today (it’s all relative), and Offenbach was obliged Richard Traubner Home of Old World Pastries to engage the well-trained Zulma Bouffar toThe create and World Class Coffees the role of Gabrielle. The rehearsals were hardly encouraging. Messieurs Brasseur (as Le Brésilien) and Hyacinthe (as the Baron) were voiceless every day. Mlle. Honorine (Métella) didn’t care for her role at all, and Mlle. Paurelle (Pauline) didn’t The Home of Old World Pastries bother to have her costume remade, as she didn’t World Class Coffees We serve lunch! think that the show would last more than three gourmet breakfast andand Mon. Open Mon. - Sat. 7:30 am- Thur. - 6 pm7:30 am - 5 pm nights. The company hated the final two acts. Fri.11 - Sat. am - 7 pm • Sun. 11 am - 4 pm Sun. am -7:30 4 pm Only Offenbach was confident, and he implored 122 South Market Wooster, Oh 44691 122St., South Market St.,Wooster, Oh 44691 his great star Hortense Schneider to attend the 330-264-8092330-264-8092 first night so she could “go through more than We serve gourmet breakfast and lunch!

The Wayne County Historical Society & Museum  546 E. Bowman St., Wooster, Ohio  •  Phone: (330) 264-8856  •  waynehistoricalohio.org  •       Wayne County Historical Society; Wooster, OH 

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Stay up-to-date on ALL OF OUR MANY EVENTS  at www.waynehistoricalohio.org/news-and-events/2016-schedule-of-events  Only minutes from Freedlander Theatre! Stroll through campus turning right on Beall Ave. Located on Bowman St. beside Drug Mart. 

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Premiere

Devised, Written and Composed by.................................. Ivor Novello Lyrics by...................................... Christopher Hassall Conductor........................................................ Steven Byess Stage Director................................................Steven Daigle Choreographer............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer.........................................................Ken Martin Costume Designer.....................................Charlene Gross Lighting Designer................................ Brittany Shemuga Maria Ziegler.............................. Sarah Best | Julie Wright Costa Cacille Kurt..................................................................... Hannah Kurth Grete Schone................................................................. Emily Hagens Ceruti.....................................................................Benjamin Krumreig Hattie Watney...................................................................Alexa Devlin Countess Lotte..........................................................Gretchen Windt Rudi Kleber..................................Nathan Brian | Ted Christopher Prince Charles Metterling........................................Samus Haddad Franzel................................................................................... Isaac Assor Carl.............................................................................Madi Christopher Madame Pelotti............................................................ Tanya Roberts Sadun................................................................... Jessamyn Anderson Lilli......................................................................... Jessamyn Anderson 1st Officer................................................................ Matthew Brennan 2nd Officer............................................................ Cameron Brownell Elizabeth........................................................................... Emily Nelson Sonia...........................................................................Hannah Gauthier Wanda...................................................................................Audrey Lee Sari.............................................................................. Hilary Koolhoven Mitzi............................................................................... Amy Livingston Hilde.....................................................................Alexandra Camastro Emmy............................................................................... Tanya Roberts Footman.........................................................................Jacob Clanton Kathie...................................................................Alexandra Camastro Lorelei........................................................................... Katharine Nunn Signor Valdo...........................................................................Matt Kelly The Night Watchman.......................................... Christopher Sapp Echo..........................................................................................Matt Kelly Otto........................................................................Bryson Christopher Oscar......................................................................... Matthew Brennan Schani............................................................................... Royce Strider Goetzer....................................................................................Matt Kelly Poldi................................................................................Spencer Reese Young Maria Ziegler (cover)....................... Jessamyn Anderson

This production of The Dancing Years has been partially underwritten by gifts from: Ambassador and Mrs. John D. Ong Ralph & Grace Jones Foundation 38 Box Office: 330.263.2345


Ensemble Jessamyn Anderson, Isaac Assor, Matthew Brennan, Cameron Brownell, Alexandra Camastro, Tom Carle, Jacob Clanton, Bailey Cummings, Stephen Faulk, Hannah Gauthier, David Geist, Matt Kelly, Hilary Koolhoven, Audrey Lee, Amy Livingston, Hannah Miller, Emily Neill, Emily Nelson, Katharine Nunn, Spencer Reese, Tanya Roberts, Christopher Sapp, Royce Strider

SETTING

ACT II

ACT I

1911 Scene 1: The garden of an inn outside Vienna Scene 2: The same Scene 3: Maria Ziegler’s drawing room— a month later Scene 4: The bare stage of the Theater an der Wien—a week later Scene 5: The corridor outside the grand tier boxes at the Theater an der Wien Scene 6: The interior of the Theater an der Wien Scene 7: Maria Ziegler’s apartment

1914 Scene 1: A chalet in the Tyrol Scene 2: The same—a week later Scene 3: The period fête at the Belvedere, Vienna 1927 Scene 4: Locher’s Restaurant Scene 5: The garden of the inn 1938 Scene 6: A room in a former royal palace in Vienna

Intermission

MUSICAL NUMBERS ACT I

Overture Dawn Prelude..........................................................................................................................Night Watchman, Echo Uniform......................................................................................................................................................... Officers, Girls Waltz of My Heart........................................................................................................Officers, Girls, Maria, Chorus A Masque of Vienna The Wings of Sleep......................................................................................................................... Maria, Cacille Kurt My Life Belongs to You....................................................................................................... Ceruti, Maria, Ensemble Lorelei......................................................................................................................Countess, Ceruti, Lorelei, Chorus My Life Belongs to You (reprise)....................................................................................................................... Ceruti I Can Give You the Starlight.................................................................................................................................. Maria

ACT II

Entr’acte My Dearest Dear........................................................................................................................................................ Maria Chorale and Tyrolese Dance.............................................................................................................................. Chorus Primrose........................................................................................................................................................................ Grete In Praise of Love..................................................................................Pelotti, Sadun, Cacille Kurt, Ceruti, Valdo The Leap Year Waltz A Masque of Vienna My Dearest Dear (reprise)..................................................................................................................................... Maria Finale.......................................................................................................................................................................... Chorus

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“I can give you the starlight” S “Dancing Years, The (Original version)” is presented by special arrangement with SAMUEL FRENCH, INC.

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ARGUMENT

ACT I: At an inn outside Vienna, aspiring but penniless operetta composer Rudi Kleber returns from a walk with the landlady’s 15-year-old niece Grete to find his piano sitting out in the garden. Hattie, the inn’s most popular waitress, informs Rudi that Grete’s stern Aunt Liesel, to cover Rudi’s long-overdue rent, has sold the piano to a local merchant, who will be arriving soon to take it away. The morning breakfast crowd, including soldiers and their actress friends, arrives at the inn, and Rudi sees an opportunity to make some fast cash by playing, and then auctioning off, his latest tune. The disappointing low bids are far exceeded by that of a latecomer, opera star Maria Ziegler, who can use the song for her latest show. Some days later, Maria returns with her friend, benefactor, and romantic interest Prince Charles Metterling, whom she convinces to help promote Rudi’s career and to let him live in a studio at Palais Metterling. Grete, who has a huge crush on Rudi, is distraught at losing him. Playfully— but not so in her mind—he promises her right of first refusal if ever he should entertain marrying someone else. A month later, Maria reveals to her voice teacher Cacille Kurt that she is in love with Rudi, but that he has been focusing on his music and shown little interest in her. Charles, meanwhile, has become increasingly jealous of Rudi, especially after his operetta Lorelei, with Maria starring, is a huge success at the Theater an der Wien. At her apartment after the show, Maria and Rudi, he somewhat drunk with wine and success, share a romantic moment. When Charles enters, catches the couple in a kiss and mentions that he had been visiting there with Maria the previous evening, Rudi leaves the apartment, but is drawn back when he overhears an argument between Maria and Charles. ACT II: It is three years later. Rudi’s career has skyrocketed and he and Maria are living together, very much in love. Grete is off studying in England, and until she returns and Rudi can fulfil his promise to her—a promise that he agreed to keep secret—he cannot bring himself to ask for Maria’s hand in marriage. She doesn’t understand his reticence, and is more than aware of the social unacceptability of their living arrangements. When Grete arrives home, Maria becomes overly jealous, storms out on Rudi and pens a letter to the long-absent Charles. She quickly makes amends with Rudi, but the letter is on its way. Rudi, hav40 Box Office: 330.263.2345

ing requested that Maria go upstairs for a few minutes, takes the opportunity to offer Grete his mock proposal. Maria catches a few words, but does not stay long enough to hear Grete’s refusal—she is long gone by the time Rudi realizes that something has gone terribly wrong. ACT III: The next morning, arriving late for a concert rehearsal, Maria congratulates Rudi and Grete on their engagement. When they explain what really happened the previous evening and Rudi assures her that all is well now, Maria reveals that, to ensure comfort, security, and faithfulness, she married Charles that morning. Rudi stands motionless in shock. Twelve years pass. Rudi has become even more successful and Maria is ensconced in the social whirl of a prince’s wife. Both realize that their lives have been wretched without one another. At a chance meeting at a restaurant, Maria suggests that they meet in a week and that Rudi tell her then what he wants to do concerning their future together. She evades his question about what difference a week might make. When they reconvene a week later at the same inn where they had met many years before, things have changed …

BACKGROUND

His World War I song “Keep the Home Fires Burning” became a rallying cry on both sides of the Atlantic; his status as Britain’s most popular silent film matinee idol was religiously followed in the American press; he virtually single-handedly brought romantic musicals back to life in Britain in the 1930s, 40s, and early 50s; and he was the scriptwriter for Hollywood’s 1932 film Tarzan the Ape Man. He was a prolific playwright, assumed the lead role in most of his late, long-running musicals, and posthumously “lent” his name to Britain’s annual award for best composer and songwriter. According to his biographer Paul Webb, his 1951 funeral, in terms of crowd size, was rivaled (among non-monarchs) only by those of Winston Churchill and Princess Diana. And yet … today in America he is virtually unknown, with barely a note of his heard on Broadway during the last century. Ivor Novello, born David Ivor Davies on January 15, 1893 in Cardiff, Wales, was a true renaissance man of theater and film, whose success and popularity in Great Britain during his lifetime matched, and even exceeded, that of his friend and rival Noël Coward.


With a catalogue of more than three dozen published songs under his belt, Novello’s initial entry into musical theater came in early 1916 with the interpolation of his song “The Garden of England” into the London revue The Bing Boys Are Here. To capitalize on the popularity of his earlier wartime hit, the song was listed in the program as “Keep the Home Flowers Blooming.” Later that year, Novello shared composing duties with Jerome Kern on the score for Theodore and Co., which ran for an impressive 503 performances. Over the next decade, while building up an imposing resumé as a silent film star (most notably Alfred Hitchcock’s 1927 The Lodger) and dramatic actor (works of Guitry, Molnar, and Coward), Novello found time to compose music for revues (See-Saw, Tabs, A-Z, Puppets), an operetta (A Southern Maid), and musical comedies (Arlette, Who’s Hooper?, The Golden Moth, and Our Nell). Following his three-month 1930-31 run on Broadway opposite Billie Burke in The Truth Game, M-G-M engaged Novello as actor and scriptwriter, but life in Hollywood was not to his liking. He returned to London and, over the next few years, wrote and/ or starred in more than a dozen plays. In 1934, Ivor met for lunch with Harry Tennent, general manager of the prestigious Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, who bemoaned the prospects for finding a blockbuster entertainment to fill his theater. Ivor suggested that he himself had something up his sleeve (he really didn’t), and that he would have it all fleshed out within 24 hours (he did). By the next day, he had come up with a synopsis and title for a new musical—Glamorous Night— that not only resurrected the fortunes and standing of the Theatre Royal, but did likewise for British romantic musical theater, which had long been too dependent on imports from Broadway. The

show opened in May of 1935 to great acclaim; it ran for seven months and then, in an irrefutable misstep, the theater directors closed it down to accommodate the annual Christmas pantomime. After going out on tour, the show returned in mid-1936 to London’s vast Coliseum, but its momentum had been sacrificed and it closed after about 90 additional performances. Novello followed Glamorous Night with Careless Rapture (1936, 295 performances) and Crest of the Wave (1937, 203 performances). His next musical, and the greatest success of his career, The Dancing Years, had its genesis in a story related to Ivor by a friend who had gone to a Vienna record shop and was dismayed that there were no recordings by Jewish composers, who had produced many of the greatest works of Viennese operetta in the first decades of the century. Novello, up to this point in his life, had minimal interest in politics, but now felt compelled to address the Nazi threat headon in a musical, albeit it to the great chagrin of his producer, who thought that such material did not belong on the musical stage. By the time of the opening on March 23, 1939 at the Theatre Royal, Ivor’s original concept for addressing the threat as part of the romantic drama had been significantly tempered, but not dismissed. Nevertheless, driven by the composer’s lushest musical score—a combination of opera, operetta, musical comedy, and revue—The Dancing Years chalked up more than 1150 performances in a run that was interrupted and displaced by wartime demands. Most regrettably—at least until this summer at OLO—it appears that there has been only one fully-staged American production, that by the St. Louis Municipal Opera in 1947. Michael D. Miller

An elegant retreat of comfort and Old World charm. , Est. 1997 ,

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Premiere

(DAS HOLLANDWEIBCHEN)

Music by.......................................... Emmerich Kálmán Libretto by..................Leo Stein and Béla Jenbach New Performance Edition and English Translation by............ Steven Daigle Conductor........................................................... Steven Byess Stage Director..................................................Steven Daigle Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer......................................... Tymberley Whitesel Costume Designer.......................................Stefanie Genda Lighting Designer...........................................Daniel Huston Princess Jutta..................................................................Meagan Sill Baroness Elly, from the Weyde, first maid of honor................................... Jessamyn Anderson Chatelaine Sallina Frelln Webel Horst...........Gretchen Windt Marshal of Eberius.........................................................David Geist Von Stopp, lord chamberlain.......................Benjamin Krumreig Prince Adalbert, Jutta’s uncle................................... Brad Baron Paul Roderich, crown prince of Usingen...............................Clark Sturdevant Dr. Udo von Sterzel, extraordinary ambassador of Usingen........Samus Haddad Von Oppel, minister of Usingen.............................Spiro Matsos Von Seydenhecht, minister of Usingen...............Nathan Brian Von Trockenrodt, minister of Usingen............. Stephen Faulk Four newlyweds........................ Emily Nelson, Tanya Roberts, .......................................Alexandra Camastro, Hannah Kurth Von Tiedemann, president............................. Matthew Brennan Baron Seeborg...................................................................Tom Carle Von Melow.................................................................... Kyle Yampiro Von Wetterling..........................................................Spencer Reese Klaas, host.........................................................................Isaac Assor Coachman.......................................................... Cameron Brownell Princess Jutta (cover)............................................ Katherine Corle

This production of The Little Dutch Girl has been partially underwritten by gifts from: Edith G. Andrew • Bradley Bennett • Michael & Nan Miller

42 Box Office: 330.263.2345


Ensemble Isaac Assor, Brad Baron, Matthew Brennan, Nathan Brian, Cameron Brownell, Alexandra Camastro, Tom Carle, Jacob Clanton, Katherine Corle, Stephen Faulk, Hannah Gauthier, David Geist, Emily Hagens, Hilary Koolhoven, Hannah Kurth, Audrey Lee, Amy Livingston, Spiro Matsos, Hannah Miller, Emily Neill, Emily Nelson, Katharine Nunn, Spencer Reese, Tanya Roberts, Christopher Sapp, Kyle Yampiro

SETTING Time 1920

ACT I

The small German princely capital Sonneburg-Glücksburg Intermission

ACT II

Wijk aan Zee in Holland—three days later

ACT III

The princess’ pleasure palace near the capital—two days later

MUSICAL NUMBERS ACT I

Life Starts Anew!.................................................................................................................................................... Chorus Close in My Arms I’ll Discover......................................................................................................................Jutta, Elly There’s Only Women to Blame....................................................................................... Sterzel, Stopp, Ministers What’s Wrong to Love within This World............................................................................................ Sterzel, Elly My Heart to You I Give.............................................................................................................................. Jutta, Brides Finale.....................................................................................................................................................................Ensemble

ACT II

Entr’acte We Merrily Dance and We Sing!....................................................................................................................... Chorus Happy Is the Prince Who Seldom Tarries................................................................................................ Paul, Men All Alone, Far Away.....................................................................................................................Jutta, Paul, Seeborg Little Dutch Girls............................................................................................................................................. Jutta, Paul Play the Part, Call It Art................................................................................................................... Jutta, Elly, Stopp Let Us Discover Love Like No Other........................................................................................................ Jutta, Paul Drinking’s Best When Shared by Two................................................................................................... Sterzel, Elly Finale.....................................................................................................................................................................Ensemble

ACT III

Entr’acte Introduction and Melodrama................................................................................................................................. Jutta Hear It … A Song of Love Is Calling............................................................................. Jutta, Elly, Sterzel, Stopp Drinking’s Best When Shared by Two (reprise)................................................................................ Sterzel, Elly Finale Ultimo.......................................................................................................................................................Ensemble

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“When your soul’s enraptured, sing a fiery song” S ohiolightopera.org 43


ARGUMENT

ACT I: In the small German principality of Sonneburg-Glücksburg, Princess Jutta eagerly awaits her dynastic arranged marriage to Crown Prince Paul Roderich of Usingen, whom she has not met but whose letters and portraits have won her heart. With her lady-in-waiting Elly, she rhapsodizes on the happy future that awaits her and her Prince Charming. While Jutta is in her room dressing, a deputation arrives at the palace to great pomp and circumstance. But it is not the prince who steps forward, but Dr. Udo von Sterzel, the prince’s private secretary. Jutta’s Lord Chamberlain von Stopp is aghast at the prince’s absence—for years he has masterminded a swindle in which fabricated letters were sent to the princess to convince her that the prince loves her. Sterzel explains that the prince has no interest in marriage, preferring to continue his adventures with girls, days at the races, and time sailing. When Elly appears, she and Sterzel take an immediate liking to one another. Finally, Jutta appears in full dress with her bridesmaids and is told that Prince Paul is sick and couldn’t make it. Stopp intervenes and tells Jutta that, according to statute, the ceremony can go ahead as planned, but with von Sterzel acting as proxy. After the ceremony, Sterzel confesses to Jutta that he himself had written the letters and poems that so enthralled her, and that Paul couldn’t care less about her. Jutta vows to seek her revenge. ACT II: In Wijk aan Zee in Holland, the local girls, joined by Prince Paul and his fellow yacht club members, extoll their carefree lives. Jutta, Elly, and Stopp arrive at the dock and, in conversation with the local pub-owner Klaas, learn that there is a party planned that evening, with Prince Paul in attendance, but with Klaas’ two nieces, Bella and Kaatje, unavailable to wait on tables. Jutta jumps at the opportunity—she and Elly will impersonate the two girls and act as servers. It doesn’t take the womanizing Paul long to fall hard for the cute waitress, as Jutta, Elly,

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and Stopp delight in the chance to inflict on Paul his comeuppance. Von Sterzel arrives, initially unaware of Jutta’s scheme, but eventually recognizing Elly and reveling with her in the benefits of a glass of wine, a song, and a little love. When Paul is informed that both governments insist that he travel to Glücksburg and assume his role as husband to the princess, he refuses—he will remain in Holland with his new sweetheart Bella. Although Jutta/Bella is slowly succumbing to his charms, she summons up the will to reveal her identity, dump him, and claim her revenge. ACT III: Two days later, back at her Glücksburg palace, Jutta has mixed emotions—taking joy in the revenge she has achieved, but feeling all alone without the prince who had won her heart in Holland. When Sterzel announces to Jutta that Paul has arrived at the palace and is in a jolly state rather than sad, Jutta calls for champagne and glasses and launches, with Elly, Sterzel, and Stopp, into a fiery quartet of mock tribute to Paul. The prince confronts Jutta, begging her forgiveness and intent to win her back. Meanwhile, Elly and Sterzel have reunited and agree to marriage, but only under some strict conditions. Jutta, after playing with Paul’s emotions, calls for the proxy marriage contract and tears it up in front of him. Paul is utterly dejected and heads for the exit. But Jutta stops him with a warning that his penance isn’t over quite yet …

BACKGROUND

In 1917, the Messter Film Company in Germany released a comedy titled Höhenluft (Mountain Air), featuring the country’s first major film star, Henny Porten, in the role of the Princess of Solmsdorf, who, at the behest of her ministers, is to be married to the dashing Duke Egon of Isenburg. Egon, with no interest in marrying a stranger, sends his deputy to the wedding in his stead. Insulted by this affront, the princess travels to the mountains where Egon is enjoying the good life, disguises herself as a peasant girl, and tries to make him fall for her. Inspired by the operetta potential of the plot, Emmerich Kálmán and his librettists Béla Jenbach and Leo Stein (who had teamed in 1915 for Die Csárdásfürstin—The Gypsy Princess) submitted a libretto— titled Das Hollandweibchen (The Little Dutch Girl)—to Erich Müller, manager of Vienna’s Johann-Strauss-Theater. It was quickly accepted and, after much fine-tuning, premiered on Jan-


uary 30, 1920 to unanimous rave reviews. This show represented a significant shift in both the Viennese operetta paradigm and in Kálmán’s own time-tested approach to the genre. With the defeat of Germany and the Austro-Hungarian empire, operetta could no longer deal with revolutions (as in the composer’s 1912 The Little King) or the perceived decline of the aristocracy (as in The Gypsy Princess). Audience favor turned to nostalgic stories—stripped of all political undertones—that reminded them of the good old, pre-war days. Perhaps feeling empowered after the success of his two previous shows, The Gypsy Princess and Miss Springtime, Kálmán set out, in his words, to “scale back the newly popular modern dance genre and instead ‘make music’ to my heart’s content … I wanted to assign a larger role to the chorus … modeled on our grand classical operettas ... the chorus shares in the action as appropriate ... More than ever, I worked on and refined that music and would love to see that appreciated.” And quite unusual in the show is the absence for almost the entire first act of the leading man, Prince Paul, who appears only, at the last moment, as a vision. As noted by Kálmán biographer Stefan Frey: “His surreal appearance in the first finale beggars all operetta dramaturgy, which always valued unity of action, no matter how improbable that action might be.” Prior to the war, England and America had relied heavily on Viennese operetta imports to populate their theaters—works of Kálmán, Franz Lehár, Oscar Straus, and Leo Fall, to name just a few. The war, of course, brought a virtual halt to this. The Little Dutch Girl was, in fact, the first Viennese operetta to be performed after the war in former enemy territory. It opened at London’s Lyric Theatre on December 1, 1920, starred opera soprano Maggie Teyte and stage comedian Jack Hulbert, and played for 215 performances, more than for any subsequent Kálmán import (including The Gypsy Princess in 1921 and Maritza in 1938). Already by July of 1920, show producer Marc Klaw had secured the Broadway rights for The Little Dutch Girl. However, 18 months later, believing that the show was too pretentious for his theaters, he let the rights lapse. By 1924, interest in mounting a Broadway production had resurfaced, and stage director Guy Bragdon undertook to create an English-language libretto, under the title The Prince and the Girl. The

American premiere, now under the title The Dutch Girl, took place on January 13, 1925 at the Shubert Theatre in New Haven, and featured a young Irene Dunne in a minor role. On January 22, the show relocated to Boston, with a three-week run scheduled. Although Kálmán’s music garnered the highest praise, very little else about the production impressed the critics—the show closed two days after its opening and all hopes for a Broadway production were dashed. This Ohio Light Opera production of The Little Dutch Girl appears to be the first U.S. mounting of the work since a 1931 German-language version in Chicago by the German Stock Company. Kálmán scholar Kevin Clarke sums it up best: “The score proves that there is more to Kálmán than the eternal Hungarian-flavored Csárdásfürtsin and Gräfin Mariza, more than czardas and puszta. Indeed, it shows Kálmán at his most inventive and opulent.” Michael D. Miller

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Brigadoon

Friederike

The Yeomen of the Guard

Oh, Kay!

Oh, Kay!

Can-Can

Ruddigore

Can-Can

One Touch of Venus

The Yeomen of the Guard


Brigadoon

Can-Can

One Touch of Venus

Ruddigore

2015 Season Photos by Matt Dilyard

Oh, Kay!

Friederike

Brigadoon

The Yeomen of the Guard


FESTIVAL STAFF STEVEN DAIGLE, artistic director, is professor of opera and head of the Eastman Opera Theatre program at The Eastman School of Music. He has served as part of the artistic staff for more than 300 lyric theater productions, along with calling over 400 professional operatic performances as a production stage manager. Daigle’s experience as a stage director encompasses over 150 titles and a wide range of lyric theatre repertoire: Madama Butterfly, Our Town, Manon, Silk Stockings, Serse, Passion, La Traviata, Zip! Goes A Million, To Hell and Back, Il Trovatore, Don Giovanni, Oh, Lady! Lady!!, Carmen, La Rondine, A Little Night Music, Sweeney Todd, Norma, Dialogues of the Carmelites, Susannah, I Capuleti e i Montecchi, Claudia Legare, La finta giardiniera, Il turco in Italia, Così fan tutte, Transformations, La Bohème, Suor Angelica, The Tender Land, Porgy and Bess, L’elisir d’amore, and Pelléas et Mélisande, among others. Productions include collaborations with legendary Broadway composer Charles Strouse, Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Robert Ward, Carlisle Floyd, and conductors Louis Lane, Robert Spano, and Evan Whallon. Reviews and articles of Daigle’s work have been published in Opera News, Opera London, American Record Guide, Gramophone, Fanfare, Classical Singer, and Opera Now. As a champion of early American operetta and musical theater, he continues to pursue the preservation of the art form, and has received critical acclaim for his commitment to research, reconstruct, and produce neglected musicals of early Broadway. With Ohio Light Opera, he served as stage manager, assistant director, and general manager under the guidance of company founder James Stuart, and in 1999 was appointed artistic director. His first year with the company was in 1990. At OLO he has called over 300 performances as a stage manager, served on the technical or artistic staff for over 150 productions, and directed over 60 titles, including many American premieres in original versions: Lehár’s Der Zarewitsch (The Zarevitch), Künneke’s Der Vetter aus Dingsda (The Cousin from Batavia), and Kálmán’s Der Zigeunerprimás (Sari), Ein Herbstmanöver (Autumn Maneuvers), Das Veilchen vom Montmartre (The Violet of Montmartre), Der gute Kamerad (A Soldier’s Promise), Marinka, Die Faschingsfee (Miss Springtime), and Der kleine König (The Little King). As artistic director, he has created five performance translations for 48 Box Office: 330.263.2345

Kálmán operettas, expanded OLO offerings to include traditional musicals (including those of Kern, Gershwin, Porter, Berlin, Rodgers and Hart, Lerner and Loewe, and Rodgers and Hammerstein), and introduced over 50 new titles to the company’s vast and unique repertoire, including works of Benatzky and Stolz, Bock and Harnick, Friml, Leigh, Loesser, Schubert and Berté, Sousa, Styne and Sondheim, and Willson. Daigle has also supervised OLO’s highly acclaimed series of CD and DVD recordings on the Newport Classic, Operetta Archives, and Albany Records labels, including historical reconstructions and world-premiere recordings of Friml’s The Firefly, Romberg’s Maytime, Herbert’s Naughty Marietta, Sweethearts, and Dream City and the Magic Knight, Kern’s The Cabaret Girl, and six operettas of Emmerich Kálmán. The company’s unique mission and service to the traditional lyric art form (Viennese, French, and German operetta; Edwardian musicals and Gilbert and Sullivan; early American operetta and musical theater) has been recognized internationally through scholarly publications. Steve served on the faculty of Kent State University, and as assistant director and acting director of the Opera Theater program at the Oberlin Conservatory. In the summer of 1998, he served on the faculty of the Oberlin in Italy program in Urbania, Italy. In September 2003, The Ohio Light Opera was given an Award of Achievement by Northern Ohio Live for its role in preserving operetta for the past 25 years. In the spring of 2006 he received the Outstanding Alumnus award from Southeastern Louisiana University. From 2009-13 he served as chair of the voice and opera department at the Eastman School of Music. Future directing engagements include Future directing engagements include Jake Heggie’s Out of Darkeness and Massenet’s Cendrillon. In May of 2015, Steve received the Eisenhart Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Eastman School of Music and the University of Rochester. JULIE WRIGHT COSTA, associate artistic director, is held in high regard as an interpreter and director of operetta, singing numerous leading roles, nationally. This season, Julie is honored to celebrate her 25th anniversary performing with the Ohio Light Opera. She has sung in over 100 different productions, performed some 65 roles, and directed


over 20 of OLO’s season titles. Julie offers sincere thanks and appreciation to all of the distinguished mentors, esteemed colleagues, and generous patrons at OLO, in addition to the College of Wooster and surrounding community. Since last summer, Julie is thrilled to have performed the title role in Hello, Dolly! with the University of Utah Department of Theatre, in collaboration with faculty and student artists, in addition to spotlight recitals with colleagues at The University of Utah School of Music. Next year, Julie will sing in the world premiere of Neely Bruce’s Circular 14, The Apotheosis of Aristedes. During this 38th summer season, Julie will direct La vie parisienne, in addition to performing the roles of Maria Ziegler (shared with Sarah Best) in The Dancing Years, Mrs. Pyne in Have A Heart, and Dolly Tate in Annie Get Your Gun. In charge of the casting process for OLO, she traveled to seven cities, auditioning over 300 singers from across the country throughout November and December. Career highlights include performances with the opera companies of Nevada, Chautauqua, Cleveland, North Carolina, and Utah, as well as performances with the symphonies of Charlotte, Illinois, Utah, and Detroit. Favorite performances include leading roles in productions of La bohème, The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, The Turn of the Screw, Bitter Sweet, La rondine, Countess Maritza, and Giuditta. As a stage director, she has worked in productions for the Moab Music Festival, Nevada Opera, Opera Southwest, The Eastman School of Music, The University of Utah, and The Ohio Light Opera, among others. She can be heard on compact disc recordings for the Newport Classic, Albany Records, and Operetta Archives labels. Julie resides in Salt Lake City with her husband, composer John Costa, and their dachshunds, Otis, Freddie, and Rose. She is a tenured professor of voice and chair of the voice area at the University of Utah’s School of Music. J. LYNN THOMPSON, music director, has a successful career that includes more than 40 years as conductor, artistic leader, recording artist, performer, and educator. This season is Thompson’s 27th with Ohio Light Opera, for which he will have led over 1000 performances of more than 120 different productions, including two world premieres and several American premieres. Additionally, Thompson and OLO have recorded 18 full-length CDs on the Newport Classic and Albany Records labels. In 2007, Thompson was named artistic director emeritus of Atlanta Lyric Theatre, a company he assisted in founding in 1980 and for which he has

served as music director, conductor, and artistic director. Thompson attended the University of Tennessee and Georgia State University, and has studied with Robert Shaw, Robert Ward, Donald Neuen, and Samuel Jones. He has collaborated with conductors Louis Lane and Robert Spano; singers Michael Hume, Peter Harrower, and Victoria Mallory; and pianist Paul Ford, accompanist for Stephen Sondheim for over 20 years. Composers Robert Wright and George Forrest consulted on Thompson’s 1998 production of Kismet in Atlanta, and he worked closely with the Kurt Weill Foundation in the remounting of the rarely performed The Firebrand of Florence with OLO in 1999. Thompson has served as principal guest conductor with Pensacola Opera and as guest conductor with the Akron Symphony, Theatre of the Stars in Atlanta, and the Empire State Orchestra in Schenectady. In 2009, he joined the music faculty of Birmingham-Southern College and, while in the area, conducted productions of West Side Story, The Consul, Gianni Schicchi, and Cabildo. J. Lynn and his wife Adelia, along with their two golden retrievers, Buck and Maggie, currently reside in Newport News, VA, where, at Christopher Newport University, he serves as director for the University Orchestra and music director for Theatre and Opera CNU. This season at OLO, Mr. Thompson conducts Annie Get Your Gun, Have a Heart, The Mikado, and the annual July 4th Pops concert. STEVEN BYESS, associate music director, is celebrating his 18th season with OLO, where he has conducted over 70 productions and 19 recordings. He is also the music director of the Portland Columbia Symphony Orchestra (Oregon), the North Mississippi Symphony Orchestra, the Arkansas Philharmonic Orchestra, and principal guest conductor of the Sinfonia Chamber Orchestra (Krakow, Poland). Mr. Byess was formerly on the faculty of the Cleveland Institute of Music, the University of Denver, California State University–Los Angeles, and the University of Michigan. He studied conducting at the Cleveland Institute of Music with Louis Lane and Carl Topilow, with Maître Charles Brück at the Pierre Monteux Memorial School for Conductors, and he was an assistant conductor to Robert Shaw at the Shaw Institute in Souilliac, France. Mr. Byess has been a frequent conductor at the Pine Mountain Music Festival in Michigan, conducting productions of Le tragédie de Carmen (Bizet/Brook), a highly acclaimed production of Leonard Bernstein’s Candide, and Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte. He recently conducted Weill’s Street ohiolightopera.org 49


Scene at the Eastman School of Music, and Puccini’s La bohème and a critically acclaimed production of Robert Ward’s The Crucible at the International Vocal Arts Institute in Tel Aviv. He has conducted at Carnegie Hall with such artists as violinist Alexander Markov, and he is a conductor for the Carnegie Hall Weill Music Institute Link Up orchestra education concerts, performing with over 50,000 children in multiple U.S. communities since 2013. Guest engagements for 2016-17 include the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, the Maracaibo Symphony Orchestra (Venezuela), the Arkansas All-State Orchestra, a U.S. tour with the Sinfonia Chamber Orchestra, and opera productions of Die Fledermaus and The Pirates of Penzance. He is an ardent food and wine aficionado, a Shakespeare enthusiast, and loves skiing. He and his wife Sara are the extremely proud parents of their new daughter Avani, who premiered in Wooster during the 2015 season. JOHN SCHUESSELIN, trumpet /orchestra personnel manager, is returning for his 31st season with the Ohio Light Opera. Since 1999, John has been on the faculty of the University of Mississippi, where he teaches trumpet, high brass methods, and performs with the University of Mississippi Faculty Brass Quintet. He earned degrees in trumpet performance from the Eastman School of Music, Kent State University, and Louisiana State University. His orchestral experience includes performing with the North Mississippi Symphony, Charleston Symphony, Chicago Sinfonietta, Memphis Symphony, Meridian Symphony, New World Symphony, Rochester Philharmonic, and Tupelo Symphony Orchestras. He has presented at the Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities in Honolulu, the College Music Society’s Southern Regional Conference in Orlando, the College Music Society’s Southern Regional Conference in Memphis, and the College Music Society’s National Conference in Richmond, VA. The Schuesselin family is excited to spend another summer with the friendly faces of OLO. CHARLENE ALEXIS GROSS, production manager/resident costume designer, has been resident costume designer since 2005 and production manager since 2008. Her more than 45 designs with OLO include Call Me Madam, Madame Pompadour, Of Thee I Sing, The Cabaret Girl, The Mikako, and A Friend of Napoleon. This past year she designed costumes and sets for Peter Mowrey’s premiere of 50 Box Office: 330.263.2345

the opera Sangreal (Shirley Huston-Findley) at The College of Wooster and costumes for A Christmas Story (Jason Parrish) at Florida Repertory Theatre. Her work has been seen on and off Broadway at the Flea, Rattelstick Theatre, Perry Street Theatre, Classic Stage Company, NYC Fringe Festival, Joe’s Pub, NY Public Theater, New York Shakespeare Festival, Manhattan Theatre Company, and the Ambassador Theatre. Favorite designs include Endgame (Massoud Saidpour), Cleveland Museum of Art; Inherit the Wind (Seth Gordon); Just Yesterday (Diane McIntyre), GroundWorks; and The Gamesters’ Manhattan Magic at the Sands Casino, Atlantic City. Dance designs have been seen at the Yard (Martha’s Vineyard), West Wave Dance Festival, NBC Nightly News, and Joyce SoHo, Symphony Space, and Kunnigham Studios. Educational design credits include The Juilliard School, Columbia University, New York University, Ashland University, Baldwin Wallace, and The College of Wooster, where she is currently the resident costume designer for the Department of Theatre and Dance. She is a proud member of USA Local 829. Her costume renderings for Romeo & Juliet can be seen July 5 - August 8 at the University of Mount Union Beeghly Hall Galleries. The three-year-old you saw in the lobby may be her son Max, who likes to demonstrate the water fountain. Her husband, Stephen Spoonamore, is currently running for Ohio State Representative, District 1. TED CHRISTOPHER, baritone/ principal guest director, saw his first OLO performance in 1982, and it was love at first sight. Since 1997, he has been lucky enough to work here in all but two festival seasons. Favorite roles over the years include Arthur (Camelot), Billy (Carousel), Danilo (The Merry Widow), The King (The King and I), Ludwig (The Merry War), Florestan (Véronique), Villon (The Vagabond King), and, of course, anything by Gilbert and Sullivan (at OLO, he has performed the complete canon, save one). In 2005 he began directing at OLO, while continuing as a performer. Some notable productions include The Student Prince (2007), The Fortune Teller (2011), Blossom Time (2012), The Desert Song (2008), Die Fledermaus (2005 and 2014), H.M.S. Pinafore (2006), and Oh, Kay! (2015). This season, Ted will perform Fred (Kiss Me, Kate), the Baron (La vie parisienne), and Rudi (The Dancing Years), and he will direct The Mikado. In the off-season, he sings, directs, and teaches. In opera, he has appeared throughout the United States and Canada in repertoire ranging from the Baroque to the 20th century. In concert,


STEPHEN CARR, stage director, first came to OLO 16 summers ago as a company member, performing the roles of Ko-Ko in The Mikado, Silas in Naughty Marietta, and Mordred in Camelot. More recently, he has directed OLO productions of Bluebeard, Oklahoma!, and Fiddler on the Roof. As a member of Actor’s Equity, his performance credits include New York, touring, and regional productions of Ragtime, Cabaret (London), Jesus Christ Superstar (European Tour), and The Scarlet Pimpernel. Stephen is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music, The Royal Academy of Music in London, and the Domingo-Cafritz Program of the Washington National Opera. He is currently an associate professor at the Eastman School of Music, and a visiting professor at the Senzoku Gakuen JACOB ALLEN, stage director, Conservatory in Tokyo. returns for a tenth season with SPENCER REESE, choreograOLO as stage director for this pher/tenor, is thrilled to return to year’s production of Annie Get OLO for a third season. With his Your Gun, after staging Briganotorious “fidgety feet,” he was doon last year. Other OLO directfeatured last summer as Larry Poting credits include My Fair Lady, ter in Oh, Kay!, Harry Beaton in The King and I, Guys and Dolls, Brigadoon, and the Head Waiter/ and 2011’s “Triple Bill.” OLO veterans may reSerpent in Can-Can. As a choreogmember Jacob as Frosch in Die Fledermaus, Hale Underwood in Oh, Lady! Lady!! Mordred in rapher, last season found him immersed in the galliCamelot, The Prince in Jubilee, Horace Gripps vanting ensemble of Ruddigore and the regimented in The Cabaret Girl, Benny in The Desert Song, title characters of The Yeomen of the Guard. Other and Jimmy Jack John Bondy in The Duchess of recent choreography highlights include Le nozze di Chicago. Jacob, a native of Oxford, ME, serves Figaro and Philip Glass’ Hydrogen Jukebox, both as associate professor and director of the musical at the Eastman School of Music. A student of Stetheatre program at the University of Memphis, ven Daigle, Spencer completed his master’s degree and he recently received the Thomas W. Briggs in stage directing at Eastman in the spring of 2015. Foundation Award for Excellence in Teaching. He holds a bachelor’s degree in voice performance, He holds performance degrees in acting and voice and his repertoire spans opera, operetta, and musifrom Lawrence University in Appleton, WI, and cal theatre. Favorite previous roles include The Cat his graduate degree in stage direction from the in the Hat in Seussical, Monostatos in Die ZauberEastman School of Music, where he studied under flöte, Marius in Les Misérables, and Bobby Strong OLO artistic director Steven Daigle. As a direc- in Urinetown. When not on stage or in rehearsal, tor and performer, Jacob has worked extensively he enjoys teaching opera performance and ballthroughout the Midwest and New England; recent room dance. A competitive ballroom dancer, Spenproductions include The Wedding Singer, West cer and his partner have won more than 250 indiSide Story, Oklahoma!, Titanic, Chess, Fiddler vidual awards and placed third at the USA Dance on the Roof, Children of Eden, Phantom of the National Championships. In the fall, Spencer will Opera, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling begin his doctoral music studies at the University Bee, Bat Boy, The Winter’s Tale, and She Loves of Connecticut. Me. As a teacher, he is fascinated by the challengWILSON SOUTHERLAND, es faced by young singers in their development as conductor, is in demand throughtheatrical performers and is dedicated to the inteout the United States, Africa, Eugration of acting and singing. rope, and the Middle East. He made his conducting debut to high acclaim with Philip Glass’ Les enfants terribles at North Carohe has sung at some of the major concert halls of the world, including Carnegie Hall, The Kennedy Center, the Rudolfinum (Prague), and the Schauspielhaus (Berlin). Ted is a featured artist on several recordings of the critically acclaimed Milken Archive of American Jewish Music, as well as on several recordings from OLO. He currently serves on the faculty of Pennsylvania State University, where he is artistic director of Penn State Opera Theatre. Previous faculty appointments include the University of Memphis and the Eastman School of Music. Ted is particularly gratified to appear onstage this season with his children, who, if it is possible, love this place even more than he does. As always, he is grateful to the College of Wooster and the community at large for the generosity and gracious welcome they extend to him and the entire troupe every summer.

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lina Opera in 2012, and was the principal conductor for Eastman Opera Theater’s production of She Loves Me in 2013. After first appearing as rehearsal pianist at OLO from 2006-08, Wilson has since traveled the world: he served as pianist, coach, assistant conductor, and recitalist at Opera Africa in Pretoria; the New Israeli Opera in Tel Aviv; Les Azuriales Opera in France; AIMS Graz in Austria; Si parla, Si canta in Italy; and The Royal Opera House in Muscat, Oman. He was one of 24 singer/pianist duos worldwide chosen to compete in the Wigmore Hall International Art Song Competition in London. Stateside, Wilson was a principal coach for Seattle Opera’s Young Artist Program, as well as an associate conductor/pianist at Gotham Chamber Opera, Opera Omaha, Des Moines Metro Opera, Opera Birmingham, Opera Memphis, Spoleto USA, and the Mark Morris Dance Group. For six years, Wilson was the senior coach and primary pianist under Lorin Maazel at the Castleton Festival, and he went on to accompany the esteemed conductor-violinist in recital at the Kennedy Center. A former faculty member of Vanderbilt University, Wilson was chosen to perform on Juilliard’s Vocal Arts Honors Recital in Alice Tully Hall. He ushered in the 2014-15 season as associate conductor, head coach, and language specialist for La rondine at The New Israeli Opera, featuring Angela Gheorghiu. In the fall of 2015, he joined the faculty of the University of Alabama-Tuscaloosa as the first faculty opera coach in the university’s 184-year history, where among his coaching and performing duties he also conducted Sondheim’s A Little Night Music for the UA Opera Theatre. Wilson holds an MM in piano from The Juilliard School.

in piano performance and has studied abroad in France and Austria. Last season, Eric was the ninth recipient of the Brian Woods Award. ERIN FREEMAN, technical director and assistant production manager, is absolutely delighted to be returning to the Ohio Light Opera for her sixth season. This is her first season taking the reins as TD, after working with OLO as the properties master for five seasons. A New Orleans native, she has worked and wandered across the United States; she is currently the technical director for the Department of Theatre at Michigan State University. KATIE HUMPHREY, production stage manager, is delighted to be back with her OLO family for her fourth season as the PSM and sixth overall with the company. After a couple seasons away, it is a joy to be back in Wooster. Some of her favorite productions here include: H.M.S. Pinafore, Of Thee I Sing, Camelot, Patience, Gypsy, and Guys and Dolls.

TYMBERLEY A. WHITESEL, set designer, is pleased to return to Wooster for her 11th summer. Tymberley has been working in scenery and lighting design for nearly 20 years. Along with working in educational theater, she has a number of professional design credits and has worked for theatre companies such as Airmid Theatre Company, The Florence Little ERIC ANDRIES, rehearsal ac- Theatre, South Carolina Shakespeare Company, companist, is pleased to return to and the Illinois Shakespeare Festival. Tymberley is Ohio Light Opera for a ninth year. an active member of The United States Institute He has a wide range of musical of Theatre Technology and a fiber arts enthusiast. experience in several genres. Over KIMBERLY V. POWERS, set dethe past few years, he has been signer, is very pleased to be returnthe rehearsal pianist for several ing to Ohio Light Opera for her opera companies, including Omaseventh season as a set designer. She ha Opera, Des Moines Opera, Amarillo Opera, is a freelance scenery, event, and exShreveport Opera, Mobile Opera, Syracuse Opera, hibit designer and scenic artist. She Indianapolis Opera, and the Ashlawn Music Festihas designed scenery for venues val. Eric has been the musical director for touring across the country, including Lyric educational opera troupes with Opera Iowa, Port- Theatre (OK), Orlando Repertory Theatre (FL), land Opera, and Nashville Opera. In addition, he is Northern Stage (VT), Children’s Theatre Charan avid jazz pianist and has worked with Princess lotte (NC), and Porthouse Theatre (OH), among Cruise Line as piano player for the showband. He others. She was the resident set designer for Ocean was also the keyboardist/arranger for a local salsa State Theatre Company in Rhode Island (2012music group that was featured at the New Orleans 13), design assistant at the Denver Center Theatre Jazz and Heritage Festival. Eric has been band lead- Company (2006-08), scenic artist at Cleveland Play er and pianist for several musical shows as well. A House (2002-03), and has taught at The University native of Baton Rouge, he holds degrees from LSU of Tulsa, Coastal Carolina University, and Colby 52 Box Office: 330.263.2345


College. She received her MFA degree in scenic de- Touch of Venus. Daniel has his MFA in producsign from Kent State University. tion design from Michigan State University. He STEFANIE GENDA, resident has most recently been working in designer David costume designer, is excited to be Korins’ studio in New York, which has designed returning this season to the Ohio the sets for shows such as Hamilton and the teleLight Opera. In previous seasons, vised Grease Live! on FOX.

KENNETH J. MARTIN, set designer, is a scenic designer, production manager, and professor of theatre at Coastal Carolina University. Ken has worked in the professional theatre for over 30 years. As a member of United Scenic Artists, his design work has been seen at The Sacramento Theatre Company, Cleveland Ensemble Theatre, Contemporary American Theatre Company, Actor’s Summit Theatre, Weathervane Playhouse, Ocean State Theatre Company, Surflight Theatre, Theatre by the Sea, Florida Repertory Theatre, Theatre Rhinoceros, Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, and GEVA Theatre, among others. Ken has also designed shows for many colleges and universities, including Marquette University, University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point, Coastal Carolina University, Cuyahoga Community College, and The Ohio State University. In the academic arena, Ken has served in a variety of capacities for the United States Institute for Theatre Technology and the Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festival. He has been teaching for over 20 years, while MARK R. SNYDER-SCHULTE, keeping active in regional professional theatre. wardrobe master/tenor, is thrilled HALI HUTCHISON, costume shop manager/ to be back in Wooster celebrating costume designer, is excited to be returning to his 13th season with his OLO OLO for her second season as the costume shop family. This summer, he will be manager and costume designer for Have a Heart. performing as Matthew Pyne A native of Davie, FL, Hali graduated this May in Have a Heart and in The with her MFA in costume design and technoloMikado. Favorite OLO roles gy from the University of Southern Mississippi include: Count Hector von Eigensicht in The (USM). Also holding a BM and MM in vocal Grand Duchess of Gerolstein, Duke Ottokar performance, Hali wandered over to the costume in Miss Springtime, Calynx in Utopia Limited, shop one day and never looked back. Her costume Max in The Sound of Music, and Schneck in Der design credits include As You Like It, Moby Dick– Vogelhändler. He has performed with the Beck Rehearsed, and Spring Awakening. Hali has also Center for the Arts, Cleveland Opera, Lakeland designed for Mississippi Opera’s Tosca, Santa Fe Civic Theatre, and Cassidy Theatre. Other roles Opera’s Apprentice Scenes (Apprentice Program include The Genie in Aladdin, Edwin in Trial by 2014), Natchez Festival of Music (2012-15), FesJury, Audience Member in Jerry Springer: The tivalSouth, and USM Opera Theatre. Opera, Monostatos in The Magic Flute, and DANIEL HUSTON, lighting designer, is excited Pirelli in Sweeney Todd. He is employed as a to be returning for his sixth season with the Ohio production assistant/assistant costume designer at Light Opera and is thrilled to have the opportuThe University of Akron, tenor soloist at Church nity to design with the company. This summer he of Our Saviour, and an IATSE stagehand. Mark will be lighting The Mikado, La vie parisienne, will also be very busy when not on stage, as he and The Little Dutch Girl. The technical nomad serves as the Ohio Light Opera’s wardrobe master. of OLO, Daniel has previously worked as a scenic she designed One Touch of Venus, Oh, Kay!, The Yeomen of the Guard, My Fair Lady, Die Fledermaus, and Dream City and the Magic Knight. Regional theater credits include: Twelve Angry Men, The Unexpected Guest, One Slight Hitch, Clybourne Park (Florida Repertory Theater); Crossing Swords, tick, Tick...BOOM!, Marry Harry (American Theater Group); The New Moon, Sweethearts (Light Opera of New York); and Othello (American Shakespeare Center). Film/TV credits: How You Look at It (short film, USA Film Festival award for best experimental film) and The Americans (FX, shopper). Stefanie is also the assistant costume supervisor for Manhattan Theatre Club and has worked at Lincoln Center Theater, The Public, SoHo Rep, and MCC Theater. She holds a BA in theatre from the College of Wooster and an MFA in costume design from Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University. Stefanie is a member of United Scenic Artist Local 829.

DANIEL HOBBS, scenic designer, is happy to be returning for a second season at OLO to design for Have A Heart and La vie parisienne. Last year, he enjoyed the chance to design the set for One

carpenter, a props artisan, and, last summer, as the scenic charge artist. A native Ohioian, Daniel graduated from Mount Union College before receiving his MFA in production design from Mich-

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igan State University, concentrating in lighting design. For the past nine months, he taught lighting and sound design at The University of South Dakota. Some of Daniel’s recent lighting designs include Assassins, Le nozze di Figaro, and Venus in Fur at the University of South Dakota; American Night at Teatro Milagro in Portland, OR; Romeo & Juliet and Carrie the Musical at Michigan State University; and The Lion in Winter at Williamston Theatre in Williamston, MI. In addition to designing, this year he is excited to be on stage in the chorus of Have a Heart. After OLO, Daniel plans to move to New York City and work as a freelance designer.

JUSTIN H. GIBSON, assistant lighting designer, is very excited to be back for his forth season at OLO and first year as ALD. A rising senior at East Carolina University, Justin will be getting a theatre degree in design and production, as well as stage management. In his small windows of free time, Justin enjoys being outside in his hammock, or inside working on his next lighting design opportunity. KIAH KAYSER, assistant set designer/painter, is going into her third year as an MFA candidate in scenic design at the University of Arkansas. Originally hailing from Minnesota, in 2014 she obtained her bachelor’s degree at Iowa State University. There she earned credits designing and painting shows varying from God of Carnage to Romeo and Juliet. In the past she has worked for Story Theatre Company, Repertory Theatre of Iowa, and Prairie Repertory Theatre as both a painter and designer. Recent scenic design credits include: The Chairs, Twelfth Night, and The Diary of Anne Frank. She is proud and excited to start a new adventure at OLO.

BRITTANY SHEMUGA, lighting designer, is excited to be returning to OLO for a second season as the lighting designer of Annie Get Your Gun, Have a Heart, and The Dancing Years. Her recent designs include Middletown at Nextstop Theatre, Harvey at 1st Stage, and Rigoletto at Hubbard Hall Opera Theatre. She has also assisted on numerous productions, including Fish in the Dark on Broadway. Originally from Akron, Brittany received her BFA from Ohio University and her ALEX VAZQUEZ, wig master, hails from OrMFA in lighting from the University of Maryland. lando, FL. She received her BA in costume design She currently resides in Washington, DC. from Rollins College and her MFA in costume KENT SPRAGUE, lighting designer, earned design and technology from West Virginia Univerhis bachelor’s degree in 2014 at The College of sity. She has worked and designed productions at Wooster. Recent show credits include Sangreal both educational institutions as well as in the com(College of Wooster), Hairspray and The Big Meal munity and professionally at Lexington Children’s (Timberlake Playhouse), House Rules and Alamat Theatre, Cincinnati Opera, Hangar Theatre, and (Ma-Yi Theater Company), Dido and Aeneas Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey. During the (Heartbeat Opera), The Velveteen Rabbit (Atlantic year she serves as costume shop manager and resTheatre), A Little Night Music (Berkshire), and ident costume designer for the Florida Repertory Paradise Interrupted (Spoleto). He is very excited Theatre in Fort Myers. Her most recent projects to finally be returning to OLO. include costume designing for Florida RepertoCHRISTOPHER PLUMMER, sound designer, ry Theater’s Mainstage, Artstage, and Education has a wide interest in our relationship with sound. Tour shows. She is thrilled to be returning to OLO He has worked with a Houghton, MI preschool to for her second season and wants to thank her falower student stress and improve learning through millia, loved ones, friends, and colleagues for their acoustic improvements. This summer, when not continuous support. www.alexandriavazquezcosin Wooster, he is recording natural soundscapes tumedesign.com at several national parks for a touring art installation, Listening to The Parks, exploring soundscapes of the parks and their importance. As a sound engineer, he loves working with music and has mixed artists such as Ravi Shankar, Wayne Sorter, and Ani DiFranco. He designed the sound for the New York premiere of Cherylene Lee’s The Legacy Codes, and wrote and directed Stealing Fire, about the relationship of creative life with power and love in the legend of Prometheus. He is particularly happy with the sound of Erin Smith’s album Around This Place, which he recorded, mixed, and mastered.

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CHARLES SOUTHWARD, sound technician, is thrilled to be working with OLO for the first time in his career. He originates from Blissfield MI, and is entering his third year of college, where he studies audio production and technology at Michigan Technological University. When he is not working in a theater, Charles enjoys playing soccer, canoeing, hiking, and camping. While away at school, he embraces the winter wonderland that is the Keweenaw Peninsula by snowboarding and snowshoeing. Charles has been involved with the performing arts since elementary years and is thrilled to carry on his passion with The Ohio Light Opera.


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FESTIVAL CAST JESSAMYN ANDERSON, soprano, is excited to return to OLO for a second season as Baroness Elly in The Little Dutch Girl and Lilli in The Dancing Years. Last summer, she high-kicked her way into Wooster as Claudine in CanCan and learned how to lose a fiancé as Constance in Oh, Kay! She graduated cum laude from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, where she washed a man out of her hair as Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, spun a parasol as Cousin Hebe in H.M.S. Pinafore, and shimmied as Margot in The Merry Widow. Other operetta credits include the title role in Iolanthe with IU Gilbert & Sullivan Society and Isabel in The Pirates of Penzance with Opera in the Ozarks. Favorite roles include Mrs. Dolly Levi in Hello, Dolly!, Aunt Eller in Oklahoma! and Judy in I Married an Angel, a role that earned her Indianapolis Encore Award nominations for best female vocalist and best supporting actress. Jessamyn is a born and bred Indiana girl, but she is thrilled to be off on a new adventure as she moves to New York City this fall to pursue her Broadway dream. Keep up with her at www.jessamynanderson.com.

BRAD BARON, bass-baritone, returns to OLO for a third season as Fred Graham (Kiss Me, Kate), Buffalo Bill (Annie Get Your Gun), and Pooh-Bah (The Mikado). He was last seen here in 2012 and 2015 performing Jeff Douglas (Brigadoon), Whitelaw Savory (One Touch of Venus), Wilfred Shadbolt (The Yeomen of the Guard), Sir Roderick (Ruddigore), Nathan Detroit (Guys and Dolls), and Phantis (Utopia Limited). Brad is a versatile and accomplished performer in many genres and has appeared with the Bergen County Players, CLOC, Des Moines Metro Opera, LSU Opera Theatre, Opera Louisiane, Princeton Triangle Club, The Secret Opera, Theatre Intime, including roles in Sweeney Todd, The Pirates of Penzance, L’Italiana in Algeri, Comedy on the Bridge, Béatrice et Bénédict, Don Giovanni, Man of La Mancha, Samson, and Patience. Brad is also a director and writer—his short plays have been performed in festivals around the United States, most recently with the La Strada Ensemble Theater and Luna Stage, and he is currently working on a comic libretto alongside composer Marc Hoffeditz and collaborators Esha Datta ISAAC ASSOR, baritone, is and Jennifer Peterson. This fall, Brad joins Opera thrilled to join the Ohio Light Memphis. You can follow him on social media Opera in the roles of Pish-Tush @BaronAsInRed and visit his website for more in The Mikado, Hortensio in information. www.brad-baron.com Kiss Me, Kate, The Turk in Have SARAH BEST, mezzo-soprano, a Heart, Urbain in La vie parisispent most of her fifth season enne, and Franzel in The Dancing at OLO onstage as an eccentric Years. He recently completed his goddess (Venus, One Touch master’s degree at the Eastman School of Music, of Venus), a lovelorn loon studying with Katherine Ciesinski. In his time at (Mad Margaret, Ruddigore), Eastman, Isaac sang the title role in Mozart’s Le and avoiding a Parisian prison nozze di Figaro and the bass-baritone in Philip (Pistache, Can-Can). She is Glass and Allen Ginsberg’s Hydrogen Jukebox delighted to be back again this season as Lilli with the Eastman Opera Theatre. Other favorite Vanessi (Kiss Me, Kate), Peggy Schoonmaker roles include Papageno in Mozart’s Die Zauber- (Have a Heart), and young Maria Ziegler (The flöte and the Gamekeeper in Janácˇek’s The Cun- Dancing Years). Last year, Sarah began her MM ning Little Vixen. Equally comfortable in musical degree at the University of Maryland, with the theater, Isaac has played Radames in Aida, Fa- Maryland Opera Studio, where she will be seen ther in Children of Eden, and Huck in Big River, as Lucretia (The Rape of Lucretia), Orfeo (Orfeo among others. Last summer, he sang as a young ed Euridice), and Venus (Orphée aux Enfers) artist in the Central City Opera Studio. In addi- in the upcoming season. Most recently, the tion to performing on stage, he serves as the can- 2016 season included her debut with Ash Lawn torial soloist for Temple Sholom in Monticello, Opera (Annina, La Traviata), performances of NY. Isaac completed his undergraduate degree at the Mass in D (Dvorˇák) and Messiah, as well Columbia University, where he graduated sum- as a recording of Walter Jurmann’s rediscovered ma cum laude with a double major in music and musical Windy City. Sarah has appeared as a psychology. featured performer at Symphony Space, Carnegie 56 Box Office: 330.263.2345


Hall, Radio City Music Hall, and New York City Center. Additionally, she has performed with Operetta Foundation in Los Angeles, Liederkranz Opera Theatre, Light Opera of New York, Luzerne Music Center Festival, New York Gilbert and Sullivan Players, the American Symphony Orchestra, Bard Music Festival, and Opéra Louisiane. MATTHEW BRENNAN, baritone, is very proud to be working with OLO as Nathaniel in Kiss Me, Kate and Prosper in La vie parisienne. Since receiving his BM from Vanderbilt University, he has been singing professionally with numerous companies, including The Lakeside Singers and /kor/ productions in his hometown of Chicago. He spent last summer performing with the College Light Opera Company in Falmouth, MA, and recently recovered his sanity after his first foray into stage direction with Le nozze di Figaro. Some of his favorite past roles include Curly in Oklahoma!, The Baker in Into the Woods, and Pooh-Bah in The Mikado. This coming fall Matt will be pursuing his masters of music at the Cleveland Institute of Music. NATHAN BRIAN, baritone, first appeared on the Ohio Light Opera stage in 2003 as Freddy in My Fair Lady. Since then, Nathan has been seen as Tommy (Brigadoon), Sky Masterson (Guys and Dolls), Curly (Oklahoma!), Jimmy Winters (Oh, Kay!), Steve Canfield (Silk Stockings), Dick Trevor (Lady, Be Good!), President Wintergreen (Of Thee I Sing), Martin Barrett (A Connecticut Yankee), Bill Finch (Oh, Lady! Lady!!), J. Bilkington Holmes (Dream City and The Magic Knight), Red Shadow (The Desert Song), Giuseppe (The Gondoliers), and Robin (Ruddigore). A native of Minnesota, Nathan also performs regularly with Pine Mountain Music Festival in Michigan, Arizona Broadway Theatre, Theater Latte Da in Minneapolis, The Operetta Foundation in Los Angeles, and The Light Opera of New York. Roles include Papageno (The Magic Flute), Sam (Trouble in Tahiti), Maximilian (Candide), Marcello (La bohème), Monty (Kern’s Zip! Goes a Million), Villon (The Vagabond King), Bennie (The Desert Song), Cyrano (Herbert’s Cyrano de Bergerac), and Bob Wallace (White Christmas). Now in his ninth season at OLO, Nathan will be performing the roles of Frank Butler (Annie Get Your Gun), Ko-Ko (The Mikado), Ruddy (Have a Heart), and Rudi Kleber (The Dancing Years). nathanbrian.com

CAMERON BROWNELL, tenor, is thrilled to be debuting at OLO as Bobby Clay in Annie Get Your Gun and Gremio in Kiss Me, Kate. Favorite roles include George M. Cohan in George M! and Robert Martin in The Drowsy Chaperone with the College Light Opera Company (CLOC) and The Baker in Into the Woods. A native of Colchester, VT and a graduate of SUNY Potsdam, The Crane School of Music, Cameron is now pursuing a masters in sacred music at the University of Notre Dame. Cameron is a student of Stephen Lancaster. ALEXANDRA CAMASTRO, mezzo-soprano, is thrilled to be making her OLO debut as a young artist. Originally from Orange County, CA, Alexandra has insisted on being a performer since the age of three, when she precociously declared that she was “born to sing and dance.” Keeping with that theme, however, less precociously, she attended the University of Utah and this year received her BFA in musical theatre. Past roles and shows include: ensemble in She Loves Me, Gymnasia in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Jenny Diver in The Threepenny Opera, and Irene Molloy (u/s Dolly) in Hello, Dolly! at Kingsbury Hall. She is extremely grateful for the opportunity to be here this summer. TOM CARLE, tenor, is thrilled to participate in his first year at OLO. Having graduated from Westminster Choir College this May with an MM in performance and pedagogy, Tom currently lives in New Jersey and seeks employment and casting. On the operatic stage, Tom most recently appeared as Fenton in Verdi’s Falstaff with Westminster Opera Theater and Tom Rakewell in Stravinsky’s The Rake’s Progress with Opera Brooklyn. Other opera credits include Ecclitico in Westminster Opera Theater’s production of Haydn’s Il mondo della luna, and Drunken Man in The Little Prince with Opera Fayetteville. Tom also frequently appears as a concert soloist. In the 2015-16 season, he appeared as tenor soloist in The Unity Choir’s productions of Handel’s Messiah and Gounod’s Requiem. In addition to operatic and concert work, Tom is involved with numerous music projects. He recently recorded an album with the Paragon Ragtime Orchestra and Grammy-winning producer Judith Sherman. ohiolightopera.org 57


The album, released in December 2015, features popular and lost tunes written by ragtime composer Irving Berlin. Tom is thrilled to appear this season as Phillip in Kiss Me Kate, Alphonse and Gardefeu (cover) in La vie parisienne, and Baron Seeborg in The Little Dutch Girl. JACOB CLANTON, tenor, is so excited to be making his OLO debut this season. He is a thirdyear BFA theatre major with an emphasis in musical theatre at the University of Memphis. Favorite roles include: Gabe in Next to Normal, Albert Lennox in The Secret Garden, Marius in Les Misérables, Jack in Into the Woods, and Ben Rodgers/Huck Finn (u/s) in Big River. This fall Jacob will be playing the role of Seymour in Little Shop of Horrors at the U of M. He is a student of Rachel Black.

ALEXA DEVLIN, mezzosoprano, is ecstatic to return to the OLO stage for her fourth season as Annie Oakley in Annie Get Your Gun, Katisha in The Mikado, and Hattie in Kiss Me, Kate. In OLO years past, she had the honor of playing Sally Adams (Call Me Madam), Fanny Welch (Oh, Lady! Lady!!), Amanda Boggs (Dream City and the Magic Knight), Lady Thiang (The King and I), Janice Dayton (Silk Stockings), Buttercup (H.M.S. Pinafore), Adelaide (Guys and Dolls), and Katisha (The Mikado). Other favorite roles include Ruth Sherwood (Wonderful Town), Suzuki (Madama Butterfly), Fay Apple (Anyone Can Whistle), The Baker’s Wife (Into the Woods), Ruth (The Pirates of Penzance), and The First Prioress (Dialogues of the Carmelites). The Pittsburgh native now hails from New York City, where she performs with the New York Gilbert and Sullivan Players, having most recently been seen in its productions of Princess Ida and The Gondoliers. She also was a soloist with the esteemed Lotos Club Foundation in 2015. She is a proud graduate of Carnegie Mellon University. Perhaps her favorite role to date was the beaming freckled bride (October 2015) of her handsome new husband, David. She sends all her love to her Devlin/Adelman family.

KATHERINE CORLE, soprano, is delighted to be returning to OLO for a second season, having appeared last year as Mimi in Can-Can and Ruth in Ruddigore. She has performed frequently in operetta productions with Light Opera of New York and, most recently, VHRP Live! Her favorite opera roles include Mimì in La bohème, the Contessa in Le nozze di Figaro, and Echo in Ariadne auf STEPHEN FAULK, tenor, Naxos. She is very lucky to have performed in returns for his seventh season all sorts of interesting places, including a rooftop at the Ohio Light Opera as Bill in Florence, a former monastery in the Czech Calhoun (Kiss Me, Kate), NankiRepublic, a Bulgarian resort overlooking the Poo (The Mikado), and Ted Black Sea, a nursing home on NYC’s Upper West Sheldon (Have A Heart). Favorite Side, and aboard the Queen Mary 2. Originally roles from previous seasons from Minnesota, Katherine attended NYU’s include: Charlie Dalrymple Tisch School of the Arts and received a BFA with honors in theatre. She is a student of Dorothy (Brigadoon), Boris Adzinidzinadze (Can-Can), Richard Dauntless (Ruddigore), Kenneth Gibson Stone. (Call Me Madam), Freddy Eynsford-Hill (My BAILEY CUMMINGS, baritone, Fair Lady), Marco Palmieri (The Gondoliers), is thrilled to be making his OLO Nanki-Poo (The Mikado), Ralph Rackstraw debut. Originally from Wolcott, (H.M.S. Pinafore), Frederic (The Pirates of CT, Bailey is a junior in the musical Penzance), The Defendant (Trial by Jury), theatre program at the University Count Lothar Mereditt (Miss Springtime), of Utah. He most recently Captain Ladislas (The Fortune Teller), Ottokar performed in its productions of (The Gypsy Baron), and Henri D’Absinthe Hello, Dolly! (Ambrose Kemper) (Dream City and The Magic Knight). Stephen and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the has performed with the Light Opera of New Forum (Protean #2). Bailey has also performed York, New York Street Opera, Troupers Light at The Grand Theatre in Salt Lake City in Young Opera, Little Orchestra Society, Opera Carolina, Frankenstein: The Musical (ensemble /swing), the Savannah Philharmonic, Augusta Opera, and has worked as an assistant director for The VHRP, LIVE!, Georgia Southern Opera, and Importance of Being Earnest at the University the Operetta Foundation in Los Angeles. Other of Utah and for The Full Monty at The Grand career highlights include: Carl Linden (Bitter Theatre. Sweet), Mr. Erlanson (A Little Night Music), 58 Box Office: 330.263.2345


Simon O’Hara (Naughty Marietta), St. Brioche addition to his operatic career, Samus is an avid (The Merry Widow), Lopez (The Serenade), Kid chef and coffee aficionado, and has a persistent Conner (The Red Mill), Barry O’Day (Eileen), interest in kinesthetics and alternative medicine. and Christian de Neuvillete (Herbert’s Cyrano de EMILY HAGENS, soprano, Bergerac). When Stephen is away from Wooster, returns to OLO for a second he often finds himself singing “Oh, why oh, why season as Yum-Yum (The oh, did I ever leave Ohio?” stephenpfaulk.com Mikado), Grete Schone (The HANNAH JOY GAUTHIER, Dancing Years), Minnie (Annie soprano, is a rising senior at Get Your Gun), and Lizzie DePauw University in Greencastle, O’Brien (Have a Heart). She IN. She is a student of Caroline was last seen at OLO in 2015 as B. Smith. Last summer, Hannah pocket-rocket Lady Kay (Oh, Kay!), “Bonnie” Joy was a member of the College Jean MacLaren (Brigadoon), and the squawky Light Opera Company, playing artists’ model (Can-Can). She has performed the roles of Ernestina Money in with The Dallas Opera, Fort Worth Opera, Hello, Dolly!, Madeline Astor in Titanic, and Knoxville Opera, Aspen Opera Theater Center, Fiametta in The Gondoliers, along with many Lyric Stage, and Operetta Foundation in Los ensemble roles. Other roles include Poppea in Angeles, as well as in concerts with Dallas L’incoronazione di Poppea, Lady of the Lake Symphony Orchestra, Fort Worth Symphony in Spamalot, and Mary Phagan in Parade at Orchestra, Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, DePauw University. Hannah Joy has also worked AIMS Festival Orchestra, and Musica Coeli with Adam Guettel, Jason Robert Brown, Mark Graz. Favorite previous roles include Pamina Adamo, and Gabriela Lena Frank during her (Die Zauberflöte), Adele (Die Fledermaus), time at DePauw. Zerlina (Don Giovanni), Hodel (Fiddler on the DAVID GEIST, baritone, is Roof), and Frasquita (Carmen). Emily currently thrilled to be joining OLO for the resides in Dallas, where she spends her nonfirst time, playing Ralf in Kiss Me, singing hours working at a civil law firm. Kate, Maitre d’Hotel in Have A www.emily-hagens.com MATT KELLY, tenor, a native of Virginia, is pleased to join Ohio Light Opera for his second season as a young artist. Mr. Kelly is currently pursuing graduate work at the University of Notre Dame, where he regularly appears in recitals and conducts the Notre Dame Children’s Choir. This spring he sang the role of the tenor soloist in the world premiere of J.J. Wright’s jazz oratorio, O Emanuel, as well as the lead role in the world premiere of Roger SAMUS HADDAD, baritone, Steptoe’s As You Like It. In the fall, Mr. Kelly is elated to return for his third will sing the role of King Solomon in the world season at the Ohio Light Opera, premiere of a cantata setting of Dante’s Paradiso performing the title role in The at the University of Notre Dame. Mikado, and Dr. Udo von Sterzel HILARY KOOLHOVEN, soin The Little Dutch Girl. In 2005, prano, is elated to be in her he joined the company as Frank first season at OLO as Peep-Bo in Die Fledermaus and Judge in The Mikado and Pauline in Goblin in the world premiere of Robert Ward’s La vie parisienne. A native of A Friend of Napoleon, and returned a decade Salt Lake City, she is currently later as Shorty McGee in Oh, Kay! Recent attending the University of Utah credits include Bello in La fanciulla del West for her master’s degree in vocal with Nashville Opera, Count Almaviva in Le performance. While there, she has been studying nozze di Figaro with St. Petersburg Opera, Count with her wonderful teacher and mentor, Julie Ceprano with Opera Tampa, and Sharpless in Wright Costa. Some of Hilary’s favorite roles in Madama Butterfly with Central City Opera. In the past have been Ilia in Idomeneo, Rosita in Heart, Marshal of Eberius in The Little Dutch Girl, and ensemble in Annie Get Your Gun, The Mikado, and La vie parisienne. Born in Burnsville, MN, David attended Luther College and recently completed his MM at the University of Oklahoma. He has played the roles of Dancairo in Carmen, Gianni Schicchi in Gianni Schicchi, Jupiter in Orpheus in the Underworld, and understudied the roles of Trevor Grayden in Thoroughly Modern Millie and Younger Brother in Ragtime. David is a student of Joel Burcham.

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Un mari à la porte, Angelina in La Cenerentola, and Margaret in The Light in the Piazza. In her spare time, she enjoys reading exceptionally large books, LOTR movie marathons (extended editions only), eating popcorn, and saving the world one video game at a time.

and is a 2016 graduate of Bowling Green State University with a BA degree in film production and music. At BGSU she was a member of the Acapella Choir and the Women’s Chorus. In the summer of 2014, she did an internship with OLO and worked as a spot operator. Audrey is BENJAMIN KRUMREIG, tenor, absolutely thrilled to be back for another season is excited to be returning to OLO with the Ohio Light Opera, where she knows she for a fourth season as Nanki- will continue to grow and learn as an artist and Poo in The Mikado, Gardefeu in performer. La vie parisienne, and Ceruti in AMY LIVINGSTON, mezzoThe Dancing Years. A native of soprano, is excited to be joining Cleveland, Benjamin received his the OLO ensemble for her first BM from the Baldwin Wallace season. Originally from Boise, ID, University Conservatory of Music. He then earned Amy is a recent graduate of the his MM from the University of Illinois School of vocal performance program at the Music. Well-versed in opera, operetta, and musical University of Utah, with a minor theatre, Benjamin’s roles include George Gibbs in English literature. Despite in Ned Rorem’s Our Town, Arcadio in Daniel an inexplicable aversion to the stage in her Catán’s Florencia en el Amazonas, Marco in The childhood, Amy has played and enjoyed many Gondoliers, Freddy Eynsford-Hill in My Fair Lady, roles through her high school and undergrad Fenton in Verdi’s Falstaff, and Pluto in Offenbach’s years, including Millie in Thoroughly Modern Orpheus in the Underworld. Last year, Benjamin Millie, Marian in The Music Man, Mrs. Van made his debut with The Philadelphia Orchestra Daan in The Diary of Anne Frank, and Amahl in Bernstein’s Mass. Previous roles at OLO include in Amahl and the Night Visitors. She studied Rodney Hatch in One Touch of Venus, Charlie acting with the Idaho Shakespeare Festival and Dalrymple in Brigadoon, and Ralph Rackstraw in the American Conservatory Theatre in San H.M.S. Pinafore. He currently studies voice with Francisco, and in her free time enjoys reading baritone Mark Schnaible. Shakespeare, trying out Pinterest recipes, and HANNAH KURTH, mezzo- chasing her friends around with a camera. Amy soprano, is delighted to return to is a student of Julie Wright Costa. SPIRO MATSOS, tenor, Wooster’s escoffier, celebrates his 35th season with the Ohio Light Opera. He will be seen on stage this year as von Oppel In The Little Ducth Girl. Spiro has been recorded singing professionally in both his native Greece and in this country. OLO fans have learned to look forward to his carefully crafted comic cameos and to enjoy the food and atmosphere in his restaurant on Liberty Street in downtown Wooster. There the walls are covered with OLO production photographs from seasons past, and the booths AUDREY LEE, mezzo-soprano are often occupied by Company members. This is in her second season on stage season is dedicated to his friends Doc, Brian, and as a young artist and her third Frank … who will remain with us forever. season with Ohio Light Opera. HANNAH MILLER, mezzoLast season she had the pleasure soprano, is thrilled to be making of being part of the talented her debut this season with the ensemble in Brigadoon. This Ohio Light Opera as a resident season she is in the ensembles young artist. Hailing from of Annie Get Your Gun, The Mikado, La vie Wooster, Hannah has grown parisienne, The Little Dutch Girl, and is Wanda up going to OLO productions, in The Dancing Years. Audrey is from Wooster and is looking forward to seeing OLO for her fourth summer. You may remember her from previous seasons as Molly in One Touch of Venus, Kate in The Pirates of Penzance, or Gladys Peck in Dream City and the Magic Knight. A native Iowan, Hannah holds a BM from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and an MM from The Eastman School of Music. She currently resides in upper Manhattan, where she studies with Claudia Catania, sings with the Compostela Choir at St. James Episcopal Church, and enjoys cooking with her boyfriend Paul.

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Freedlander Theatre from a new perspective this year. She recently graduated from Malone University in Canton, OH, where she performed in a number of productions throughout her undergraduate career. Most recently, Hannah has played the roles of Amahl in Amahl and the Night Visitors, Cherubino in Le nozze di Figaro, the Witch in Into the Woods, and Madame Flora in The Medium. Hannah would like to thank Aultman Hospital and her colleagues on 4 South for their flexibility and support through the OLO season. Hannah is a student of Cynthia Wohlschlager.

Eller in Oklahoma!, Ida Straus in Titanic, Luce in The Boys from Syracuse, and Duchess Maria in Me and My Girl, among her fondest roles is the title character in Handel’s Xerxes. She was a featured soprano soloist at Carnegie Hall and Merkin Concert Hall with MSU choirs, received first place at both state and regional NATS, and third place in the 2016 NOA Vocal Competition, as well as receiving the Jessye Norman and Elizabeth Gardner Voice Awards. She is thrilled to begin her studies at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music in August. In her free time she enjoys ultimate frisbee and copious EMILY NEILL, soprano, just amounts of chocolate. completed her second year at the TANYA ROBERTS, soprano, College of Wooster as a cognitive is thrilled to return for her third behavioral neuroscience major. season as Lilli Vanessi (Kiss Emily appeared in Wooster’s Me, Kate), Gabrielle (La vie production of Scapin and is a parisienne), Dolly (Have a Heart), member of its dance company. and Emmy (The Dancing Years). She has danced for 16 years and Previous OLO roles include considers the Snow Queen in The Nutcracker Eliza (My Fair Lady), Rosalinda and the Fairy Godmother in Cinderella as two (Die Fledermaus), Anna (The King and I), and of her favorite classical ballet roles. This summer Gianetta (The Gondoliers). Tanya has performed at OLO, she will be performing in The Dancing over 45 roles throughout North America, Europe, Years and The Little Dutch Girl. She is grateful and the Middle East, including solo engagements to her colleagues on the OLO stage for the with Michigan Opera Theatre, Lyrique-en-Mer opportunities to grow and learn over the years. Festival de Belle-Île, Edmonton Opera, Ash EMILY NELSON, soprano, is Lawn Opera Festival, and the Tel Aviv Vocal delighted to return to OLO for Arts Festival. Tanya also made her solo debut her third season as Yum-Yum with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in the in The Mikado. Previously she Very Special Promenades concert series and as appeared as Elsie Maynard in the soprano I cover in Bach’s Mass in b minor The Yeomen of the Guard, Adele under Riccardo Muti. 2015-16 season highlights in Die Fledermaus, and a braid- include a solo debut at Carnegie Hall in Mozart’s swinging Wagnerian soprano Solemn Vespers, finishing a 184-performance in Victor Herbert’s Dream City and the Magic run as Susanna (Le nozze di Figaro) with Sound Knight. Emily loves to perform in a wide variety of Austria in Vienna, Valencienne (The Merry of musical styles, from the ancient to the avant- Widow) with Edmonton Opera, Aline (The garde. A native of Salt Lake City, she recently Sorcerer) with Troupers Light Opera, Carmina completed her doctorate in vocal performance Burana with the Mineola Choral Society, and with Julie Wright Costa. A freelance singer, she a residency at The Banff Centre. She returns to co-directs Utopia Early Music, a group that Edmonton Opera next season as Fünfte Magd performs Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque (Elektra). Tanya is a native of Toronto and a music for surprisingly appreciative Utahns. She graduate of McGill University. also teaches voice to troubled teenagers and lesstroubled college students, as well as teaching courses in world music and jazz. KATHARINE NUNN, mezzosoprano, graduated from Michigan State University in May. Though most recently seen with the College Light Opera Company as Katisha in The Mikado, The Duchess of PlazaToro in The Gondoliers, Aunt

CHRISTOPHER SAPP, tenor, is fresh from the University of Georgia for the 2016 season at the Ohio Light Opera. This is his first season with OLO and hopefully not his last. Roles played at the University of Georgia include Anthony in Sweeney Todd, Jamie Wellerstein in The Last Five Years, Tarzan in Tarzan: The Musical, and Matt in The Fantasticks. Last summer, Christopher worked for the College Light Opera Company in Cape

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Cod, MA. Some of his most noted roles include eating veggie burgers, gaming, nature walks, and Robert in The New Moon and Thomas Andrews reading trashy books. in Titanic: The Musical. Christopher will attend CLARK STURDEVANT, tenor, New York University this fall, pursuing an is returning for his fourth season MM in voice performance with an emphasis in at Ohio Light Opera in the roles musical theatre. of Harrison Howell (Kiss Me, MEAGAN SILL, soprano, is Kate), Pawnee Bill (Annie Get from Northern Virginia and is a Your Gun), Le Brésilien (La vie 2015 graduate from the Jacobs parisienne), and Prince Paul (The School of Music at Indiana Little Dutch Girl). Clark has University, with her MM in performed roles for Dayton Opera, Kentucky vocal performance. Sill recently Opera, Opera Seabrook, Capital Heights Opera, performed the role of Musetta in Union Avenue Opera, Winter Opera St. Louis, IU Opera Theater’s production Owensboro Symphony Orchestra, Pacific Opera of La bohème and was a member of the chorus Project, and Natchez Festival of Music. His in its South Pacific. Sill was a student of Carol previous work consists of more than 30 roles, Vaness during her time at IU and holds an including Tamino (The Magic Flute), Count Artistic Excellence Award from the Jacobs Almaviva (Il barbiere di Siviglia), Sky Masterson School of Music. She received her BM in vocal (Guys and Dolls), Nanki-Poo (The Mikado), performance with a minor in jazz studies from Frederic (The Pirates of Penzance), and Col. James Madison University in 2013. While at Fairfax (The Yeomen of the Guard). He recently JMU, Sill performed the roles of Adina (L’elisir returned to the role of Frederic in Wichita Grand d’amore), Adele (Die Fledermaus), Frasquita Opera’s production of The Pirates of Penzance. (Carmen), Monica (The Medium), Yum-Yum Clark received his BM at the University of Iowa (The Mikado), and Mabel (The Pirates of and his MM at Washington University, studying Penzance). She has also performed with the Bel under tenor John Stewart. Cantanti Opera as Adina (L’elisir d’amore) and GRETCHEN WINDT, mezzoas Lyudmila in Glinka’s Ruslan i Lyudmila, and soprano, is thrilled to return to has appeared as a soloist in Vivaldi’s Gloria and OLO for a third season. Previous Brahms’ Ein deutsches Requiem. Meagan sang roles include Prince Orlofsky her first season last summer with The Ohio Light in Die Fledermaus and Meg Opera in the title role of Lehár’s Friederike and Brockie in Brigadoon, and she is excited to be returning for her second season. looks forward t h i s s e a s o n to ROYCE STRIDER, baritone, is tickled pink to be returning for his second summer with OLO to play the 2nd Gangster in Kiss Me, Kate and Detective Baker in Have a Heart, among other ensembles and cameos throughout the season. Last summer he entertained Wooster audiences as all manner of waiters, policemen, and even as a painting. Hailing from Norman, OK, Royce is currently pursuing his MM at the University of Houston Moores School of Music, after completing his BM at the University of Missouri – Kansas City. Recent appearances at the Moores Opera Center include Monsieur de Brétigny (Manon), Guglielmo (Così fan tutte), and Prince Yashvin in the first academic production of David Carlson’s Anna Karenina. Other favorite roles include the Baker (Into the Woods), Betto (Gianni Schicchi), Le superintendent des plaisirs (Cendrillon), and Starveling in Britten’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream. When not gracing a stage, Royce enjoys 62 Box Office: 330.263.2345

performances of The Mikado (Pitti-Sing) and La vie parisienne (Métella). Gretchen has performed with Utah Opera and Symphony, Cincinnati Opera, Opera Idaho, Sarasota Opera, Opera Southwest, Chesapeake Chamber Opera, Bowen Park Opera, DuPage Opera Theatre, and Sugar Creek Symphony and Song. Originally from Chicago, she received her BME from North Park University, her MM from the University of Cincinnati–College Conservatory of Music, and most recently, her DMA from the University of Utah. She won’t insist that you call her Dr. Windt, but she doesn’t mind if you do.

KYLE YAMPIRO, baritone, is thrilled to be returning to OLO for his second season. He has previously performed both opera and musical theatre with various regional companies, including the College Light Opera Company (MA), Thin Air Theatre Company (CO), Blue Gate Musicals (IN),


Luray Opera Theatre (VA), and Texas Family Musicals. Favorite roles include Tony Esposito in The Most Happy Fella, Julian Marsh in 42nd Street, the title role in Gianni Schicchi, and KoKo in The Mikado. After a full decade of higher education, he recently completed his DMA in voice performance, pedagogy, and literature, with an optional singing health emphasis at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, VA, where he assisted with opera, taught theory

and music appreciation classes, sang backup for Josh Groban with The Madison Singers, and frequently practiced the art of photocopying. In addition to performing, in the past year he taught private voice in the Harrisonburg area, music history at Eastern Mennonite University, and an audition prep class at Shenandoah Valley Governor’s School, while freelancing as a writer, arranger, clinician, and adjudicator for a cappella groups. www.kyleyampiro.com

Bakery ~ Breakfast ~ Lunch 4776 Kidron Rd ~ Kidron OH 44636 www.quincebakeryandcafe.com 330-816-0233

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ELIZABETH PERKINS is extremely happy to return to OLO, in the role of Nellie in Annie Get Your Gun, after appearing as Louis in The King and I (2013) and Prince Rudolph in Jubilee (2011). Her other credits include The Sound of Music (Brigitta) and Sarah, Plain and Tall (Anna), as well as training at Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp, The Wayne Center for the Arts, and Ballet Wooster. Elizabeth studies voice, piano, acting, and dance.  She wishes to thank her teachers and her very special friends and mentors in the cast of the Ohio Light Opera. Front, from left: Madison Mitchell, Elizabeth Perkins, Anna Christopher and Adam Kirk. Back, from left: Madi Christopher and Bryson Christopher. ADAM KIRK, tenor, is honored to be joining Ohio Light Opera for the first time this season as a member of the ensemble in Annie Get Your Gun and Have a Heart. While this is Adam’s first professional experience, he has been involved in many productions with the Wooster High School Drama Club and Summer Stage Wooster. A few of his favorite roles include Telly in Godspell, Grandpa Joe in Willy Wonka, and Charles Follis in The Black Cyclone. Born and raised here in Wooster, Adam has witnessed OLO from the audience and is overjoyed to finally be a part of it. MADISON MITCHELL is excited for her debut performance with the Ohio Light Opera. Madison lives in Raleigh, NC, where she has performed in multiple musicals, including NRCA Squire Theatre productions of Mary Poppins (Jane) and Fiddler on the Roof (Bielke), and Durant Rd. Musical Theatre productions of Lion King, Jr. (Nala), The Wizard of Oz, Jr. (Dorothy), Fame, Jr. (Mable Washington), and Shrek, Jr. (Pinocchio).  Madison is a recent eighth-grade graduate from St. Timothy’s School, and is so thankful to everyone who has supported her, especially her grandparents, who have taught her to love all things Ohio—especially performing in Wooster.

MADI CHRISTOPHER is thrilled to be sharing the stage with her dad and all the talented artists at OLO for a second time. Previously at OLO, she performed as one of the king’s daughters in The King and I. Recently, she performed in Titanic and 110 in the Shade at Penn State University Centre Stage. This summer, she will be playing Little Jake in Annie Get Your Gun and Carl in The Dancing Years. Aside from performing this summer, she will be on the Wooster swim team, and taking many trips to the library. She hopes you enjoy the shows. ANNA CHRISTOPHER returns to OLO for a second time, having previously been seen as the youngest child of the King of Siam in The King and I. She is currently seven years old and attends Young Scholars Charter School of PA. She studies ballet at the Performing Arts School of Central Pennsylvania, and she enjoys reading, bike riding, and swimming. This summer, she will be playing the role of Mary in Annie Get Your Gun. BRYSON CHRISTOPHER makes his stage debut this season at OLO in the role of Otto in The Dancing Years. He is a rising 5th grader at Young Scholars Charter School of PA. He enjoys playing soccer as a member of Centre Soccer Association, singing in the Nittany Valley Children’s Chorus, studying both the piano and oboe, and helping his sisters (both older and younger) with math. He hopes you enjoy the show.

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2016 FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

Laurentiu Norocel concertmaster

Tatiana Zueva assistant concertmaster

Jeffrey Anderson clarinet

Jacob Boca trumpet

Laura Chalmers clarinet

Arturo Fernandez viola

McKenna Glorioso violin

Peter Gooch trombone

Kolten Heeren double bass

M. BelĂŠn HernĂĄndez violin

Joy Holz viola

Ben Hottensmith horn

Rana Jurjus horn

Laura Kellogg flute

Andrew Liebermann saxophone

Gerson Medina violin

Devin Morton oboe

John Olshinski trumpet

James Petrello III percussion

Hannah Previty bassoon

Thomas Roblee percussion

Emory Rosenow violin

John Schuesselin trumpet

Rebecca Simpson harp

Philip Snyder flute

Jack Steward string bass

Kathryn Vetter clarinet

Robin Vorkink oboe

Mark Wallace saxophone

Claire Watkins violin

Spencer Wilson bassoon

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LAURENTIU NOROCEL, concertmaster, is an active performer and educator in the Baton Rouge area. Originally from Romania, Laurentiu earned his bachelors degree in violin performance from National University of Music in Bucharest. He came to the United States to pursue his masters degree, which he earned in 2010 from The Boston Conservatory. During his college years, Laurentiu was a regular member of the National Opera House of Bucharest and the George Enescu Philharmonic, with which he toured extensively in Europe. Currently, he is a regular member of the Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra and Acadiana Symphony Orchestra. Throughout his career, Laurentiu has been afforded multiple opportunities to study and perform under the guidance of great masters, including Stefan Gheorghiu, Shmuel Ashkenasi, and Joseph Silverstein. Besides his performing career, Laurentiu is also a passionate violin teacher. He served as teaching assistant at the Boston Conservatory, where his responsibilities included teaching applied violin to non-major students. Laurentiu has nearly five years of teaching experience and believes that playing the violin or any instrument is a great gift and under the right guidance, anybody can learn it. TATIANA ZUEVA, assistant concertmaster, is excited to be the part of OLO for the first time. She graduated from St. Petersburg Conservatory in Russia and is now working on her DMA degree at Michigan State University with Dmitri Berlinsky. She also plays in several orchestras in Michigan: Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra, Traverse Symphony, and West Michigan Symphony. JEFFREY ANDERSON, clarinet, is pleased to be returning to the OLO pit orchestra for a third season. Jeffrey recently finished his second year at the University of Cincinnati – CollegeConservatory of Music as a doctoral candidate in clarinet performance, with a cognate in piano performance. Highlights of the year include performing the Nielsen Clarinet Concerto in one of three solo recitals during the 2015-16 school year, and holding a graduate theory assistantship, teaching Honors Musicianship III and IV, while assisting with Honors Theory III. This summer Jeffrey will be working on music arrangements for his DMA project entitled “Clarinet Orchestral Excerpts with Clarinet Choir Accompaniment.” When not inputting thousands of notes in music notation programs, Jeffrey enjoys biking, cooking, and traveling to new places. Principal teachers include Theodore Oien, Caroline Hartig, Kevin Schempf, and Ixi Chen. www.jeffreyandersonmusic.com

JACOB BOCA, trumpet, is thrilled to return to Wooster for a second season with the Ohio Light Opera. Jacob is a 2015 graduate of The College of Wooster, where he earned both a BM in trumpet performance and a BA in music theory. Currently, he is pursuing a master’s degree in trumpet performance at the Carnegie Mellon University School of Music, where he studies with Neal Berntsen of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. In addition to his performance studies, he serves as both a research and teaching assistant in the Department of Music Theory. During the 201516 academic year, Jacob performed frequently with the CMU Philharmonic, Wind Ensemble, and Contemporary Music Ensemble. Outside of the university community, he has performed professionally with the Ashland Symphony, Tuscarawas Philharmonic, and Alliance Symphony. For more information, please visit JacobBoca.com. LAURA CHALMERS, clarinet, is excited to be returning for a second season at OLO. She is a Montreal native. Despite numerous interventions, Laura decided that she wanted nothing more than to be an orchestral clarinetist, a decision that led her to pursue a double DEC in music and science at Vanier CEGEP in Montreal with Zaven Zakarian. She then went on to earn her BM at McGill University with Alain Desgagne, and was then fortunate enough to study with her personal hero, James Campbell, and then with Eli Eban at Indiana University for her masters and doctorate, which she is currently pursuing. Laura was a finalist in IU’s concerto competition this year; she is also the assistant instructor in the clarinet studio at Indiana University, which allows her to yell at the freshman quite a bit, thereby achieving one of her greatest goals in life. ARTURO FERNANDEZ, viola, is a native of Miami, FL. He is a student at the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music, where he is pursuing a doctoral degree in music composition. However, he has not given up his viola. Previous pit production experiences include Little Women and Falstaff in the 2011 season of the Boston Opera Collaborative, and Madama Butterfly, L’elisir d’amore, and The Pirates of Penzance in the 2013 season of Opera in the Ozarks in Eureka Springs, AK. More recently, he plays with CCM’s Chamber Players, where he has performed such works as Arnold Schönberg’s Chamber Symphony and Camille Saint-Saëns’ Carnival of the Animals. He is thrilled to be returning for his second season at the Ohio Light Opera.

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McKENNA GLORIOSO, violin, will be entering the final year of her bachelor’s program at the Schulich School of Music at McGill University in Montreal. She currently studies with Marcelle Mallette and has also recently studied with Aurélien Pederzoli and Ilya Kaler in Chicago. McKenna has held the position of concertmistress of the DePaul Chamber Orchestra and has played for many opera productions, such as Carmen, The Magic Flute, and Iphigénie en Tauride, with multiple companies in the Chicago area. She plays a violin on generous loan by Wilhelm Schlag. When not in Montreal, McKenna enjoys spending time with her family in Cleveland. PETER GOOCH, trombone, is thrilled to be returning to OLO for his second season with the company. A native of Wooster and recent graduate of Wooster High School, Peter just completed his first year at The Ohio State University as a music education major, where he studies with Joseph Duchi and Lucas Kaspar. Some of Peter’s hobbies include music composition, golf, and camping. Peter has performed with the College of Wooster Jazz Ensemble, the Eastman New Jazz Ensemble, and the Eastman Trombone Choir. His future aspirations lie in the field of education, while remaining an active performer. Currently, Peter is a freelance jazz and classical musician in northeast Ohio. Peter’s past instructors include Larry Zalking, Scott Garlock, Ken Holzworth, Dan Adams, Doug Bennett, and Mark Kellogg.

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, pursuing a double major in music composition and double bass performance, studying with Michael Cameron. Kolten is a veteran in the pit, having played in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Cabaret, L’elisir d’amore, Beatrice and Benedict, and The Music Man, among many others. He has served as principal bassist in the Fox Valley Festival Orchestra, assistant principal for the Joliet Symphony Orchestra and the University of Illinois Symphony Orchestra, and plays for the Illinois Modern Ensemble. Outside of music, Kolten enjoys camping and hiking in the mountains. Sadly, there are very few in Illinois, where he is from.

M. BELÉN HERNÁNDEZ, violinist, started her musical journey in her native Argentina. She graduated with a bachelor’s degree in violin performance from the Universidad Nacional de Tucuman in 2007, and a music theory bachelor’s degree from Carson-Newman University in Tennessee in 2014. She has been a full-time member of the Salta Symphony Orchestra in Argentina (2007-10). She has performed with many orchestras in the United States, including Greeley Philharmonic Orchestra, Symphony of the Mountains (Kingsport, TN), and Oak Ridge Symphony. Belén recently finished an MM in violin performance at the University of Northern Colorado, where she will continue with doctoral studies in violin performance starting fall of 2016. She is currently Jubal Fulks’ teaching EMILY GRISSING, cello, was captivated and assistant at the University of Northern Colorado inspired by live classical professional orchestral and orchestral coach at the Denver School of the music at age two, and immediately dove into a life Arts. She is thrilled to play her first season with dedicated to in-depth study and performance of the Ohio Light Opera. music. While other children played in sandboxes, Emily practiced piano, composed music, listened JOY HOLZ, viola, earned a bachelor of arts to opera, classical, jazz, and more, while also degree in music at Kansas State University, where exploring literature, mathematics, physics, she served as principal violist of the University and lingual curiosities. Emily has studied cello, Orchestra. While studying at KSU, Ms. Holz conducting, free improv, flute, voice, viola, performed in multiple chamber music groups and double bass, musical theater, music theory, early participated in the first Kansas Intercollegiate music, and more, while establishing herself as an Orchestra. Ms. Holz completed her masters accomplished, collaborative musician. She has degree in viola performance and pedagogy at held professional cello positions since age 22 and Colorado State University in 2016, where she has participated in prestigious music festivals, and other students, as part of the Graduate String including the Aspen Music Festival, the National Quartet Program, formed the Zinnia String Repertory Orchestra, the Eastern Music Festival, Quartet, which performed concerts at CSU and and the National Orchestral Institute. Close throughout Northern Colorado. to Emily’s heart is sharing music with others BENJAMIN HOTTENSMITH, horn, is through performance, mentoring, and teaching. excited to begin his first season with the Ohio She is delighted to be with the Ohio Light Opera Light Opera. Ben was a winner of the 2016 this summer. University of Akron Concerto Competition and KOLTEN HEEREN, double bass, hails from has participated in master classes with Richard Yorkville, IL, and this will be his second season King, Lisa Bergman, and Catherine Turner. Last with OLO. He currently attends the University of summer, Ben attended the Marrowstone Music 68 Box Office: 330.263.2345


Festival in Bellingham, WA, where he worked with former Chicago Symphony principal hornist, Dale Clevenger, and performed under his direction. Ben also maintains a private teaching studio and has performed with area groups including the Contemporary Youth Orchestra and Lunaris Wind Quintet. A native of Northeast Ohio, Ben recently completed a master’s degree in horn performance at the University of Akron, while working as a graduate assistant to Margaret Tung. Prior to Akron, Ben studied with Kent Larmee while attending Kent State University. RANA JURJUS, horn, is excited to be returning to OLO for her second season. She has just finished the first year of her masters program in French horn performance at Carnegie Mellon University, studying under Bill Caballero. Over the past year, she has had the opportunity to perform with the Canton Symphony, Westmoreland Symphony, and the Brass Roots ensemble in Pittsburgh. She is an alumna of the Contemporary Youth Orchestra under Liza Grossman and the Cleveland Orchestra Youth Orchestra under James Feddeck and Jayce Ogren. She has performed in a multitude of ensembles and summer festivals, including the Sewanee Summer Music Festival in Tennessee, the National Music Festival in Maryland, and the Brevard Summer Music Festival in North Carolina. LAURA KELLOGG, flute, is pleased to be returning to OLO for a third season. Laura recently completed her DMA at the University of Oklahoma. She has a BM in performance from Michigan State University and an MM in performance from Wright State University. While attending WSU and OU, she held a graduate teaching assistantship. Her teachers include Valerie Watts, Christopher Chaffee, and Richard Sherman. Preceding her seasons with OLO, Laura attended the Chautauqua Music Festival in New York for two summers. She has also performed with the Cimarron Opera, the Fort Smith Symphony, and the Lansing Symphony Orchestra. Laura has a private flute studio in Goodrich, MI. She looks forward to the OLO performances this summer and hiking at Spangler Park in Wooster. laurakelloggflutist.com. ANDREW LIEBERMANN, saxophone, is a freelance saxophonist and woodwind doubler based in Northwest Ohio. He performs music that spans a broad stylistic spectrum and has extensive experience as an ensemble musician. In addition to his performing career, he also maintains an active private teaching studio. Andrew holds a bachelor of music education

degree from Bowling Green State University, as well an MM and DMA degrees in saxophone performance from the Eastman School of Music. While studying at Eastman, he was the recipient of the prestigious Performer’s Certificate. GERSON MEDINA, violin, started his musical studies at the age of 10 in “El Sistema” San Juan de Colon – Venezuela. He was in the studio of Simon Gollo since 2008, and has participated and played in recitals and concerts at the Nuevo Mundo Festival & Academy in Venezuela for five years. In June of 2010, he was accepted to be part of the National Youth Orchestra in Venezuela, which was conducted by Sir Simon Rattle and Gustavo Dudamel. In 2012 he won the first prize at the Nuevo Mundo Festival & Academy, Maracaibo – Venezuela. He has played in many orchestra concerts with Wynton Marsalis, Jonathan Snowden, and John O’Conor. Currently, he is getting his bachelor’s degree in music performance at Shenandoah University. DEVIN MORTON, oboe, is a doctoral student at the University of Missouri–Kansas City. He currently performs with the UMKC Symphony Orchestra, Chamber Orchestra, and Wind Symphony. Devin has performed as principal oboist with the Mississippi Symphony, North Mississippi Symphony, and Pine Bluff Symphony, as well as on oboe and English Horn with the Delta Symphony and Starkville Symphony. Devin has performed in master classes under Alex Klein, Sherry Sylar, Rebecca Mindock, and Rebecca Henderson. His teachers include Katie Piecuch, Dan Ross, and Barbara Bishop. Devin holds an MM in oboe performance from Arkansas State University and a BME from Mississippi State University. JOHN OLSHINSKI, trumpet, enjoys a diverse career as a trumpet player and a conductor of both classical and jazz music. He is delighted to be returning to OLO for a second season. John first began studying trumpet with Joe Phelps at Appalachian State University while completing an undergraduate degree in music education. In 2014 he completed a master’s degree in trumpet performance at the University of Utah. In addition to this, John performs with the Utah Philharmonia and the American West Symphony, and frequently plays with orchestras and jazz groups throughout the Salt Lake Valley. In his free time from teaching and performing, he enjoys working for the Salt Lake City Public Library. A native of North Carolina, John originally moved to Utah as a ski instructor, after completing his Peace Corps service in the Philippines.

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JAMES PETRELLO, percussion, is elated to be playing his debut season with OLO! James is a rising senior at the Eastman School of Music pursuing degrees in percussion performance and music education. While James has extensive large and small ensemble experience playing with groups such as the Eastman Wind Ensemble, Eastman Percussion Ensemble, and the Ossia New Music Group, this summer marks a benchmark in his young career as his first experience playing in musical theater. In addition to his performance career, James has devoted much of his time and energy into developing his skills as a music educator. James has a special interest in elementary general and instrumental, as well as in early childhood music education. After he graduates, James wishes to pursue a position teaching music in public schools as well as maintaining an active performance career.

She previously attended Kansas State University, earning a bachelor’s in violin performance studying with Cora Cooper. Emory has spent a lot of time in orchestra pits, playing for productions ranging from The Marriage of Figaro and La bohème to Cabaret and Trouble in Tahiti. In addition to theatre productions, Emory also has extensive experience with orchestral and chamber playing. When she isn’t playing her violin, she enjoys reading and trying to convince her cat, Mr. Butters, to exercise.

THOMAS ROBLEE, percussion, is currently assistant band and orchestra director of Alliance City Schools. After completing degrees from SUNY Fredonia and The University of Akron, he has been teaching and performing in Wooster for nine years. Thomas is timpanist of the Tuscarawas Philharmonic and has performed with the Akron, Ashland, and Wooster Symphony Orchestras. He performed for marimba virtuoso Keiko Abe during June of 2012 in Fredonia, NY and continuously presents clinics and performances of traditional African music on gyil (Ghanaian xylophone) and drums. When not performing, Thomas enjoys downhill skiing, mountain biking, and traveling.

the three awards available to harpists. Rebecca played with the Ohio Light Opera in 2012, and she is thrilled to return for the 2016 season. In the fall, Rebecca will begin an MM degree at Temple University, where she will study with Elizabeth Hainen.

KAYLA SCHOENY, cello, is excited for her first season with Ohio Light Opera. Born in Yorkville, IL, she is currently at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, where she is completing a bachelors in cello performance. At U of I, Kayla participates in the University Symphony Orchestra and Illinois Modern Ensemble, and is a student of Dmitry Kouzov. Previous shows she HANNA PREVITY, bassoon, is greatly has been involved with include Bye Bye Birdie, anticipating her first season with OLO. She Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, attended many ballets as a young girl and was The Music Man, Abe and Ann, The Merry always greatly fascinated with the musicians in Widow, and Benjamin Britten’s A Midsummer the pit orchestra. This inspired her to pursue Night’s Dream. In her free time, Kayla enjoys classical music at a very young age. As a student yoga and binge crocheting. at the Baldwin Wallace Conservatory of Music, REBECCA SIMPSON, harp, graduated magna Hannah is highly involved in the orchestra, cum laude in May 2015 from Vanderbilt symphonic wind ensemble, chamber music, and University with a degree in musical arts and pit ensembles. She has recently participated in human & organizational development. She is a the ensembles for A Chorus Line and La finta member of the Pi Kappa Lambda music honor giardiniera. She recently spent a semester in Seoul society, signifying she was in the top five percent learning about classical music, Korean traditional of her class at Vanderbilt. She released a solo CD music, and how to eat spicy food without crying. in 2010 and has begun recording a second CD Hannah currently studies with Jonathan Sherwin of French and Italian works. She studied the art and in the past has studied with Sunghee Kim, of accompanying opera singers at the Bel Canto Phillip Austin, and Carol Chenoweth. Institute in Florence, Italy, where she won two of

EMORY ROSENOW, violin, is happy to be returning for her third season with OLO. She recently finished her master’s degree in violin performance at Oklahoma State University as part of its Tulsa Symphony fellowship program. 70 Box Office: 330.263.2345

PHILIP SNYDER, flute, is pursuing a DMA in flute performance at the University of South Carolina as a graduate assistant. He is a past winner of the Flute Society of Kentucky Young Artist Competition, National Flute Association Masterclass Competition, and the University of North Carolina Concerto Competition. Philip is an avid performer of contemporary music and is an organizer for two new music ensembles: Collaborations in Contemporary Art (Cica) and ebb:flow music collective. He recently received a grant to produce an experimental field recording album titled around-past-away. Philip is a hobby outdoorsmen and has hiked over 500 miles of the


Appalachian Trail, in addition to trips in New Mexico, Colorado, and Minnesota. He jokingly refers to his “backpacking philosophy” as a source of inspiration for teaching and performing music. JACK STEWARD, string bass, is currently adjunct instructor of string bass and electric bass at the College of Wooster. He has performed professionally for 41 years in all styles of music in several Ohio orchestras, the Ohio Light Opera orchestra, big bands, Broadway productions, chamber music, and small jazz ensembles. He maintains a private studio in his home in Cuyahoga Falls. KATHRYN VETTER, clarinet, is excited to join the OLO orchestra this season. In addition to clarinet, she is eager to put her doubling skills to use in Kiss Me, Kate by playing alto saxophone and bass clarinet. Prior to this summer, Kathryn has performed at Carnegie Hall, The International Midwest Band and Orchestra Clinic, and the North American Saxophone Alliance Biennial Conference. This year, she survived her first tornado season while working on a dual master’s degree in clarinet performance and music theory at the University of Oklahoma. She is currently serving as the clarinet graduate teaching assistant and recently was awarded the Provost’s Certificate of Distinction in Teaching. Kathryn completed her bachelor’s in music education at Michigan State University. As a native of New Jersey, Kathryn eats Taylor ham, wears sneakers, has mastered driving through a jughandle, and celebrates Mischief Night.

she decided to ditch the day job and pursue her music career full-time. Robin is currently majoring in oboe performance at the University of Utah and studies with Bob Stephenson. MARK WALLACE, saxophone, is a music educator in Columbus, OH. He earned an MM in saxophone performance from Youngstown State University, and serves as the saxophone tech for Pickerington High School North. Mr. Wallace’s undergraduate education includes a bachelor of music degree in saxophone performance and a bachelor of music education degree, both magna cum laude, from The Ohio State University. Additionally, he holds an associate of arts degree in music from Sinclair Community College. Mr. Wallace is currently a student at the Jazz Arts Studio in Dayton, OH. When not studying jazz, he enjoys increasing his fluency in sarcasm to the point that it is nearly unrecognizable, as well as dissolving the souls of second graders with his more-than-intense stare.

CLAIRE WATKINS, violin, graduated this year with her masters degree in violin performance at DePaul University, studying with Olga Kaler, following a degree in performing arts management at DePaul. Growing up in the Central Ohio area, she studied with Stephen Sims of Denison University, and became an avid chamber musician under the coaching of Deborah Price of the Chamber Music Connection in Worthington, OH. She has performed as a member of the DePaul Symphony and Chamber Orchestras, as well as the new-music oriented Ensemble 20+, and in opera productions such as Cavalleria NICHOLAS VOORHEES, trombone, recently Rusticana with Opera Project Columbus under graduated from The Cleveland Institute of Alessandro Siciliani. She also enjoys performing in Music. He is a native of Greenville, SC and other genres, particularly with her violin-looping earned his bachelors degree at the University of original music project Scout Ripley. South Carolina. Nick is a student of Massimo La SPENCER WILSON, bassoon, is excited to join Rosa and Brad Edwards. OLO for his first season. While working on his ROBIN VORKINK, oboe and English horn, is studies for his BM and MM at James Madison thrilled to be joining OLO for her first season. University and Indiana University, respectively, Her previous show experience has included he performed as principle bassoonist for La some of the classics, including Carmen, William traviata and L’elisir d’amore. Spencer has made Tell, The Magic Flute, The Marriage of Figaro, it his passion to educate people on the bassoon A Christmas Carol, Beauty and the Beast, The and to make the instrument more recognizable. Wizard of Oz, The Sound of Music , and Fiddler Originally from Chesapeake, VA, Spencer now on the Roof. Robin is originally from California works as a freelance musician in a chamber duo and received her first degree from UCLA. But after and as a reed maker in Denver. He is a student of spending several years in “corporate” America, Sue Barber and William Ludwig.

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FESTIVAL TECHNICAL AND ARTISTIC STAFF SCENE SHOP AND STAGE CREW TYLER BENSEN, carpenter, is thrilled to be joining OLO for his first season. Hailing from Greeley, PA, Tyler has a background in residential carpentry and was first introduced to theatrical carpentry while in high school. Tyler is currently pursuing a BA in theatre arts with a minor in German at The University of Pittsburgh, where he studied under technical director and former OLO technician Jon West. Tyler enjoys all aspects of technical theatre and plans on broadening his skill set. In the future, he would like to expand his aptitude in design, particularly set and lighting design. Tyler’s hobbies include traveling and philosophizing.

BOOM!, lighting design for The Boy Who Stole the Stars, and multiple sound design projects over the last year. Katie will be graduating in May of 2017.

KATIE JOHNSON, carpenter, is thrilled to be attending her first season at OLO. Katie is a senior at Nebraska Wesleyan University in Lincoln. She is currently studying for her BFA in technical design in theater. In the three years that she has been at NWU, Katie has worked on over 40 shows, including scenic design for Tick… Tick…

the outdoor ATD at the Colorado Shakespeare Festival, a slew of scenic carpenter jobs, a yearlong stint studying fine furniture-making in Boston, and teaching woodworking at a children’s camp. She received a BA in English, with a minor in philosophy, from Boston College in 2012.

ALEXIS MULLINS, carpenter, is thrilled for her first season working with OLO. She is a native of the Wooster area and attended Waynedale High School, where she was heavily involved with the music and theater programs. Alexis just finished her first year as a communications major, with a specialization in theatre studies, at Capital University in Bexley, OH and works as a special projects’ manager in the campus’ Cabaret Theater. After graduating, she hopes to travel and HANNAH HERRON, carpenter, is working to- work as a set designer. wards her BFA at the University of Central Mis- LIV WITKOWSKI, assistant technical director, souri. This is her first season at OLO. She has is excited to come to OLO for her first season. worked on various shows: as assistant technical She is going to start her final year at the Univerdirector and deck chief for The Little Foxes and sity of Memphis this fall, where she is getting an carpenter for The Taming of the Shrew. She is a MFA in theatre, with a concentration in technical student of Michael G. Benson. production. Past experiences include: working as

SCENIC ARTISTS KELSEY GARRETT, scenic artist, is ecstatic to be joining OLO for her first season. Originally from Oregon, she is a graduate of Linfield College, where she majored in studio art, as well as studying theatre, music, and French. Kelsey has worked with both the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and Cobalt Studios. She spent the last year as an English teaching assistant in France and is incredibly excited to dive back into the world of theatre. Painting is her primary passion, although she also loves playing percussion and good food. ELISE PIZZONIA, lead painter, graduated from Wagner College in 2015 with a BA in theatre design, technology, and management. She spent her senior year as scenic charge artist at Wagner’s Mainstage Theatre. Originally from Pittsfield, MA, she has moved to Brooklyn, NY post 72 Box Office: 330.263.2345

grad, where she nannys and freelances painting and carpentry work. She spent two summers at the College Light Opera Company in Falmouth, MA; this is her first summer with the Ohio Light Opera. JOSH SAMANIEGO, scenic charge artist, recently graduated from Texas State University with a BFA in design/technology with an emphasis in scenic design. He is currently enrolled at The University of Arkansas, pursuing his MFA in set design. He has designed Top Girls, Doubt, Kill/Shot, and Hay Fever. However, he has done scenic art for all of his shows and many more. He did summer training at Cobalt Studios in White Lake, NY and interned as a scenic artist at Illinois Shakespeare Festival. He has worked as charge artist at Theatre Squared in Fayette-


ville, AR on shows such as Proof, Peter and the Starcatcher, Water by the Spoonful, and Around the World in 80 Days. He currently works as cocharge artist at the University of Arkansas while attending school. He is thrilled to start his first summer with OLO this season and cannot wait to see the amazing work we will make together. ELSPETH WILLIAMS, painter, is pleased to be returning to the world of opera by spending her first summer with OLO. In past summers, Elspeth

has served as a paint charge for the St. Petersburg Opera in Florida on works such as Tosca and Ariadne auf Naxos. Her most recent work includes serving as paint charge and scenic designer for Too Much, Too Much, Too Many as well as costume designer for Grease. Elspeth has just recently completed her MFA in scenic and costume design at Michigan State University and is looking forward to continuing her work as a freelance designer and scenic artist in Michigan.

COSTUMES AND WARDROBE RISA ALECCI, first hand, is thrilled for the opportunity of joining the Ohio Light Opera this summer. During the school year, Risa works at Interlochen Center for the Arts as the costume artist in residence. Her fascination with clothing and fashion started at an early age with a love for playing dress-up. Since that time, she has earned a BA in theatre with a minor in art history from Cornell College IA, and an MFA in costume design and technology from The University of Cincinnati–College Conservatory of Music (CCM). Recent productions include The King and I (Interlochen), A Streetcar Named Desire (Parallel 45 Theatre, Traverse City, MI), and Rent (Interlochen). MEG BURKE, assistant costume designer, recently graduated from The Theatre School at DePaul University with a BFA in costume design. While at DePaul she designed Joe Turner’s Come and Gone, God’s Ear, The Day John Henry Came to School, and The Killing Game. Meg has worked and lived in Illinois, New Jersey, New York, Texas, and Germany. She is excited to return to Wooster for her second season with OLO, before navigating a career in film and theatre. MYRON ELLIOTT, costume designer, is happy to be back with OLO designing Annie Get Your Gun, after designing Bluebeard and The Student Prince in 2007. Now living and working in Chicago, recent credits include the premieres of Pilgrim’s Progress and The Opponent (A Red Orchid Theatre); The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, To Kill a Mockingbird (Steppenwolf for Young Adults); Oblivion, Ski Dubai, Honest, Sex with Strangers (Steppenwolf First Look); Dental Society Midwinter Meeting (16th Street/ Theatre on the Lake); Eclipsed (Northlight Theatre); I Do, I Do, Phantom (Theatre at the Center); Speech & Debate (American Theatre Company). Collaborations include productions with Stages St. Louis, Profiles Theatre, Concert Dance Inc., Cincinnati Playhouse, Indiana Repertory The-

atre, Aurora University, College of Wooster, and Berkshire Theatre Festival. Myron is the costume shop manager for The Theatre School at DePaul University. LINDSAY FANNIN, wardrobe, is a student at The College of Wooster majoring in pre-medicine biochemistry and molecular biology and minoring in theatre and dance. She is the business manager for her college’s branch of Alpha Psi Omega and was last seen on stage as Mrs. Medina in the college’s fall production of Latins in La-La Land. KIM GRIFFIN, assistant costume designer, comes to OLO from Florida Repertory Theatre, where she served as assistant costume shop supervisor. She graduated from Baylor University with a BFA in theatre design and technology, with an emphasis in costume design, and a music minor. She began her career at Baylor Opera Theatre, where she was the resident costume designer, over four years, for such shows as Dialogues of the Carmelites, The Marriage of Figaro, and Albert Herring. She also has worked for Baylor Theatre, Waco Civic Theatre, Performing Arts Supply Company, Theatre Under The Stars, Gilbert and Sullivan Society of Houston, Opera in the Heights, and Houston Family Arts Center. She was on tour, traveling the country by train, as head seamstress with Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey’s Legends production. Kim is excited to be returning to opera and is grateful for the opportunity to grow in this discipline. MARISA LUJAN, stitcher, is a senior at the University of Arizona pursuing a BFA in theatre production, with an emphasis in costume design. She is excited to be joining the costume department at the Ohio Light Opera for her first foray into the world of summer stock theatre. This past season with the Arizona Repertory Theatre, she worked as an assistant costume designer on The Tempest, a draper on The Comedy of Errors, and is starting work as costume designer for her senior capstone and honors thesis, Hands ohiolightopera.org 73


on a Hardbody. Marisa would like to thank her friends, family, and professors for supporting her academic and professional career, and allowing her short breaks in the sunlight while working in the basement costume shop.

and construction. She has worked on several theatrical productions, as well as designed and sewn for children’s shows and dance pieces. Amber intends to graduate from ECU in December of 2016 and continue to work on her career as a ZOE MADDEN, lead stitcher, returns again for costume technician and draper. a grand fourth season with OLO. As a fresh-off- HANNAH SMITH, wardrobe/stitcher, is excited the-press graduate of the College of Wooster, to be spending her first summer with OLO. She Zoe can be found crafting everything from sets is a rising sophomore theatre and dance major at to costumes to props. She recently completed her the College of Wooster, and has been involved in Independent Study, delving into the nature of theatre for the last six years of her life. Hannah craftsmanship within the theatrical world by de- works in the College of Wooster costume shop signing and producing one full Victorian gown, during the school year and has worked in cosone full-facial prosthetic, and one prop armor tumes for productions like Latins in La-La Land, piece. In the fall, Zoe will be joining the Univer- where she learned to make a murder scene, and sity of Nevada at Las Vegas’ graduate costume Sangreal: An Opera, where she styled wigs like design and technology program, where she will there was no tomorrow. She also did the costume continue her passion. design for the College’s Festival of New Works. ELISE PETRUCCI, draper, is excited for her She is looking forward to expanding her costume first season with OLO. Originally from Stam- knowledge in the shop during this OLO season. HEATHER P. STEWARD assistant costume shop manager, is a second-year MFA costume candidate at the University of Southern Mississippi. She is from South Carolina, where she received her BA in theatre from North Greenville University. Since her time at USM, she has been awarded a graduate assistantship and is working in the AMBER PHILLIPS, stitcher, is a current student costume shop. She has also costumed Machinal, at East Carolina University working towards a Nickel and Dimed and The Seagull. Recently, she BFA in theater arts, focusing on costume design has also worked for the Natchez Opera, where she costumed Show Boat and Carmen. ford, CT, she currently lives in Chicago, where she freelances for companies like Steppenwolf Theatre, Threadline Studios, Lookingglass Theatre, Lyric Opera of Chicago, and pretty much anywhere that needs something hemmed. A graduate of The Theatre School at DePaul University, she has worked under Myron Elliott.

STAGE MANAGEMENT JOSH LAU, assistant stage manager, was born and raised in Honolulu, graduated with a BA in theatre arts from Nazareth College in Rochester, NY, and has been the production stage manager for Eastman Opera Theatre at the Eastman School of Music for two years. Josh previously worked at Bristol Valley Theatre in Naples, NY as its ASM, apprentice program director, and stage manager for the past four summers. He also spent a year at Meadow Brook Theatre in Rochester, MI as its ASM for shows such as A Christmas Carol (adaptation: Charles Nolte), Lysistrata Jones, and Cole Porter’s You Never Know. Show credits include Merrily We Roll Along

and Spring Awakening at Nazareth College; Les Misérables and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum at Bristol Valley Theatre; and Albert Herring, Hydrogen Jukebox, and Le nozze di Figaro at Eastman. Josh is excited to spend his first summer in Ohio working for OLO. He enjoys crossword puzzles. KRISTEN WEST, assistant stage manager, is thrilled to be working at the Ohio Light Opera for the first time. Kristen studies technical theatre and social work at the University of Pittsburgh, PA. Past favorite projects include A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Titus Andronicus.

PROPERTIES SHANNAN BURROWS, prop crew, is pleased to be returning for a second season with the Ohio Light Opera. As a College of Wooster student and a worker in the College’s scene shop, she is happy to once again extend her stay this summer 74 Box Office: 330.263.2345

to work among the great minds and talent OLO has to offer. This year, she was property master for the College of Wooster’s world premiere of Latins in La-La Land and assistant set designer for Sangreal. Hailing from Nassau, Bahamas, she


is active in the Wooster community as an assist- is not really sure what she wants to do with her ed-living volunteer and a member of the College’s life at this point in time. Nonetheless, she is very Quidditch team. excited to have this chance to expand her techniEMMA FARRENKOPF, run crew, hails from cal skill and theatrical knowledge this summer.

BRIE HOPE, run crew, recently graduated from Sinclair College in Dayton, OH with an associate of arts degree in theatre technology. She has an emphasis in lighting and has designed two shows at her former college, Telemachus Clay and A Charlie Brown Christmas. During her time at Sinclair, she also garnered a lot of experience with scenic construction, stage management, and lighting crew work. Last January she worked a call with IATSE Local 66 for Once at The Benjamin & Marian Schuster Performing Arts Center. This summer marks her first experience working NATHANIEL FITZSIMONS, properties arti- for a professional company and she is incredibly san, is ecstatic to be joining OLO for his second excited by the opportunity. summer season. He thanks his peers for enduring LAURA PRATT, running crew, is new to OLO his never-ending barrage of puns, his family for and working her first season in a professional driving the infinite expanse to get him here, Erin company. She recently completed her first year at for her support, and you for reading this far into the College of Wooster, yet for some reason chose the program. Nate is currently a theatre major to live on the campus over the summer. During at UNC Charlotte and spends his non-working the year, she acted as an ASM for the world prehours reading magic books, proving that ghosts miere of Migdalia Cruz’s Latins in La La Land, do not exist, and adding more “useless” skillsets as well as also acting as ASM for the Festival of to his lexicon. New Works. She is a native of New Jersey. Columbus. This will be her first year working with OLO. Although she loves to be behind-thescenes, Emma also loves being on the stage, as she is currently a sophomore vocal performance and theater and dance double major at The College of Wooster. Favorite roles on stage include Baker’s Wife (Into the Woods), Laly (Latins in La La Land, world premiere), Morticia Addams (The Addams Family), and Kelly (Beautiful Cul de Sac). It has been a while since her crew experiences in high school, but she can’t wait to hop back into it in a professional environment.

OLIVIA HALL, run crew, is excited to join the crew of the Ohio Light Opera for this summer after completing her first year of undergraduate education at the College of Wooster. During the school year, she works in the college’s costume shop, participates in the marching and symphonic bands, and is an active member of Greenhouse and WOODS. Officially declared as a philosophy major, she also intends to minor in French, and is considering a second major in geology and possibly an additional minor in environmental studies, which is essentially a very long-winded way of saying that she has many diverse interests and

PETER VERHAEGHE, properties master, is returning for his third season with OLO, after spending last summer as properties master at the Black Hills Playhouse in Custer State Park, SD. Peter hails from Swartz Creek, MI and is currently an MFA design candidate at Michigan State University in East Lansing. He received his BA in theatre in December of 2014 at Albion College in Michigan. Peter is extremely pleased to resume residence in the shop where he fell in love with the creation of stage properties during the 35th and 36th seasons of OLO.

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ELECTRICS TREY EIKLEBERRY, electrician/swing carpenter, is heavily eager to be joining OLO for his first season with the other cast/crew. Being a new kid on the block within theater, Trey has a couple of show experiences under his belt, including spotlight operating for Urinetown and acting as deck crew for Noises Off, both at Bowling Green State University, where he currently studies theatre with a minor in film studies. Born and raised in the local town of Shreve, Trey has major aspirations to find his calling, and is very thankful that OLO will be his first major step in doing so. Some hobbies he enjoys are camping and fencing, in which, with his college club, he competes with colleges across the state. Fun fact: It’s also rumored that he can play a mean air guitar, so watch out.

COOPER SIMON, master electrician, is excited and honored to be spending his first summer with OLO. Cooper is going into his senior year at the University of Oklahoma as a theatre major, with an emphasis in lighting design. His most recent lighting designs at OU include Othello, the Moor of Venice and Arcadia, for which he received the Steven A. Draheim Lighting Design Award and an Honorable Mention for Excellence in Design from the Southwest Region of USITT. Cooper has also had the pleasure of being on the projection design teams for the world premieres of Becoming Santa Claus at the Winspear Opera House in Dallas and the off-Broadway show Phalaris Bull: Solving the Riddles of the World in New York. Cooper spent his last summer as an electrician at Music Theatre Wichita and is employed as undergraduate assistant in OU’s electric shop.

SPOT OPERATORS JULIET FREED, spot operator, is a sophomore chemistry major and Chinese language minor at Bowling Green State University. She is very excited to return to OLO this season. WIL GASTIER, spot operator, is a senior at Wooster High School. This is his first season with Ohio Light Opera. He has been involved in seven shows with the Wooster High School Drama Club, and was a state quarter finalist in speech and debate.

Seated, from left: Anneliese Wagoner, Jansen Gullifer, Jack Neill, Meredith Bruch. Standing, from left: Lexi Snoddy, Wil Gastier, Adam Kirk. Not pictured: Brooklyn Crawford, Juliet Freed and Taylor Mills MEREDITH BRUCH, spot operator, is a junior at the College of Wooster studying theatre and dance. She has danced with the Wayne Center for the Arts Ballet for 14 years. This is her third season with Ohio Light Opera.

JANSEN GULLIFER, spot operator, is excited to be part of the Ohio Light Opera for the first time this summer. He is entering his junior year at Wooster High School. He plays soccer at WHS and for the Ohio Strikers United travel team. Jansen has performed as a dancer with Tennessee Dance Theater in its productions of The Nutcracker and Cinderella. ADAM KIRK, spot operator, is a senior at Wooster High School and this is his first year with the Ohio Light Opera. He has been involved in theatre since 8th grade TAYLOR MILLS, spot operator, is a recent graduate of Wooster High School and will be attending The University of Akron in the fall to major in vocal music education. She has previously been a part of four seasons at OLO on stage. This season Taylor is excited to be helping out as a spot operator.

BROOKLYN CRAWFORD, spot operator, is pleased to be back at OLO this summer. She has JACK NEILL, spot operator, is a junior at just finished her freshman year at college in New Wooster High School; this is his tenth season York City, where she attends Marymount Manwith OLO. He plays basketball and soccer for hattan College and is pursuing a BFA in acting. WHS, along with performing in the drama club.  76 Box Office: 330.263.2345


LEXI SNODDY, spot operator, is a junior at Wooster High School. She has been a part of the Wooster Drama Club for three years and the Speech and Debate Team for two years.

ANNELIESE WAGONER, spot operator, is a freshman at the College of Wooster majoring in forensic anthropology. This is her fourth season at OLO and her second as a spot op. She danced at Wayne Center Ballet for seven years and Ballet Wooster for one.

ADMINISTRATIVE/FRONT OF HOUSE STAFF MICHELLE FRAZIER, box office manager/ business development coordinator, is honored to be a part of the OLO administrative staff now for year six. Michelle is a 1994 graduate of Mount Union College, where she studied accounting and business administration, and has spent the majority of her professional career in the consumer packaged goods industry in various capacities. Over the past 15 years, Michelle has worked in sales and marketing with Kraft Foods, Inc. and recently as manager of category development with The J.M. Smucker Company. Working as the box office manager and business development coordinator for the Ohio Light Opera not only allows Michelle to work in a field that she loves (the arts), but it also allows her to utilize her business experience. Michelle lives here in Wooster with her son Mason, her daughter Maddie Rae, and English bulldog, Benson Butch Barkeley. Michelle is very excited to experience this summer season with OLO.

RACHAEL CAMMARN, box office, received her BA in vocal performance from Concordia College in Moorhead, MN in 2015. Rachael was a semi-finalist in the 2013 Minnesota NATS auditions and the second-place winner of the 2012 North Dakota NATS auditions. In the summer of 2015, Rachael was awarded a scholarship to the International Music Festival of the Adriatic in Duino, Italy. She performed in both Italy and Slovenia. In addition to performing her own repertoire, Rachael collaborated with composers Jacinth Greywoode and Jeff Schaller. She premiered two art songs at the Civico Museo Teatrale Fandazione Carlo Schmidl in Trieste, Italy. Rachael studies with Jim Mismas at Baldwin Wallace University and serves as soprano and teaching artist at Great Lakes Light Opera in Cleveland. Rachael made her stage debut in 2016 with Opera Circle Cleveland as the Second Spirit in Mozart’s The Magic Flute. This upcoming fall, she will be attending Bowling Green State University for her LAUREN BRECK, box office assistant, is excit- master’s degree in vocal performance. She will be ed to be a part of OLO for the first time. She is studying with Myra Merritt. a 2016 graduate of The College of Wooster with SARAH DILLER, front of house manager, is a BA in English. Lauren became a part of the thrilled to be working another season with the OLO box office staff in October of 2015. Besides Ohio Light Opera. She has been seen on the working there, she enjoys anything that involves OLO stage as Zorah in Ruddigore, Edith in The literature and writing, playing the violin, visiting Pirates of Penzance, Kate in The Yeomen of the art museums, and traveling. After this summer, Guard, and in various ensemble roles, as well as Lauren plans to find a full-time job before going working with the wonderful front of house staff. to grad school, and hopes to have her own writ- She currently resides in Chicago, where she ening published one day. joys performing and teaching piano and voice. ANN CAMMARN, house manager, is pleased to be returning to OLO as a front of house manager. Last year was her first season, and she is ready to take on this new and exciting year. Anna is currently a junior at Bluffton University, where she studies music and psychology in hopes of becoming a music therapist. Her instrument of concentration includes singing soprano under Crystal Sellers Battle. At Bluffton, Anna is also currently employed as the Artist Series student coordinator, in which she coordinates five programs with Adam Schattschneider for the 201617 season.

HELENA GASTIER, house manager, is excited to be a part of the 2016 OLO festival season. She is a student at The Ohio State University, where she majors in chemistry and is pursuing a minor in French. She hopes to have a career in medicine in the future. In high school she was a thespian, and she is excited to be a part of the dramatic arts again.  ZOE HOSTETLER, box office assistant, is currently a rising senior at The College of Wooster and is majoring in sociology. Before attending Wooster, she did a gap year and studied abroad in Wolfsburg, Germany as a Rotary exchange student. Zoe is heavily involved in the Cathoohiolightopera.org 77


lic Campus Ministries group on campus and is the chair of service as well as head of the Prison Ministry. She enjoys traveling, the color yellow, and comedy. Her dream is to succeed in doing a stand-up comedy performance one day. This is her first year with the Ohio Light Opera and she is honored to be part of such a wonderful organization. SETH JOHNSON, house manager, is a passionate musician who has worked with numerous opera-involved organizations, including Opera Youth Outreach, Opera Illinois, and the Opera Workshop at Bradley University. He has performed such roles as Nemorino in L’elisir d’amore, Tamino in Die Zauberflöte, and Archibald Grosvenor in Patience. Seth is also a member of the teaching administration for the Great Lakes Light Opera. He earned a BM in vocal performance from Bradley University, where he was the winner of the Concerto/Aria Competition in 2015. He also had the opportunity to study in Duino, Italy at the International Music Festival of the Adriatic in the summer of 2015. SANDY MCILVAINE, office assistant, returns to OLO after a three-year hiatus to spend time with her elderly parents. Delighted to be here again, she now lives in Dalton, a short drive from Wooster. Sandy looks forward to the 2016 season and renewing friendships with OLO friends and patrons. She is most grateful to Laura Neill for inviting her back.

ARIELLE NACHTIGAL, summer events coordinator and house manager, recently graduated from the Eastman School of Music with her MM in vocal performance and literature. There, she performed the roles of Emily Webb in Ned Rorem’s Our Town, Carmela in Umberto Giordano’s Mese mariano, and the title role in Puccini’s Suor Angelica. Last summer she spent six weeks in Urbania, Italy through Si parla, si canta, where she studied bel canto, the Italian language, and worked with world-renowned coaches. In her free time, she enjoys working as a camp counselor for various music and performing arts camps, particularly with middle schoolers. A true Montana girl at heart, she always makes time for hiking, camping, or simply floating the river on hot summer days. NORA NGUYEN, office assistant/technical staff, was born in Hanoi, Vietnam. She is majoring in business economics and psychology and will be graduating college in 2018. She has been active in theater and dance and in international student associations. REBECCA SNEDEKER-MEIER, box office and front of house assistant, is a junior at The College of Wooster studying theatre and mathematics. This is Rebecca’s second season with OLO, but she has been involved in theatre productions from a young age. She has worked with several theatre companies in Chicago, as well as back home in Findlay, OH. She hopes to pursue a career in arts administration.

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2016 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Over the last 37 years, the staff at the College of Wooster has been instrumental in Ohio Light Opera’s success. Without their enthusiasm and support of our endeavors, the Company would not function as seamlessly as it does. The “in kind” services and “hidden assets” over the years have made it possible for OLO to exist as a unique part of the educational mission at Wooster. We acknowledge them with grateful hearts for their support and assistance.

HEARTFELT THANKS go out to: Spiro Matsos for being our #1 patron and supporter.

S J. Lynn Thompson in commemoration of your 1000th performance as a conductor at OLO.

S Julie Wright Costa for your 25 years as performer, director, and member of the artistic team.

S Kathy Kruse of The Wooster Inn for your hard work on behalf of the company and your tireless efforts to make people feel at home and appreciated.

S John Finn, recently retired Director of Public Information at the College of Wooster, for his years of service to OLO. For 16 years, John was instrumental in promoting the mission of our company. This responsibility included writing countless news releases about upcoming seasons, as well as special feature articles on company members. It is estimated that John publicized and promoted more than 100 OLO productions. Without his expertise, we would not be as prominent within this community and nationally. Thank you, John. We will miss you.

S Carol Kobylanski, recently retired from College of Wooster custodial services, for caring for the company each summer.

S Andrea Traubner for donating the use of Richard’s translation of La vie parisienne.

S Michael and Nan Miller for your never-ending commitment to the company.

S Joyce Heitger for working with so many of our staff on multiple projects and for your enthusiasm for the work you do.

S ABS Materials for loaning OLO your truck when needed.

S Dan Adams, and the Wooster High School Band, for loaning us musical instruments and for supporting OLO.

S Alexander Butziger for the literal English translation of The Little Dutch Girl.

S David Packard, Khori Dastoor, Paul Corneilson, and the Packard Humanities Institute for the use of the orchestra parts and supporting material for Have a Heart. Your generosity helped to serve our company’s mission this year. Without your contribution, this production would not have been possible.

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A Festival Symposium on the Lyric Theater Tradition

Taking Light Opera Seriously TUESDAY, AUGUST 2 - FRIDAY, AUGUST 5 TICKETS – $45/DAY – $150/WEEK INDIVIDUAL CONCERT TICKETS AVAILABLE, $25/TICKET

CALL 330.263.2345 FOR TICKETS TALKS BY REXTON BUNNETT Ivor Novello’s The Dancing Years Ivor Novello was a man of many theatrical skills. Remembered now as the composer of a string of hit operettas in London during the thirties and forties, he was also a matinee idol both on screen and stage, often in plays he wrote. This talk will be about the man and his work, concentrating on his most loved show The Dancing Years. P. G. Wodehouse: The Englishman Who Helped Create the Broadway Musical Most people hear the name Wodehouse and think straight away of Jeeves and Wooster and his many other brilliant comedy character creations. But Sir P. G. Wodehouse was initially a man of the theatre, supplying lyrics and librettos to a string of shows on both sides of the Atlantic. This talk will concentrate on his theatrical life and his involvement in this season’s Have a Heart. TALKS BY DANIEL HIRSCHEL The Cafés-Concerts of Paris and the Three Fathers of Operetta During the Second Empire in mid-19th-century France, the café-concert provided nightly entertainment for the middle class. Among the diversions presented at the Eldorado, Alhambra, or any number of theatres that dotted Paris, were intimate one-act operettas for one to four singers, many of whom were engaged by Jacques Offenbach for his more substantial works, including La vie parisienne. Along with Offenbach and Hervé, a now-forgotten “third father of operetta” was Frédéric Barbier, chief conductor of the Eldorado and composer of more than 75 operettas, most written in the café-concert style.

York, Berlin, and Budapest. Yet Canada, Brazil, Peru, Luxemburg, Azerbaijan—the list goes on— have long, but widely unknown, traditions in operetta. This talk will survey these more exotic regional operetta cultures and, by examining both their performances of vintage operettas and those written in the last few decades, dispel any notion that operetta is not a thriving art form. TALKS BY MARJAN KIEPURA AND JANE KNOX Emmerich Kálmán and the Operetta Legacy of Jan Kiepura and Marta Eggerth By the time that Hungarian soprano Marta Eggerth assumed the lead roles in Emmerich Kálmán’s 1930 The Violet of Montmartre and the acclaimed 1934 film version of his Die Csárdásfürstin, a new chapter in operetta history had begun. In 1943, her husband, tenor Jan Kiepura, resigned from the Metropolitan Opera and joined his wife at the Majestic Theater in New York City for what would lead to more than 2000 performances of Lehár’s The Merry Widow, in five languages worldwide. This talk will trace the evolution and impact of their impressive operetta legacy.

Eggerth and Kiepura … The Original Crossover Artists The evolving film industry of the 1930s was in some ways a bigger revolution for the arts than the Internet is today. Polish opera tenor Jan Kiepura and Hungarian operetta soprano Marta Eggerth, who married in 1936, were among the original “crossover” artists, moving from opera and operetta to film and becoming among the most popular and successful European screen stars. Through rare audio and video clips, Operetta Rediscovered—Operetta Up-to-Date including songs written for Jan and Marta by For most of us, the operetta horizon does not Franz Lehár and Robert Stolz, this talk will extend much beyond Paris, Vienna, London, New examine their film careers and the resistance to it by some opera purists. 82 Box Office: 330.263.2345


TALK BY MICHAEL MILLER I’ve Heard that Tune Before … Has the Composer? – The Sequel “Imitation is the sincerest form of plagiarism,” said the acerbic wit Oscar Levant. And nowhere is it more “sincere” than in musical comedy and operetta. Musical borrowings might be coincidental, inadvertent, or intentional, and have led to numerous well-publicized court cases involving some of the biggest names in the music world. This talk will continue (from the 2014 symposium) the survey of the most blatant and surprising examples of tune pilfering. Side-byside audio examples will be offered for each tune discussed—you be the judge! TALKS BY RICHARD NORTON Kiss Me, Kate and the Musicalization of Shakespeare In 1948 Cole Porter hadn’t had a hit in five years. If Rodgers and Hammerstein had created the “musical play” as the new template, how could Porter fit in, or rise to the challenge? Shakespeare was thought to be notoriously tricky to musicalize; everyone said “don’t tamper with the Bard.” Rodgers and Hart and George Abbott did it successfully with The Boys from Syracuse. But The Taming of the Shrew is a tougher, smarter play—not a musical farce. Yet Kiss Me, Kate would prove Porter’s greatest triumph and most enduring hit, sharing top honors with Anything Goes. Just how did this happen? The Bumpy Road to Annie Get Your Gun Annie Get Your Gun was a shotgun marriage for everyone involved! Originally Jerome Kern and Dorothy Fields were to write the score, but Kern died suddenly in November 1945. Irving Berlin stepped up to the job, but didn’t think he could do it. Rodgers and Hammerstein were just starting as show producers. Ethel Merman was accustomed to old-fashioned musical farces as star vehicles. But could she handle a real book musical? This sure-shootin’ smash success wobbled a bit in its creation, and its film version was equally troubled. Let’s find out all these back stories.

TALK BY ANDRÁS SZENTPÉTERI Operetta – Hungaricum Hungarian operetta and the way it is performed has achieved the status of Hungaricum— something unique to Hungary and representing great value to both Hungarians and foreigners. Operetta is the only theatrical genre among the Hungaricums, which include paprika, Tokay, and Herend porcelain. Hungary is proud of its operetta composers—Emmerich Kálmán, Franz Lehár, Paul Abraham, and Jeno˝ Huszka, to name a few—and to tell the truth, Kálmán is the second most famous Hungarian, right after soccer player Ferenc Puskás. So what makes Hungarian operetta different? Why is it so successful all over the world, from Germany to Oman, from Japan to Ukraine—even if performed in Hungarian? Let’s learn all the secrets of it, and about its home, the Budapest Operetta and Musical Theatre.

Wake Up to the Charm! 330-264-6006

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CONCERTS AUGUST 2 PLAY GYPSIES! DANCE GYPSIES! A MUSICAL TRIBUTE TO EMMERICH KÁLMÁN An intimate OLO ensemble takes us on a musical journey into the life of one of operetta’s most performed and revered composers. In this autobiographical entertainment, Kálmán discusses how family tragedies and political persecution led to his creation of some of the most haunting and uplifting melodies in the operetta repertoire. This gala evening, a revival of a program first produced at OLO in 2004, features songs from all 18 of Kálmán’s stage shows.

This concert, presented by members of the OLO cast, will feature discussion and performance of songs that were originally cut from or added to the shows of this season’s repertoire.

AUGUST 5 THE LATEST IN OPERETTA AND MUSICAL COMEDY … A CENTURY AGO In its mission to promote the finest of lyric theater, OLO presents extended highlights from two shows that opened during the World War I years. Viktor Jacobi’s Sybil, which premiered in Budapest in 1914, is a romantic operetta about an opera diva who is mistaken for the grand duchess. In 1916, Broadway welcomed a musical comedy entitled AUGUST 3 Follow Me, whose plot centers on the romance SONGS FROM THE of Parisian variety star Claire La Tour. Music CUTTING-ROOM FLOOR. was primarily by the already-established Sigmund The path from conception to opening night of an Romberg and Harry Tierney, who achieved fame operetta or musical was typically a long one, with three years later with Irene. The hit tune, “Oh, songs reworked, reassigned, deleted, or added to Johnny, Oh, Johnny, Oh!” was interpolated into fit the evolving demands of the show and its stars. the show during its Broadway run.

PRESENTERS REXTON BUNNETT, from London, has written extensively on musical theater and revue, and is a co-author of London Musical Shows on Record and Collins Guide to Musicals. He has served as consultant at London’s Theatre Museum, is the chairman of the Bunnett-Muir Musical Theatre Archive Trust (known as Overtures), which will be housed at the Victoria and Albert Museum, has produced BBC radio series, including a six-part Harold Arlen appreciation, publishes regular historical profiles of British and American musicals, and is the author of numerous liner notes for CD releases of British musicals. STEVEN DAIGLE is Artistic Director of Ohio Light Opera and Dramatic Director of Eastman Opera Theatre. In his tenure at OLO, he has expanded the company’s scope to include early and mid-century American musicals, introduced more than 65 new titles to OLO’s repertoire, stage-directed scores of productions, and created new performance editions for five Kálmán operettas and 2014’s revelatory Dream City and The Magic Knight by Victor Herbert. DANIEL HIRSCHEL, from Weida, Germany, is the true epitome of an operetta factotum. Since finishing theatre history studies at the University of Leipzig, he has served as dramaturg, translator, producer, director, and performer for operettas and operas—both popular and those unjustly neglected. He has lectured and written extensively on Hungarian composer Paul Abraham and collaborated with ARTE TV on the documentary “Paris, 84 Box Office: 330.263.2345

SYMPOSIUM SCHEDULE Morning Coffee: 9:00 a.m. Morning Session I: 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Break Morning Session II: 10:45 – 11:45 a.m.

Lunch

Afternoon Session: 1:00 – 1:45 p.m.

Evening Session:


RICHARD NORTON is the co-author of American Musical Theatre: A Chronicle and the author of the three-volume A Chronology of American Musical Theatre, which reproduces complete playbill information for every musical MARJAN KIEPURA AND JANE KNOX have that has played Broadway since 1866. He devoted a significant part of their married life to has contributed to numerous musical theater preserving the legacy of Marjan’s parents, Marta publications, including a German monograph Eggerth and Jan Kiepura, two of operetta’s most devoted to White Horse Inn, and is currently luminous superstars—on stage, on film, and on authoring a book on Frederick Loewe. record. Marjan is an internationally acclaimed ANDRÁS SZENTPÉTERI, from Budapest, pianist, among whose concert appearances are began his career as a cultural journalist and many in which he accompanied his mother, whose has worked for the Budapest Spring Festival, last public performance was in 2011 at age 99. Hungarian National Radio, and in promoting Australian-born Jane has spearheaded research culture throughout Hungary. He currently and curating on the life and times of Marjan’s serves as managing director of Pentaton Concert parents, and served as executive producer of the and Artist Management, Central Europe’s oldest 2004 two-CD tribute to Marta. private artist management company, responsible MICHAEL MILLER is the chair of the Ohio for all foreign tours and co-productions of the Light Opera Board of Directors and the president Budapest Operetta and Musical Theatre. He has of Operetta Foundation, which has produced been a driving force—in recent BOT engagements staged versions of long-forgotten shows and in Russia, India, Israel, Oman, Qatar, United released more than 30 CDs and DVDs of rare Arab Emirates, and throughout Europe—in bringing the company’s inimitable and irresistible operetta and early musical comedy. style of operetta to all corners of the globe. Vienna, Berlin: A Short History of Operetta.” He maintains one of the world’s largest archives of operetta recordings, and is currently working on a comprehensive encyclopedia of international operetta.

TUESDAY AUGUST 2

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 3

THURSDAY AUGUST 4

FRIDAY AUGUST 5

Lyric Theatre Roundtable 1 (Host: Steven Daigle)

Daniel Hirschel Operetta Rediscovered— Operetta Up-to-Date

Marjan Kiepura and Jane Knox Eggerth and Kiepura in Film

Concert: The Latest in Operetta and Musical Comedy—A Century Ago (Part 1) (OLO Performers)

 Richard Norton The Bumpy Road to Annie Get Your Gun

Concert: Songs from the Cutting-Room Floor (OLO Performers, Host: Steven Daigle)

Michael Miller I’ve Heard that Tune Before: The Sequel

Concert: The Latest in Operetta and Musical Comedy—A Century Ago (Part 2) (OLO Performers)

Marjan Kiepura and Jane Knox Kálmán and the Kiepura/ Eggerth Legacy

András Szentpéteri Operetta—Hungaricum

Daniel Hirschel The Cafés-Concerts of Paris and the Three Fathers of Operetta

Rex Bunnett P. G. Wodehouse: The Englishman Who Helped Create the Broadway Musical

Concert: Play Gypsies! Dance Gypsies! 7:30 p.m.

Richard Norton Kiss Me, Kate and the Musicalization of Shakespeare 6:30 - 7:15 p.m.

Rex Bunnett Ivor Novello’s The Dancing Years 6:30 - 7:15 p.m.

Lyric Theatre Roundtable 2 (Host: Steven Daigle) 6:30 - 7:15 p.m.

ohiolightopera.org 85


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THE COLLEGE OF WOOSTER The College of Wooster is America’s premier college for mentored undergraduate research. Since 2002, U.S. News & World Report has asked college presidents and deans which colleges provide the best undergraduate research opportunities and senior capstone experiences. Only two have made both lists every year: Wooster and Princeton. The presidents and deans also ranked Wooster seventh among all liberal arts colleges where “the faculty has an unusually strong commitment to undergraduate teaching.” Founded in 1866, Wooster enrolls approximately 2,000 students, who choose from more than 50 academic programs in the sciences, humanities, business and the arts. Wooster offers an excellent, comprehensive liberal arts education, culminating in a rigorous senior project, in which each student works one-on-one with a faculty mentor to conceive, organize and complete a significant research project on a topic of the student’s own choosing. Through this distinctive program, every Wooster student develops abilities valued by employers and graduate schools alike: initiative, self-confidence, independent judgment, creative problem solving, and strong written and oral communication skills. Almost a third of Wooster’s students play intercollegiate athletics, a third perform in at least one musical group, and a quarter are involved in theatre and the arts. Notable Wooster alumni include award-win-

88 Box Office: 330.263.2345

ning filmmakers Duncan Jones ’95, director of Source Code and Moon, and J.C. Chandor ’96, writer and director of Margin Call and All Is Lost; Jennifer Haverkamp ’79, director of the Environmental Defense Fund’s international climate program; Donald Kohn ’64, former vice chairman of the Federal Reserve; Laurie Kosanovich ’94, general counsel for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; and Sangram Sisodia ’77, director of the Center for Molecular Neurobiology at the University of Chicago.


Experience international Lyric Theater classics in the charming atmosphere of Wooster, Ohio “Renowned summer festivals within driving distance once didn’t seem so far away. Shaw and Stratford in Canada, and even Ravinia in Chicago, remain magnets for those who are high on theater and music .... It’s a relief to know that a day trip to seek artistic replenishment need not crush the budget. One of the most reasonable and delightful destinations is Wooster, where The Ohio Light Opera is in its 30th season of operetta merriment.” Donald Rosenberg, The Plain Dealer

“It’s nothing less than remarkable that ... [The Ohio Light Opera] singers and instrumentalists gather from around the country to arrange a seasonal platter of rotating repertory – Viennese operetta, Gilbert & Sullivan shows, classic American musicals – that these indefatigable performers serve with style through the months of June, July and August.” Elaine Guregian, The Beacon Journal

ohiolightopera.org 89


DINING, ACCOMMODATIONS & SHOPPING Dining Broken Rocks Cafe & Bakery............. (330) 263-2949 City Square Steakhouse....................... (330) 262-2489 Ginger China Bistro............................ (330) 345-6388 Hartzler Family Dairy......................... (330) 345-8190 The Henry Station............................... (330) 264-2226 Matsos Family Restaurant................... (330) 264-8800 Pine Tree Barn..................................... (330) 264-1014 Quince Bakery & Cafe........................ (330) 816-0233 Spoon Market & Deli......................... (330) 262-0880 TJ’s Restaurants.................................. (330) 264-6263 Tulipan Hungarian Pastry and Coffee Shop..................................... (330) 264-8092 Accommodations Bed & Breakfast Black Squirrel...................................... (330) 317-6627 Market Street Inn................................ (330) 262-4085 Mirabelle Bed & Breakfast.................. (330) 264-6006 Cabins/Campgrounds Meadow Lake Park............................. (330) 435-6652 Hotel/Motel Best Western Wooster Hotel................ (330) 264-7750 Hampton Inn Wooster........................ (330) 345-4424 Hilton Garden Inn Wooster................. (330) 202-7701 Rodeway Inn....................................... (330) 262-5008 St. Paul Hotel...................................... (330) 601-1900 The Wooster Inn/ The Wooster Inn Pub...................... (330) 263-2660 Entertainment/Attractions Akron Symphony Orchestra................ (330) 535-8131 Ashland Symphony Orchestra............. (419) 289-5115 The Cleveland Orchestra..................... (216) 231-1111 The College of Wooster, Theatre & Dance Department......... (330) 263-2541 Huron Playhouse................................. (419) 433-4744 Porthouse Theatre............................... (330) 672-3884 Secrest Arboretum............................... (330) 464-2148 Wayne Center for the Arts................... (330) 264-2787 Wayne County Convention and Visitors Bureau......................... (330) 264-1800 Wooster Chamber Music Series........... (330) 263-2115 Wooster Country Club........................ (330) 263-1890 Wooster Jazz Fest................................ (330) 262-6222 Wooster Symphony Orchestra............. (330) 263-2419

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Shopping Books in Stock.................................... (330) 262-2665 The Cheese Shoppe............................. (330) 264-6214 Coblentz Chocolate Company............. (800) 338-9341 Deborah’s Garden Market................... (330) 601-1027 Everything Rubbermaid...................... (330) 264-7119 Friendtique.......................................... (330) 262-2012 Gallery in the Vault............................. (330) 262-3599 Jodi’s Closet........................................ (330) 601-1250 Lehman’s............................................. (888) 438-5346 Local Roots......................................... (330) 263-5336 Motts Oils & More............................. (330) 601-1645 P. Graham Dunn................................. (330) 828-2103 Roomscapes........................................ (330) 682-4926 Shisler’s Cheese House........................ (330) 682-2105 Simply Smucker’s Store and Cafe........ (330) 684-1500 Today’s Kitchen Store.......................... (330) 601-1331 Urban Cottage..................................... (330) 262-0603 Wilson Bookstore................................ (330) 263-2421 Wooster Book Company..................... (330) 262-1688 Wooster Gift Corner........................... (330) 264-6117 Services/Manufacturing Akron Beacon Journal/ohio.com......... (330) 996-3000 Buehler’s Fresh Foods Wooster Towne Market................... (330) 264-9900 Buehler’s Fresh Foods Milltown.......... (330) 345-5908 Kendal at Home.................................. (440) 835-8681 Kendal at Oberlin................................ (440) 775-0094 Main Street Wooster........................... (330) 262-6222 Northeast Ohio Media Group/ cleveland.com.................................. (216) 999-3900 Ray Crow Cleaners............................. (330) 262-5010 Seaman Corporation........................... (330) 262-1111 United Titanium.................................. (330) 264-2111 Wayne County Community Foundation...................................... (330) 262-3877 WKSU................................................. (330) 672-3114 Wooster Brush Company.................... (330) 264-4440 The Wooster Historical Society........... (330) 264-8856 Banking/Financial Commercial & Savings Bank............... (330) 674-2397 Critchfield, Critchfield & Johnston, Ltd.................................. (330) 264-4444 Edward Jones...................................... (330) 262-3572


GILBERT & SULLIVAN

H.M.S. Pinafore THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA J. Lynn Thompson CONDUCTOR

Steven Daigle ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

43 COMPLETE RECORDINGS

AVAILABLE ON CD

Tomás Bretón La Verbena de la Paloma

André Messager Véronique

Reginald De Koven Robin Hood

Lionel Monckton The Arcadians

Rudolf Friml The Vagabond King • The Firefly

Jacques Offenbach The Brigands • Bluebeard

Gilbert & Sullivan Utopia Limited • Patience • Princess Ida The Grand Duke • The Gondoliers The Mikado • Ruddigore • The Sorcerer The Yeomen of the Guard The Pirates of Penzance • H.M.S. Pinafore

Sigmund Romberg Maytime • Blossom Time

Victor Herbert Dream City and the Magic Knight* Eileen • Mlle. Modiste* Naughty Marietta • The Red Mill Sweethearts • The Fortune Teller Emmerich Kálmán The Bayadere • Sari • Autumn Maneuvers Countess Maritza • The Violet of Montmartre A Soldier’s Promise* • Miss Springtime Jerome Kern The Cabaret Girl

Franz Schubert Das Dreimäderlhaus John Philip Sousa El Capitan Oscar Straus The Chocolate Soldier Johann Strauss A Night in Venice Carl Zeller Der Vogelhändler Compilations Gems from The Ohio Light Opera, Vol. 1 Gold and Silver

These recordings are mastered and adapted from our summer productions. Most are released as two-CD sets and are available in the lobby during the season and in finer book and music stores. Patrons may also call The Ohio Light Opera at (330) 263-2345 to purchase compact discs or visit www.ohiolightopera.org to view CDs and to order online. *Dream City and the Magic Knight, A Soldier’s Promise, and Mlle. Modiste are also available on DVD. ohiolightopera.org 91


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COMPLETE REPERTOIRE 1979-2016 THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA – STEVEN DAIGLE, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

Daniel Auber Fra Diavolo......................................’88 Lindsay Warren Baker & Amanda Jacobs Pride & Prejudice.............................’06 Ralph Benatzky & Robert Stolz White Horse Inn...............................’05 Irving Berlin Call Me Madam................................’14 Annie Get Your Gun.........................’16 Jerry Bock & Sheldon Harnick Fiddler on the Roof...........................’09 Tomás Bretón La verbena de la paloma...................’99 Emmanuel Chabrier L’étoile.......................................’91, ’08 Federico Chueca & Joaquín Valverde La gran vía.......................................’99 Noël Coward Bitter Sweet...............................’93, ’98 Reginald De Koven Robin Hood......................................’04 Leo Fall The Dollar Princess..........................’95 Madame Pompadour........................’11 Rudolf Friml The Vagabond King...................’87, ’04 Rose Marie.......................................’03 The Firefly........................................’06 Edward German Merrie England.................................’84 Tom Jones.........................................’92 George & Ira Gershwin Of Thee I Sing..................................’09 Lady, Be Good!................................’13 Oh, Kay!...........................................’15 William Gilbert & Arthur Sullivan H.M.S. Pinafore... ’79, ’80, ’81, ’82, ’83, ’84, ’85, ’87, ’90, ’93, ’98, ’02, ’06, ’09, ’13 The Mikado... ’79, ’80, ’81, ’82, ’84 ’85, ’88, ’92, ’95, ’00, ’04, ’08, ’12, ’16 The Pirates of Penzance.....’79, ’80, ’81, ’83, ’84, ’86, ’89, ’94, ’99, ’03, ’07, ’11, ’14 The Gondoliers....’79, ’82, ’85, ’88, ’92, ’96, ’01, ’06, ’13 The Yeomen of the Guard.. ’79, ’81, ’84, ’86, ’90, ’97, ’01, ’08, ’15 Iolanthe.. ’79, ’81, ’84, ’87,’91, ’98, ’05, ’10 Ruddigore.............’79, ’82, ’85, ’88,’95, ’02, ’09, ’15 Trial by Jury...............’79, ’80, ’81, ’84, ’86, ’89, ’98, ’11 The Sorcerer..’80, ’82, ’86, ’89, ’96, ’05 Patience..’80, ’83, ’86, ’91, ’97, ’04, ’10 Princess Ida..........’80, ’85, ’94, ’99, ’07 Utopia Limited....’80, ’83, ’87, ’93, ’00, ’12 The Grand Duke................’81, ’95, ’03 Reynaldo Hahn Ciboulette.........................................’90 Victor Herbert Naughty Marietta .....................’89, ’00 Eileen................................................’97 The Red Mill.....................................’01 Sweethearts.......................................’02 Mlle. Modiste....................................’09 The Fortune Teller............................’11 Dream City and The Magic Knight......’14

Richard Heuberger The Opera Ball.................................’90 Emmerich Kálmán Countess Maritza.........’85, ’89, ’94, ’03 The Gypsy Princess.............’86, ’93, ’10 The Bayadere....................................’98 Sari/Der Zigeunerprimás...................’01 Autumn Maneuvers .........................’02 The Violet of Montmartre.................’04 A Soldier’s Promise/ Der gute Kamerad........................’05 The Duchess of Chicago...................’07 Marinka: The Mayerling Story..........’08 Miss Springtime................................’12 The Little King.................................’14 The Little Dutch Girl........................’16 Jerome Kern The Cabaret Girl..............................’08 Oh, Lady! Lady!!.............................’14 Have a Heart....................................’16 Eduard Künneke The Cousin from Batavia...........’00, ’02 Charles Lecocq Clairette/La fille de Madame Angot.............................’89 Le petit duc.......................................’00 Franz Lehár The Merry Widow.’83, ’90, ’96, ’04, ’11 The Count of Luxembourg.. ’88, ’97, ’10 The Land of Smiles....................’90, ’03 Giuditta............................................’94 Gypsy Love......................................’95 The Czarevitch..................................’08 Friederike..........................................’15 Mitch Leigh Man of La Mancha...........................’05 Alan Jay Lerner & Frederick Loewe Camelot.....................................’00, ’11 Brigadoon..................................’02, ’15 My Fair Lady.............................’03, ’14 Frank Loesser Guys and Dolls.................................’12 André Messager Véronique.........................................’97 Karl Millöcker The Beggar Student....................’87, ’96 Lionel Monckton The Arcadians...................................’98 Otto Nicolai The Merry Wives of Windsor............’95 Ivor Novello The Dancing Years............................’16 Jacques Offenbach The Brigands......................’83, ’92, ’03 La Périchole...............................’84, ’93 La vie parisienne.................’85, ’99, ’16 La belle Hélène...................’86, ’94, ’09 Bluebeard..................................’87, ’07 Orpheus in the Underworld....................’88, ’91, ’01 The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein.......................... ’89, ’13 Christopher Columbus......................’95 Robinson Crusoe..............................’96 Regrets Only/M. Choufleuri.......’96, ’98 The Island of Tulipatan....................’05 Evening Wind...................................’11

Cole Porter Jubilee...............................................’11 Silk Stockings....................................’13 Can-Can...........................................’15 Kiss Me, Kate....................................’16 Richard Rodgers & Oscar Hammerstein II Carousel...........................................’01 South Pacific.....................................’04 The Sound of Music..........................’07 Oklahoma!.......................................’08 The King and I..................................’13 Richard Rodgers & Lorenz Hart A Connecticut Yankee.......................’12 Sigmund Romberg The Student Prince.’82, ’85, ’92, ’99, ’07 The Desert Song.................’86, ’95, ’08 The New Moon..................’91, ’97, ’06 Maytime...........................................’05 Blossom Time...................................’12 Franz Schubert & Heinrich Berté Das Dreimäderlhaus.........................’02 John Philip Sousa El Capitan........................................’10 Oscar Straus The Chocolate Soldier.........’88, ’98, ’12 A Waltz Dream.................................’91 Johann Strauss A Night in Venice........’81, ’91, ’99, ’09 The Gypsy Baron.........’82, ’89, ’00, ’13 Die Fledermaus.....’86, ’92, ’97, ’05, ’14 Wiener Blut........................’87, ’93, ’98 The Merry War.................................’01 The Queen’s Lace Handkerchief.......’06 Jule Styne & Stephen Sondheim Gypsy...............................................’10 Arthur Sullivan & F.C. Burnand Cox and Box.’79, ’80, ’81,’84, ’89, ’96, ’99, ’11 Arthur Sullivan & B.C. Stephenson The Zoo............................................’99 Franz Von Suppé Boccaccio...................................’83, ’02 My Fair Galatea................................’90 Heitor Villa-Lobos Magdalena........................................’92 Robert Ward Lady Kate.........................................’94 Robert Ward & James Stuart A Friend of Napoleon.......................’05 Kurt Weill Street Scene.......................................’90 Kurt Weill & Ira Gershwin The Firebrand of Florence.................’99 Kurt Weill & Ogden Nash One Touch of Venus.........................’15 Meredith Willson The Music Man.................................’06 Quade Winter & William Gilbert Thespis.............................................’96 Quade Winter & Frank Desprez The Carp..........................................’99 Robert Wright & George Forrest The Great Waltz...............................’94 Song of Norway................................’96 Kismet..............................................’10 Carl Zeller Der Vogelhändler................’93, ’94, ’07

ohiolightopera.org 93


THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA 2016 PERFORMANCE CALENDAR SUNDAY

MON

2PM

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

2PM

2PM

THURSDAY

7:30PM

2PM

7:30PM

FRIDAY 2PM

7:30PM

SATURDAY 2PM

7:30PM

June 18 

★ Kiss Me Kate*

June 19 June 20 June 21

June 22 Kiss Me Kate

June 26 June 27 June 28 Kiss Me Kate July 3

July 4

July 11

July 6

July 12

July 18

July 13

July 19 ★ The Dancing Years

July 24

July 25

July 31 The Little Dutch Girl August 7 Kiss Me Kate

Aug 1

July 20 Kiss Me Kate

July 26

July 21 The Mikado

July 27

August 2 The Little Dutch Girl

July 14 Kiss Me Kate

July 28

August 3 The Mikado

June 24

August 4

The Kiss Me La Vie Dancing Kate Parisienne Years

June 25 Annie Get Kiss Me Your Gun Kate*

July 1 Kiss Me Kate

The Mikado

Annie Get Your Gun*

July 9 Annie Get Your Gun

July 15 Have A Heart

July 2 The Mikado

July 8

Have A Heart*

July 16

Annie Get La Vie The Your Gun* Parisienne Mikado*

July 22

July 23

The La Vie Have A Dancing Parisienne* Heart Years July 29

The La Vie Annie Get Dancing Parisienne Your Gun Years

★ Kiss Me The Little Kate Dutch Girl

Annie Get Your Gun

July 7 ★ Have A Heart

★ Annie Get La Vie Your Gun Parisienne July 17

June 30 ★ The Mikado

Kiss Me Kate

POPS

July 10

June 29 Annie Get Your Gun

July 5

CONCERT

June 23 ★ Annie Get Your Gun

Have A Heart*

August 5

Annie Get Your Gun*

July 30 Kiss Me Kate

The Mikado*

August 6

Annie Get Your Gun* The Little Kiss Me Dutch Girl Kate* Festival Symposium On The Lyric Theater Tradition, August 2-5

Aug 8 August 9

August 10

Annie Get La Vie Your Gun Parisienne

August 11 The The Little Dancing Dutch Girl Years

Have A Heart

August 12 Kiss Me Kate

Have A Heart*

August 13 Annie Get The Your Gun Mikado*

★ Indicates an Opening Performance * Indicates a Pre-Performance Talk at 6:30 p.m. prior to Friday & Saturday evening performances. Informative & Free!

OLO 2016 Festival Special Events JUNE 18 Opening Night Gala The audience is invited to celebrate the opening of our 38th Summer Season by attending our Opening Reception in Freedlander lobby following the 7:30 p.m. performance of Kiss Me, Kate. JULY 4 Pops Concert 7-8 p.m. Downtown Wooster

AUGUST 2-5 A Festival Symposium on The Lyric Theater Tradition Individual tickets available for Symposium Concert Series, $25/ticket • 8/2 Play Gypsies! Dance Gypsies!—$25/ticket •8  /3 Songs from The Cutting-Room Floor— $25/ticket •8  /5 Operetta & Musical Comedy Parts I & II— $25/ticket

JULY 12 “Children’s Introduction to Theater” 1-2 p.m. Freedlander Theatre Lobby For more detailed information regarding our events, please log on to ohiolightopera.org or call The Ohio Light Opera box office at 330-263-2345. 94 Box Office: 330.263.2345


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The Ohio Light Opera 2016 Program