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Resident Professional Company of The College of Wooster Freedlander Theatre

TABLE OF CONTENTS Welcome..........................................................................5 Annual Fund Donors...................................................6 Endowment Gifts........................................................10 The James F. Stuart Legacy.................................... 11 Steven A. Daigle & Laura Neill Interview.................................................................... 16

Everything. Right where you need it.®

Our Mission..................................................................20 The Pajama Game..................................................... 22 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background

• Refreshed lobby and fitness facilities • The Garden Grille & Bar • Heated indoor pool, whirlpool • Guestrooms feature microwave oven, refrigerator and Keurig® Brewer.

Babes in Arms............................................................. 26 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background Fifty Million Frenchmen..........................................30 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background Candide......................................................................... 34 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background Iolanthe......................................................................... 38 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background

959 Dover Road, Wooster, OH 44691 330-202-7701 www.wooster.hgi.com 2003 Hilton Hospitality, Inc.

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La Périchole................................................................. 42 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background Cloclo.............................................................................46 Cast, Musical Numbers, Argument, & Background Festival Artistic and Technical Team................ 52 Festival Cast................................................................60 Festival Orchestra..................................................... 68 Festival Technical and Artistic Staff.................. 74 Festival Symposium................................................. 83 Taking Light Opera Seriously The College of Wooster......................................... 86 Dining, Accommodations & Shopping............. 88 Complete Repertoire...............................................90 Acknowledgments.................................................... 92 Ticket Information & Prices................................... 93 2018 Schedule............................................................94

We love having you here. • Cloud Nine – the Hampton Bed experience • Guestrooms feature mini-refrigerator, microwave & coffeemaker • On the House® hot breakfast • Heated indoor pool & all new JumpStart® fitness center 4253 Burbank Road, Wooster, Ohio 44691 330-345-4424 • www.wooster.hamptoninn.com

“God Save the Queen”.......................... Back Cover

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Out of respect to the performers, the use of cell phones, cameras, or any other electronic device is prohibited in the theater. We ask that you please turn all these devices off completely for the duration of the performance, so that you and those around you can enjoy the show.

Both Hotels are 2015 TripAdvisor Circle of Excellence Winners! ohiolightopera.org

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Box Office: 330.263.2345

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800-927-8578 • 330-262-1111 Fax: 330-263-6950


THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA WELCOME Dear Friends of Ohio Light Opera,

Steven A. Daigle Artistic Director

Laura Neill Executive Director

Julie Wright Costa Associate Artistic Director

Thank You! It is you, our dedicated patrons, who have allowed us to celebrate, during the 2018 season, our 40th-anniversary festival. As America’s Premier Lyric Theater Festival, The Ohio Light Opera presents outstanding productions: classic operettas and musicals, including shows not staged for many years. Our fantastic 2018 season includes Adler and Ross’ The Pajama Game, Rodgers and Hart’s Babes in Arms, Cole Porter’s Fifty Million Frenchmen, Leonard Bernstein’s Candide, Gilbert & Sullivan’s Iolanthe, Jacques Offenbach’s La Périchole, and Franz Lehár’s Cloclo. The works produced during the summer season offer our patrons high-level musical artistry (from both the performers and the orchestra) and visually engaging theatrical values (from sets, costumes, lights and the actors themselves). Most importantly, through an historical musical journey, whimsical dialogue, satirical plots, memorable melodies, rousing choruses, lovable characters, and full orchestrations, our festival season offers a chance for patrons to escape, be entertained, be amused, and discover the intimate environment of Wooster and Freedlander Theatre. Building on the success of and enthusiastic response to the last four years, there will be a Festival Symposium on the Lyric Theater Tradition in the 2018 season. It is scheduled for July 31 through August 3 and will feature lectures and special concerts that pay tribute to OLO’s mission— looking back at 40 years and pointing forward to 40 more! Thank you for your loyal support for The Ohio Light Opera. Your generosity, with continuing “in-kind” support from The College of Wooster, makes each season possible, and we look forward to entertaining you again next summer. With warmest regards,

J. Lynn Thompson Music Director

Artistic Director

Executive Director

THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA BOARD OF DIRECTORS Steven Byess

Associate Music Director

Wilson Southerland Conductor

Michael Miller, Chair Steven A. Daigle, Artistic Director and Vice Chair Marlene Kanipe, Treasurer, ex officio Nan Miller, Secretary Jayne Churchmack Ronald Holtman Ambassador John Ong Sara L. Patton John Schambach Richard N. Seaman Laura M. Neill, Executive Director

Honorary Members Bill & Marilyn Blanchard Lois Freedlander Jean W. Knorr Boyd & Eloise Mackus Barbara Robinson

ohiolightopera.org

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THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA 2018 ANNUAL FUND We are grateful for the generosity of the following donors to the 2018 Ohio Light Opera Annual Fund.

Lord Chancellors ($10,000 and above) Brad Bennett Don & Shirley Buehler Charitable Fund Burton D. Morgan Foundation

Robert Eyestone, in memory of Susan W. Eyestone Norman K. Keller Live Publishing Company

Michael & Nan Miller Ohio Arts Council Ambassador & Mrs. John Ong WCLV

Bitsy & Joe Loewenstein J.D. & Arlene Milliken Sara L. Patton Wally Pretzer, in memory of Diane Pretzer

Seaman Corporation Tim & Jenny Smucker Robert Stein, in memory of Ernie & Mary Lou Stein Mary Alice Streeter

Clarence & Connie Drennon Joe & Mary Dulle Glen & Lisa Grumbling

Michael & Linda Kennedy

Dick & Mimi Lewellen Chuck & Dawn McCaghy Dwight & Christina McCawley Betty J. McNutt Julie A. Mennes Gordon F. Musch Prof. Alan Miles Ruben & Judge Betty Willis Ruben

John Schambach Geri Sherman Richard Springman & Pamela Elsass Lynn & Cyndy Willett Jean Wingate

Anonymous Michael Acree Mrs. Elsa G. Anderson Steven & Lisa Armstrong Bob Baer & Judy Cohen-Baer Robert F. Bendall Phil Bowers Briggs Financial Robert & Virginia Cassady Jeffrey Chase & Gale Kramer Marilyn & Dave Cooper Eugene L. Cox

David L. Dalrymple Tom & Patsy Doak Bill & Claudette Finke Marvin Fletcher Joseph & Eleanor Hingtgen Jim & Mary Jicha Richard LeSueur Luke & Nita Lovell Stephen Miles Allen & Jane Noble Jan Opalachek & Katherine Edmonds Jonathan F. Orser

David Patton, in memory of Maggie Patton Ward Randol Stanley Ransom Janis & Gardnar Stevens Dr. & Mrs. Sigel G. Stocker Joe & Marlene Toot Andrea Traubner, in memory of Richard Traubner Miro & Maria Vida

Peers or Peris ($350 to $599) Anonymous Mrs. James C. Abbott Julius L. Amling Julia & Bruce Bain Mike & Judy Berliner Sally Bernhardt Deborah Bittaker & A.V. Shirk Bill & Pauline Bittner Marlene S. Blackford Dennis Bond Robert & Constance Bouchard Linda Bromund Dan B. & Elizabeth Candler & Frank L. Skillean

Dick & Lois Clemmer Marian T. Cropp Tom & Judy Driskell Linda Earley Mr. & Mrs. William Edgerton Tom & Anne Engel Howard & Terry Epstein Lori & Bob Everett Mr. & Mrs. Ramsey H. Fahim Phyllis Gallo Mya L. Gosling Dave & Pam Grant Mary Ann Grumbling Louise E. Hamel Martha Hancock

Alicia & Ivan Handwerk Lee Helsby & Thomas Donnan Roger & Sheila Hollenbaugh Edward & Pamela Jajko, in memory of Costi Baramki Byron & Sue Kentner Stan & Joan Levy Joan C. Long W. Berry Lyons & Anne E. Carey Dr. John R. Madison Beverly McCall Bob McInnes Bill & Jane Miller Roy & Cindy Moore Dr. & Mrs. Paul Morton

Mikados ($5,000 to $9,999) Lois Freedlander Heuer Foundation Ron & Prue Holtman Yvonne Kรกlmรกn David Knapp Sorcerers ($2,500 to $4,999) Henrietta Baramki, in memory of Costi Baramki David & Carol Briggs

Pirate Kings ($1,250 to $2,499) Certified Angus Beef Evan & Terry Buck The Richard Cocks Family Ann Fox Stan & Diane Hales Bruce Kinsel Jean Knorr & Family, in memory of Frank Knorr

Englishmen ($600 to $1,249)

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Box Office: 330.263.2345


Gary Nemeth & Gail Jones-Nemeth Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey M. Nicholls Drs. Cyril Ofori & Amelia Laing Joan Lee Parsons Jeff Perkins & Mary Stockton Gunther & Dorothy Piepke Barbara & Michael Porte David Porter & Margaret Poutasse Dr. Frank W. Quillen & Nathalie Trent Edgidijus & Vida Radvenis Linn & Jodie Raney

Mr. & Mrs. Bunn S. Rhea Mr. & Mrs. Byron S. Rose Dr. & Mrs. James Rybak Dr. & Mrs. Martin Saltzman Roger Simmons Mr. & Mrs. Robert Slagle Jim Smith Jean Soper Mr. & Mrs. Vernon Sponseller Talia Starr Larry & Carol Stewart

Timothy Strope Sheldon & Rebecca Taft James & Martha Taggart L. Gordon Tait David Tovey Ted & Sandy Wiese Linda Wilcox Steve & Nanciann Woodward J. Rufener & J. Young John & Linda Zimmermann

Yeomen ($250 to $349) Linda Betzer Walter & Elva Bixler Roy & Joan Burgess Bill & Janet Burkholder Ruth & Paul Crowley Charles L. Cureton Mrs. Herbert C. Douglas John & Adriana Dryer Joe & Dee Durbin Jon & Mary Fancher Richard & Sally Gillmore Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Gordon

Tom & Catherine Graves Don Hayden Eric & Carol Henderson Bob & Elizabeth Hooker Sally Krueger Drs. Steven & Carolyn Kuerbitz Henry & Pat Kurdziel Charles & Connie Lepold Anne R. Lewellen Judy Penn Mallonn The Mersol Family Elizabeth Mitchell, in memory of Joan Strope

Dr. Michael Nichols, in memory of Susan Davis Nichols David & Karolyn Rice, in honor of Laura Neill John & Nancy MarĂ­a Schuesselin Ken & Rita Schuesselin J. Lynn & Adelia Thompson Dr. Bonnie Thurston Karl R. Warner Lynn & Cyndy Willett, in honor of the marriage of Wesley Willett & Lara Oehlberg Dorothy Zellers

Flowers of Progress ($125 to $249) Anonymous Barbara Adams Elaine Arnold Mr. & Mrs. Warren Ashburn Mr. & Mrs. Gilbert Aumiller Dr. Barbara Barna Robert F. Bennett, in memory of Hugh Gage Mr. & Mrs. Brian W. Bishop Harold Brayman Alison Brown, in memory of Mag. Siegmund Haider Clarendia Brown Ken & Polly Burns Daniel & Janet Calhoun Richard & Susanne Campbell Mr. & Mrs. Lucien Case Gerald L. Chapman, Jr. Margaret Chorney Wendell & Ruth Cole Rusty Cowden & Carolyn Griffeth, in memory of Evelyn Moser Alan & Susan Crittenden David H. Cullis & Patricia A. Rodgers Donald F. & Emily A. Curie Anne Dunipace Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Efremoff John & Toby Emerson Jim & Di Erickson Dr. Charles & Mrs. Carol Faiman Dr. Ron Fleming Suzanne Fligiel Dr. Todd & Mrs. Kemper Florin Gerald & Mary Fuerst

Hope Gertler Frank & Linda Gollinger Ed & Terry Grissing Ray & Marge Gunther Patricia Harrell Robert A. Harris Malinda Heineking, in memory of Janice M. Ladd Douglas M. & Suzanne R. Hicks Ira Hinden & Stefani Koorhan Karen Hollo, in memory of Elaine Bielniak Katherine M. Hull John & Liz Jarvey Willard H. Johnson Mike & Penny Kinter Mary Knox Gregg Leach & Monte Porter Mrs. R. J. Linderman Alan & Kathleen Markus Spiro Matsos Richard & Karen Middaugh Marc Miller Mark & Beth Ann Mitchell Lynn Moomaw Ken & Cheryl Moon Dr. & Mrs. Charles Neer Daniel Neer Tim & Sherry Niederkorn David & Pamela Oliver David & Ann Olszewski Bob & Edie Penick Ilona Pinzke Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Polet David Pozorski & Anna Romanski

Mary Rawlings Hope & David Reynolds Mrs. Barbara Robinson Allan K. Rodd Chris Saylor John & Rebecca Schmidt Dr. Frederick C. Schoenig, Jr. & Marguerite H. Schoenig Sanford Marion Schwartz Rose Ella Sears M.R. Severiens Wes & Connie Shilling Hiram Smith, in memory of G. Michael Darling Irene S. Smith Kent & Judy Smith Charles Sommerville George & Marilyn Spencer Phil & Karen Steiger Howard & Joann Strauch Joseph Tatnall & Daniel Colburn Brant & Mary Tedrow John E. Titmas Drs. Howard & Sara Tucker Charles & Joan Vanden Eynden Larry Wallerstein Richard & Jane Ward Robert Weppler Lynn & Cyndy Willett, in loving memory of our good friends, Ernie & Mary Lou Stein Julie & Jerry Yaffee Bob & Diane Yates Beth Young

The donor list includes gifts received prior to June 6th. Please let us know if your name has been inadvertently omitted or incorrectly listed.

The Ohio Light Opera Annual Fund provides essential financing for each OLO season, and we are grateful for the loyal support of so many donors through the years. If you want to help ensure that the unique mission of The Ohio Light Opera continues, we ask that you make a gift to the 2018 Ohio Light Opera Fund. Please contact: Laura Neill at 330-263-2090, lneill@wooster.edu for information on how to make a gift to The Ohio Light Opera Annual Fund.

ohiolightopera.org

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The Ohio Arts Council helped fund this program with state tax dollars to encourage economic growth, educational excellence, and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans. The Ohio Arts Council is committed to the economic, educational, and cultural development of the state. The Council believes the arts should be shared by the people of Ohio. The arts arise from public, individual, and organizational efforts. The OAC supports and encourages these efforts.

The Ohio Light Opera gratefully acknowledges a grant from the Laura B. Frick Charitable Trust to help underwrite the distribution of complimentary tickets to local social service agencies for use by persons who otherwise could not attend OLO performances. Corporate Matching Gifts Emerson

UBS Financial Services

KeyBank

Production Sponsors The Ohio Light Opera appreciates the generous support from the following corporations, foundations, and individuals who have helped underwrite production costs for the 2018 season: Brad Bennett David & Carol Briggs Briggs Financial Don & Shirley Buehler Foundation Ralph & Grace Jones Foundation J.D. & Arlene Milliken The Burton D. Morgan Foundation

Lois Freedlander Ron & Prue Holtman Norman K. Keller David Knapp Live Publishing Company Bitsy & Joe Loewenstein Michael & Nan Miller

Ambassador & Mrs. John Ong Sara L. Patton Wally Pretzer Seaman Corporation Tim & Jenny Smucker Mary Alice Streeter WCLV

A wee bit of Ireland in downtown Wooster 116 S. Market Street, Wooster, Ohio 44691

www.unitedtitanium.com | 3450 Old Airport Road, Wooster, Ohio | (330) 264-2111

Gasche House Bed & Breakfast 330-264-8231 | 340 N. Bever St. | Wooster OH 44691

New Owners/Innkeepers Genevieve & Bill Welcome You! 8

Box Office: 330.263.2345


Wooster Country Club invites you to visit and experience a rich tradition of fine service and relaxing recreation. Casual dining in a Country Club atmosphere. Tues-Sat 11am-9pm Reservations are required.

1251 Oak Hill Road 330.263.1890 www.woostercountryclub.com

ohiolightopera.org

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THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA ENDOWMENT The Ohio Light Opera Endowment was established in 1993 by a generous gift from founding Artistic Director James F. Stuart. Additional gifts have helped ensure the current and future financial stability of the Company. A restricted fund in The College of Wooster’s endowment, the Ohio Light Opera Endowment is managed professionally and provides support for a portion of annual OLO expenses. We encourage you to consider making a gift or estate commitment to the Ohio Light Opera Endowment. Please contact Laura Neill at 330-263-2090, lneill@wooster.edu to receive information on how to make an endowment gift.

The Brian Woods Award Thirteen years ago, the company lost one of its most talented and supportive young company members. Tenor Brian Woods exemplified in so many ways the best that the Ohio Light Opera has to offer. He was a devoted and enthusiastic supporter of this company’s unique mission. Brian’s love for operetta extended far beyond this company. As a performer and educator, he gave selfless hours to bringing his love for operetta into the the hearts of thousands of patrons and to many students. As part of his legacy, the company (along with his widow, Jessie Wright Martin) established an endowment in his honor. As part of this endowment, each year a company member is presented the Brian Woods Award. This is given to a returning company member who exemplifies some of the qualities that made Brian a champion for this company and the lyric theater art form. A few years ago, it was decided that in the future the award would be vetted by past award winners who are presently in residency (eight performers), along with key artistic and administrative personnel. Although the majority of awards have been given to singers in the past, any company member may receive the award. Past Recipients of The Brian Woods Award: ’07 Peter Nathan Foltz—singer ’08 Todd Strange—singer ’09 Stephen Carr—stage director ’10 Boyd Mackus—singer

’11 Ted Christopher—singer and stage director ’12 Nathan Brian—singer ’13 Benjamin Krumreig—singer ’14 Stephen Faulk—singer

’15 Eric Andries—coach/accompanist ’16 Jacob Allen—performer/director ’17 John Schuesselin—trumpet and orchestra personnel manager

The 2018 recipient of the Brian Woods Award:

KATIE HUMPHREY In Memory Of Mary Lou and Ernie Stein Mary Lou and Ernie Stein followed James Stuart’s company to the College of Wooster from Porthouse Theater in Akron. They served on the Ohio Light Opera Advisory Board from the beginning and were major supporters for many years, which was crucially important in OLO’s formative and lean times.

Ernie Stein 1927-2017

Ernie and Mary Lou attended hundreds of performances over the years and enjoyed interacting with the performers after each show. When health concerns no longer permitted them to attend OLO, they were missed terribly by performers and staff alike. Their son Rob said, “gardening, their church, and OLO were everything to them, in no particular order.” Ernie and Mary Lou, your OLO family misses you both. Gifts may be given in their names to the Ohio Light Opera.

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Mary Lou Stein 1932-2015


TAKING LIGHT OPERA SERIOUSLY!

THE LEGACY OF OLO FOUNDER

S JAMES F. STUART S

“I had long realized that operetta requires no less a commitment to quality than does grand opera, both in front of and behind the curtain. My objective from the beginning with OLO was to return artistic integrity to operetta. Through coaching on the importance of taking light opera seriously, the company has nurtured an audience that has itself gained a new appreciation for a once seemingly moribund art form.” James F. Stuart

James F. Stuart Founding Artistic Director 1928-2005

When James Stuart, in 1979, began The Ohio Light Opera at The College of Wooster, he had already built a successful career as a musical and theatrical educator, producer, director, and performing artist. Born in Baton Rouge in 1928, he studied at LSU and earned a doctor of musical arts degree at the Eastman School of Music. For seven seasons, he performed the principal tenor roles with Dorothy Raedler’s American Savoyards and the Martyn Green Gilbert and Sullivan Company. Over several decades, he appeared with opera companies in New York, Boston, Cleveland, Chautauqua, Atlanta, and New Orleans. He sang the Husband in the world premiere of Raffaelo de Banfield’s Lord Byron’s Love Letter, opposite Patricia Neway, and performed the title role in the American premiere of Rameau’s Platée. Among the distinguished musical artists with whom Stuart performed are singers Beverly Sills, Joan Sutherland, Richard Tucker, and Robert Merrill; and conductors Franz Allers, Richard Bonynge, Boris Goldovsky, Louis Lane, Julius Rudel, and Robert Shaw. Under Stuart’s vision and guidance, The Ohio Light Opera evolved into the nation’s premier venue for the presentation of both the masterworks and forgotten gems of the lyric theater repertoire. His translations for the Company include those for Auber’s Fra Diavolo, Lecocq’s La fille de Madame Angot, Hahn’s Ciboulette, Kálmán’s Die Bajadere and Der Zigeunerprimás, Strauss’ Der lustige Krieg, and Offenbach’s Monsieur Choufleuri. In recognition of his contributions to lyric theater, he was awarded an honorary doctorate by The College of Wooster, and was invested in the College of Fellows of the American Theatre in a ceremony at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC. Stuart was further honored by his inclusion in several standard biographical works: Dictionary of International Biography, International Who’s Who in Music, Who’s Who in America, and International Who’s Who of Intellectuals. James Stuart in The Gondoliers, 1996

S To make a lasting gift to The Ohio Light Opera, contact Executive Director Laura Neill at 330-263-2090.

ohiolightopera.org

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Kismet 2010

Can-Can 2015

Guys and Dolls 2012

Have a Heart 2016

The King and I 2013

Oklahoma! 2008

L’Étoile 2008

Camelot 2011

The Music Man 2006

The Grand Duke 2003

My Fair Lady 2014


Ruddigore 1995

H.M.S. Pinafore 1987

The Bayadere 1998

Boccaccio 1983

The Yeomen of the Guard 1997

The Pirates of Penzance 1986

The Merry Widow 1990

Trial by Jury 1998

Patience 1997

The Mikado 1985

The Gondoliers 1988


1968- 2O18

B LO S S O M M U S I C FE S TI VA L

JUL

38

PM

SALUTE TO AMERICA Blossom Festival Band Loras John Schissel, conductor

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SATURDAY JUL

78

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PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION The Cleveland Orchestra Franz Welser-Möst, conductor Joela Jones, piano Stephen Rose, violin Mark Kosower, cello

JUL

14 8:30

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AT T H E M OV I E S

SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN — LIVE

The Cleveland Orchestra Richard Kaufman, conductor On the big screen with the score performed live by The Cleveland Orchestra.

ER 18s ND

ONT LAWN HE

Share your memories of Blossom and join in the conversation online . . . facebook.com /clevelandorchestra twitter: @CleveOrchestra instagram: @CleveOrch #CleOrchBlossom

TICKETS:

800-686-1141

JUL

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The Cleveland Orchestra Jahja Ling, conductor with the Kent/Blossom Chamber Orchestra Vinay Parasewaran, conductor and the Blossom Festival Chorus

JUL

28 8

LING

MAHLER’S FIRST SYMPHONY

PM

BRAHMS FOURTH SYMPHONY

The Cleveland Orchestra Herbert Blomstedt, conductor

BLOMSTEDT

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Blossom Music Center has provided an inviting and gracious summer home for The Cleveland Orchestra since it opened in 1968. Located just north of Akron, Ohio, and about 25 miles south of Cleveland, Blossom is situated on 200 acres of rolling hills surrounded by the Cuyahoga SEASON SPONSOR Valley National Park. Its beautiful outdoor setting is an integral part of the Blossom experience — and unrivaled among America’s sumANNIVERSARY SPONSOR mer music festival parks for the clear sightlines from across Blossom’s expansive Lawn and the superb acoustics and architectural beauty of the famed Blossom Pavilion. Come early to savor the summer weather. Bring your own picnic, or purchase from a variety of onsite options available, including a wide selection of wines, spirits, and beers. For an eighth summer, The Cleveland Orchestra is offering free Lawn tickets to young people ages 17 and under for all Blossom Festival concerts. Two “under 18s” will be admitted with each paid adult admission. This offer is part of The Cleveland Orchestra’s Center for Future Audiences, an initiative endowed by the Maltz Family Foundation to engage and expand the audiences for symphonic music.

TUESDAY

SCHISSEL

YEARS

FOURTH

WELSER-MÖST

2 18 SUMMER HOME OF THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA

== features features fireworks, fireworks, weather weather permitting permitting


AUGUST

WEDNESDAY PM

SALUTE TO AMERICA SCHISSEL

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Blossom Festival Band Loras John Schissel, conductor

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DVOŘÁK’S SEVENTH SYMPHONY

AT TH E M OV I ES

THE LITTLE MERMAID — LIVE

The Cleveland Orchestra Sarah Hicks, conductor

The Cleveland Orchestra Michael Francis, conductor

Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts

SUNDAY PM

ROGER DALTREY PERFORMS THE WHO’S TOMMY

DALTREY

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On the big screen with the score performed live by The Cleveland Orchestra.

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RACHMANINOFF’S RHAPSODY

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YO-YO MA PLAYS BACH

YO-YO MA

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SOLO PERFORMANCE: Yo-Yo Ma, cello

The Cleveland Orchestra Vasily Petrenko, conductor Simon Trpčeski, piano

Complete performance of Bach’s Six Suites for Solo Cello.

with members of The Who Band and The Cleveland Orchestra conducted by Keith Levenson

The Cleveland Orchestra John Storgårds, conductor Vilde Frang, violin

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The Cleveland Orchestra James Gaffigan, conductor Stephen Hough, piano

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25 8

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FRANK & ELLA The Cleveland Orchestra Randall Craig Fleischer, conductor Capathia Jenkins, vocalist Tony DeSare, vocalist/piano

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7 PM

SCHUMANN’S SPRING SYMPHONY

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SIBELIUS SECOND SYMPHONY

An evening of great hits and tunes in a musical tribute to two of the greatest — Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald.

FRANG

JUL

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JENKINS

The original album performed live in concert.

PM

CARMINA BURANA

LUNA

The Cleveland Orchestra Adrien Perruchon, conductor Audrey Luna, soprano Matthew Plenk, tenor Elliot Madore, baritone Blossom Festival Chorus Cleveland Orchestra Children’s Chorus

LABOR DAY WEEKEND FRIDAY

29 7

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AUDRA M C DONALD SINGS BROADWAY The Cleveland Orchestra Andy Einhorn, conductor Audra McDonald, soprano

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Broadway favorites sung by one of today’s most-acclaimed singers.

SATURDAY

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STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE — LIVE

The Cleveland Orchestra Vinay Parameswarn, conductor The classic original film shown in HD on the big screen — with the score performed live by The Cleveland Orchestra. Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts

TICKETS:

clevelandorchestra.com

SUNDAY


AN INTERVIEW WITH OHIO LIGHT OPERA ARTISTIC DIRECTOR STEVEN A. DAIGLE AND EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR LAURA NEILL With a combined OLO leadership tenure of over 60 years, artistic director Steven A. Daigle and executive director Laura Neill have spearheaded the company’s continuing evolution from a regional Gilbert and Sullivan company to an internationally recognized purveyor of the finest in lyric theater. OLO program editors sat down with the pair in April 2018 for a question and answer session. This summer, OLO celebrates its 40th anniversary season. What has been the most rewarding aspect of guiding this development? cleaning the stage floor, fell backwards into the Steve: So many operetta and musical theater pit. And, of course, there are the inevitable fire companies these days, because of economic alarms and tornado warnings that never fail to and artistic pressures, have been forced to be rattling. compromise their missions and sadly, in many cases, fold. Supported by our wonderful audience base, OLO has managed both to greatly expand its repertoire and to steadfastly remain true to its original mission, championing the same ideals that inspired the formation of the company in the late 1970s. It has been a special joy to see so many OLO alumni not only performing around the globe, but also, as teachers or artistic administrators, exploiting their experiences at OLO and imparting a love for the genre to new generations. Laura: The opportunity, under the supporting umbrella of The College of Wooster, for vocalists, instrumentalists, and technical staff to “put on a show,” week after week, season after season, is unparalleled in this country. To have patrons, whether long-term supporters or firstyear attendees, come up to me in the lobby and say, “You can’t see this anywhere else,” totally validates OLO’s commitment to its model. On top of this, I have had the pleasure and honor of working side-by-side with people who share this passion.

Steve: First among funny moments might be the numerous times that OLO founder James “Doc” Stuart brought his great pyrenees Valcour, and later Justin, into rehearsals. To see Doc running and screaming down the hall after the dog was itself a day’s entertainment. What drives the choice of repertoire for a particular season? Steve: It’s a complex dynamic driven by tradeoffs among artistic, historical, and box office concerns. We have a truly enviable history of programming rare works. With the benefit of hindsight, and confident of the support of our audience, we can make a judgment that a century-old work that might have failed in its time is well-worth reviving. There is certainly an excitement and sense of “making history” when OLO presents the American premiere of a Continental work, as we have done so many times with works of Emmerich Kálmán and others. More pragmatically, we must figure out how the season slate of summer shows fits together, in terms of box office potential and shared design resources.

Can you recall any particularly harrowing Laura: And there are concerns, especially with moments or, on the other side of the coin, funny rare or long-neglected shows, about availability moments? of materials, royalty costs, and the need for Laura: We have had remarkably few serious English translations. We listen very carefully injuries over these 40 years, and we do have to our audiences and try to program in a way procedures in place for dealing with them, but that will resonate with their interests. It is they are always frightening when they happen. revealing, in surveying those works that we About five years ago, a spot operator, while have done multiple times during these 40 years, 16 Box Office: 330.263.2345


how audience tastes can change. There is no guarantee that a work that was a hot seller in the 1980s will remain so 30 years later.

crowds and draw the wrong conclusion about our demographics; evening performances are different. If we can get more people in their 40s If you had to put your finger on it, what qualities and 50s, we are doing okay. Social media is the key to maintaining and building our audience best distinguish the Ohio Light Opera? base. We are not in a metropolitan region with a Laura: Increasingly, audiences want value for vibrant younger population. Most patrons have what they are paying. I believe that we have been to drive (or fly) some distance to get to OLO, but very successful in meeting this demand over the they are finding that Wooster has more and more years. Since its third season, OLO has offered all to offer. its shows—141 titles to date—with full orchestra, costumes, and staging. And, there is no question With technology rapidly advancing, can we that all three elements have been getting better expect more use of projections and other and better. Our revolving rep format, in which a technical innovations? patron can see as many as seven titles in four days, Steve: How far we go with new theater has helped attract audiences from great distances. technology—projections and more elaborate sets, Our mix each season of returning singers and new for example—is limited by the fact that we are a talents has worked out extremely well in building, revolving rep company and have to service seven among our patrons, full trust in the ensemble shows, many times two in one day. The addition nature of the company. of classic musicals to our repertoire has created Steve: We all give up something for the mission. its own challenges. Without the resources to do The works that we, or any company, perform every scene in its full glory, we have to think out are more sacred than any of us. That doesn’t of the box and, with high-tech software, find mean, as performers, conductors, directors, and ways to make the seven shows work together in designers, that we cannot impose our own style their sharing of sets and design elements. in interpreting these shows. But it does mean— in contrast to what we see increasingly in opera, operetta, and musical theater venues—that we must sacrifice something for the mission and resist any temptation to manipulate the works to showcase ourselves ahead of the composers and librettists.

Aside from hosting OLO as a resident professional company, how has The College of Wooster contributed to the growth of the company?

Laura: What has not changed over the years is the recognition by the College of the unique nature of having a summer-only resident company In recent years, OLO has received many on campus. The College is the “ultimate arts kudos—in Kiss Me, Kate and Anything Goes, partner”—both supporting us with in-kind for example—for its increasing commitment to services that would otherwise be cost-prohibitive the dance component of musical theater. Can we and acknowledging OLO’s contribution, both expect more of this? artistically and economically, to the Wooster Steve: Yes … as part of the evolving and community and beyond. expanding rep, we will certainly want to touch OLO started as a Gilbert and Sullivan company base in future seasons with shows such as No, with, in that first year of 1979, eight G&S titles. No, Nanette; 42nd Street; and Me and My Girl. These days, the company is down to two, or It is difficult to know how far we might want to sometimes one, title. Are we at all forgoing the go in this direction. We cast our season, first and pair? foremost, with vocalists and do not necessarily Steve: Not at all. OLO’s repertoire has expanded have the luxury of being able to hire dance and we just don’t have the same number of specialists, as might occur in an opera company. show slots to devote to G&S. Our commitment What is OLO doing to attract a younger to their shows, and recognition that OLO was audience? founded as a G&S company, will never waver. Laura: I try not to obsess on the term “younger The (so far) annual symposium has given us the audience.” People might look at our matinee opportunity to explore the periphery of G&S— Gilbert’s Ages Ago last year and, I would like ohiolightopera.org 17


one could travel 100 miles and most likely find two or three productions of Oklahoma! This is not so anymore—some companies are sensing the vacuum and trying to fill it. Perhaps OLO cannot take credit for this, but there is certainly a sense of validation of OLO’s decision almost 20 years ago to go that route. Have you detected any changes in perceptions of young singers and how they value their experience at OLO? Laura: What I have detected—and what is really nice to see—is that many of the current generation of OLO vocalists have voice teachers, or have crossed paths with people, who were here at OLO in years past. This exposure makes their stay here, whether for one year or many years, that much more meaningful, because they know When OLO added a musical—Camelot in some of OLO’s history, its mission, and its ideals. 2000—it was virtually unheard of for an opera I have yet to find anybody in the cast who has or operetta company to program a musical. not been exceptionally appreciative of his or her Now it’s happening more and more. Is this a experience here. Singers want to perform and positive step? OLO offers them the opportunity. The amount Steve: It certainly was for OLO, both of time they spend on the stage is unparalleled economically and, in terms of serving our for any U.S. regional opera company. mission, artistically. Opera and musical theater In the 2015 program interview, you listed some are increasingly aligning themselves, with opera shows that you thought might soon come to artists, to a greater extent, doing crossover work. OLO and, indeed, just in the last few years, Producers sense that good music is good music, several have. What can we look forward to in good theater is good theater. Many of the midfuture seasons? century musicals—Rodgers and Hammerstein, Lerner and Loewe, for example—can greatly Steve: In the musical realm, I would say Damn Yankees, 42nd Street, Me and My Girl, No, benefit from classically-trained voices. No, Nanette, Cinderella, and Hello, Dolly!. We Laura: Audiences, in these days of multi-media, could potentially see a Sondheim—perhaps the want more and more of a theatrical experience. waltz-oriented A Little Night Music, as well Young opera singers are increasingly trained to go as more modern shows like A Secret Garden, beyond the “stand and sing” norm of past days. which, although not an operetta, has many of There is a changing climate within the music the defining characteristics of the genre. OLO schools to exploit these changes. And there is would do a fantastic job on Les Misérables. In no better place than OLO—with its eclectic mix early musical theater—Gershwin, Kern, Porter, of old and new, operetta and musical—for young Rodgers and Hart, etc.—there are enough performers to exercise their training. shows to last us 20-30 years and beyond. In the Steve: It is unfortunate that community theater, operetta realm, we have every hope of completing and Broadway in its revivals, is programming our survey of the complete Kálmán canon, of less and less of the classic musicals of the first 70 possibly revisiting some shows—for example years of the 20th century. There is a generation Giuditta and The Cousin from Batavia—and of of audience that are not 70 years old, but 40 re-introducing America to some forgotten gems and 50, who remember such shows from high of the past: Jacobi’s Sybil and Fall’s The Rose school and local theater. Among many of them, of Stamboul spring into mind. More zarzuela there is a sense of nostalgia and desire to turn might be on tap, and, who knows, maybe even a the clock back. Not that many decades ago, Shostakovich operetta. to think, other such investigations in the future. One advantageous byproduct of reducing the number of G&S shows per season is that it heightens the excitement for each show when it does cycle around into the season’s rep.

18 Box Office: 330.263.2345


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AMERICA’S PREMIER LYRIC THEATER FESTIVAL

The Lady of the Slipper, OLO 2017

OUR MISSION For thirty-nine seasons, The Ohio Light Opera has dedicated itself to the exploration and production of the best of traditional operetta and musical theater. Founded by James Stuart as a Gilbert and Sullivan repertory summer festival, the company has grown to encompass all forms in the light opera canon. This includes the complete Gilbert and Sullivan repertoire, as well as the recognized treasures from the Viennese, French, Hungarian, German, British, and American repertoire. Along with this unique mission, the company also reconstructs and produces those rare operetta titles of artistic value that were popular in their own times but have long since been forgotten. The historical performance practices of each work premiered are delicately balanced with the resources of a state-of-theart theater and engaging and entertaining performance values. Each summer, between seven and nine titles are presented in a revolving format of approximately 60 performances over a seven-week period. Nearly 20,000 patrons each season see productions in The College of

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Wooster’s intimate Freedlander Theatre. About 150 company members from around the United States are selected each year to become a part of our residency program. The 40 performing artists who make up the vocal ensemble are chosen for their abilities to perform and work at the highest level in all disciplines demanded by the company’s specialized repertoire: singing, acting, and dancing. With over 140 titles produced, over 250 productions, and 750,000 patrons watching, The Ohio Light Opera has become the forerunner in promoting the light opera genre. The company’s contribution to the preservation and promotion of traditional lyric theater has received recognition in prominent national and international publications and its work is frequently cited by leading scholars of operetta and light opera. In residency on The College of Wooster campus, the summer festival offers a country setting with an inviting community that is proud of the unique service this company has given to its many patrons and to the art form. —Steven A. Daigle

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20 Box Office: 330.263.2345


THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA 2018 FESTIVAL COMPANY* Administrative/Front Of House Staff Gracie Delollis Imogen Campbell Hendricks Brendan Lemkin Sandy McIlvaine Helen Rooker Becca Snedeker-Meier Alex Swiger

Double Bass Mitchell Reiner-Coffey Jack Steward

Resident Costume Designer Charlene Gross

Flute Stephanie Hegedus Laura Kellogg

Resident Lighting Designer Daniel Huston

Guitar Adam Keeler

Resident Set Designer Daniel Hobbs

Harp Janna Young

Resident Stage Director Jacob Allen

Horn Paul Litterio Sophia Senderak

Run Crew Iain Joseph Juliet Merillat Daria Oberholzer Maya Rickard Riley Woods

Assistant Costume Designers Jennifer Ammons Kim Griffin

Ivana Martinic Spiro Matsos Emily McCormick Tim McGowan Garrett Medlock Chelsea Miller Daniel Neer Elizabeth Perkins Caitlin Ruddy Sadie Spivey Tzytle Steinman Megan Taylor Trevor Todd DeShaun Michael Tost Yvonne Trobe Stephen Walley Gretchen Windt

Assistant Lighting Design Cameron Filepas

Choreographer Spencer Reese

Assistant Set Designer Brandon M. Newton

Conductor Wilson Southerland

Percussion Sarah Jayne Gartin Thomas Roblee

Assistant Shop Manager KayLee Taylor

Costume Designers Myron Elliott-Cisneros Stephanie Eubank

Saxophone Mark Wallace

Set Designer/Scenic Charge Kiah Kayser

Trombone Peter Gooch

Shop Foreman Alexander Clark

Trumpet Jacob Boca Caleb Laidlaw

Sound Designer Christopher Plummer

Artistic Director Steven A. Daigle

Assistant Sound Designers Colin Kovarik Chris Wilson

Crafts Heather Michelle Oles

Deck Chief Assistant Stage Managers Miranda Thompson Alex Ganger Draper Pauline Humbert Cynthia Overton Assistant Technical Electrician/Swing Director Carpenters Jessica Gilliard Logan Lowe Associate Artistic Director Rachel Pickering Julie Wright Costa Executive Director Associate Music Director Laura Neill Steven Byess First Hand Carpenters Jesse Crouch Ben Ganger Alexander Houston Christopher Tucker

Cast Sarah Best Nathan Brian Rachael Cammarn Cody Carlson Cory William Clines Alexa Devlin Benjamin Dutton Stephen Faulk Jonathan Heller Mailee Herzog Jonah Hoskins Seth Johnson Mason Kelso Adam Kirk Hilary Koolhoven Benjamin Krumreig Abby Kurth Hannah Kurth Joelle Lachance Amy Livingston Boyd Mackus

Madeline Corson

Lighting Designer Brittany Shemuga Master Carpenter Cari Kamper

Oboe Ashley Cook Devin Morton

Viola David Berghoff Iva Raykova Violin Adriana Perez Cerqueda Diana Farah Kennedy McKain Emory Rosenow Beth Uhimchuk Alistair Watson Orchestra Personnel Manager John Schuesselin

Master Electrician Trey Eikleberry

Painters Jackie Kempe Michaela Dannenbrink Sophia Tepermeister

Music Director J. Lynn Thompson

Principal Guest Director Ted Christopher

Orchestra Assistant Concertmaster Tatiana Zueva

Production Assistant Rachel Kobernick

Bassoon Joshua Schairer Cello Emily Grissing Romina Monsanto Clarinet Jeffrey Anderson Laura Chalmers Charlotte Kies Concertmaster Laurentiu Norocel

Production Stage Manager Katie Humphrey Prop Artisans Hannah Dains Jenevieve Lee Rachel Montgomery

Set Designers Kim Powers Victor Shonk

Spot Operators Meredith Bruch Nikolas Demers Juliet Freed Madison Helms Matthew Lorentz Victoria McMaslin Taylor Mills Jack Neill Lexi Snoddy Joseph Stoll Anneliese Wagoner Nicklaus Wilcher Stage Manager Louis Markowitz Stitchers Michelle Pettit Lena Smith Emily Wallace Stitcher/Wardrobe Thomas Martin Technical Director Stephen Tomlin Wardrobe Taylor Greene Newman Jones Emily Santiago Wardrobe Master Mark Snyder

Props Master Roderick McCladdieMcLeod

Wigs Austin Conlee

Rehearsal Accompanist Eric Andries

* Listed alphabetically by job position.

ohiolightopera.org 21


P R E M I E R E

THE PAJAMA GAME (1954)

Music and Lyrics by........ Richard Adler and Jerry Ross Book by....................George Abbott and Richard Bissell Conductor................................................. J. Lynn Thompson Stage Director...................................................... Jacob Allen Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer.......................................................Daniel Hobbs Costume Designer............................................Myron Elliott Lighting Designer.................................. Brittany Shemuga Sound Designer............................... Christopher Plummer Assistant Sound Designer............................. Colin Kovarik Catherine “Babe� Williams.......................................... Alexa Devlin Sid Sorokin........................................................................ Nathan Brian Gladys Hotchkiss................................................................. Sarah Best Myron Hasler....................................................................... Cory Clines Prez.................................................................................. Spencer Reese Vernon Hines.......................................................................Daniel Neer Mabel.................................................................................Hannah Kurth Mae................................................................................ Gretchen Windt Brenda.............................................................................. Yvonne Trobe Pop..................................................................................... Seth Johnson Poopsie.............................................................................Caitlin Ruddy Charley......................................................................... Jonathan Heller Joe......................................................................................DeShaun Tost Quartet..........................................Abby Kurth, Timothy McGowan .................................................. Cody Carlson, Stephen Walley Max......................................................................... Benjamin Krumreig Worker........................................................................ Benjamin Dutton Mara.................................................................................. Mailee Herzog Sara............................................................................. Emily McCormick Virginia............................................................................. Ivana Martinic Rita.................................................................................Amy Livingston 1st Helper......................................................................Stephen Walley Sandra................................................................................ Sadie Spivey Carmen.......................................................................Hilary Koolhoven Charlene.......................................................................Joelle Lachance Bob........................................................................................... Adam Kirk Jim......................................................................................... Trevor Todd Anderson.................................................................... Garrett Medlock Waiter.......................................................................... Garrett Medlock Ensemble Cody Carlson, Benjamin Dutton, Jonathan Heller, Mailee Herzog, Seth Johnson, Mason Kelso, Adam Kirk, Hilary Koolhoven, Benjamin Krumreig, Abby Kurth, Joelle Lachance, Amy Livingston, Ivana Martinic, Emily McCormick, Timothy McGowan, Garrett Medlock, Caitlin Ruddy, Sadie Spivey, Megan Taylor, Trevor Todd, DeShaun Tost, Yvonne Trobe, Stephen Walley, Gretchen Windt

This production of The Pajama Game has been partially underwritten by gifts from:

Don & Shirley Buehler Foundation 22 Box Office: 330.263.2345

Ambassador & Mrs. John Ong

Sara L. Patton


SETTING

Time.............................................................. The present Place.............................A small town in the Midwest ACT I Scene 1..........................................Sewing room at the ...........................................Sleep Tite Pajama Factory Scene 2............................................................. The same Scene 3.................................A hallway in the factory Scene 4........................................................... The office Scene 5.................. On the way to the union picnic Scene 6..................................................Picnic grounds Scene 7.......................................................... Picnic path Scene 8.......................The kitchen of Babe’s house

Scene 9................................A hallway in the factory Scene 10............................................................The shop 15-minute intermission ACT II Scene 1............................................................. Eagle Hall Scene 2........................The kitchen of Babe’s house Scene 3.................................A hallway in the factory Scene 4........................................................... The office Scene 5.....................................Hernando’s Hideaway Scene 6......................................Morning in the office Scene 7.................................... A street near the park Scene 8....................................Hernando’s Hideaway

MUSICAL NUMBERS Overture ACT I The Pajama Game.....................................................................................................................................................Hines Racing with the Clock..............................................................................................................................Men, Women A New Town Is a Blue Town.......................................................................................................................................Sid I’m Not at All in Love..............................................................................................................................Babe, Women I’ll Never Be Jealous Again......................................................................................................................Mabel, Hines Hey There..........................................................................................................................................................................Sid Her Is................................................................................................................................................................ Prez, Gladys Sleep Tite......................................................................................................................................................Men, Women Once-A-Year Day......................................................................................................................... Sid, Babe, Ensemble Her Is (reprise)...................................................................................................................................................Prez, Mae Small Talk.............................................................................................................................................................Sid, Babe There Once Was a Man...................................................................................................................................Sid, Babe Slow Down.............................................................................................................................................................. Women Finale: Hey There (reprise).........................................................................................................................................Sid 15-minute intermission ACT II Entr’acte Steam Heat.....................................................................................................................................................Gladys, Men Hey There (reprise)...................................................................................................................................................Babe Think of the Time I Save.......................................................................................................................Hines, Women Hernando’s Hideaway...............................................................................................................Gladys, Women, Men I’ll Never Be Jealous Again (ballet) 7 ½ Cents...............................................................................................................................Prez, Babe, Men, Women There Once Was a Man (reprise)................................................................................................................. Babe, Sid Finale Ultimo: The Pajama Game (reprise)............................................................................................ Ensemble

S “This is our once-a-year day” S The Pajama Game is presented by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

ohiolightopera.org 23


ARGUMENT

ACT I: At the Sleep Tite Pajama Factory, Prez, the head of the Garment Workers’ Union threatens a strike unless the workers are granted a 7½-cent raise. Factory head Hasler has no intention of giving in to such a demand. Newlyhired superintendent Sid Sorokin, exasperated by the slow work pace of two young employees, shoves one of them and soon finds himself before the grievance committee, overseen by the headstrong—but to Sid, very attractive—Babe Williams. No sooner has she adjudicated the dispute than she is teased by the factory girls about her own, quite obvious, initial feelings for Sid. Factory timekeeper Hines, meanwhile, is sweet on Hasler’s secretary Gladys, but has trouble containing his jealousy over every contact she has with males in the factory. When the principled Babe refuses Sid’s offer for a date, he laments his own inadequacy and senses the futility in trying to pursue her. At the Union picnic, the skirt-chasing Prez foists his attentions first, without success, on Gladys and then on seamstress Mae. With chemistry starting to sizzle, Babe invites Sid over to her place, where discussions about romance and Union wage claims become entangled. Back at the factory, Hasler still refuses to accept the wage hike. When Prez orders a work slowdown and Babe jams the production line, Sid sacks her on the spot. ACT II: Gladys entertains at a Union assembly called to consider more ways to undermine operations at the factory. Babe’s father Pop tries to effect a reconciliation between his daughter and Sid, but stubbornness and opposing commitments to the well-being of the factory intervene. With the work slowdown continuing, Sid’s secretary Mabel informs Hasler that quality control is suffering and orders are being cancelled. Sid’s plea with Hasler to compromise with the Union falls on deaf ears, but his elaborate scheme to get Gladys to show him the locked company ledger eventually succeeds after a visit to a local club. Armed with some “top secret” company data, Sid confronts Hasler and then goes before the Union rally.

BACKGROUND

It is highly intriguing, but ultimately futile, to contemplate how much richer our cultural legacy might have been if Mozart had lived past 35, 24 Box Office: 330.263.2345

Schubert past 31, or Arriaga (Google him!) past 19. Or if James Dean had made it beyond 24, or Van Gogh beyond 37, or Gershwin beyond 38. Or … if composer/librettist Jerry Ross had survived beyond his twenties. When he passed away from a lung ailment on November 11, 1955, at age 29, Broadway was robbed of one of its brightest, most imaginative, and highly promising talents. Teaming with Richard Adler, with whom he shared both music and lyrics, they created two of the decade’s most enduring, and longest-running, Broadway musicals: The Pajama Game (1954) and Damn Yankees (1955). Both shows took home Tony Awards for Best Musical, and Adler and Ross remain, to this day, the only composer(s) to open, in consecutive years, two Broadway shows that ran more than 1000 performances. The two had first joined forces in 1950 and, as protégés of Frank Loesser, scored a major song success in November of 1953 with “Rags to Riches,” which, in a recording by Tony Bennett and Percy Faith, held the number one Billboard spot for eight weeks and reached the one-million sales mark. The next month, in their first Broadway outing, the team contributed seven numbers to John Murray Anderson’s Almanac, a musical revue. Loesser had already introduced Adler and Ross to legendary show producer/director/playwright George Abbott, who eventually offered the two the chance to write music and lyrics for a musical based on Richard Bissell’s 1953 novel 7½ Cents. The Pajama Game, with book by Abbott and Bissell, opened at the St. James Theatre on May 13, 1954. It is notable not only for its exuberant score, amusing lyrics, and engaging storyline, but also as providing the Broadway musical premieres of Bob Fosse as choreographer (Tony Award), Harold Prince as producer, and Carol Haney (Gladys—Tony Award) and Janis Paige (Babe) as performers. The role of pajama factory superintendent Sid was taken by John Raitt, who had skyrocketed to fame as Billy Bigelow in the 1945 production of Carousel. The strength of the musical score lies just as much in its variety as in its tunefulness: from the waltz (“I’m Not at All in Love”) to the ballad (“Hey There”) to a Latin-infused comic tango (“Hernando’s Hideaway”) to a Western-style duet (“There Once Was a Man”) to a Fosse-choreographed jazz gem (“Steam Heat”). The opening of “Hey There,” sung by Sid into a dictaphone—which


he then plays back to himself—is based (per a suggestion of Loesser) on the familiar opening melody of Mozart’s Piano Sonata in C. Upon Ross’ death in 1955, Adler was on his own, never really teaming up with another partner, but injecting his talents into diverse theatrical ventures, including television musicals (Little Women and The Gift of the Magi), a play (The Sin of Pat Muldoon), two Broadway musicals (Kwamina—34 performances and Music Is— eight performances), various symphonic works and ballets, and three new songs for the 2006 Broadway revival of The Pajama Game, but without ever achieving the popular success of his work with Ross. He also served as producer of Richard Rodgers’ penultimate musical Rex and of the Madison Square Garden gala in which Marilyn Monroe sang her birthday greeting to President Kennedy. And, for good measure, he was the composer of the “Let Hertz Put You in the Driver’s Seat” commercial jingle from 1959. Michael D. Miller

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www.roomscapesonline.com 330-262-1088 ohiolightopera.org 25


P R E M I E R E

BABES IN ARMS (1937)

Music by........................................................ Richard Rodgers Lyrics by................................................................. Lorenz Hart Book by.......................Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart Conductor........................................................... Steven Byess Stage Director..................................................Steven Daigle Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer........................................................Victor Shonk Costume Designer................................. Stephanie Eubank Lighting Designer.................................. Brittany Shemuga Sound Designer............................... Christopher Plummer Assistant Sound Designer.............................. Chris Wilson Assistant Stage Director............................Spencer Reese Val LaMar....................................................................... Spencer Reese Billie Smith............................................................................. Sarah Best Marshall Blackstone.............................................. Benjamin Dutton Dolores Reynolds..................................................... Gretchen Windt Gus Fielding........................................................ Benjamin Krumreig Baby Rose.......................................................................... Alexa Devlin Irving de Quincy............................................................DeShaun Tost Ivor de Quincy...................................................................... Adam Kirk Peter.........................................................................Timothy McGowan Lee Calhoun............................................................... Jonathan Heller Beauregard Calhoun................................................Stephen Walley Dan LaMar, Val’s dad, a vaudevillian......................... Trevor Todd Maizie LaMar...................................................................Hannah Kurth Nat Blackstone............................................................... Seth Johnson Emma Blackstone........................................................ Yvonne Trobe Sheriff Reynolds, Dolores’ father................................ Cory Clines Rene Flambeau, a French aviator..................... Garrett Medlock Phil McCabe..................................................................... Cody Carlson Girl.................................................................................... Mailee Herzog Ensemble Cody Carlson, Cory Clines, Jonathan Heller, Jonah Hoskins, Seth Johnson, Mason Kelso, Adam Kirk, Hilary Koolhoven, Abby Kurth, Hannah Kurth, Joelle Lachance, Amy Livingston, Timothy McGowan, Garrett Medlock, Chelsea Miller, Caitlin Ruddy, Sadie Spivey, Tzytle Steinman, Megan Taylor, Trevor Todd, DeShaun Tost, Yvonne Trobe, Stephen Walley Understudy for Gus: Cody Carlson

This production of Babes in Arms has been partially underwritten by gifts from:

Ralph & Grace Jones Foundation 26 Box Office: 330.263.2345

J.D. & Arlene Milliken

Tim & Jenny Smucker


SETTING

Time.............................During the Great Depression Place............................................Seaport, Long Island ACT I Scene 1....................................... The LaMar’s house in ......................................................Seaport, Long Island Scene 2.........................The Oscar W. Hemmingway ......................................post of the American Legion Scene 3................................................... The clubhouse Scene 4...................................The living room of the .............................................................Calhoun mansion

Scene 5...........................................The LaMar’s house Scene 6..............................................The old red barn 15-minute intermission Act II Scene 1................................A barn on the work farm Scene 2.............................................. The LaMar’s field Scene 3...........................................The LaMar’s house Scene 4........................The Oscar W. Hemmingway ......................................post of the American Legion

MUSICAL NUMBERS Overture ACT I Opening Where or When..................................................................................................................................................Val, Billie Babes in Arms............................................................................................................ Val, Marshall, Billie, The Gang I Wish I Were in Love Again................................................................................................................... Gus, Dolores Babes in Arms (reprise)............................................................................................... Marshall, Sheriff, The Gang Light on Our Feet...........................................................................................................................................Ivor, Irving Way Out West............................................................................................................................Baby Rose, The Gang My Funny Valentine................................................................................................................................................... Billie Johnny One-Note........................................................................................................................................... Baby Rose Johnny One-Note (ballet) 15-minute intermission ACT II Entr’acte Imagine......................................................................................................... Baby Rose, Peter, Marshall, The Gang All at Once............................................................................................................................................................Val, Billie Imagine (reprise)..................................................................................................................................Peter, The Gang Peter’s Journey (ballet) Imagine (reprise)..................................................................................................................................Peter, The Gang The Lady Is a Tramp.................................................................................................................................................. Billie You Are So Fair........................................................................................................................................... Gus, Dolores The Lady Is a Tramp (reprise)............................................................................................................................... Billie Finale Ultimo...................................................................................................................................................... Ensemble

S “And so it seems that we have met before” S Babes in Arms is presented by arrangement with R & H Theatricals.

ohiolightopera.org 27


ARGUMENT

ACT I: With their actor parents departed on a multi-month vaudeville tour, the teenagers of Seaport, Long Island wonder how they will survive on their own. When Billie Smith, somewhat disheveled from hitchhiking across country, arrives at the doorstep of now-on-hisown Val LaMar, he wastes no time offering her room and board and regaling her with his opinions of Marx, Nietzsche, and Roosevelt. It takes no more than a kiss for both to sense a feeling of déjà vu. Resisting the sheriff’s attempt to escort all the teens to a work farm, Val summons all the kids and leads them in a war-cry of defiance. The bigoted Southerner Lee Calhoun, expounding the theory of superior races, makes it clear that he is not one of them, that his parents are vacationing in the south of France, and that his wealthy father owns the town. To the dismay of the jealous Marshall, Gus cozies up to the sheriff’s daughter Dolores, as a brawl breaks out among the ranks. When the sheriff intervenes, the quick-thinking Val explains that the kids were not fighting, but rehearsing for their upcoming Follies. The sheriff gives them two weeks to raise money, stage the show, and become self-sufficient. Things start to look up when former child film star Baby Rose passes through town and is convinced to lend her talents and fame to the revue. Lee, with a promise that the show title will bear his name, offers to finance the project, but only under the condition that the two black teens—Ivor and Irving De Quincy—not be allowed to participate. When the show opens two weeks later, Val, sensing that it is not fully winning over the audience, summons Ivor and Irving to go on. Lee objects and, when Val socks him, Lee withdraws his funding, as the two teens score a triumph with the audience. ACT II: With the Follies now shut down, the teens are sent off to a work farm. Billie tries to instill a chins-up optimism among the gang. When Communist sympathizer Peter announces that he has won some cash in the Irish Sweepstakes, everyone expects him to share the wealth. With wad of bills in hand, he declares that he is no longer a Communist and pictures himself—in a ballet sequence—as a round-the-world traveler, with servants at his feet. Back at Val’s house on a night off from the work farm, Billie informs him that she has become disenchanted with the drudgery of the farm and wants to return to 28 Box Office: 330.263.2345

the road. Gus’ delight that Dolores, with the permission of her sheriff father, will be joining the teens at the farm is short-lived when he realizes that he will be sharing her attention with Marshall and the other boys. When the kids hear on the radio that famed French aviator René Flambeau, on a transatlantic journey, will be making an emergency landing on their property, Val hatches a plan.

BACKGROUND

If the first five letters of the word “musical” are suggestive of what is expected, first and foremost, from a Broadway show, then Babes in Arms delivers the goods. “Arguably the greatest single collection of sophisticated cabaret songs ever written”; “More enduring songs per … page of music than any other of its time”; “[Songs] crooned, jazzed, hooted, and yodeled … on a pile of records that would top the Leaning Tower of Pisa.” These are just a few of the accolades that confirm what was recognized, by both critics and the public, at the time of its April 14, 1937 Broadway premiere. Back just a couple of years from their less-than-rewarding experiences writing songs for Hollywood films, Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart, with Jumbo (1935) and On Your Toes (1936), had recaptured their position (along with Cole Porter) at the top of Broadway’s musical ranks—a position they had earned during the last half of the 1920s in shows such as Dearest Enemy, The Girl Friend, PeggyAnn, and A Connecticut Yankee. It was after seeing a bunch of children making up games and rules in Central Park that they hit on the idea of a “let’s put on a show” musical. Babes in Arms represented the first time in their collaboration that Rodgers and Hart wrote, entirely, their own book (which they did again the next year for I Married an Angel and in 1942 for By Jupiter). By Rodgers’ own confession, the team “put together a serviceable book,” which producer Dwight Deere Wiman took to immediately, eventually mounting the completed show for only $55,000. Quite boldly, the show was cast totally with newcomers, many still teenagers: Mitzi Green as Billie, Ray Heatherton (Joey’s father!) as Val, Alfred Drake (later Curly in Oklahoma!), soon-to-be big stars Dan Dailey and Robert Rounsesville as ensemble members, and the soon-to-be-legendary Nicholas Brothers as Ivor and Irving DeQuincy. Although critics were near-


unanimous in questioning the cohesion of the book, Hart, who had (along with Ira Gershwin) more than a decade earlier elevated the roles of lyrics and lyricist to near-equal footing with music and composer, was duly praised for his contribution: “Mr. Hart proves that he is the slyest and most ingenious of lyric writers” (Herald Tribune); “Hart … never topped … still maintains the lightest touch in the business” (Time). Ticket sales were initially sluggish, but by July, the show found itself, remarkably, the only book musical on Broadway. This, combined with the musical score’s exposure through record sales—most notably the song “Where or When”—boosted interest and, by the time it closed on December 18, the show had turned a nice profit. In 1939, M-G-M released a film version featuring Judy Garland and Mickey Rooney, but—as is often Hollywood’s wont—with the entire musical score eliminated except for “Where or When,” the title song, and orchestral snippets from “The Lady Is a Tramp,” the lyrics of which, according to Hart biographer Gary Marmorstein, would not have passed muster with the Hays Office. Almost 40 years after its premiere, Babes in Arms received

a little extra—if not politically correct—publicity when, during a July 1976 White House dinner commemorating the U.S. bicentennial, President Ford invited Queen Elizabeth onto the dance floor just as the orchestra began playing “The Lady Is a Tramp.” Michael D. Miller

2018 PLATINUM AWARD

2018

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P R E M I E R E

FIFTY MILLION FRENCHMEN (1929)

Music and Lyrics by.............................................Cole Porter Book by..............................................................Herbert Fields Conductor................................................. J. Lynn Thompson Stage Director..................................................Steven Daigle Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer.......................................................Daniel Hobbs Costume Designer....................................... Charlene Gross Lighting Designer.................................. Brittany Shemuga Sound Designer............................... Christopher Plummer Assistant Sound Designer............................. Colin Kovarik Assistant Stage Director...................... Rachel Kobernick Louis Pernasse, a bookmaker..............................Ted Christopher Mr. Emmit Carroll, of Terre Haute, Indiana............Boyd Mackus Mrs. Gladys Carroll, his wife..................................... Yvonne Trobe Joyce Wheeler...........................................................Joelle Lachance Michael Cummins........................................................... Nathan Brian Billy Baxter................................................................. Jonathan Heller Looloo Carroll....................................................................... Sarah Best Peter Forbes, of “the street”....................................Stephen Faulk Violet Hildegarde............................................................ Alexa Devlin May DeVere, a cabaret artist.....................................Hannah Kurth Waiter................................................................................... Trevor Todd Male Quartet.......................Timothy McGowan, Spencer Reese, .................................................................. Trevor Todd, Cody Carlson Ensemble Cody Carlson, Benjamin Dutton, Mailee Herzog, Jonah Hoskins, Mason Kelso, Hilary Koolhoven, Abby Kurth, Ivana Martinic, Emily McCormick, Timothy McGowan, Chelsea Miller, Spencer Reese, Tzytle Steinman, Megan Taylor, Trevor Todd, DeShaun Tost

BRAND GUIDELINES This production of Fifty Million Frenchmen has been partially underwritten by gifts from:

30 Box Office: 330.263.2345


SETTING

Time............................................................................. 1929 Place............................................................................Paris

Scene 5..................... At a bookstall on a boulevard Scene 6................... The racetrack at Longchamps

ACT I Scene 1.........................................................The Ritz Bar Scene 2..............The American Express Company, ..........................................................................Rue Scribe Scene 3.......The Café de la Paix, Place de l’Opéra Scene 4.......................... Peter Forbe’s Tour of Paris

15-minute intermission ACT II Scene 1............... The lounge of the Hotel Claridge Scene 2........................ The corridor at the Claridge Scene 3.......................................The Moroccan Room

MUSICAL NUMBERS Overture ACT I You Do Something to Me....................................................................................................................... Peter, Looloo The American Express................................................................................................................................... Ensemble You’ve Got That Thing...........................................................................................................................Michael, Joyce Find Me a Primitive Man................................................................................................................May, Male Quartet I Worship You............................................................................................................................................................... Billy Do You Want to See Paris?...................................................................................................................Peter, Tourists Where Would You Get Your Coat?.................................................................................................................... Violet At Longchamps Today/Yankee Doodle................................................................................................... Ensemble I’m in Love.................................................................................................................................................................Looloo Please Don’t Make Me Be Good......................................................................................................................... Joyce You Don’t Know Paree............................................................................................................................................ Peter 15-minute intermission ACT II Entr’acte Somebody’s Going to Throw a Big Party................................................................................................. Servants It Isn’t Done...................................................................................................................................... Pernasse, Servants The Queen of Terre Haute......................................................................................................................... Mrs. Carroll Let’s Step Out............................................................................................................................................ Looloo, Joyce The Tale of the Oyster............................................................................................................................................ Violet I’m Unlucky at Gambling...........................................................................................................................................May Why Shouldn’t I Have You?........................................................................................ Billy, Michael, Joyce, Violet Paree, What Did You Do to Me?.................................................................................... Peter, Looloo, Ensemble You’ve Got That Thing (reprise)................................................................................................................. Ensemble

S “You do something to me” S Fifty Million Frenchmen is presented by arrangement with Tams-Witmark Music Library.

ohiolightopera.org 31


ARGUMENT

ACT I: On holiday in Paris with their daughter Looloo and her friend Joyce, social climbers Mr. and Mrs. Emmit Carroll, of Terre Haute, Indiana, waste no time heading for the Ritz Bar. Also at the bar are a trio of college men—Peter, Michael, and Billy—who have been scouring Paris in search of the girl whom the wealthy Peter had eyed on their transatlantic cruise. Of course, Looloo is that girl, but before Peter can advance on her, Billy bets him 50,000 francs that, within a month and without his credit line, he cannot win Looloo’s hand in marriage. The selfassured Peter accepts the bet, introduces himself to Looloo, proposes marriage, and gets anything but a negative response. Peter finds work as a tour guide, but his schedule leaves no time for socializing with Looloo. He is engaged for city tours by the American Violet Hildegarde, who has come to Paris to be shocked, and by cabaret artist May DeVere, who makes it clear to him what kind of man she is seeking. By the time Peter meets up again with Looloo, she has taken up with Billy and, put off by Peter’s seemingly empty pockets, dismisses him. Several days later at the racetrack, Looloo, realizing that she really loves Peter, gives him 2000 francs to bet on a horse that he has been convinced will win. Joyce, meanwhile, has to reconcile a marriage proposal from Michael with his threat of suicide if she does not accept. When Peter’s horse fails to win, he tears up his tickets … but to his great dismay when the winner is disqualified and his choice is declared the winner. When he explains to Looloo what he has done, she thinks that he just wants to keep all the money for himself. She runs off as he laments the sobering effect of Paris on love. ACT II: Mrs. Carroll, in an attempt to elevate her social position, orders Looloo to marry a grand duke. With no interest in that, and with her heart still given to Peter, Looloo tries to take her mind off her mother’s demand by stepping out with Joyce for an evening on the town. The days pass and, finally, the month is up. Peter, now working as a master of ceremonies/dance partner at the Château Madrid, is preparing for a party to commemorate the end of the bet. Joyce and Michael, and, for good measure, Violet and Billy, and also May and hotelier Pernasse agree that marriage is the only way to go. When Looloo arrives, with only a few minutes until the 32 Box Office: 330.263.2345

midnight deadline, Peter proposes again. Before she can respond, he is called to dance with a lady at table four. Bemoaning his gigolo status, Looloo orders a cab. But … it’s not over yet!

BACKGROUND

On April 15, 1927, legendary vocalist Sophie Tucker released a song, on the Okeh label, titled “Fifty Million Frenchmen Can’t Be Wrong.” With music by Fred Fisher and lyric by Willie Raskin and showman Billy Rose, it was an unabashed admission that the French way of life—without Prohibition, without censorship, and without inhibition in fashion—was pretty darn good. This was not news to Cole Porter, who, following a failed first attempt at a Broadway comic opera in 1916 and some sporadic song successes for Broadway revues, had spent much of the next dozen years in Paris, studying classical music and hobnobbing with the upper crust. In 1928, he penned about 15 songs for a Parisian show, La Revue des Ambassadeurs, and then returned to Broadway, writing six tunes for the musical Paris, including “Let’s Do It (Let’s Fall in Love).” Porter’s theatrical love affair with Paris was off and running, capped a quarter of a century later with his final two Broadway musicals, Can-Can and Silk Stockings, both set in the French capital. In February of 1929, the New York Times reported that Porter would be writing music and lyrics for a Broadway musical titled Fifty Million Frenchmen, the title, and perhaps the spirit, of which were certainly inspired by the earlier Tin Pan Alley hit. Engaged to write the show’s book, in the first of seven collaborations with Porter, was Herbert Fields (son of Lew Fields of “Weber and Fields” fame, and brother of academy awardwinning lyricist Dorothy Fields), who was fresh off six script-writing assignments for Rodgers and Hart shows. Following a Boston tryout, the show opened at Broadway’s Lyric Theater on November 27, 1929, just a month after the stock market crash, ran for 254 performances, and provided Porter his first Broadway hit. During the 1930s, cranking out hit shows (e.g., Anything Goes; Jubilee; Red, Hot and Blue; and Dubarry Was a Lady) at the rate of one a year, he virtually took control of Broadway, sharing honors during the last half of the decade with Rodgers and Hart, who had returned from a multi-year stay in Hollywood. Porter’s score for Fifty Million Frenchmen showcases those


musical and theatrical devices that would very quickly become Porter trademarks. There are the so-called “list” songs, like You’ve Got that Thing” and “Where Would You Get Your Coat?” in which he repeatedly slams home a point, but with clever topical and historical references. There are the ever-present double entendres that, sometimes incredulously, sailed right over the heads of the censors into the laps of his audiences. In “I’m Unlucky at Gambling,” Porter makes his first-ever lyrical allusion to homosexuality, which—albeit always couched in a heterosexual setting—would pervade most all his future work. Warner Bros., who had with The Jazz Singer in 1927 ushered in the era of sound films, was constantly on the prowl for stage works—especially musicals—worthy of transfer to the silver screen. They sensed a hit in the Porter/ Fields show and risked $200,000 in backing the show. By the time the film was released in 1931, musical films were totally out of vogue (public tastes change quickly!)—the movie did not include a single song from the stage show, only a hint of some tunes in the background score. The screen company made amends of sorts three years later in the 21-minute short Paree, Paree, starring Bob Hope and Dorothy Stone, and including several hit songs from the show. Michael D. Miller

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P R E M I E R E

CANDIDE (1956)

Music by.....................................................Leonard Bernstein Book Adapted from Voltaire by...............Hugh Wheeler Lyrics by.......................................................... Richard Wilbur Royal National Theatre Version (1999) by... John Caird Additional Lyrics by........................... Stephen Sondheim, ........................................... John Latouche, Lillian Hellman, ....................... Dorothy Parker, and Leonard Bernstein Conductor........................................................... Steven Byess Stage Director..................................................Steven Daigle Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer.......................................................... Kiah Kayser Costume Designer....................................... Charlene Gross Lighting Designer...........................................Daniel Huston Sound Designer...............................Christopher Plummer, ............................................ Chris Wilson, Colin Kovarik Assistant Stage Director...................... Rachel Kobernick Voltaire/Pangloss..................... Daniel Neer*, Ted Christopher** Candide............................ Benjamin Krumreig*, Stephen Faulk** CunĂŠgonde.................................Chelsea Miller*, Ivana Martinic** Maximilian....................................................................Stephen Walley Paquette...........................................................................Caitlin Ruddy The Old Woman............................Alexa Devlin*, Hannah Kurth** Cacambo..................................................................... Jonathan Heller Martin..................................................................................Boyd Mackus The Governor............................................................... Spencer Reese Vanderdendur................................................................. Seth Johnson Baron of Thunder-ten-Tronck..................................... Mason Kelso Baroness of Thunder-ten-Tronck........................... Yvonne Trobe Corporal.................................................................................. Adam Kirk Captain..............................................................................DeShaun Tost Drill Sergeant........................................................... Benjamin Dutton Dutch Minister.......................................................... Garrett Medlock James, the Anabaptist..................................................Boyd Mackus Don Issacar.......................................................................... Cory Clines The Grand Inquisitor....................................................... Trevor Todd Portuguese Sailor.................................................... Garrett Medlock Inquisitors...................................... Benjamin Dutton, Trevor Todd Agents of the Inquisition...........................................Seth Johnson, .............................................Timothy McGowan, DeShaun Tost King of Eldorado............................................................. Mason Kelso Queen of Eldorado........................................................... Abby Kurth Surinam Slave................................................................. Cody Carlson Tunisian Captain............................................................DeShaun Tost

This production of Candide has been partially underwritten by gifts from: Brad Bennett

BRIGGS FINANCIAL GROUP

David & Carol Briggs

Wealth Advisory Services

34 Box Office: 330.263.2345

Ron & Prue Holtman


Ensemble Rachael Cammarn, Cody Carlson, Cory Clines, Benjamin Dutton, Jonah Hoskins, Seth Johnson, Mason Kelso, Adam Kirk, Hilary Koolhoven, Abby Kurth, Joelle Lachance, Amy Livingston, Emily McCormick, Timothy McGowan, Garrett Medlock, Elizabeth Perkins, Spencer Reese, Sadie Spivey, Tzytle Steinman, Megan Taylor, Trevor Todd, DeShaun Tost, Yvonne Trobe, Gretchen Windt * 7/5, 7/11, 7/19, 8/3 ** 7/8, 7/13, 7/27, 8/10

SETTING ACT I Scene Scene Scene Scene Scene Scene Scene

1.........................Royal courtyard, Westphalia 2................................................................. Bavaria 3................................................................. Holland 4......................... Paris, Vienna, and Portugal 5....................................................................At sea 6.................................................................. Lisbon 7..................................................................... Spain

ACT II Scene 8........................................................Montevideo Scene 9.............................................................Paraguay Scene 10............................................................ Eldorado Scene 11...............................................................Surinam Scene 12..................................................... At sea again Scene 13............................................ A Tunisian galley Scene 14................................................................. Venice Scene 15...............Royal courtyard/The Mountains

15-minute intermission

MUSICAL NUMBERS Overture

15-minute intermission

ACT I Voltaire Chorale...............................................................Chorus Life Is Happiness Indeed........................................... Candide Life Is Absolute Perfection........ Maximilian, Cunégonde, ........................................................................Candide, Paquette The Best of All Possible Worlds..... Pangloss, Cunégonde, ............................................... Paquette, Candide, Maximilian Universal Good............... Cunégonde, Candide, Paquette, ........................................................................................Maximilian Oh, Happy We......................................Candide, Cunégonde It Must Be So.................................................................. Candide Candide’s Lament........................................................ Candide Dear Boy.........................................................Pangloss, Chorus Glitter and Be Gay.................................................Cunégonde Auto-da-fé.........................................................................Chorus You Were Dead, You Know...................................... Candide, ......................................................................................Cunégonde I Am Easily Assimilated.........The Old Lady, Cunégonde, ...............................................................................................Chorus Quartet Finale.........Candide, Cunégonde, The Old Lady, .............................................................................Captain, Chorus

ACT II Entr’acte We Are Women........................ Cunégonde, The Old Lady My Love................................................. Governor, Cunégonde Alleluia......................................................... Maximilian, Chorus The Ballad of Eldorado..............................Candide, Chorus Bon Voyage........................................ Vanderdendur, Chorus It Must Be Me................................................................. Candide Words, Words, Words.................................................... Martin Money, Money, Money...................................................Chorus The Venice Gavotte....................... The Old Lady, Candide, ..................................................................Cunégonde, Pangloss Nothing More than This............................................. Candide Universal Good (reprise)...........................Candide, Chorus Finale: Make Our Garden Grow............................ Ensemble

S “One finds that this is the best of all possible worlds” S Candide is presented by arrangement with Music Theatre International.

ohiolightopera.org 35


ARGUMENT

ACT I: Seemingly out of the fertile imagination of the philosopher Voltaire, the show’s characters appear one-by-one on stage. He sets his story: the Westphalian castle of Baron Thunder-tenTronck, whose sister had borne an illegitimate son Candide, who, in his simplicity, sees life as happiness indeed. He is joined by the Baron’s children, Maximilian and Cunégonde, who share Candide’s cheerful disposition, and by the chambermaid Paquette. Voltaire is transformed into the optimistic philosopher Pangloss, who imparts his wisdom to his four receptive pupils. When Cunégonde announces to her father that she and Candide have fallen in love and are going to be married, the Baron, dismayed by Candide’s lack of pedigree, banishes him from the castle. Following a stint in the Bavarian army, fighting against his Westphalian homeland, Candide finds himself in Holland, where the Anabaptist James leads him to the hospice where Pangloss is fighting a debilitating disease. The old philosopher tells his student that the Baron’s castle has been destroyed in war, he and his family wiped out, and Cunégonde ravished and killed by Bavarian soldiers. Candide is heartbroken. But, unknown to Pangloss, Cunégonde has survived and been passed around from soldier to soldier, from country to country. While in Portugal, as mistress to the wealthy Jewish banker Don Issacar, she is forced to submit to the Grand Inquisitor, who threatens Issacar with a visit from the Inquisition. While accompanying James on a trip to Lisbon, Candide and the now-recovered Pangloss survive a shipwreck in which James is drowned. Upon reaching Lisbon, they experience a devastating earthquake and are arrested by Inquisition agents when Pangloss tries to justify the tragedy as a philosophical necessity. After a mock trial secretly witnessed by Cunégonde, who is there as a guest of the Grand Inquisitor, Candide is flogged and Pangloss hanged. Cunégonde sends her servant, the Old Woman, to care for Candide. Candide’s joy at discovering that Cunégonde is alive turns to rage when the jealous Issacar tries to kill her, and the Grand Inquisitor demands a night of passion. Candide has no choice but to draw his sword and run them both through. In a small Spanish town, Candide, Cunégonde, and the Old Woman are befriended by Cacambo, who offers his services as Candide’s servant. Their optimistic plan: to escape the Inquisition by emigrating to the New World. 36 Box Office: 330.263.2345

ACT II: In Montevideo, while Candide and Cacambo are occupied in their new army posts fighting the Jesuits, the Old Woman convinces Cunégonde that marriage to the womanizing Governor would benefit everyone. With Cunégonde whisked off to the palace, the Old Woman fibs to the returning Candide that Inquisition troops have arrived to track down the murderer of the Grand Inquisitor. Candide has no choice but to flee, separated again from his beloved. Deciding to fight with, rather than against, the Jesuits, Candide and Cacambo arrive at the Jesuit camp and find that the Father Superior is none other than the previouslythought-dead Maximilian. Enraged that Candide wants to marry his sister Cunégonde, Maximilian tries to kill Candide, who draws his own sword and does-in his would-be brother-in-law. On the run once again, Candide and Cacambo, drifting downstream in a canoe, find themselves on the shores of a magical Utopian kingdom—El Dorado. Departing a few months later with a vast quantity of gold, Candide meets up in Surinam with a vicious merchant named Vanderdendur, who cheats Candide out of his gold, leaving him sinking in a boat. Cacambo, meanwhile, has gone back to Montevideo to retrieve Cunégonde and the Old Woman. Accompanied by his new servant Martin, Candide finds himself, with his gold restored, on a Tunisian galley on the way to Venice. Surprise, surprise! There on the galley are Pangloss and Maximilian, who miraculously survived their own deaths. In Venice, they encounter Cacambo, who admits to losing Cunégonde and the Old Woman shortly after arriving in town. At a gala masked ball, Candide encounters Cunégonde, but under circumstances that don’t bode well for a future together. But then Candide, walking through the alleys of Venice, overhears a conversation that makes him re-evaluate his priorities.

BACKGROUND

Leonard Bernstein’s Candide is based on a 1759 novel by the French philosopher Voltaire that has endured for more than a quarter of a millennium as a brilliant, misunderstood, perplexing, risqué, and disconcerting paean to human freedom. When the conductor/composer, fresh off success with his musical comedy Wonderful Town, teamed in 1954 with dramatist Lillian Hellman to create a musical stage work, it was with the


express goal of combatting, on the stage at least, what they felt were injustices in American society that mirrored those inflicting France in its prerevolution days. Although billed as a “comic operetta,” Candide was, by any conventional understanding of the term, anything but. Work on the project was slow, with, as related by American composer Irving Fine, the austerity of Hellman’s work seemingly at odds with the “Americanized Gilbert and Sullivan” stylings of Bernstein’s score. After a fall 1956 tryout in Boston, the show opened on Broadway on December 1 at the Martin Beck Theatre. The producers had assembled a stellar team: Barbara Cook as Cunégonde and Robert Rounseville as Candide, costumes by Irene Sharaff, sets by Oliver Smith, and stage direction by Tyrone Guthrie. When the show closed after only 73 performances, pundits were quick to pick apart its shortcomings. In her 1994 Bernstein biography, Meryle Secrest claimed that the show’s creators had “removed the sting from Voltaire’s sexual satire.” Hellman’s biographer Carl Rollyson wrote of “a failure of nerve.” British director Robert Lewis argued that the piece was too serious for those expecting a musical, while those wanting heavier fare didn’t venture into the musical theater houses. Candide was just the latest in a series of sophisticated musical theater works—think also of Regina of Mark Blitzstein and Magdalena of Villa-Lobos— whose significant merits were duly noted by both public and press, but which ultimately failed to resonate at the box office. But unlike its two predecessors, Candide, propelled by the strength

of Bernstein’s music, came back to life, not the least because its overture had already become world-famous. In 1974, Hal Prince produced and directed a revised version—labeled a musical rather than an operetta—with additional lyrics by Stephen Sondheim, a modified and less dark book (with Hellman’s blessing) by Hugh Wheeler, and some new songs by Bernstein. Whether it was the more comedy-infused script of Wheeler, or just a work coming of its time, the show ran for 740 performances. Wheeler took home a Tony for “Best Book of a Musical,” as he had done the year before for A Little Night Music. Bernstein, pleased with the show’s comeback, but less happy about its reduced orchestration and the elimination of some of his music, worked with Prince to create a compromise version of Candide, which was produced in 1982 by the New York City Opera. Seven years later, Scottish Opera produced its own take on the show, wiping out some of the comedy of the 1982 rewrite and focusing more on the dark moralizing of the original script and Voltaire. But, we’re not done yet! In 1989, London’s Royal National Theatre mounted its own new version by John Caird, who didn’t feel that any of the earlier incarnations had put sufficient trust in Voltaire’s novel. Although OLO makes use of this version, its focus this summer is on commemorating the 100th birthday of an American icon, Leonard Bernstein, who felt that “There’s more of me in that piece than anything else I have done.” Michael D. Miller

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ohiolightopera.org 37


IOLANTHE (1882)

Music by............................................................Arthur Sullivan Libretto by...................................................... William Gilbert Conductor...... J. Lynn Thompson/Wilson Southerland Stage Director............................................. Ted Christopher Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer.......................................................... Kim Powers Costume Designer.................................. Jennifer Ammons Lighting Designer...........................................Daniel Huston Sound Designer................................................ Colin Kovarik Assistant Set Designer......................Brandon M. Newton The Lord Chancellor................................................Ted Christopher Earl of Mountararat....................................................... Nathan Brian Earl Tolloller......................................................... Benjamin Krumreig Private Willis, of the Grenadier Guards..................... Cory Clines Strephon, an Arcadian shepherd............................Stephen Faulk Phyllis, an Arcadian shepherdess and ward in chancery ......................................Hilary Koolhoven Queen of the Fairies...........................................Julie Wright Costa Iolanthe, a fairy, Strephon’s Mother.............................. Sarah Best Fairies Celia............................................................................... Chelsea Miller Leila................................................................................. Sadie Spivey Fleta........................................................................... Gretchen Windt Ensemble Rachael Cammarn, Benjamin Dutton, Jonathan Heller, Mailee Herzog, Jonah Hoskins, Seth Johnson, Mason Kelso, Adam Kirk, Joelle Lachance, Amy Livingston, Ivana Martinic, Emily McCormick, Timothy McGowan, Garrett Medlock, Chelsea Miller, Daniel Neer, Elizabeth Perkins, Spencer Reese, Caitlin Ruddy, Sadie Spivey, Tzytle Steinman, Megan Taylor, Trevor Todd, Yvonne Trobe, Stephen Walley, Gretchen Windt Understudy for Private Willis: Stephen Walley Understudy for Iolanthe: Tzytle Steinman

This production of Iolanthe has been partially underwritten by gifts from: Lois Freedlander

38 Box Office: 330.263.2345

David Knapp

Wally Pretzer, in memory of Diane Pretzer


SETTING

ACT I.......................................................................................................................................... An Arcadian landscape 15-minute intermission ACT II.....................................................................................................................................Palace Yard, Westminster

MUSICAL NUMBERS Overture ACT I Tripping Hither, Tripping Thither............................................................................................... Fairies, Celia, Leila Iolanthe! From Thy Dark Exile..................................................................Queen, Celia, Leila, Fairies, Iolanthe Good Morrow, Good Mother!......................................................................................................... Strephon, Fairies Fare Thee Well, Attractive Stranger................................................................................................ Queen, Fairies Good Morrow, Good Lover!............................................................................................................ Phyllis, Strephon None Shall Part Us from Each Other.......................................................................................... Phyllis, Strephon Loudly Let the Trumpet Bray!..............................................................................................................................Peers The Law Is the True Embodiment.....................................................................................Lord Chancellor, Peers My Well-Loved Lord and Guardian Dear.............................................. Phyllis, Tolloller, Mountararat, Peers Nay, Tempt Me Not.................................................................................................................................Phyllis, Chorus Spurn Not the Nobly Born................................................................................................................... Tolloller, Peers My Lords, It May Not Be...................................................................Phyllis, Peers, Lord Chancellor, Strephon ’Neath This Blow........................................................................................................................ Mountararat, Tolloller When I Went to the Bar.....................................................................................................................Lord Chancellor Finale: When Darkly Looms the Day........................................................................................................ Ensemble 15-minute intermission ACT II When All Night Long a Chap Remains............................................................................................................. Willis Strephon’s a Member of Parliament.................................................................................................. Fairies, Peers When Britain Really Ruled the Waves................................................................................Mountararat, Chorus In Vain to Us You Plead................................................................... Leila, Celia, Mountararat, Tolloller, Chorus Oh, Foolish Fay........................................................................................................................................ Queen, Fairies Though P’r’aps I May Incur Your Blame............................... Tolloller, Mountararat, Phyllis, Willis, Chorus Love, Unrequited, Robs Me of My Rest........................................................................................Lord Chancellor If You Go In, You’re Sure to Win........................................ Mountararat, Tolloller, Lord Chancellor, Chorus If We’re Weak Enough to Tarry..................................................................................................... Strephon, Phyllis My Lord, A Suppliant at Your Feet................................................................................................................Iolanthe It May Not Be........................................................................................Lord Chancellor, Iolanthe, Fairies, Queen Finale: Soon as We May, Off and Away!.................................................................................................. Ensemble

S “Away we go to Fairyland!” S

ohiolightopera.org 39


ARGUMENT

ACT I: Twenty-five years after her banishment from Fairyland for marrying a mortal—a crime usually punishable by death—Iolanthe has been pardoned. She had a son by this illicit marriage, Strephon, who is, therefore, half mortal and half fairy. Now a shepherd, he is in love with Phyllis, whom he is determined to marry. However, in order to do so, he needs the consent of her guardian, the Lord Chancellor, who shows little enthusiasm for the idea of his ward marrying a mere shepherd. When Strephon turns to his mother for comfort, Phyllis misinterprets their intimacy (as a fairy, Iolanthe has not physically aged beyond a certain point) and, believing him to be unfaithful, renounces her love for him. Although he protests that Iolanthe is his mother, his claims are met with derision by Phyllis and the peers (who are unaware of his parentage), and even the intervention of the Queen of the Fairies cannot persuade them otherwise. Furious at their attitude, she declares that Strephon will enter Parliament and work to overthrow all the privileges enjoyed by the nobility. ACT II: Strephon has succeeded admirably in his Parliamentary “duties,” but finds them no substitute for Phyllis. With no further reason to conceal it, he reveals his fairy origins to her. This explains Iolanthe’s apparent youth and the couple become re-engaged. At Strephon’s request, Iolanthe puts their case to the Lord Chancellor, but has to disguise herself before doing so. For, unbeknown to him, he is her mortal husband and she is forbidden to enlighten him, under penalty of death. Unfortunately, when he declares that he has decided to marry Phyllis himself, she is forced to reveal her true identity, although this will mean forfeiting her life. However, when it emerges that the other fairies have committed the ultimate offense and married the peers (mortals), the Lord Chancellor suggests that the law be amended so that it is a crime for any fairy not to marry a mortal. The Queen happily selects a mortal for herself.

BACKGROUND

Nine days after the premiere of Patience in 1881, Arthur Sullivan recorded in his diary: “Gilbert came this evening and sketched out an idea for a new piece—lord chancellor, peers, fairies, etc. Funny, but at present vague.” Gilbert’s funny but 40 Box Office: 330.263.2345

vague idea stemmed, as did several of his plots, from one of his Bab Ballads. “The Fairy Curate” (published in Fun in 1870) tells of a fairy who married an attorney. Their son, Georgie, with the help of his mother, becomes a curate, but is rebuked by his bishop, who mistakes the youthful-appearing mother for a ballet girl. With his characteristic tenacity, Gilbert spent months transforming this sketch into a coherent and multi-faceted comedy. To protect their work from American piracy, the creators and impresario D’Oyly Carte planned simultaneous premieres in London and New York. Rehearsing the work under a false title—Perola—they revealed the true title to the cast only at the final rehearsal. One may suspect a bit of superstition on Gilbert’s part. After three successive box office triumphs— Pinafore, Pirates, and Patience—he may have wished to guarantee success by yet another title beginning with “P.” The magic letter is retained in the alliterative subtitle: “The Peer and the Peri.” That subtitle (a peri is a kind of fairy) suggests one source of lolanthe’s comedy: the collision of mortal and immortal worlds. Like the fairies in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Gilbert’s fairies have the power to create mischief for humans; their threat to open the peerage to competitive examination throws the peers into consternation. But they are also obviously sisters of those winsome and highly marriageable maidens of Pinafore, Pirates, and Patience. And their queen, a strict disciplinarian, cannot quench her love for a handsome young guardsman. That guardsman, Private Willis, is the vehicle for one of Gilbert’s jabs at politicians. Willis opens act two by singing of how clever it is of nature that every boy and girl is born either a little “liberal” or a little “conservative,” thus relieving M.P.’s (members of Parliament) of the necessity of thinking before they vote. Lord Mountararat blithely praises the House of Lords for doing nothing, and doing it particularly well, in good King George’s glorious days. Law is also good-naturedly satirized. The Lord Chancellor solves the amorous fairies’ dilemma at the end by adding a single word to their queen’s law, making it state that every fairy shall die who does not marry a mortal. As was the case with Patience, Iolanthe went into rehearsal before Sullivan had finished the score. The music, of course, shows no signs of hasty composition. From the overture (which reveals an affinity


with Mendelssohn’s style) to the act-two finale, this is one of Sullivan’s most sophisticated and buoyant scores. Consider only two examples of his ingenuity: the fugato passage for orchestra that introduces the Lord Chancellor (suggestive of the law’s entanglements) and the shift from D

minor to D major at the end of his “Nightmare Song,” a shift that perfectly matches the text’s change from the discomforts of darkness to the hope promised by daylight. Adapted from the original of Raymond McCall

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LA PÉRICHOLE (1868)

Music by...................................................Jacques Offenbach Original French Libretto by......................... Henri Meilhac ................................................................... and Ludovic Halévy English Translation by....................................... Jacob Allen Conductor..............................................Wilson Southerland Stage Director........................................ Julie Wright Costa Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer.......................................................... Kiah Kayser Costume Designer................................................ Kim Griffin Lighting Designer.................................. Brittany Shemuga Sound Designer................................................. Chris Wilson Assistant Stage Director...................................Cory Clines La Périchole, a poor street singer...................... Gretchen Windt Piquillo, a poor street singer.........................................Daniel Neer Don Andres, viceroy of Peru......................................Boyd Mackus Don Miguel de Panatellas, first gentleman of the bedchamber..................Stephen Faulk Don Pedro de Hinoyosa, governor of Lima..................................................Ted Christopher Guadalena, first cousin............................................... Chelsea Miller Berginella, second cousin..........................................Caitlin Ruddy Mastrilla, third cousin..................................................... Alexa Devlin Marquis de Tarapote, chamberlain of the viceroy..................................... Spiro Matsos Manuelita, lady of the court...............................Hilary Koolhoven Ninetta, lady of the court............................................... Abby Kurth Brambilla, lady of the court.......................................Hannah Kurth Frasquinella, lady of the court................................ Ivana Martinic First Notary..................................................................... Seth Johnson Second Notary.................................................................. Trevor Todd Ensemble Nathan Brian, Rachael Cammarn, Cody Carlson, Cory Clines, Alexa Devlin, Mailee Herzog, Jonah Hoskins, Seth Johnson, Mason Kelso, Adam Kirk, Hilary Koolhoven, Abby Kurth, Hannah Kurth, Amy Livingston, Ivana Martinic, Emily McCormick, Timothy McGowan, Garrett Medlock, Chelsea Miller, Caitlin Ruddy, Sadie Spivey, Tzytle Steinman, Trevor Todd, DeShaun Tost, Stephen Walley Understudy for La Périchole: Tzytle Steinman Understudy for Piquillo: Garrett Medlock

This production of La Périchole has been partially underwritten by gifts from: Norman K. Keller 42 Box Office: 330.263.2345

Bitsy & Joe Loewenstein

WCLV


SETTING

ACT II........................................................................ Same

Place................................................................ Lima, Peru

10-minute intermission

ACT I............ On the public square, in front of the Cabaret of the Three Cousins

ACT III..........................In the palace of the Viceroy

15-minute intermission

MUSICAL NUMBERS Overture ACT I Lift Up Your Voices, Sing with Joyous Laughter......................................................... Three Cousins, Chorus I Wander Up and Down the City, Incognito................................................................................ Viceroy, Chorus We Spaniards Know, Our Love Will Grow..........................................................................Piquillo, La Périchole Seguidilla: The Muleteer and the Peasant Maid..............................................................Piquillo, La Périchole Let’s Stand Up and Put On Our Hats.............................................................................................................. Chorus Letter Song: Oh, My Life, My Love, I Adore You...............................................................................La Périchole Hola, Hey, Hurry Up I Say................................................................. Three Cousins, Notaries, Viceroy, Chorus I’ve Dined So Well, I Feel Divine.............................................................................................................La Périchole I Hate to Tell You, Pretty Lady.............................................................................. Piquillo, La Périchole, Viceroy Finale and March of the Palanquins...........................................................................................................Ensemble 15-minute intermission ACT II Entr’acte Noble Lord, Get Up Now, Awake........................................................................... Ladies of the Court, Piquillo Is It True What They Tell Us?.................................................................................................................................... Men Of All the Blessings Nature Gave Us............................................................... Piquillo, Panatellas, Don Pedro Finale A Husband Now We Soon Shall See......................................................................................................Ensemble What Does It Mean, This Fiery Passion.......................................................................... La Périchole, Piquillo And Now, Oh Ruler of Our Nation...............................................................................................................Piquillo Take Him Away, Courtiers Gallant..........................................................................................Viceroy, Ensemble 10-minute intermission ACT III (Tableau 1) Entr’acte Bolero: Once Husbands with Submission....................................................................... Don Pedro, Panatellas He Could Not Bribe Me to Deliver...................................................................................................................Piquillo You Are Not Rich, You Are No Beauty............................................................................... La Périchole, Piquillo I’m the Jolly Jailer Bold.......................................................................................... Viceroy, La Périchole, Piquillo Finale: I Adore You, It’s Crazy to Say It.............................................................................. La Périchole, Piquillo ACT III (Tableau 2) Entr’acte March Along, March Along...................................................................................Don Pedro, Panatellas, Chorus Outcasts Poor, Where Are They?........................................ Three Cousins, Don Pedro, Panatellas, Chorus It Is Heard in Every Country................................................................................................... La Périchole, Piquillo Finale.....................................................................................................................................................................Ensemble

S “Lift up your voices … sing with joyous laughter” S ohiolightopera.org 43


ARGUMENT

ACTS I & II: In a public square in 18th-century Lima, the people celebrate the birthday of Don Andres, the Viceroy of Peru. The Governor of Lima, Don Pedro, circulates among the crowd disguised as a fruit vendor. He wants to ensure that the people give the proper responses to Don Andres, who will shortly arrive incognito. The people easily penetrate Don Andres’ disguise and offer well-rehearsed replies to his questions. Two impoverished street singers, Piquillo and La Périchole, entertain the merrymakers with a ballad, but are unable to raise enough money for a marriage license. When Piquillo departs to try his luck elsewhere, Périchole falls asleep. She is discovered by Don Andres, who immediately falls in love and resolves to make her a lady-in-waiting to his deceased wife. While the practical Périchole writes a farewell letter to Piquillo, assuring him nonetheless of her devotion, Don Pedro and his aide Panatellas go in search of a husband; the law requires that only a married woman may live in a widower’s palace. Périchole’s letter plunges Piquillo into despair. He is rescued from a suicide attempt by Don Pedro and Panatellas, who ply him with drink and promise him money and a title if he will marry an unknown lady. Having wined and dined with Don Andres, the tipsy Périchole conceals her surprise on seeing that Piquillo will be her mate. The drunken Piquillo fails to recognize his sweetheart, and after the marriage ceremony, the two are borne off in opposite directions. The next morning at the palace, the viceroy’s chamberlain Tarapote and the ladiesin-waiting are miffed by the fact that the newest among their ranks is a common street singer. They also mock Piquillo, who arrives to collect his promised fee. Don Pedro and Panatellas tell him that he will not be paid until he has formally presented his wife to the viceroy. Don Andres has arranged a splendid reception for Périchole, who challenges the snobbery of the courtiers. Stunned to behold his sweetheart, Piquillo throws her at the feet of Don Andres, who consigns him to the dungeon for recalcitrant husbands. ACT III: Don Pedro and Panatellas have escorted Piquillo to the dungeon, where the unhappy lover muses that his honesty has cost him both his freedom and the woman he loves. Périchole, although exasperated by his behavior, comes to rescue him with the aid of a bag of jewels that she has acquired 44 Box Office: 330.263.2345

from the viceroy. They attempt to bribe the jailer, who turns out to be Don Andres in disguise; he has them chained to the wall. But with the help of an old prisoner, they free themselves and then manage to shackle Don Andres. In the second scene, the dragoons search the public square for the escaped prisoners, who have taken refuge in the Cabaret of the Three Cousins. When the search is suspended for the dinner hour, Piquillo and Périchole, dressed again as street-singers, appear with the old prisoner and sing a ballad about their love and their right to liberty. Don Andres is so moved that he pardons the lovers, but orders the old prisoner back to jail because he has committed no crime for which he can be pardoned.

BACKGROUND

The storyline of La Périchole has its origins in accounts of the life of an 18th-century Peruvian actress—accounts that freely mingle legend and fact and that inspired writers as diverse as Prosper Merimée and Thornton Wilder. Mariquita, or Micaëla Villegas, who was born around 1739, made her debut in Lima probably in her early twenties. Her extraordinary beauty attracted the attention of the Spanish viceroy, Don Antonio Amat, who made her his mistress. Mariquita, who was half Indian, delighted in humiliating the aged viceroy in retaliation for the wrongs the Spaniards had inflicted on her people. On one occasion, so the story goes, she so provoked him that he called her a “perra chola”—slang for “native bitch.” The nickname stuck, and La Périchole became increasingly extravagant in her demands on the viceroy. Merimée, later the creator of the character Carmen, published a one-act comedy in 1829 called La Carrosse du Saint-Sacrement (The Coach of the Blessed Sacrament), which was unsuccessfully produced at the Comedie-Française in 1850, but a century later served as the basis for Jean Renoir’s 1952 film The Golden Coach, with music of Vivaldi and with Anna Magnani playing the actress. Offenbach’s favorite librettists, Ludovic Halévy and Henri Meilhac, transformed the actress into a singer, and gave her a boyfriend, Piquillo, who is also a singer (instead of the bullfighter in Merimée’s version). The title role was first played by the famous and tempestuous Hortense Schneider, who had contributed to the success of La belle Hélène (1864) and La Grande Duchesse de Gérolstein (1867). Although the


initial reception at the Théâtre des Variétés on October 6, 1868 was rather cool, the work eventually gained the favor of Parisian audiences. For a Paris revival in 1874, the creators decided to expand the second act and add a third. The show’s first foreign production took place on January 4, 1869, in French, at Pike’s Opera House in New York City. A quarter century later, the title role was assumed at Abbey’s Park Theatre on Broadway by the inimitable Lillian Russell, whose own company staged the piece. She considered the show “the most perfectly constructed story and libretto that has ever been written in the history of comic opera.” London first saw La Périchole in 1870, with Schneider reprising her title role. There is no doubt that Gilbert and Sullivan—and the subsequent development of British operetta—were strongly influenced by the multiple collaborations of Offenbach, Halévy, and Meilhac and by this work in particular. In Thornton Wilder’s 1929 Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, The Bridge of San Luis Rey, La Périchole appears as a famous actress, but later devoted to pious causes as a way of atonement. The Metropolitan Opera— in its only foray into Offenbach other than The Tales of Hoffmann—mounted the work in 1956 in a notable production starring Patrice Munsel, Cyril Ritchard, and Theodor Uppman. Although somewhat faithful to the original score and script, the orchestration was revised and a few tunes added from Offenbach’s Fantasio, La Grande Duchesse de Gérolstein, and Le 66. OLO’s 1984 and 1993 productions of La Périchole employed this Met Opera version; this summer, however, the company turns back to the 1874 three-act version, in a new English translation. Adapted from the original of Raymond McCall

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P R E M I E R E

CLOCLO (1924)

Music by.................................................................. Franz Lehár Original German Libretto by........................Béla Jenbach English Translation by............................. Steven A. Daigle Conductor........................................................... Steven Byess Stage Director..................................................Steven Daigle Choreographer...............................................Spencer Reese Set Designer.......................................................Daniel Hobbs Costume Designer.................................. Jennifer Ammons Lighting Designer...........................................Daniel Huston Sound Designer................................................ Colin Kovarik Cloclo Mustache............................................................Caitlin Ruddy Severin Cornichon, mayor of Perpignan...................Daniel Neer Melousine, his wife....................................................... Yvonne Trobe Maxime de la Vallé................................................. Benjamin Dutton Chablis, piano teacher................................................Stephen Faulk Petipouf, police officer................................................. Nathan Brian Angèle Garelle, a young widow................................... Abby Kurth Tricolet, called “The Count of Monte Cristo”............................ Jonathan Heller Pipère, called “The Prince of Veuve-Cliquot”..........................Stephen Walley Rasolin, called “The Marquis of Corneville”....................... Benjamin Krumreig Barbesol, called “The Duke of Moulin Rouge”....................................... Adam Kirk Flipeur, called “The Vicomte of Grand Marnier”.............................. Cory Clines Torcheboeuf, called “The Marshal Tabarin”............................................ Jonah Hoskins Marcell Duval, called “Cyrano de Bergerac”................................................. Trevor Todd Claude Monet, called “Count of Nénuphars”.............................................Stephen Faulk Henri Matisse, called “The Duke of bêtes sauvages”.............................. Seth Johnson George Barbier, called “Vicomte of affiches et illustrations”..................DeShaun Tost Pablo Picasso, called “Marquis of the période bleue”...................... Garrett Medlock Von Marambot, minister............................................. Seth Johnson A Police Inspector.........................................................DeShaun Tost A Police Commissioner................................... Benjamin Krumreig Police Officers............................ Cody Carlson, Garrett Medlock Branzini, dancing master............................................. Nathan Brian Gaspard, servant at Cornichon’s....................... Garrett Medlock Brigitte, cook........................................................................ Sarah Best Rosalie, chambermaid at Cloclo’s.......................... Chelsea Miller Josef, lackey at Cloclo’s.............................................. Cody Carlson Maxime’s Mother......................................................Tzytle Steinman

This production of Cloclo has been partially underwritten by gifts from:

Michael & Nan Miller 46 Box Office: 330.263.2345

Mary Alice Streeter

Live Publishing Company


Ensemble Sarah Best, Nathan Brian, Rachael Cammarn, Cody Carlson, Cory Clines, Stephen Faulk, Jonathan Heller, Mailee Herzog, Jonah Hoskins, Seth Johnson, Adam Kirk, Benjamin Krumreig, Abby Kurth, Joelle Lachance, Amy Livingston, Ivana Martinic, Emily McCormick, Garrett Medlock, Chelsea Miller, Sadie Spivey, Tzytle Steinman, Megan Taylor, DeShaun Tost, Stephen Walley

SETTING

Time............................................................................. 1924 ACT I.......................................... Cloclo’s Parlor—Paris 15-minute intermission

ACT II............ Mayor Severin Cornichon’s Country .......................... Home in Perpignan—The Next Day ACT III.............. Paris Jail Cell—The Following Day

MUSICAL NUMBERS Overture ACT I The Gentlemen’s Club of Cloclo............ Josef, Pipère, Rasolin, Flipeur, Tricolet, Men of the Ensemble I’m Looking for a Man............................................................................................................................................ Cloclo Top Hat....................................................................................................................................................... Severin, Cloclo Every Day’s a Holiday When You See Cloclo......................................... Tricolet, Rasolin, Severin, Women .................................................................................................................................................and Men of the Ensemble Love May Pass Us By........................................................................................................................... Maxime, Cloclo The Country’s Calling Me..................................................................................................................................... Cloclo Finale.................................................................................................................................... Melousine, Cloclo, Rosalie 15-Minute Intermission ACT II Bells Peal Softly through the Countryside........ Brigitte, Gaspard, Women and Men of the Ensemble I’ll Light the Flame of Love’s Desire............................................................................................................... Severin Our Family Tree................................................................................................................Melousine, Severin, Cloclo To the Land of Java Paradise............................................................................................................ Severin, Cloclo Babette...................................................................................................................................................... Chablis, Cloclo Come Take the Rose of Youth............................................................................................................................ Cloclo Dear One.................................................................................................................................................. Maxime, Cloclo When I Hunt for Men......................................................................................................................................Melousine Finale.................................................................................................................................................................... Ensemble ACT III Come Take the Rose of Youth (reprise)......................................................................................................... Cloclo Every Day’s a Holiday When You See Cloclo (reprise)..................................................... Severin, Ensemble Melodrama Fools Often Have More Fun.............................................................................................................................. Severin Kiss Me My Love.................................................................................................................................... Cloclo, Maxime When I Hunt for Men (reprise)....................................................................................................................Melousine Finale Ultimo.................................................................................................... Cloclo, Maxime, Severin, Melousine

S “Come Take the Rose of Youth” S Materials for this production were provided by Glocken Verlag through Josef Weinberger Ltd.

ohiolightopera.org 47


ARGUMENT

ACT I: At a party at her Parisian apartment, extroverted Folies-Bergères star Cloclo is providing the guests a preview of her new show number. Among her large number of male admirers is the wealthy Severin, mayor of Perpignan, who enjoys nothing more than escaping from his wife Melousine and enjoying a night on the town with Cloclo. Although she refers to him as “Papa,” milks him for money, and receives an occasional kiss on the hand, their relationship is, otherwise, quite innocent. Her heart is given to the young, but penniless, Maxime, although her love for the high life keeps her attached to Severin. Cloclo’s request-formore-money letter, addressed to “Darling Papa” and sent to his home, is opened by Melousine, who pays a visit to Cloclo’s apartment, assumes that the young woman is her husband’s illegitimate daughter, and, in a moment of maternal devotion, invites her to come live with them in Perpignan. Cloclo, who is in trouble for earlier striking an officer, evades arrest and is more than happy to accept the offer and head off with Melousine. ACT II: At his 50th birthday celebration at his Perpignan home, Severin is surprised to see Cloclo and senses quickly what his wife believes to be his connection to the girl. As part of her “parental” duties, Melousine has engaged the piano teacher Chablis to provide lessons for Cloclo. But he quickly falls in love with her, and piano progress is slow. No sooner has Severin kicked Chablis out of the house than he himself starts advancing on Cloclo, whom he has renamed Babette. Her mind, however, is on Maxime, who, to Cloclo’s delight, shows up at the house and presses his case for marriage. She is not averse to the idea, but still has trouble accepting his lack of means. Severin’s birthday celebration continues with a visit from the Cabinet Minister and the neighbors, but is brought to a quick halt when the very policeman whom Cloclo struck arrives and arrests her. ACT III: Cloclo, serving a 14-day prison sentence, is despondent, but her mood takes a turn for the better when Severin and a hoard of her admirers arrive and—with flowers, sofas, and carpets—turn her cell into an elegant ladies’ boudoir. Severin informs Cloclo that his wife has filed for divorce. But … where is Maxime? 48 Box Office: 330.263.2345

BACKGROUND

With the deaths, in the final years of the nineteenth century, of the four leading composers of the “golden age of Viennese operetta”—Johann Strauss, Franz von Suppé, Karl Millöcker, and Karl Zeller—it looked as if operetta in Vienna had run its course. When, in 1905, Hungarianborn Franz Lehár submitted his score for Die lustige Witwe to the Theater an der Wien, it was accepted, but with the expectation that it would be nothing more than a temporary schedule filler following the unexpected early closing of Leo Fall’s opera Der Rebell. The unparalleled success of The Merry Widow across the globe jump-started the so-called “silver age of Viennese operetta” and placed Lehár in the forefront of the city’s purveyors of operetta. Over the next two decades, he penned more than two dozen works for Vienna, including titles still well known: The Count of Luxembourg, Gypsy Love, and Eva, and some all but forgotten: The Man with Three Wives, The Star Gazer, and The Blue Mazurka. By the beginning of the 1920s, facing strong competition by Emmerich Kálmán, Leo Fall, and Oscar Straus, Lehár’s star had begun to fade. But, as fate would have it, star operatic tenor Richard Tauber had a love for operetta and, in 192021, essayed the role of Józsi in Lehár’s 1910 operetta Gypsy Love. In 1922, at the Theater an der Wien, he took over the lead tenor role in the initial production of Lehár’s Frasquita. Singer and composer began a friendship that would last until their deaths in 1948. Lehár, at the beginning of his career, had set his sights on opera composition and longed, throughout his operetta years, to take the genre to loftier heights. Tauber’s rich voice was the perfect vehicle. Beginning with Paganini in 1925, and with the tenor always in mind, Lehár composed six lushly romantic operettas, all but one with unhappy endings: Der Zarewitsch, Friederike, Das Land des Lächelns, Schön ist die Welt, and Giuditta. But … before embarking on this decade-long journey, he took one last fling at the lighthearted, prewar stylings of The Merry Widow. This was the time at which George Gershwin was starting to jazz-up Broadway, and Maurice Yvain was doing the same for Paris. Lehár biographer Stefan Frey reports of a 1923 interview of the composer by Cleveland Plain Dealer drama critic William F. McDermott, who asked Lehár for his opinion on jazz. “Good! Good! Very good! … As


a matter of fact, I am writing some jazz myself … a new operetta, especially for America. The world will be astonished.” Lehár, obviously with an eye on the international market, infused the score of Cloclo with a panoply of 20th-century dance rhythms—foxtrot, shimmy, blues, java, tango, onestep—that played out side-by-side with the more traditional waltzes and marches. The show opened on March 8, 1924 at Vienna’s Bürgertheater for a 12-week run. A year and a half later, the Johann Strauss-Theater mounted a new production of the work, retitled Clo-Clo, in which the composer, doubling down on his commitment to jazz, replaced the glorious waltz duet for the leading couple with a sultry foxtrot, “Come, the Night Belongs to Sin.” London welcomed Cloclo for a 95-performance run in 1925, but America did not see the work until a production in Chicago in 2009. The 1935 Austrian film Die ganze Welt dreht sich um Liebe (The World’s in Love), starring Marta Eggerth, made use of several tunes from the operetta.

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The Student Prince

The Lady of the Slipper

Primrose

The Music Man

Anything Goes

2017 Season Photos

H.M.S. Pinafore

Anything Goes

The Student Prince

Primrose

Countess Maritza

The Music Man


The Student Prince

H.M.S. Pinafore

Primrose

by Matt Dilyard

Anything Goes

The Music Man

Countess Maritza

H.M.S. Pinafore

Countess Maritza

The Lady of the Slipper


FESTIVAL ARTISTIC AND TECHNICAL TEAM Listed alphabetically … respectful of the ensemble spirit that has characterized OLO since its founding.

JACOB ALLEN, stage director, returns for an 11th season with OLO as director of The Pajama Game. Other OLO directing credits include Brigadoon, My Fair Lady, The King and I, Guys and Dolls, and 2011’s “Triple Bill.” OLO veterans may remember Jacob as Frosch in Die Fledermaus, Hale Underwood in Oh, Lady! Lady!!, Mordred in Camelot, The Prince in Jubilee, Horace Gripps in The Cabaret Girl, Benny in The Desert Song, and Jimmy Jack John Bondy in The Duchess of Chicago. Jacob, a native of Oxford, ME, serves as associate professor and director of the musical theater program at the University of Memphis. He recently received the Thomas W. Briggs Foundation Award for Excellence in Teaching. He holds performance degrees in acting and voice from Lawrence University in Appleton, WI, and his graduate degree in stage direction from the Eastman School of Music, where he studied under OLO artistic director Steven Daigle. As a director and performer, Jacob has worked extensively throughout the Midwest and New England; recent productions include The Wedding Singer, West Side Story, Oklahoma!, Titanic, Chess, Fiddler on the Roof, Children of Eden, Phantom of the Opera, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee, Bat Boy, The Winter’s Tale, and She Loves Me. As a teacher, he is fascinated by the challenges faced by young singers in their development as theatrical performers, and is dedicated to the integration of acting and singing. JENNIFER AMMONS, costume designer, recently received her MFA in costume design from the University of Memphis. Her designs for the University include: The Servant of Two Masters, Nine, Measure for Measure, Empires of Eternal Void, and Bull. Last summer she worked for OLO as associate costume designer for H.M.S. Pinafore, in addition to assistant costume designer for The Lady of the Slipper and The Student Prince. In 2016 she was the assistant to Janice Benning Lacek on the U of M - TSC joint production of Henry V. Other Memphis-area designs include Elephant’s Graveyard at Voices of the South, The Romeo and Juliet Project & Julius Caesar for Tennessee Shakespeare Company, Pinkalicious for New Day Children’s Theatre, and Marcus; or the Secret of Sweet at Hattiloo Theatre. Previously she was the resident costume designer and shop manager for Mars Hill University and Southern Appalachian Repertory Theatre near Asheville, NC.

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ERIC ANDRIES, rehearsal accompanist, is pleased to return to Ohio Light Opera for an eleventh year. He has a wide range of musical experience in several genres. Over the past few years, he has been the rehearsal pianist for several opera companies, including Omaha Opera, Des Moines Opera, Amarillo Opera, Shreveport Opera, Mobile Opera, Syracuse Opera, Indianapolis Opera, Ashlawn Music Festival, and Opera Idaho. Eric has been the musical director for touring educational opera troupes with Opera Iowa, Portland Opera, and Nashville Opera. In addition, he is an avid jazz pianist and has worked with Princess Cruise Line as piano player for the showband. He was also the keyboardist/arranger for a local salsa music group that was featured at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. Eric has been band leader and pianist for several musical shows as well. A native of Baton Rouge, he holds degrees from LSU in piano performance and has studied abroad in France and Austria. STEVEN BYESS, associate music director, is celebrating his 20th season with OLO, where he has conducted over 75 productions and 21 audio and video recordings. He is renowned for his versatility, multi-faceted presence on the podium, passion for music education, and his devotion to promoting a lifelong love and enthusiasm for music and the arts. Equally adept with symphonic, opera, operetta, music theater, and ballet repertoire, Maestro Byess is also the music director of the Portland Columbia Symphony Orchestra (Oregon), the North Mississippi Symphony Orchestra, and the Arkansas Philharmonic Orchestra. He was formerly on the faculties of the Cleveland Institute of Music, the University of Michigan, the University of Denver, and California State University-Los Angeles. He studied conducting at the Cleveland Institute of Music with Louis Lane and Carl Topilow, with Charles Brück at the Pierre Monteux Memorial School for Conductors, and was an assistant conductor to Robert Shaw at the Shaw Institute in Souilliac, France. Mr. Byess has been a frequent conductor at the Pine Mountain Music Festival in Michigan, conducting productions of Le tragédie de Carmen (Bizet/Brook), a highly acclaimed production of Leonard Bernstein’s Candide with the composer’s daughter Jamie Bernstein, and Mozart’s Die Zauberflöte. He conducted productions of Puccini’s La bohème and a critically acclaimed production of Robert


Ward’s The Crucible at the International Vocal Arts Institute in Tel Aviv, Bizet’s Carmen with Emerald City Opera (Colorado), and Copland’s The Tender Land and Sullivan’s H.M.S. Pinafore with Intermountain Opera (Montana). Byess also recently conducted Weill’s Street Scene and Sullivan’s The Pirates of Penzance at the Eastman School of Music, and led multiple performances with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra and the Florida Orchestra. He is a conductor for the Carnegie Hall Weill Music Institute Link Up orchestra education concerts, performing for over 70,000 children in multiple U.S. communities since 2013. A proud seasonal resident of Wooster, his daughter Julianna was a member of the OLO cast for several seasons before serving as the orchestra’s assistant concertmaster, and his daughter Avani was born in Wooster during the 2015 summer festival. TED CHRISTOPHER, baritone/principal guest director, saw his first OLO performance in 1982, and it was love at first sight. This season marks his 20th with the company as a performer and director. Favorite roles over the years include Arthur (Camelot), Billy (Carousel), Danilo (The Merry Widow), The King (The King and I), Harold Hill (The Music Man), Florestan (Véronique), Villon (The Vagabond King), and, of course, anything by Gilbert and Sullivan (at OLO, he has performed the complete canon, save one). In 2005 he began directing at OLO, while continuing as a performer. Some notable productions include The Student Prince (2007), The Fortune Teller (2011), Blossom Time (2012), The Desert Song (2008), Die Fledermaus (2005 and 2014), H.M.S. Pinafore (2006), and Oh, Kay! (2015). This season, Ted will perform Louis Pernasse (Fifty Million Frenchmen), Voltaire/Pangloss (Candide), The Lord Chancellor (Iolanthe), and Don Pedro (La Périchole), and he will direct Iolanthe. In the off-season, he sings, directs, and teaches. In opera, he has appeared throughout the United States and Canada in repertoire ranging from the Baroque to the 20th century. In concert, he has sung at some of the major concert halls of the world, including Carnegie Hall, The Kennedy Center, the Rudolfinum (Prague), and the Schauspielhaus (Berlin). Ted has directed productions with companies throughout the United States, including Rochester Lyric Opera, Opera Louisiane, Atlanta Lyric Theatre, and Cincinnati Opera-on-Tour. He currently serves on the faculty of Pennsylvania State University, where he is artistic director of Penn State Opera Theatre. Previous faculty appointments include the University of Memphis and the Eastman School of Music. As always, he is grateful to the

College of Wooster and the community at large for the generosity and gracious welcome they extend to him and the entire troupe every summer. JULIE WRIGHT COSTA, associate artistic director, is held in high regard as an interpreter and director of operetta, singing numerous leading roles, nationally. Julie is honored to celebrate her 27th season performing with the Ohio Light Opera and delighted to return to the Wooster community, her second home. With OLO, she has sung in over 100 productions, performed over 70 roles, and directed more than 20 of OLO’s season titles. This past year, she staged Offenbach’s Orpheus in the Underworld and Rodgers and Hammerstein’s The King and I for the Western Plains Opera Company and has been invited back to direct Il barbiere di Siviglia and Into the Woods. Performances include the role of Buttercup in H.M.S. Pinafore with Opera Louisiane and the soprano soloist in Mozart’s Requiem with the Salt Lake City Symphony. During OLO’s 40th festival season, Julie will direct Offenbach’s delightful La Périchole and brandish her magic wand as Queen of the Fairies in Gilbert and Sullivan’s Iolanthe. In charge of the casting process for OLO, Julie traveled to seven cities, auditioning over 300 singers from across the country throughout November and December. Career highlights include performances with the opera companies of Nevada, Chautauqua, Cleveland, Michigan, Carolina, and Utah, as well as performances with the symphonies of Charlotte, Illinois, Utah, and Detroit. Favorite performances include leading roles in productions of La bohème, The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, The Turn of the Screw, Bitter Sweet, La Rondine, Countess Maritza, Giuditta, Camelot, Carousel, and the title role in Hello, Dolly! As a director, she has staged productions for the Moab Music Festival, Nevada Opera, Opera Southwest, The Eastman School of Music, The University of Utah, and The Ohio Light Opera, among others. She can be heard on compact disc recordings for the Newport Classic, Albany Records, and Operetta Archives labels. Julie resides in Salt Lake City with her husband, composer John Vasconcelos Costa, and their dachshunds, Freddie and Rose. She is a tenured professor of voice and voice area head at the University of Utah School of Music. STEVEN DAIGLE, artistic director, is professor of opera and head of the Eastman Opera Theatre program at The Eastman School of Music. He has served as part of the artistic staff for more than 300 lyric theater productions, along with calling over 400 professional operatic performances as a production stage manager. Daigle’s experience ohiolightopera.org 53


as a stage director encompasses over 150 titles and a wide range of lyric theater repertoire: Madama Butterfly, Our Town, Manon, Silk Stockings, Serse, Passion, La Traviata, Zip! Goes A Million, To Hell and Back, Il Trovatore, Don Giovanni, Oh, Lady! Lady!!, Carmen, La Rondine, A Little Night Music, Sweeney Todd, Norma, Dialogues of the Carmelites, Susannah, I Capuleti e i Montecchi, Claudia Legare, La finta giardiniera, Il turco in Italia, Così fan tutte, Transformations, La bohème, Suor Angelica, The Tender Land, Porgy and Bess, L’elisir d’amore, and Pelléas et Mélisande, among others. Productions include collaborations with legendary Broadway composer Charles Strouse, Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Robert Ward, Carlisle Floyd, Jake Heggie, Gene Shear, and conductors Louis Lane, Robert Spano, and Evan Whallon. Reviews and articles of Daigle’s work have been published in Opera News, Opera London, American Record Guide, Gramophone, Fanfare, Classical Singer, and Opera Now. As a champion of early American operetta and musical theater, he continues to pursue the preservation of the art form, and has received critical acclaim for his commitment to research, reconstruct, and produce neglected musicals of early Broadway. With Ohio Light Opera, he served as stage manager, assistant director, and general manager under the guidance of company founder James Stuart, and in 1999 was appointed artistic director. His first year with the company was in 1990. At OLO he has called over 300 performances as a stage manager, served on the technical or artistic staff for over 150 productions, and directed over 80 titles, including many American premieres in original versions: Lehár’s Der Zarewitsch (The Zarevitch), Künneke’s Der Vetter aus Dingsda (The Cousin from Batavia), and Kálmán’s Der Zigeunerprimás (Sari), Ein Herbstmanöver (Autumn Maneuvers), Das Veilchen vom Montmartre (The Violet of Montmartre), Der gute Kamerad (A Soldier’s Promise), Marinka, Die Faschingsfee (Miss Springtime), and Der kleine König (The Little King). As artistic director, he has created five performance translations for Kálmán operettas, expanded OLO offerings to include traditional musicals (including those of Kern, Gershwin, Porter, Berlin, Rodgers and Hart, Lerner and Loewe, and Rodgers and Hammerstein), and introduced over 50 new titles to the company’s vast and unique repertoire, including works of Benatzky and Stolz, Bock and Harnick, Friml, Leigh, Loesser, Schubert and Berté, Sousa, Styne and Sondheim, and Willson. Daigle has also supervised OLO’s highly acclaimed series 54 Box Office: 330.263.2345

of CD and DVD recordings on the Newport Classic, Operetta Archives, and Albany Records labels, including historical reconstructions and world-premiere recordings of Friml’s The Firefly, Romberg’s Maytime, Herbert’s Naughty Marietta, Sweethearts, and Dream City and the Magic Knight, Kern’s The Cabaret Girl, and six operettas of Emmerich Kálmán. The company’s unique mission and service to the traditional lyric art form (Viennese, French, and German operetta; Edwardian musicals and Gilbert and Sullivan; early American operetta and musical theater) has been recognized internationally through scholarly publications. Steve served on the faculty of Kent State University, and as assistant director and acting director of the Opera Theater program at the Oberlin Conservatory. In the summer of 1998, he served on the faculty of the Oberlin in Italy program in Urbania, Italy. In September 2003, The Ohio Light Opera was given an Award of Achievement by Northern Ohio Live for its role in preserving operetta for the past 25 years. In the spring of 2006 he received the Outstanding Alumnus award from Southeastern Louisiana University. From 2009-13 he served as chair of the voice and opera department at the Eastman School of Music. Future directing engagements include Ricky Ian Gordon’s The Tibetan Book of the Dead, a production that will include a collaboration with the composer. In May of 2015, Steve received the Eisenhart Award for Excellence in Teaching from the Eastman School of Music and the University of Rochester. MYRON ELLIOTT-CISNEROS, costume designer, returns to OLO to design costumes for The Pajama Game. Previous OLO designs include Annie Get Your Gun and Bluebeard. Chicago credits include An Evening at the Talk House, 3C, The Nether, Pilgrim’s Progress, In a Garden, and The Opponent (A Red Orchid Theatre); The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, To Kill a Mockingbird (Steppenwolf for Young Adults); Oblivion, Ski Dubai, Honest, Sex with Strangers (Steppenwolf First Look); Dental Society Midwinter Meeting (16th Street/Theatre on the Lake); Eclipsed (Northlight Theatre); I Do, I Do, Phantom (Theatre at the Center); Speech & Debate (American Theatre Company). Collaborations include productions with Walkabout Theatre, Stages St. Louis, Profiles Theatre, Concert Dance Inc, Cincinnati Playhouse, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Aurora University, College of Wooster, and Berkshire Theatre Festival. Myron is an assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago.


CAMERON FILEPAS, assistant lighting designer, is a senior at Montclair State University, NJ, majoring in lighting design with a BFA in theater production and design. Cameron is thrilled to be joining OLO for the first time. At MSU, he has designed Punk Rock, Company, and Mad Forest, as well as assisted both student and professional designers. Other credits include work as assistant master electrician on Carrie the Musical and master electrician on Anything Goes, both at MSU. Cameron is currently the resident lighting designer for Hopewell Valley Children’s Theatre and has designed the lights for The Unspoken 200 at the Strawberry One Act festival in the St. Clements Theatre, NYC. Upcoming designs include Wedding Band and Guys and Dolls at the Alexander Kasser Theatre, NJ. Cameron resides in Pennington, NJ and is a student of Daniel Huston at MSU.

Wooster. He is excited to return for his fourth season with the Ohio Light Opera, designing for The Pajama Game, Fifty Million Frenchmen, and Cloclo. Past shows with OLO include Anything Goes, H.M.S. Pinafore, Have a Heart, and One Touch of Venus. His recent credits include 45 Plays for 45 Presidents for NextStop Theatre in Washington, DC, Seussical at Ashland University, and Hansel and Gretel at Eastman School of Music.

DANIEL HOBBS, scenic designer, is a freelance scenic and costume designer and the new professor of scenic design for the College of

windows at Bloomingdale’s and Tiffany’s in New York City.

KATIE HUMPHREY, production stage manager, is excited to celebrate her eighth season in Wooster alongside OLO’s 40th. A native of North Carolina, she has enjoyed working in past seasons with Children’s Theatre of Charlotte, Opera Carolina, and Virginia Opera, and most recently travelled between Montana and Florida, working with Intermountain Opera Bozeman and Sarasota Opera. When she’s not backstage, she CHARLENE ALEXIS GROSS, resident can oft be found around Wooster eating cupcakes costume designer, has held this position for with friends or walking the planets on Beall OLO since 2005. This season she will design Avenue. Some of her favorite OLO productions her 49th and 50th shows for the company. over the years include: Of Thee I Sing, Gypsy, Favorites include The Duchess of Chicago, Camelot, Guys and Dolls, Silk Stockings, The Call Me Madam, Madame Pompadour, Pride Dancing Years, The Lady of the Slipper, and and Prejudice, Of Thee I Sing, The Mikado, everything Gilbert & Sullivan (though H.M.S. and The Dancing Years. Select national designs Pinafore is perhaps her most beloved). include Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland DANIEL HUSTON, production manager/ Playhouse, Florida Repertory Theatre; Sangreal resident lighting designer, is excited to be (Shirley Huston-Findley), Ingenuity Festival, and returning for his eighth season with the Ohio The Gamesters’ Manhattan Magic at the Sands Light Opera. For years the technical nomad Casino, Atlantic City. NYC designs include the of OLO, this summer he will be lighting Flea, Rattelstick Theatre, Perry Street Theatre, Candide, Iolanthe, and Cloclo, in addition NYC Fringe Festival, Joyce SoHo, Symphony to his responsibilities as production manager. Space, and Kunnigham Studios. Dance designs His previous lighting designs for OLO include include GroundWorks, the Yard (Martha’s Primrose, Countess Maritza, The Mikado, La vie Vineyard), West Wave Dance Festival, and NBC parisienne, and The Little Dutch Girl. In 2016 Nightly News. Notable Broadway and London he was also in the chorus of Have a Heart. A West End assistant costume design credits native Ohioian, Daniel graduated from Mount include the Pulitzer Prize-winning Top Dog/ Union College before receiving his MFA in Under Dog (Emilio Sosa, costume designer) and lighting design from Michigan State University. A Class Act (Carrie Robbins, costume designer). A freelance lighting designer based in New York Off-Broadway and regional work include Seattle City, he is the resident lighting designer with Repertory, Guthrie, NY Public Theater, New the Annabella Gonzalez Dance Theatre (NYC). York Shakespeare Festival, Manhattan Theatre Some of Daniel’s recent lighting designs include Company, Berkshire Theatre Festival, and the Almost Maine at the College of Wooster, SEX! Classic Stage Company. Educational design with The Dirty Blonde Productions in New York credits include the the Juilliard School, Columbia City, Assassins and Venus in Fur at the University University, NYU, Ashland University, Baldwin of South Dakota, and American Night at Teatro Wallace, University of Memphis, and The College Milagro in Portland, OR. This past year Daniel of Wooster. Charlene is an assistant professor worked and taught at Montclair State University of theater at Penn State University, as costume in New Jersey. He has also had the opportunity design faculty for the BFA/ MFA program. of working with Spaeth Design on the Christmas

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KIAH KAYSER, scenic designer/charge artist, is pleased to come back to OLO for her third season. Originally hailing from Minnesota, she is a New York-based scenic designer. Her recent design credits include: As Is, Come Back to the Five and Dime, Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean (Regeneration Theatre), A Piece of My Heart (Onomatopoeia Theatre), Primrose (The Ohio Light Opera), It’s a Wonderful Life (TheatreSquared), The Little Mermaid, and The Wizard of Oz (Story Theatre Company). She received her MFA in scenic design form the University of Arkansas, where she designed: Assassins, The Diary of Anne Frank, Twelfth Night, and The Chairs. In addition to her design work, Kiah has also worked as a scenic artist for Irish Repertory Theatre, Infinite Scenic, Variety 57, The Ohio Light Opera, Repertory Theatre of Iowa, Prairie Repertory Theatre, and Cedar Rapids Opera.

CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER, sound designer, is pleased to be returning to OLO for his third season. Christopher developed the sound degrees at Michigan Technological University and is continuing work on a National Endowment for the Arts funded project, “Listening to Parks,” creating an interactive multimedia experience exploring the soundscapes around Lake Superior. His professional activity includes adapting, directing, and composing music for Shakespeare’s Henry V, designing sound for the New York City premiere of Cherylene Lee’s The Legacy Codes, recording The Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, one-off live sound mixing for Ravi Shankar, producing an Ani DiFranco concert, and sound design for the PBS special Yoopera! Christopher is commissioner of sound for the United States Institute for Theatre Technology (USITT) and cochair of design, technology, and management for COLIN KOVARIK, assistant sound designer, the Kennedy Center American College Theatre is happy to be serving OLO for the first time. Festival (KCACTF) region 3. Originally from Mundelein, IL, he received his SPENCER REESE, choreographer/tenor, is BA (in acting) from the University of Wisconsin - thrilled to return to his home-away-from-home Parkside. He has been living in Milwaukee, acting for a fifth summer to celebrate OLO’s 40th and designing sound for the past year, but will anniversary season. After outfitting the entire cast soon be found in Chicago. Favorite design credits with tap shoes (for the first time in the company’s include A Streetcar Named Desire (University history) for last season’s splashy production of Wisconsin - Parkside) and The Hiding Place of Anything Goes, Spencer is excited to keep (Acacia Theatre Co.). Recently, he was awarded the Freedlander stage alive with movement for the national first place for excellence in sound his third summer as choreographer. He began design by the Kennedy Center for his work on his work as a choreographer while earning his Streetcar. Since it would seem he should keep master’s degree in stage directing at the Eastman designing sound, he intends to—while keeping School of Music, where he was a student of Steven up with his other loves. Each skill feeds another. Daigle. He recently completed coursework for his BRANDON M. NEWTON, assistant scenic DMA in voice at the University of Connecticut, designer, is ecstatic to be spending his first where he studies with Constance Rock. In the summer with Ohio Light Opera. Brandon has next academic year, Spencer plans to complete his designed scenery and supervised properties dissertation, which will examine the intersection regionally, including Texas Shakespeare Festival, of music theory and choreographic interpretation ZACH Theatre, Thunder Bay Theatre, Tipping in the context of George Gershwin’s An American Point Theatre, and the Strand Theatre, and in Paris. Spencer feels extremely lucky to have has designed the lighting for the Detroit Dance performed two of his dream roles in the last City Festival with ArtLab J. Recent projects calendar year. First, he donned the slick suit (and include Ragtime and Hamlet. His work has been numerous disguises) of Billy Crocker in Anything published in American Theatre Magazine and Goes with OLO last summer. More recently, he displayed at SETC, the Design Expo at USITT, stepped into Gene Kelly’s gloriously soggy tap and the Kennedy Center as a part of KCACTF. shoes as Don Lockwood in Singin’ in the Rain Prior to graduate school, Brandon was resident with the Westfield Theatre Group. With his scenic designer, charge artist, and properties operatic training and notoriously “fidgety feet,” supervisor for Alma College, and instructor for other favorite roles include Paul in Kiss Me, Kate the Plymouth Community Arts Council. He (OLO 2016), Frick in La vie parisienne (OLO holds a BA in theater and dance from Alma 2016), Ralph Rackstraw in H.M.S. Pinafore College and an MFA in theater from Texas State (UConn), Larry Potter in Oh, Kay! (OLO 2015), and The Cat in the Hat in Seussical. After University. www.newtondesigns.net winning more than 250 individual awards as a competitive ballroom dancer on the collegiate circuit, Spencer recently stepped back into the 56 Box Office: 330.263.2345


world of competitive dance and will be competing Pro-am open standard on the national level. When not performing, teaching, or snuggling with his dog, Spencer enjoys visiting Walt Disney World, spending time with family, and putting on his Sunday clothes every day of the week.

is very happy to be working with OLO in its 40th season. Victor is a proud member of United Scenic Artists, Local 829.

BRITTANY SHEMUGA, resident lighting designer, is excited to return to OLO for her fourth season. Her recent designs include last season’s Anything Goes, H.M.S. Pinafore, The Student Prince, and The Lady of the Slipper. She also designs at various theaters in the Washington, DC area, where she currently resides, including for Second City, Mosaic Theater of DC, and 1st Stage. Brittany has assisted on numerous productions, including Fish in the Dark on Broadway and Mary Poppins at Olney Theatre Center. Originally from Akron, Brittany received her MFA in lighting from the University of Maryland. Her upcoming productions include She the People for Second City.

Oman. He was one of 24 singer/pianist duos worldwide chosen to compete in the Wigmore Hall International Art Song Competition in London. Stateside, Wilson was a principal coach for Seattle Opera’s Young Artist Program, as well as an associate conductor/pianist at Gotham Chamber Opera, Opera Omaha, Des Moines Metro Opera, Opera Birmingham, Opera Memphis, Spoleto USA, and the Mark Morris Dance Group. For six years, Wilson was the senior coach and primary pianist under Lorin Maazel at the Castleton Festival, and he went on to accompany the esteemed conductor-violinist in recital at the Kennedy Center. A former faculty member of Vanderbilt University, Wilson was chosen to perform on Juilliard’s Vocal Arts Honors Recital in Alice Tully Hall. He ushered in the 2014-15 season as associate conductor, head coach, and language specialist for La Rondine at The New Israeli Opera, featuring Angela Gheorghiu. In the fall of 2015, he joined the faculty of the University of Alabama-Tuscaloosa as the first faculty opera coach in the university’s 184-year history, where among his coaching and performing duties he also conducted Sondheim’s A Little Night Music for the UA Opera Theatre. In 2016 Wilson joined the faculty of the Eastman School of Music as assistant professor of opera, where he conducted the revised world premiere of

MARK ROBERT SNYDER-SCHULTE, wardrobe master, is thrilled to be celebrating his 15th year with the Ohio Light Opera. He took JOHN SCHUESSELIN, trumpet/orchestra a small hiatus last year and was the costume personnel manager, is returning for his 33rd designer for The Student Prince. In the fall, he season with the Ohio Light Opera. Since 1999, will be starting his 17th year at the University of John has been on the faculty of the University Akron, where he is an assistant costume designer of Mississippi, where he teaches trumpet, and production assistant in costuming for dance, high brass methods, and performs with the theater, and opera. He is a member of the Akron University of Mississippi Faculty Brass Quintet. Canton Stage Hands Union I.A.T.S.E. Local 48. He earned degrees in trumpet performance WILSON SOUTHERLAND, conductor, is in from the Eastman School of Music, Kent State demand throughout the United States, Africa, University, and LSU. His orchestral experience Europe, and the Middle East. He made his includes performing with the North Mississippi conducting debut to high acclaim with Philip Symphony, Charleston Symphony, Chicago Glass’ Les enfants terribles at North Carolina Sinfonietta, Memphis Symphony, Meridian Opera in 2012, and was the principal conductor Symphony, New World Symphony, Rochester for Eastman Opera Theater’s production of Philharmonic, and Tupelo Symphony Orchestra. She Loves Me in 2013. After first appearing as He has presented at the Hawaii International rehearsal pianist at OLO from 2006-08, Wilson Conference on Arts and Humanities in Honolulu, has since traveled the world: he served as pianist, the College Music Society’s Southern Regional coach, assistant conductor, and recitalist at Conference in Memphis, and the College Music Opera Africa in Pretoria, South Africa; the New Society’s National Conference in Richmond, Israeli Opera in Tel Aviv; Les Azuriales Opera in VA. The Schuesselin family is excited to spend France; AIMS Graz in Austria; Si parla, Si canta another summer with the friendly faces of OLO. in Italy; and The Royal Opera House in Muscat,

VICTOR E. SHONK, scenic designer for Babes in Arms, is in his debut season with Ohio Light Opera. He has been working as a professional freelance scenic designer since 1996. He has designed scenery for television, theater, and opera in many states across the country, including Massachusetts, Wisconsin, California, New York, Michigan, Colorado, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and, of course, Ohio. Victor was born and raised in Lancaster, OH and is glad to be working close to home. He is currently the resident scenic designer/assistant professor at the University of South Dakota and

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Jake Heggie’s Out of Darkness in 2017. Wilson and Opera CNU. This season at OLO, Mr. holds an MM in piano from The Juilliard School. Thompson conducts The Pajama Game, Fifty J. LYNN THOMPSON, music director, has Million Frenchmen, Iolanthe, and the annual a successful career that includes more than 40 July 4th Pops concert. years as conductor, artistic leader, recording artist, performer, and educator. This season is Thompson’s 29th with The Ohio Light Opera, for which he will have led over 1000 performances of more than 120 different productions, including two world premieres and several American premieres. Additionally, Thompson and OLO have recorded 18 full-length CDs on the Newport Classic and Albany Records labels. In 2007, Thompson was named Artistic Director Emeritus of Atlanta Lyric Theatre, a company he assisted in founding in 1980 and for which he has served as music director, conductor, and artistic director. He has collaborated with conductors Louis Lane and Robert Spano; singers Michael Hume, Peter Harrower, and Victoria Mallory; and pianist Paul Ford, accompanist for Stephen Sondheim for over 20 years. Composers Robert Wright and George Forrest consulted on Thompson’s 1998 production of Kismet in Atlanta, and he worked closely with the Kurt Weill Foundation in the remounting of the rarely performed The Firebrand of Florence with OLO in 1999. Thompson has served as principal guest conductor with Pensacola Opera and as guest conductor with the Akron Symphony, Theatre of the Stars in Atlanta, and the Empire State Orchestra in Schenectady. J. Lynn and his wife Adelia, along with their two golden retrievers, Buck and Maggie, currently reside in Newport News, VA, where, at Christopher Newport University, he serves as director for the University Orchestra and music director for Theatre CNU

STEPHEN TOMLIN, technical director, is joining Ohio Light Opera for his second season as a member of the technical direction team. Stephen is currently a third-year graduate student at The University of Memphis and will soon be receiving his MFA in technical direction. Originally from central Texas, he received his BFA from Texas State University under the tutelage of Shane Smith and Dwight Marcus. As well as working with the technical direction team for OLO’s 2017 season, he has also recently technically-directed The Servant of Two Masters, Nine, The Sparrow, and Empires of Eternal Void. Currently, Stephen is soaking up as much knowledge as possible, under Michael S O’Nele, to begin teaching in the fall of 2019. CHRIS WILSON, assistant sound designer, is excited to attend OLO for his first season. Currently studying sound design at Michigan Technological University, he is attaining a variety of experience working on different projects, most notably composing music for Picasso at the Lapin Agile. With this work, he made it as a finalist at the regional KCACTF gathering in Indiana this year. He is a multi-instrumentalist who primarily plays piano, guitar, drums, and his self-made steel tongue drums, which he fabricates out of propane tanks. This background in music is what initially sparked his interest in the world of audio, and he hopes to lead a full career centered around creative audio.

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HOME HOME FOR FOR THE THE GOSPEL MEETS HOLIDAYS SAT / FEBRUARY 23 HOLIDAYS SYMPHONY GOSPEL MEETS SAT 23 SAT // FEBRUARY FEBRUARY 23 SAT / MARCH 2 SYMPHONY GOSPEL MEETS GOSPEL MEETS HARRY POTTER SYMPHONY SAT / MARCH 2 SYMPHONY AND THE PRISONER HARRY POTTER SAT MARCH 2 SAT MARCH 2 OF //AZKABAN™ AND THE PRISONER HARRY POTTER IN CONCERT HARRY POTTER OF AZKABAN™ AND THE PRISONER AND THE FRI /CONCERT MAY 10 PRISONER IN OF AZKABAN™ OF AZKABAN™ FAURÉ IN FRI /CONCERT MAY REQUIEM 10 IN CONCERT Akron Symphony Chorus FAURÉ REQUIEM FRI // MAY 10 Akron Symphony FRI MAY 10 Chamber Choir Akron Symphony Chorus St. Sebastian’s Church, Akron FAURÉ REQUIEM FAURÉ REQUIEM Akron Symphony Chamber Choir Akron Symphony Chorus Akron Symphony Chorus St. Sebastian’s Church, Akron All concerts will be held at Akron Symphony Chamber Akron Symphony Chamber Choir Choir EJ Thomas Hall unless noted. St. Sebastian’s Church, St. Sebastian’s Church, Akron Akron

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FESTIVAL CAST SARAH BEST, mezzo-soprano, comes “tripping hither, tripping thither” from a diverse background in performance and teaching artistry. Her versatility within her field has allowed her to garner a career involving numerous creative projects with organizations throughout New York City and Washington, DC, and in venues like Carnegie Hall, Radio City, and Symphony Space. At OLO, Sarah is often remembered for her crazy faces and physical comedy, playing characters like Freakette (The Lady of the Slipper), Mad Margaret (Ruddigore), Morgan Le Fay (A Connecticut Yankee), and Eva Standing (Jubilee). Other personal favorites: Marian Paroo (The Music Man), Maria Ziegler (The Dancing Years), and Venus (One Touch of Venus). This season’s roles include: Gladys Hotchkiss (The Pajama Game), Billie Smith (Babes in Arms), Looloo Carroll (Fifty Million Frenchmen), and the title role in Iolanthe. A graduate of the University of Maryland (MM) and Mansfield University (BM), Sarah has studied with fabulous and fiercely talented teachers: Delores Ziegler, Linda Mabbs, Dorothy Stone, and Jean-Anne Teal. Grateful for an eighth season with her talented colleagues at OLO, Sarah enjoys summers as an operetta maiden dancing to romantic waltzes, crooning from the Great American Songbook, and delivering saucy Gilbert & Sullivan witticisms.

season, Nathan will be performing the roles of Sid (The Pajama Game), Michael Cummins (Fifty Million Frenchmen), and Mountararat (Iolanthe). He continues to create, produce, and star in The Scrappy Duo. thescrappyduo.com

RACHAEL CAMMARN, soprano and box office assistant, recently received her MM in vocal performance at Bowling Green State University, where she studied with Myra Merritt. She received her BA in vocal performance in 2015 from Concordia College in Moorhead, MN, where she worked for two years as a chorus member with the Fargo-Moorhead Opera Company. In the summer of 2015, Cammarn was awarded a scholarship to the International Music Festival of the Adriatic in Duino, Italy, where she performed her own repertoire and collaborated with composers Jacinth Greywoode and Jeff Schaller. She premiered two art-songs at the Civico Museo Teatrale Fandazione Carlo Schmidl in Trieste, Italy. Cammarn made her solo stage debut in 2016 with The Cleveland Opera as the Second Spirit in The Magic Flute. From 2015-17, she served as resident soprano and teaching artist at Great Lakes Light Opera in Cleveland. There, she helped produce and premiered Cinderlena, a children’s educational program. She recently served as administrator for the Bowling Green Children’s Opera. Cammarn currently sings NATHAN BRIAN, baritone, with the Toledo Opera Chorus. Most recently, first appeared on the Ohio Light she served as the founding president of BGSU’s Opera stage in 2003 as Freddy in chapter of SNATS. Rachael is pleased to return My Fair Lady. Since then, he has to OLO for her third season. been seen as Curly (Oklahoma!), CODY CARLSON, baritone, is President Wintergreen (Of Thee thrilled to be returning to Ohio I Sing), Sky Masterson (Guys Light Opera for his second season. and Dolls), Tommy (Brigadoon), Cody is a vocal performance Frank Butler (Annie Get Your Gun), and Harold major and theater minor at the Hill (The Music Man). Nathan also appreciates University of Utah, where he the opportunities that OLO has provided him to studies with Kirstin Chávez. He perform roles in lesser known gems, such as Hilary previously studied musical theater (Primrose), Spooks (The Lady of the Slipper), at the University of Utah and the American Rudi Kleber (The Dancing Years), Jimmy Winters Musical and Dramatic Academy in New York (Oh, Kay!), Steve Canfield (Silk Stockings), Dick City. Cody’s favorite roles include Maximilian in Trevor (Lady, Be Good!), Martin Barrett (A Candide, Frank in Die Fledermaus, Michael in Connecticut Yankee), and J. Bilkington Holmes Primrose, and Sanjar in The Apple Tree. Cody (Dream City and The Magic Knight). As far as is a member of the Utah Opera chorus and sings Gilbert and Sullivan is concerned, Nathan has with the company regularly. been seen as Ko-Ko (The Mikado), Dick Deadeye (H.M.S. Pinafore), Giuseppe (The Gondoliers), and Robin (Ruddigore). Back for his eleventh 60 Box Office: 330.263.2345


CORY WILLIAM CLINES, bass, is delighted to be returning to OLO for a fourth season as Private Willis in Iolanthe, Myron Hasler in The Pajama Game, and Sheriff Reynolds in Babes in Arms. You may remember Cory from favorite roles in previous seasons, such as The Poet in Kismet, Major Murgatroyd in Patience, Dick Deadeye in H.M.S. Pinafore, Old Adam in Ruddigore, and, of course, “That Tall Guy in the Back.” Cory hails from the Wyoming Rockies—where there is much beauty but little opera—and he holds degrees from the University of Rochester, the Eastman School of Music, and the Longy School of Music. Cory is now a New Yorker, where recent activity has included his role debut as Figaro in The Marriage of Figaro and appearances with the chorus of New York City Opera. Cory is grateful to once again be working with this talented troupe as part of its 40th festival season. ALEXA DEVLIN, mezzosoprano, is back for her sixth season with OLO and is wondering where the time goes. This season, she will be seen as Babe in The Pajama Game, Baby Rose in Babes in Arms, Violet in Fifty Million Frenchmen, and The Old Woman in Candide. In years past, she was delighted to portray Reno Sweeney (Anything Goes), Pinkie Peach (Primrose), Romneya (The Lady of the Slipper), Mrs. Paroo (The Music Man), Annie Oakley (Annie Get Your Gun), two Katishas (The Mikado), Sally Adams (Call Me Madam), Fanny Welch (Oh, Lady! Lady!!), Amanda Boggs (Dream City and the Magic Knight), Lady Thiang (The King and I), Janice Dayton (Silk Stockings), and Adelaide (Guys and Dolls). Other favorite roles include Ruth Sherwood (Wonderful Town), Suzuki (Madama Butterfly), Fay Apple (Anyone Can Whistle), The Baker’s Wife (Into the Woods), and The First Prioress (Dialogues of the Carmelites). She also performs with the New York Gilbert and Sullivan Players, Victor Herbert Renaissance Project Live, and was a soloist for the Lotos Club Foundation. Alexa is a proud graduate of Carnegie Mellon University. Originally from Pittsburgh, she now calls Manhattan home, where she lives with her incredible (and patient) husband David, whom she misses each summer more than the last.

BENJAMIN DUTTON, baritone, is excited to be performing the roles of Marshall Blackstone in Babes in Arms and Maxime de la Vallé in Cloclo for his first season here at Ohio Light. He spent the last two summers at the College Light Opera Company in Massachusetts, where he performed several roles, including The Red Shadow in The Desert Song, Sky Masterson in Guys and Dolls, and Gaston in Beauty and the Beast. There, he received the WISE Foundation Emerging Artist of the Year and the STAGE Foundation Baritone of the Year awards in 2016 and 2017, respectively. In 2017, he became its first annual Kurt Weill/Lotte Lenya Sponsored Artist. Benjamin is originally from New Jersey, but he lives in Delaware while finishing his MM in vocal performance at the University of Delaware. STEPHEN FAULK, tenor, returns for his ninth season at OLO as the title role in Candide, Peter Forbes in Fifty Million Frenchmen, Don Panatellas in La Périchole, and Strephon in Iolanthe. Previous G&S roles include Ralph Rackstraw (H.M.S. Pinafore), Nanki-Poo (The Mikado), Marco Palmieri (The Gondoliers), Frederic (The Pirates of Penzance), The Defendant (Trial by Jury), and Richard Dauntless (Ruddigore). Stephen continues to specialize in operetta repertoire, performing with Light Opera of New York, Troupers Light Opera, Opera Carolina, Augusta Opera, VHRP, LIVE!, Georgia Southern Opera, and the Operetta Foundation in Los Angeles. He has starred in 11 Victor Herbert productions, including the roles of Punks (The Lady of the Slipper), Henri D’Absinthe (Dream City and The Magic Knight), Captain Ladislas (The Fortune Teller), Simon O’Hara (Naughty Marietta), Lopez (The Serenade), Kid Conner (The Red Mill), Barry O’Day (Eileen), and Christian de Neuvillette (Herbert’s Cyrano de Bergerac). Other operetta highlights include Toby Mopham (Primrose), Boris Adzinidzinadze (Can-Can), Kenneth Gibson (Call Me Madam), Charlie Dalrymple (Brigadoon), Freddy Eynsford-Hill (My Fair Lady), Count Lothar Mereditt (Miss Springtime), and Carl Linden (Bitter Sweet). Stephen is the better half of The Scrappy Duo, an online kids’ comedy show. thescrappyduo.com

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JONATHAN HELLER, baritone, is delighted to be returning for his second summer as a young artist with the Ohio Light Opera. You might remember him as one of the members of the Sailor Quartet or as Charlie Cowell. Jonathan earned his bachelor of music degree at Eastman School of Music and just finished the first year of his master’s degree at NYU, where he studies musical theater and vocal pedagogy. He has also performed with the College Light Opera Company and VHRP Live! Favorite roles include Manfred Lewin (Out of Darkness), Charlie Cowell (The Music Man), Vicomte Cascada (The Merry Widow), and Frid (A Little Night Music). Much love to Mom, Dad, Angelea, and all his extended family for always supporting him in his endeavors. MAILEE HERZOG, soprano, is ecstatic to be making her OLO debut. A Utah native and the youngest of six, Mailee has loved being on the stage ever since she was born, and currently studies vocal performance at the University of Utah. As the daughter of a choir-conducting mother and a hard-working father, Mailee has always been diligent and dedicated to her love for singing and theater. Her favorite roles include Cosette in Les Misérables, Liesl von Trapp in The Sound of Music, Kitty in The Drowsy Chaperone, and Amahl in Amahl and the Night Visitors. Known for her performing, Mailee was awarded best supporting actress in a musical two years in a row at Snow College in Utah. Her borderline obsession with Disney has lead to her love of character-performing, as Snow White, at princess parties and festivals. When not on stage, she is either working at a floral shop, buying red lipstick, traveling to Disneyland, or annoying her family with constant singing. JONAH HOSKINS, tenor, hails from Saratoga Springs, UT. He has recently been privileged to die playing the role of Romeo in Gounod’s Romeo et Juliette, sing his guts out as Rinuccio in Puccini’s Gianni Schicchi, and just returned from the Young Artist Vocal Academy with the Houston Grand Opera. When school starts up again, he will begin rehearsals for Handel’s Theodora, playing the role of Septimius at BYU, where he will begin his junior year. Jonah is excited to participate in 62 Box Office: 330.263.2345

OLO’s 2018 season and is eternally grateful for his amazing teachers and mentors, Isaac Hurtado and Darrell Babidge, who have helped him come this far in following his dream. SETH JOHNSON, tenor, is a passionate musician who has worked with numerous operainvolved organizations, including Opera Youth Outreach, Opera Illinois, Toledo Opera, Ohio Light Opera, and Michigan Opera Theater. In these groups, he performed such roles as Nemorino in L’elisir d’amore and Archibald Grosvenor in Patience. He was most recently seen playing the violin as a Mariachi in The Summer King at Michigan Opera Theater. During his time with Great Lakes Light Opera, Seth was the education administrator. When he is not working with the Ohio Light Opera, Seth teaches voice and piano at Forte Music School in Toledo. Seth earned a bachelor of music in vocal performance from Bradley University, where he was the winner of the Concerto/Aria Competition in 2015. MASON KELSO, tenor, is thrilled to be returning to OLO for his second season as ensemble in Pajama Game and Babes in Arms. Last year he was seen as the saucy Hotel Manager in Primrose and part of the tapping ensemble of Anything Goes. In May, Mason graduated from Missouri State University with his BFA in musical theater. He has also performed as Henrik Egerman in A Little Night Music, Ensemble/Dance Captain in Pippin, and Carlos/Winthrop in Legally Blonde: The Musical. Originally from Eudora, KS, Mason is also an avid baker. ADAM KIRK, tenor, is absolutely thrilled to be back for his third summer with the Ohio Light Opera. He recently completed his first year in the musical theater program at Kent State University, and is happy to be back in his hometown of Wooster. He would like to thank his family for their constant support and he wishes all those in attendance today the best of luck in pursuing their dreams the way he has been able to pursue his.


HILARY KOOLHOVEN, soprano, is delighted to return for her third season with OLO, this year playing Phyllis in Iolanthe and Manuelita in La Périchole. A native of Salt Lake City, she received her bachelor of arts from Westminster College in 2014 and her master of music from the University of Utah. She is currently a member of the adjunct voice faculty at her undergraduate alma mater, and has enjoyed three seasons in the chorus at Utah Opera. Previous roles with OLO include Josephine in H.M.S. Pinafore, Bonnie in Anything Goes, Peep-Bo in The Mikado, and Pauline in La vie parisienne. Some of Hilary’s other favorite roles have been Ilia in Idomeneo, Rosita in Un mari à la porte, the title role in La Cenerentola, and Margaret in The Light in the Piazza. In her spare time, she enjoys reading exceptionally large books, playing video games, and cooking. www.hilarykoolhoven.com BENJAMIN KRUMREIG, tenor, is excited to be returning to OLO for a sixth season, as Gus Fielding in Babes in Arms, Earl Tolloller in Iolanthe, and the title role in Candide. A native of Cleveland, Benjamin received his BM from the Baldwin Wallace University Conservatory of Music. He then earned his MM from the University of Illinois School of Music. Well-versed in opera, operetta, and musical theater, Benjamin’s roles include George Gibbs in Ned Rorem’s Our Town, Arcadio in Daniel Catán’s Florencia en el Amazonas, Marco in The Gondoliers, Freddy Eynsford-Hill in My Fair Lady, Fenton in Verdi’s Falstaff, and Pluto in Offenbach’s Orpheus in the Underworld. Previous roles at OLO include Rodney Hatch in One Touch of Venus, Freddie Falls in Primrose, Charlie Dalrymple in Brigadoon, Gardefeu in La vie parisienne, Nanki-Poo in The Mikado, and Ralph Rackstraw in H.M.S. Pinafore. Benjamin was recently seen as Baby John in West Side Story with The Philadelphia Orchestra. He currently studies voice with baritone Mark Schnaible. ABBY KURTH, mezzo-soprano, is excited to be making her OLO debut this summer. Hailing from Bettendorf, IA, she will be a senior in the fall at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, studying under Alisa Belflower. Favorite shows with UNL Opera include Adamo’s Little Women, The Ballad of Baby Doe, and Far from Heaven. She has also enjoyed

performing the roles of Alice Nutting/Edwin Drood in The Mystery of Edwin Drood, Charity in Sweet Charity, and Coricopat in Cats. In her spare time, Abby is a fan of singing with UNL’s Vocal Jazz group, attending concerts of any musical genre, and experimenting in the kitchen. HANNAH KURTH, mezzosoprano, is delighted to return for a fifth summer at OLO. You may remember her from previous seasons as Bianca in Kiss Me, Kate, Cacile Kurt in The Dancing Years, or Molly in One Touch of Venus. A native Iowan, Hannah holds a BM from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and an MM from the Eastman School of Music. She lives with her fiancé Paul (himself an OLO alum) in NYC, where she performs with the New York Gilbert & Sullivan Players, the Victor Herbert Renaissance Project, and various sacred choirs. When not hustling as a freelancer, Hannah enjoys exploring the city’s parks and cooking vegetarian delights. www.hannahmezzo.com JOELLE LACHANCE, mezzo soprano, is thrilled to be making her OLO debut this season as Joyce Wheeler in Fifty Million Frenchmen and Charlene in The Pajama Game. Recent roles include a broom-making, candy-eating Hansel in Hansel and Gretel, an energetic First Spirit in The Magic Flute, and the warrior woman Clorinda in Il combattimento di Tancredi e Clorinda. She enjoys singing wherever she is given the chance, including a short run as Dritte Dame in Die Zauberflöte in Berlin and in several random locations throughout her hometown of Cooperstown, NY. While she has only been to the Baseball Hall of Fame once, she was bitten by the opera bug attending the Glimmerglass Festival nearly a decade ago. Joelle received her BM in music education as well as an MS in music education from Nazareth College in Rochester, NY before going on to receive an MM in historical performance from Boston University. She recently attended CoOPERAtive with Laura Brooks Rice and is a student of Constance Fee. When not exploring the mezzo conundrum of playing either a man or a woman, she enjoys Marvel superhero movies, pub trivia nights, reading copious books, and spending time with her family.

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AMY LIVINGSTON, mezzosoprano, is thrilled to be back at OLO for her second season in the ensemble. She holds a bachelor of music degree in vocal performance from the University of Utah, where her favorite role was Amahl in Amahl and the Night Visitors. She has spent the last few years behind the scenes, teaching and directing children’s theater in Park City, UT, so she is eager to be returning to the stage herself. In the fall, Amy will be relocating to Orlando to pursue an MFA in acting at the University of Central Florida. BOYD MACKUS, baritone, is celebrating his 31st season this summer with Ohio Light Opera. Over this period, he has been involved in over 1300 performances on the Freedlander stage, including lead roles in shows ranging from American musicals (Camelot, South Pacific, Man of La Mancha, Of Thee I Sing) to European operettas (The Cousin from Batavia, Countess Maritza, White Horse Inn, Gypsy Love), and appearances—many in starring roles—in all 14 Gilbert and Sullivan comic operas. Mr. Mackus has performed over 90 leading opera and operetta roles throughout the United States and has been critically acclaimed from the concert hall to the operatic stage. Several of his recital projects have been recorded and distributed by National Public Radio. Mr. Mackus owns an international business in Medieval and Renaissance Illuminated Manuscripts, and also serves as artistic advisor of Wade Artist Management in New York City. Boyd will be seen this summer as Mr. Emmit Carroll in Fifty Million Frenchmen, James, the Anabaptist and Martin in Candide, and Don Andres (Viceroy of Peru) in La Périchole. IVANA MARTINIC, soprano, is thrilled to be returning to OLO for a second season as Cunégonde in Candide, Frasquinella in La Périchole, and Virginia in The Pajama Game. In her previous summer at OLO, during sympoisum week, Ivana played two people at once: Rosa and Lady Maud in the concert version of Ages Ago. Originally from Arizona, she received her BA from the Eastman School of Music in 2014 and obtained her MM from the University of Utah in vocal performance in 2017. While in Utah, she has been studying 64 Box Office: 330.263.2345

with her mentor, Julie Wright Costa. Her past role experience includes Lisette in La rondine, Ghost of Christmas Past in the new opera The Christmas Carol, and Sister Constance in Dialogues of the Carmelites. SPIRO MATSOS, tenor, Wooster’s escoffier, celebrates his 37th season with the Ohio Light Opera. Spiro has been recorded singing professionally in both his native Greece and in this country. OLO fans have learned to look forward to his carefully crafted comic cameos and to enjoy the food and atmosphere in his restaurant on Liberty Street in downtown Wooster. There the walls are covered with OLO production photographs from seasons past, and the booths are often occupied by company members. Spiro would like to dedicate this special 40th-anniversary season to his family and his OLO family. You don’t have to be a superstar, just be a happy star. EMILY McCORMICK, soprano/ mezzo-soprano, is thrilled to be spending her first summer with OLO as part of the young artists program. Originally from Cookeville, TN, she holds a BFA in musical theater from the University of Memphis, where she had the pleasure of studying with Jacob Allen, Kyle Yampiro, and Tracy Thomas. Notable university credits include Claudia Nardi in Nine, Natalie in Next to Normal, and Mariana in Measure for Measure. She has also appeared in A Midsummer Night’s Dream with the Tennessee Shakespeare Company. TIM McGOWAN, tenor is excited for his first season with OLO. He will sing the roles of Peter in Babes in Arms, King Theodore of Corsica in Candide, Waiter in The Pajama Game, and the Quartet in Fifty Million Frenchmen. Tim spent the last two summers at Seagle Music Colony and just completed his master of music degree at Boston University, where he studied with Sharon Daniels. With Boston University’s Opera Institute, he performed as Unnamed Tenor in Philip Glass’ Hydrogen Jukebox, Doofey MacLaran in Griffin Candey’s Sweets by Kate, and the title role in Albert Herring. Additional notable roles include Rinuccio in Gianni Schicchi, Bastien in Bastien und Bastienne, First Armored Man in Die Zauberflöte, Enoch Snow in Carousel, Mayor


Upfold in Albert Herring, Adam in Children of Eden, and La théière in Ravel’s L’enfant et les sortilèges. GARRETT MEDLOCK, tenor, is thrilled to be returning to Wooster for a second season at Ohio Light. Last season, Garrett lost his pants as the Elderly Passenger in Anything Goes, served his kingdom as the Second Lackey in The Student Prince, and danced his heart out as a featured dancer in The Music Man. A graduate of the University of Utah with a bachelor’s of music in vocal performance, Garrett has performed numerous operatic roles in Utah and at young artist programs around the United States and abroad. Favorite roles include Fenton in Falstaff (Lyrical Opera Theater), Nemorino in L’elisir d’amore (University of Utah), and Dr. Blind in Die Fledermaus. Garrett is also a member of the Utah Opera Chorus and has appeared in recent productions of Jake Heggie’s Moby-Dick, Puccini’s La bohème, and Bizet’s Carmen. Garrett feels honored to be a part of Ohio Light Opera’s 40th anniversary season, performing Rene Flambeau in Babes in Arms, Gaspard in Cloclo, and covering the role of Piquillo in La Périchole. CHELSEA MILLER, soprano, hails from Memphis, where she has performed over eight leading roles with the nationally acclaimed Opera Memphis. Most recently she appeared there, in the 2017-18 season, in the roles of Elvira in L’italiana in Algeri and as Doralice Rosetti in Scarlatti’s Il trionfo dell’onore. Last summer, Chelsea joined Des Moines Metro Opera to sing Mrs. Nordstrom in A Little Night Music. In summer 2016, she joined the prestigious Chautauqua Opera, starring as Yum-Yum in Ned Canty’s acclaimed off-the-wall production of The Mikado. At Opera Memphis, Chelsea has taken on the roles of Gretel, Thérèse/ Tirésias (Les mamelles de Tirésias), Queen of the Night, Mabel, Ruth (Musto’s Later the Same Evening), and Madame Silberklang. Chelsea was a 2014 regional finalist of the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. She holds a master’s degree from LSU and an artist diploma from The University of Memphis. Following her summer in Ohio, Chelsea will be making her debut with Anchorage Opera as Josephine in H.M.S. Pinafore.

DANIEL NEER, baritone, enjoys a uniquely diverse career as a singer-actor, librettist and lyricist in musical theater, vocal chamber music, art song, contemporary opera, and multimedia projects. Career highlights include performances at Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center, The Kennedy Center, Guggenheim Museum, Morgan Library, The Apollo, Chicago Art Institute, and festivals including Aspen, Bar Harbor, Ostrava, Prototype, Next Wave, Queens New Music, and Brooklyn BEAT. Daniel has collaborated on new works for Experiments in Opera, The American Repertory Theatre, Royal Opera House Covent Garden, American Opera Projects, Center for Contemporary Opera, UrbanArias, and Music-Theatre Group, and has performed with Metropolis Ensemble, Rebel Baroque Orchestra, New York City Opera, Gotham Chamber Opera, Mark Morris Dance Group, and Washington National Opera. Broadway credits include Baz Luhrmann’s La bohème and the National Theatre’s Coram Boy directed by Melly Still. He studied music and theater at The Ohio State University, University of Michigan, and the Royal Academy of Music in London. Daniel returns to OLO for his eighth season, performing the roles of Voltaire/Pangloss (Candide), Piquillo (La Périchole), Severin (Cloclo), and Vernon Hines (The Pajama Game). ELIZABETH PERKINS, mezzosoprano, is thrilled to be returning to OLO for her fourth season in the ensembles of Candide and Iolanthe. OLO patrons may remember her as Nellie in Annie Get Your Gun (2016), Louis in The King and I (2013), and Prince Rudolph in Jubilee (2011). Her most recent credits include Emily Webb in Our Town, Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz, Fiametta in The Gondoliers, and Terry Mason in Working. Elizabeth is a rising senior in the Tri-County International Baccalaureate Program and has received training at Carnegie Mellon University’s Pre-College Musical Theater Program, the Wayne Center for the Arts, Ballet Wooster, and Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp. In addition to her music and theater pursuits, she is a pianist and published playwright. Elizabeth is delighted to be performing with some of her very favorite people this summer.

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CAITLIN RUDDY, soprano, is excited to return to OLO after last appearing in its 2015 season as Marie in Can-Can and Jane Ashton in Brigadoon. She was also in the vocal company for two summers with College Light Opera Company in Cape Cod. Favorite roles at CLOC include Rosabella (The Most Happy Fella), Baker’s Wife (Into the Woods), Natalie (White Horse Inn), Hodel (Fiddler on the Roof), and Anytime Annie (42nd Street). She grew up in sunny Tampa and did her BM in vocal performance at the University of Florida. She was the 2013 Tampa Bay Symphony Young Artist Competition winner, and performed Rossini’s “Una voce poco fa” with the symphony that spring. Caitlin has now survived five New York winters, but is still a Floridian at heart. She graduated with her MM in voice performance from the Eastman School of Music, where she was Miss Wordsworth in Britten’s Albert Herring. More recently she performed Alice Beane in Titanic with CenterStage Theatre in Rochester, NY. In addition to opera and musical theater, Caitlin loves to sing jazz in more intimate spaces. SADIE SPIVEY, soprano, is delighted to be a member of the company this summer—her OLO debut. Having just returned from a wonderful semester at the Theatre Academy of London, Sadie is a senior at Penn State, where she is pursuing both a BM in voice performance and a BFA in acting. Favorite roles include Medea in Argonautika, Nimue in Camelot, Puck in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and Alice in Alice in Concert (which she performed at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival). Featured ensemble roles this season include Sandra in The Pajama Game and Leila in Iolanthe. TZYTLE STEINMAN, mezzosoprano, is so excited to be returning to Ohio Light Opera this summer. She is originally from sunny Oceanside, CA and is a recent graduate of Northwestern University, where she received her MM. Tzytle has also performed with Utah Festival Opera, Opera NEO, Boston Conservatory Opera, and Lyric Opera San Diego. Last summer at OLO, she was “so excited about the band!” as the balletdancing Mrs. Squires in The Music Man. Her 66 Box Office: 330.263.2345

other favorite past roles include Mother Marie in Dialogues of the Carmelites, The Stewardess in Flight, and Mercedes in Carmen. She is the recipient of the Farwell Trust Award from the Musicians Club of Women in Chicago, and was a finalist in Northwestern University’s Concerto Competition. When she is not singing, Tzytle loves to dance jazz, ballet, tap, and hip hop, as well as finding the best London Fog latte around. MEGAN TAYLOR, mezzosoprano, a New York City-based actress and model, is thrilled to be returning to the OLO stage for her second season. Megan has previously been seen as Geri in Absolutely Nothing, The Waitress in Order-up, and dancing countless roles in The Music Man, Countess Maritza, Anything Goes, H.M.S. Pinafore, The Student Prince, and Primrose here in Wooster. Megan would like to thank all of her friends and family for their love and support in everything she does. She hopes that everyone enjoys watching the shows as much as she has enjoyed being a part of them. TREVOR TODD, tenor, is excited to join OLO for his first season with the company as Charles Edward Stuart in Candide and Dan LaMar in Babes in Arms. Born in Lee’s Summit, MO, Trevor recently graduated from Saint Olaf College in Northfield, MN with a BM in music performance. While at Saint Olaf, Trevor played the roles of Eisenstein in Die Fledermaus and Richard Dauntless in Ruddigore. Additionally, he sang the role of Candide in concert with the Saint Olaf Orchestra. In 2017, Trevor performed with the College Light Opera Company, playing roles such as The Defendant in Trial by Jury and Lord Evelyn Oakleigh in Anything Goes. In 2018, Trevor earned an Emerging Talent Award in the Lotte Lenya Competition. After OLO, he is excited to move to Minneapolis to continue working as a wedding DJ, teaching private students, studying voice, and performing. DeSHAUN MICHAEL TOST, baritone, recently graduated from The American Musical and Dramatic Academy. He is ecstatic to be joining the cast of OLO as Irving De Quincy in Babes In Arms. He studies voice under the wonderful Dorothy Stone. He is


a native of nearby Steubenville, OH, and would like to give thanks to his high school directors, Scott Wolodkin and Julie Battistel. He is a former two-year member of the Ohio All State Choir. DeShaun is honored to be starting his career here at OLO and would also like to thank God for giving him the opportunity to do what he loves. YVONNE TROBE, soprano, is delighted to be returning to OLO for her second season as Melousine in Cloclo, Mrs. Gladys Carroll in Fifty Million Frenchmen, and Brenda in The Pajama Game. Last year at OLO, Yvonne performed the roles of Eulalie Mackecknie Shinn in The Music Man and the Duchess Anastasia in The Student Prince. Recently, Yvonne covered the role of Frasquita in Carmen at the Sarasota Opera and has also performed the roles of: The Governess in The Turn of the Screw, Rosalinde in Die Fledermaus, Suor Angelica in Suor Angelica, and Emma Goldman in Ragtime. A native of Rochester, NY, Yvonne graduated from the Eastman School of Music with her master’s in music and is currently a freelance opera singer and coffee enthusiast. STEPHEN WALLEY, baritone, returns to OLO this season as Maximilian in Candide, Beauregard Calhoun in Babes in Arms, Pipère in Cloclo, and the understudy of Private Willis in Iolanthe. Last season, Stephen was seen as a Lackey in The Student Prince, among other featured chorus moments. Stephen recently finished his undergraduate degree at Indiana University, studying under Wolfgang Brendel. While at IU, he performed the roles of Masetto in Don Giovanni, Baritone Angel in the premiere of the second version of Jake Heggie’s It’s a Wonderful Life, Sir Despard in Ruddigore, and The Imperial Commissioner in Madama Butterfly. Recently, Stephen was the second-prize winner in the Indianapolis Matinee Musicale Competition, a finalist in the Tri-State Vocal Competition with the Opera Guild of Dayton, a Bella Voce award recipient with the Bel Canto Foundation, and the recipient of the 2015 NJ Governor’s Award for Voice. A lover of operetta, Stephen has also performed the role of Falke in Die Fledermaus and, in scenes, Edwin in Die Csárdásfürstin, Candide in Candide, and Strephon in Iolanthe.

GRETCHEN WINDT, mezzosoprano, is thrilled to return to OLO for a fifth season. Previous roles here include Prince Orlofsky in Die Fledermaus, Pitti-Sing in The Mikado, Métella in La vie parisienne, and Cinderella in The Lady of the Slipper. Gretchen has performed with Utah Opera and Symphony, Cincinnati Opera, Opera Idaho, Sarasota Opera, Opera Southwest, Chesapeake Chamber Opera, Bowen Park Opera, DuPage Opera Theatre, and Sugar Creek Symphony and Song. Originally from Chicago, she received her BME from North Park University, her MM from the University of Cincinnati–College-Conservatory of Music, and her DMA from the University of Utah. When she isn’t tripping hither or thither, climbing over rocky mountains, or engaging in general operetta frivolity, she teaches at the University of North Alabama. www.gretchenwindt.com

A mixed-voice A mixed-voice adult volunteer chorus adult volunteer chorus celebrating its its 10th year, celebrating 16th year, presenting a variety of of presenting a variety concerts annually. concerts annually. WeWe welcome new members welcome new members who love to sing! who love to sing! olo07_postnet olo07_postnet 1/24/07 2:37 1/24/07 PM Page 2:37 1 PM Page www.waynechoralunion.org www.waynechoralunion.org

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2018 FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

Laurentiu Norocel concertmaster

Tatiana Zueva assistant concertmaster

Jeffrey Anderson clarinet

David Berghoff viola

Jacob Boca trumpet

Adriana Cerqueda violin

Laura Chalmers clarinet

Ashley Cook oboe

Diana Farah violin

Sarah Gartin percussion

Peter Gooch trombone

Emily Grissing cello

Stephanie Hegedus flute

Will Horner trombone

Adam Keeler guitar

Laura Kellogg flute

Charlotte Kies clarinet

Caleb Laidlaw trumpet

Paul Litterio horn

Kennedy McKain violin

Romina Monsanto cello

Devin Morton oboe

Iva Raykova viola

Mitchell Reiner-Coffey double bass

Thomas Roblee percussion

Emory Rosenow violin

Joshua Schairer bassoon

John Schuesselin trumpet

Sophia Senderak horn

Jack Steward double bass

Beth Uhimchuk violin

Alistair Watson violin

Janna Young harp

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LAURENTIU NOROCEL, concertmaster, returns to Ohio Light Opera for his second season as concertmaster. He appears regularly with many symphony orchestras, including Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra, Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra, Mobile Symphony Orchestra, Arkansas Symphony Orchestra, and Shreveport Symphony Orchestra. Throughout the years, Mr. Norocel has played many concerts and recitals in Romania, Belgium, Bulgaria, Italy, France, Germany, and United States. TATIANA ZUEVA, assistant concertmaster, is excited for her second season with OLO. She graduated from St. Petersburg Conservatory in Russia and is now working on her DMA degree at Michigan State University with Dmitri Berlinsky. She also plays in several orchestras in Michigan: Kalamazoo Symphony Orchestra, Traverse Symphony, and West Michigan Symphony. JEFFREY ANDERSON, clarinet, is pleased to be returning to the OLO pit orchestra for a fifth season. While serving there, he has played clarinet, bass clarinet, tenor saxophone, and piano. Jeffrey is a music instructor at Allen Community College in Iola, KS, where he wears many hats teaching music classes, giving applied lessons, and directing ensembles. This past fall, Allen presented the musical She Loves Me, for which Jeffrey served as music director. He recently finished his DMA in clarinet performance with a cognate in piano performance from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music. He received his master’s in clarinet performance from Bowling Green State University and his bachelor’s in music education from Michigan State University. Favorite shows of past OLO seasons include Dream City and the Magic Knight, Ruddigore, and Kiss Me, Kate. jeffreyandersonmusic.com.

a master’s degree in trumpet performance at the Carnegie Mellon University School of Music. At CMU, he had the privilege of studying with Neal Berntsen and George Vosburgh of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. This fall, Jake will begin further graduate work in music theory at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music in Bloomington. Favorite shows from previous seasons include Gilbert and Sullivan’s Ruddigore (2015), Gershwin’s Oh, Kay! (2015), Offenbach’s La vie parisienne (2016), and Cole Porter’s Anything Goes (2017). ADRIANA PEREZ CERQUEDA, violin, is originally from Puebla, Mexico. She earned her bachelor of music in performance at the Benemerit Autonomous University of Puebla. Adriana is currently pursuing an MM degree at West Texas A&M University in Canyon, TX and is a student in Evgeny Zvonnikov´s studio. She was a member, for four years, of Filarmonica 5 de Mayo, the most important orchestra in Puebla, where she got experience in the genres of opera, operetta, and zarzuela. Additionally, she has participated in music festivals in the United States, France, and Mexico. She is excited to join the Ohio Light Opera orchestra this summer and be involved in the American culture, getting a new and fresh experience in the opera field.

LAURA CHALMERS, clarinet, is excited to be returning for a fourth season at OLO. She is a Montreal native. Despite numerous interventions, Laura decided that she wanted nothing more than to be an orchestral clarinetist, a decision that lead her to study a double DEC in music and science at Vanier CEGEP in Montreal, with Zaven Zakarian. She then went on to do her bachelor’s in music at McGill University, with Alain Desgagne, and was then fortunate enough to study with her personal hero, James Campbell, DAVID BERGHOFF, viola, is performing and then with Eli Eban at Indiana University for with OLO for the first time this season. He is a her master’s and her doctorate, where she served 2018 graduate of the Shepherd School of Music as an assistant instructor. Laura is currently at Rice University, where he performed in the finishing her dissertation, while freelancing and symphony, chamber, and opera orchestras. A teaching in the Chicago area. Chicagoan, David has studied principally under James Dunham at Rice and Rami Solomonow ASHLEY COOK, oboe, is excited for her at DePaul. He was the violist of Quartet Fuoco, first season in the pit with OLO. A native of which won the gold medal in the junior division Charleston, SC, she has now lived for four of the Fischoff Chamber Music Competition, and years in Austin, where she enjoys a varied career has been featured on WFMT’s Introductions, as an orchestral oboist, freelancer, chamber musician, and teaching artist. She frequently WDAV, and on NPR’s From the Top. plays with the San Antonio Symphony, Amarillo JACOB BOCA, trumpet, is thrilled to be Symphony, Laredo Philharmonic, and Brazos returning to Wooster for his fourth season with Valley Symphony. She is a member of LI5TEN the Ohio Light Opera. He is a 2015 graduate of woodwind quintet, which provides outreach the College of Wooster, where he earned degrees concerts through the Austin Chamber Music in trumpet performance and music theory. Jake Center. She also maintains a studio of 30 young then moved to Pittsburgh, where he completed ohiolightopera.org 69


aspiring oboists, who constantly remind her why she’s glad to have lived through middle school. Ashley holds an MM from the University of Texas at Austin, where she was the holder of the prestigious Recruitment Fellowship, and a BM from the University of South Carolina. Primary instructors include Rebecca Nagel, Rebecca Henderson, and Andrew Parker. DIANA FARAH, violin, has finished her master’s program in performance under Stephen Redfield at the University of Southern Mississippi, has worked as assistant teacher in the educational program of the Mississippi Symphony, and is currently a member of the Gulfcoast Symphony Orchestra in Biloxi, MS. She has participated in prestigious musical festivals, including teaching and performing at the Guaranda Music Festival in July 2017 in Ecuador. Also, she played with the Meridian Symphony Orchestra and the Northwest Florida Symphony. A native of Brazil, Diana studied with Pedro Della Role at the São Paulo State School of Music, and was a member of the Sao Paulo Youth Orchestra, Sao Paulo University Chamber Orchestra, Jazz Symphony Orchestra, and Santos Symphony Orchestra. Recently, Diana was accepted at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh to continue her studies with Charles Stegeman. SARAH JAYNE GARTIN, percussion, is ecstatic to be joining OLO for its 40th season as a third-year orchestra member. Sarah holds a BM (performance) from The Florida State University and an MM (performance) from the Eastman School of Music, where she had the privilege of studying with John Parks IV and Michael Burritt. In 2015 Sarah moved back home to San Antonio and is currently freelancing and teaching privately. She performs with the San Antonio Symphony, Mid-Texas Symphony, Midland-Odessa SO, Abilene Philharmonic, and local theaters. When she isn’t gigging, she spends time with her family and her dog Emma, going to live concerts, experimenting with her coffee bar, exercising, or binging a new TV show.

His future aspirations lie in the field of orchestral performance and college teaching. Currently, Peter is a freelance jazz and classical musician in northeast Ohio. Peter’s past instructors include Larry Zalkind, Scott Garlock, Ken Holzworth, Dan Adams, and Doug Bennett. EMILY GRISSING, cello, is thrilled to be returning for her third season with OLO. Emily was captivated and inspired by live classical professional orchestral music at age two, and immediately dove into a life dedicated to in-depth study and performance of music. While other children played in sandboxes, Emily practiced piano, composed music, listened to opera, classical, jazz, and more, while also exploring literature, mathematics, physics, and lingual curiosities. She has studied cello, conducting, free improv, flute, voice, viola, double bass, musical theater, music theory, early music, and more, while establishing herself as an accomplished, collaborative musician. Currently based in Winston-Salem, NC, she has held professional cello positions since age 22 and has participated in prestigious music festivals, including the Aspen Music Festival, the National Repertory Orchestra, the Eastern Music Festival, and the National Orchestral Institute. Close to Emily’s heart is sharing music with others through performance, mentoring, and teaching.

STEPHANIE HEGEDUS, flute, is excited to be joining Ohio Light Opera for her first season. Originally from Michigan, she is currently working on her master of music in flute performance at Indiana University in Bloomington, where she studies with Thomas Robertello and is an associate instructor of flute. Recently, Stephanie was awarded runner-up in the Indiana University Woodwind Concerto Competition. Stephanie has freelanced with various orchestras and ensembles in the Midwest, including the Jackson Symphony (MI), the Westmoreland Symphony (PA), and with staff and faculty ensembles at Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp (MI). In 2016, she graduated with a BFA PETER GOOCH, trombone, is thrilled to be in flute performance and music education from returning to OLO for his fourth season. A native Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, where of Wooster and graduate of Wooster High School, she studied with Alberto Almarza and Jeanne Peter just completed his third year at The Ohio Baxtresser. When not playing the flute, Stephanie State University as a music performance major, enjoys going on runs and drinking coffee. where he studies with Joseph Duchi. Some of WILL HORNER, trombone, is a multifaceted Peter’s hobbies include music composition, golf, trombonist from Grove City, OH, with a lifelong and camping. He has performed with the OSU love for making music. Playing anything from Wind Symphony, OSU Symphony Orchestra, lead jazz trombone to orchestral bass trombone, Wooster Symphony Orchestra, College of he has had the opportunity to perform all over Wooster Jazz Ensemble, the Eastman New Jazz the world—most notably as a soloist with Ensemble, and the Eastman Trombone Choir. the Tatanbanya Big Band (Hungary), soloist 70 Box Office: 330.263.2345


for the Escuela Ernesto Ramos Antonini (Puerto Rico), the ORF Radio “Europatag” Artist for 2016, member of Eddie Louis Und Gnadenlosen (Austria), and touring with Wessell “Warmdaddy” Anderson in Peru. Currently finishing his degree in music at Ohio University, Will stays busy writing, arranging, recording, and playing with plenty of local bands and projects in the greater Columbus area.

with various ensembles in the region, including the Chattanooga Symphony Orchestra and the Lee University Faculty Wind Quintet. Last summer she was named the 2017 second-prize winner in the International Clarinet Association’s Orchestral Audition Competition. Charlotte also enjoys friendly competition in other aspects of her life and has been recently introduced to competitive road cycling. She completed her ADAM KEELER, guitar, has been playing for DMA degree at the University of Cincinnati— 27 years and teaching for over 13. The passion College-Conservatory of Music. began with playing electric guitar in the styles of CALEB LAIDLAW, trumpet, recently graduated the Rock gods: Joe Satriani, Steve Vai, and Eric from The Manhattan School of Music, studying Johnson. Inspired after seeing a concert by Phil trumpet performance. He plans on continuing Keaggy, he switched to acoustic fingerstyle. After his graduate work studying with Ethan Bensdorf, switching to classical guitar in 2005, he was a who plays second trumpet with the New York prizewinner at the James Stroud Classical Guitar Philharmonic. Caleb is a versatile player who has Competition and Outstanding Guitarist of the played in a number of ensembles, including the Year at The University of Akron. Holding an U.S. Army Concert Band, New Jersey Symphony MM in classical guitar, Adam has arranged and Orchestra, New York Staff Band, and West performed “The Christmas Song in a Cello Suite” Point Concert Band. He has won many awards for Helen Welch. He has premiered “Sonata for throughout his career, notably the Cecil Colins 2 Guitars” by Kevin Krumenauer and shared the award for outstanding achievement in brass. stage with Helen Welch, Seth Horan, and Stephen Caleb loves to play in musicals and sit in on Aron, among many others. Adam is currently movie studio sessions. His dream is to move to professor of classical guitar at Kenyon College, Los Angeles to become a studio musician. teaches at the Laurel School in Cleveland, and PAUL LITTERIO, horn, originally of performs in the greater Cleveland area. Massachusetts, received his bachelor of music LAURA KELLOGG, flute, is delighted to return to OLO for a fifth season. Laura lives in Macomb, MI and is a private flute instructor, freelance performer, and substitute teacher. She recently joined the board of directors for the Southeast Michigan Flute Association (SEMFA). Laura currently plays in the Southeastern Michigan Wind Ensemble (SEMWE) and the Detroit Flute Guild. She has performed with the Fort Wayne Philharmonic, Jackson Symphony Orchestra, Cimarron Opera, and the Lansing Symphony Orchestra. Preceding her seasons with OLO, Laura attended the Chautauqua Music Festival in New York for two summers. She has a DMA from the University of Oklahoma and a master’s degree in flute performance from Wright State University. At WSU, Laura received the Outstanding Graduate Student Award, the WSU Bands Clark Haines Most Outstanding Musician Award, and was a winner of the concerto competition. Her teachers include Valerie Watts, Christopher Chaffee, and Richard Sherman. www.laurakelloggflutist.com

degree from McGill University, where he studied with John Zirbel, and his master of music degree from the University of WisconsinMadison, where he studied with Douglas Hill. He has performed as a member of the Dubuque, La Crosse, Fox Valley, Duluth-Superior, and Madison Symphony Orchestras and was the featured solo artist performing the Concerto for Horn and Orchestra Op. 91. by Reinhold Gliere with the Middleton Community Orchestra. KENNEDY McKAIN, violin, is from Upper Sandusky, OH, currently attending The College of Wooster. She is studying violin performance with Thomas Wood. Kennedy is assistant concert master for the Wooster Symphony Orchestra and editor-in-chief of COW’s student-run Goliard Literary Magazine. She enjoys gardening and the company of her many family pets, and hopes to pursue a future career in the music business.

ROMINA MONSANTO, cello, a native of Venezuela, began her musical studies at the Carabobo Conservatory in her hometown Valencia. Her teachers include Carmen Rosa CHARLOTTE KIES, clarinet, simply adores Rodriguez, Paul Desenne, German Marcano, musical theater and is delighted to return for her Alexander Russakovsky, Gary Hardie, and second season with OLO this summer. During the Gal Faganel. Ms. Monsanto graduated with year, Charlotte teaches at Lee University School a bachelor’s degree from The University of of Music in southern Tennessee, and performs Southern Mississippi, and a master’s degree from ohiolightopera.org 71


Baylor University. She has been the winner of competitions such as the William T. Gower, and was a prize-winner of the Mississippi Symphony Orchestra Young Artist Competition. She has performed as soloist and in several ensembles in Venezuela, Mexico, Brazil, and the United States. In addition, she served as the principal cellist of the Porto Alegre Symphony Orchestra in Porto Alegre, Brazil. She has worked with conductors François Lopez-Ferrer, Josep Vicent, Kiyotaka Teraoka, Christopher Dragon, and Gergely Madaras. Ms. Monsanto is currently pursuing a doctor of arts degree in cello performance at the University of Northern Colorado.

musician in the United States, Germany, Austria, Italy, Netherlands, Serbia, and Bulgaria.

IVA RAYKOVA, viola, began her musical studies in Bulgaria at age four and graduated from the National Musical School “Lyubomir Pipkov.” Iva holds a BM and AD in performance from Texas Christian University, where she studied with Misha Galaganov, and an MM in performance from Southern Methodist University, studying with Barbara Sudweeks. She has appeared in festivals such as AIMS in Graz, Castleton Festival, Brevard Music Center, and Music in the Mountains. Iva performs regularly with Irving Symphony, San Angelo Symphony, Plano Symphony, Waco Symphony, and Oddysseus Chamber Orchestra. Since 2016, Iva has been a teaching artist in the El Sistema-inspired program “B Sharp Youth Music,” focusing on creating social change through music. Iva has participated in master classes with E. Goldstein, E. Eckert, M. Strauss, Hugo Wolf Quartet, and Samuel Rhodes, and has performed as chamber and orchestral

Kansas, she holds performance degrees from Kansas State and Oklahoma State Universities, and recently completed additional studies at Cleveland State with Takako Masame. In addition to various university and pit orchestras, she has played with the Tulsa Symphony and numerous chamber ensembles. When Emory isn’t playing violin, she enjoys reading, knitting, and gardening (with limited success). She currently resides in Columbus, where she gigs and teaches, and where she and Mark attempt to get her cat Mr. Butters to exercise (also with limited success).

MITCHELL REINER-COFFEY, double bass, is an incoming senior at the Cleveland Institute of Music, under the direction of Scott Dixon and Maximillian Dimoff. Hailing from Columbus, OH, Mitchell participated in the Chamber Music Connection (CMC), a nationally renowned chamber music organization for aspiring musicians. With CMC, Mitchell toured Italy and had the opportunity to play alongside professional chamber ensembles. Traveling to Cleveland every weekend, Mitchell participated in the Cleveland Orchestra Youth Orchestra, with which he toured China, and the Contemporary DEVIN MORTON, oboe, is thrilled to be Youth Orchestra, for which he played alongside returning for his third season with OLO. Devin artists such as Styx, Bootsy Collins, Graham recently completed his DMA at the University Nash, and many more. of Missouri-Kansas City, where his dissertation THOMAS ROBLEE, percussion, is in his third research focused on adapting Bach’s oboe year as assistant band and orchestra director of d’amore cantatas for performance on modern Alliance City Schools. After completing degrees instruments. In the Kansas City community, he from SUNY Fredonia and The University of has been a featured performer with the Midwest Akron, he has been performing with OLO Chamber Ensemble, the Kansas City Baroque for eleven seasons. Thomas is timpanist of the Consortium, and the Ancora Chorale. Devin has Tuscarawas Philharmonic and has performed also performed with the Kansas City Symphony, with the Akron, Ashland, and Wooster Symphony the Mississippi Symphony, and the North Orchestras. He has performed concerti with Mississippi Symphony orchestras. He holds an orchestras on marimba, timpani, and steel MM from Arkansas State University and a BME pans. Thomas continuously presents clinics and from Mississippi State University. His primary performances of traditional African music on teachers include Celeste Johnson, Barbara gyil (Ghanaian xylophone) and drums. When not Bishop, and Dan Ross. He has performed in performing, he enjoys downhill skiing, mountain master classes for Alex Klein, Sherry Sylar, and biking, and traveling. Thomas and his wife Rene David Cowley. Apart from music, Devin loves welcomed their first child, Oliver, in April 2018. cooking—particularly hand-crafting fresh breads EMORY ROSENOW, violin, is happy to be and pastries. joining OLO for a fifth season. A native of

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JOSHUA SCHAIRER, bassoon, is returning to OLO for his second season this summer. Joshua is an active freelancer, and has played with the Colorado Springs Philharmonic, the Cheyenne Symphony, the Greeley Philharmonic, and the Loveland Opera Theatre Orchestra. Currently residing in New York, he has been heard with the St. Andrew’s Chamber Orchestra, the Geneseo


Symphony Orchestra, and other ensembles in the Greater Rochester and Finger Lakes area. As a member of the award-winning Bear Lake Wind Quintet, Joshua won third place in the Southard Music Competition (2016) and second prize in the American Prize - Chamber Music Division (2017). Originally from Loveland, CO, Josh studied at the University of Northern Colorado. Having received his master’s in music, he now freelances in both Colorado and the western New York area. His principal bassoon teachers were Tristan Rennie and Charles Hansen.

working as freelance performers as they prepare for and take orchestral auditions.

JACK STEWARD, double bass, has taught at The College of Wooster for 11 years and always looks forward to participating in the pit for the Ohio Light Opera. He has performed professionally for 43 years, in all styles of music, in several Ohio orchestras, big bands, Broadway productions, chamber music, and small jazz ensembles.

St. Petersburg String Quartet. While at CCM, he served as a section leader under the baton of Mark Gibson during the Beethoven and Mahler festivals. Additionally, he served as section leader in the Suprima Chamber Orchestra, which toured throughout the United States and Russia. Afterwards, Alistair pursued an MM in violin performance, serving as a graduate assistant under stipend and full scholarship at the Texas Christian University. During this time, he had the pleasure of studying under Misha Galaganov, and playing as a section leader in the Odysseus North Texas Chamber Orchestra, which won third place in the orchestral division of the national “American Prize” competition.

MARK WALLACE, saxophone, is excited to return to Ohio Light Opera for his fourth season, after a yearlong hiatus. He spent last summer training to become a member of the U.S. Army music program. Upon graduation from the U.S. Army School of Music in November, he was stationed with the 249th Army Band, West Virginia National Guard. When not drilling with the 249th, Mr. Wallace maintains a saxophone studio in Columbus, OH. He holds a master’s in SOPHIA SENDERAK, french horn, is excited music from Youngstown State University and a to be joining OLO for her first season. A native bachelor in music education from The Ohio State to the area, Sophia grew up in Barberton, just University. He also enjoys reading, traveling, and north of Wooster. She obtained a BA in music spending time with Emory and her enormously performance and cognitive science from Case large kitty cat, Mr. Butters. Western Reserve University in Cleveland, ALISTAIR WATSON, violin, began his graduating in 2017. She has since left the area collegiate education at the University of and is now pursuing an MM at the Royal Danish Cincinnati—College-Conservatory of Music, Academy of Music in Copenhagen. While the studying under internationally acclaimed violinist city is great, the weather is often not, and she is Piotr Milewski and Alexandra Kazovsky of the looking forward to enjoying the sun again while Ariel String Quartet, with further studies under being a part of these great shows. Evgeny Zvonnikov and the grammy-nominated

BETH UHIMCHUK, violin, is honored to be playing her first season with the Ohio Light Opera. She has her master’s in violin performance from the University of North Texas and her bachelor’s in violin performance and musicology from the University of Cincinnati. Beth has performed with orchestras across the country, most recently as section violinist in the Orchestra of Indian Hill in Indian Hill, MA, and with the pit orchestras of The Arlington Friends of the Drama and The Concord Players, in Arlington, MA and Concord, MA, respectively. She has studied at numerous festivals, including the National Orchestral Institute, Green Mountain Chamber Music Festival, and Wintergreen Summer Performance Institute. Beth recently moved from Boston to Cincinnati with her husband. There, they are

JANNA YOUNG, harp, is pleased to be working for the first time with the Ohio Light Opera. She hails from Lexington, KY, where she started her schooling with Elaine Cook. She is currently in the process of receiving a BM in harp performance from the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music, studying under Gillian Benet Sella. Her most recent pit orchestra experiences were in Minkus’ La Bayadere and Puccini’s Suor Angelica and Gianni Schicchi at CCM.

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FESTIVAL TECHNICAL AND ARTISTIC STAFF SCENE SHOP AND STAGE CREW ALEXANDER CLARK, shop foreman, recently graduated from Texas State University with a BFA in technical production. This is his first season at OLO and he is looking forward, while building up his experience, to his first position outside of university life. During his studies, he held positions in notable plays such as Hamlet as technical director and Ragtime as an assistant technical director. JESSE CROUCH, carpenter, is an Ohio native who has been galivanting across this country/world as a touring stagehand over the last many years. It will be awesome to call OLO home for the summer and to get to work on these fun shows. Most recent credits include A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder tour as the head carpenter and Without Love: A Neanderthal’s Journey, a published book of which I am a co-author. Thank you to OLO for your continuation to keeping the arts alive. BEN GANGER, carpenter, is excited to be building sets for his second season at OLO. He has been involved in many aspects of producing shows at the academic level, both on and off stage. Ben graduated from Goshen College with his bachelor of arts degree in music in 2016, and recently graduated from Bowling Green State University with his master of music degree in vocal performance. While Ben’s degrees are in music, he has stayed actively involved with theater tech for every year of his education. Some of Ben’s recent projects include playing Guglielmo in Così fan tutte, constructing the set for the Bowling Green Children’s Opera, and directing several scenes for BGSU’s opera scenes program. This fall, Ben and his wife, Alex Ganger (assistant stage manager), will be moving to Goshen, IN with their German shepherd River.

Central Missouri. His hobbies include hiking, repairing random objects, and swimming; in his spare time, he models for L’Oreal. Alex really appreciates the opportunity to explore a new state and make new connections. He’s looking forward to an exciting summer. CARI KAMPER, master carpenter, is excited for her second season with OLO, following her junior year with the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music. Some of her favorite projects from her collegiate and high school years include a 12-foot turntable for Cendrillon, building Grease Lightning, a whole forest of Truffula trees for Seussical, and her first two assistant technical directing experiences with CCM Dance. However, the most fun show experience she’s had so far would have to be American Idiot, because she loves the music of Green Day, and her duties as prop drug handler never failed to be entertaining. Her other interests include hiking, general exploration, playing video games, collecting candles, and trying new foods. She would not be where she is today without JR Simons, and she hopes everyone has a delightful summer of theater. MIRANDA THOMPSON, deck chief, is excited to be a part of OLO’s 40th season. A native of Philadelphia, Miranda has the pleasure of working for Venice Island Performing Arts and Recreation Center, Philadelphia Children’s Festival at the Annenberg Center Live, and the Drama League DIRECTORFEST in NYC, as part of the deck/tech crew. Another interest of Miranda’s is being a figure model. This summer, an expressive portrait of Miranda will be featured in the International Portrait Gallery in London.

CHRIS TUCKER, carpenter, is excited to be joining the OLO team for the first time. He has been working in scene shops since his first year of high school and adores backstage work. Chris was the assistant stage manager for Little Shop of Horrors and the stage manager for Quilters, which are his two favorite productions so far. He is currently a junior enrolled at The University of ALEXANDER HOUSTON, carpenter, is from Mount Union, studying theater technology and Warrensburg, MO. He is excited to be working for design, and hopes to continue working in theater the Ohio Light Opera and, once returning home, and not have to return to customer service. will conclude his final year at The University of JESSICA GILLIARD, assistant technical director, is very excited for her first repertory experience at OLO, and the opportunity to bring back what she learns this summer to her students in California. She has one more year until she gets her master of fine arts degree at San Diego State University.

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SCENIC ARTISTS MICHAELA DANNENBRINK, scenic artist, is a graduate of the University of Arizona with a BFA in painting and a minor in theater. From Tucson, she is thrilled to be joining OLO for the summer and to be hiding from the scorching desert sun. This past year, Michaela painted on the sets of Man of La Mancha, Outside Mullingar, and Low Down Dirty Blues at Arizona Theater Company and is excited to be returning in the fall, when it is cooler, for her second ATC season as scenic artist. Her weekends, back home, include teaching art classes at Creative Juice, a local paint-and-sip studio, and hiking Tucson’s many mountain ranges.

the BU School of Theatre. She has painted for theater professionally in Colorado, New York, Massachusetts, and now Ohio. Recent charge artist credits include Rhinoceros, Sweets by Kate, Sister Act, Ghost the Musical, and Emmeline. Outside of theater, Jackie enjoys creative writing, hiking national parks, playing board games, and figure skating. She is very excited for her first season with OLO.

SOPHIA TEPERMEISTER, painter, is thrilled to be working with OLO for the first time. A Boston native, she is currently pursuing a BFA in theater design and technology, with a focus in scenic design, at Penn State. This last year she JACKIE KEMPE, lead painter, is a scenic artist was the scenic charge for Penn State’s production from Boston. In May she completed a two-year of Argonautika, and assistant scenic charge for graduate certificate program in scenic painting at its production of Love in Hate Nation. COSTUMES AND WARDROBE AUSTIN BLAKE CONLEE, wig master, is thrilled to be joining the Ohio Light Opera this summer. Starting this fall, he will begin pursuing his MFA in costume design at the University of Maryland. In 2017 he graduated with his bachelor of fine arts degree in costume design and technology from The University of Memphis. This past year, Austin served as the hair and makeup supervisor for The Utah Shakespeare Festival, styling wigs for A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Guys and Dolls, and The Tavern. He has also worked across the country in various venues: Stage Door Manor, Porthouse Theatre, Emory & Henry College of Theatre & Dance, Tennessee Shakespeare Company, The Rudi E. Scheidt School of Music, and The University of Memphis. Select costume design credits include: Così fan tutte, Little Shop of Horrors, A Streetcar Named Desire, Hamlet, MacBeth, Eurydice, Nine, and The Glass Menagerie.

TAYLOR GREENE, assistant wardrobe supervisor, is ecstatic to be returning to OLO for a second season. Taylor earned a BA at SUNY Potsdam this past May, and cannot wait for his next move in the costume world. He would like to thank his mentors, Alexis Foster and Janet Sussman, for guiding him to success during his time as an undergraduate. He hopes you enjoy this incredible season. KIM GRIFFIN, costume designer, graduated from Baylor University with a BFA in theater design and technology, with an emphasis in costume design and a music minor. She will begin the second year of her MFA at Rutgers University Mason Gross School of the Arts this fall. She began her career working for four years as resident costume designer for the Baylor Opera Theatre. She has also worked as a designer and assistant designer for Waco Civic Theatre, Williamstown Theatre Festival, Theatre Under the Stars, Houston Family Arts Center, Florida Repertory Theatre, and Ohio Light Opera. She was on tour, as head seamstress, with Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey with its Legends production. Her most recent designs are Big, The Musical (TUTS), Miss Nelson Is Missing (FRT), And Then There Were None (HFAC), The Turn of The Screw (BU), and Primrose (OLO). She is excited to be designing La Périchole this season.

MADELINE CORSON, first hand, is thrilled to be attending her first season at OLO. After graduating with a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Madeline started her career in New York, working at Izquierdo Studio and designing for off-Broadway productions. She has since held a costume tech fellowship at Shakespeare Theatre in Washington, DC and currently works at the Milwaukee Repertory Theater as the costume shop assistant/rentals NEWMAN JONES, wardrobe crew, hails from coordinator. Rocky Mount, NC. He is a senior theater design and technology major at Appalachian State University, and plans to graduate in December, ohiolightopera.org 75


2018. His recent work includes costume design for two dances for the Appalachian Dance Ensemble and makeup design for Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street. Newman has been an assistant costume designer for Radium Girls and Flight from the Mahabharath. He has been an actor/technician at Horn in the West and a makeup artist at the Tweetsie Railroad: Ghost Train. He is excited to be working with the cast and crew of Ohio Light Opera this summer.

communications from Tarleton State University. She has been a first hand, stitcher, and wardrobe crew at Illinois Shakespeare Festival, stitcher and wardrobe crew at Utah Shakespeare Festival, wardrobe crew at Dallas Theater Center, and costume crew for Royal Caribbean, which took her to the UK, Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Finland, Estonia, and Russia. When she is not manipulating fabric one way or another, she enjoys training and participating in triathlons, as THOMAS MARTIN, stitcher, just finished his well as getting to know the locals and locales of first year of undergrad at Otterbein University, Ohio, after recently moving from Texas. studying costume design and technology. This is MICHELLE PETTIT, stitcher, recently his first year at OLO. He is from Worthington, completed her second year as an MFA student OH. He has previously worked at Weathervane in costume technology at the University of Playhouse, The Florida Repertory Theatre, and Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She worked at Shadowbox Live. Ohio Light Opera last summer and is excited HEATHER MICHELLE OLES, costume to be returning for the 2018 season. Michelle crafts artisan, is pleased to join the Ohio Light graduated from Wittenberg University with a BA Opera team. She recently graduated with her in theater in 2016, and enjoyed working in its MFA in costume design and technology from costume shop. Previously, Michelle worked as a The University of Memphis. She also holds a stitcher apprentice at the Black Hills Playhouse. bachelor of science degree in theater design and Michelle is from Dublin, OH and was introduced technology, with an emphasis in costume design, to theater costuming at Dublin Jerome High from Utah Valley University. She has worked in School. One of her favorite costumes she has an array of theatrical venues: Tuacahn Center for made was Belle’s ball gown from Beauty and the the Performing Arts, Sundance Mountain Resort Beast. EMILY SANTIAGO, wardrobe crew, recently returned from Florence, where she spent the past semester studying studio arts and Italian. She is excited to be back in America for her first season with OLO. Previously, Emily has worked on several shows at UIC in her hometown Chicago, including Tartuffe, Secret in the Wings, and CYNTHIA B. OVERTON, draper, is excited Glengary Glen Ross. Emily can hardly wait to about her first season at OLO. Cynthia is graduate next spring from UIC with a double currently pursuing her MFA in costume design major in costume design and acting. from The Ohio State University, where she LENA SMITH, stitcher, hails from the slightly recently designed Execution of Justice as well as less windy suburbs of the Windy City. She is created costumes for the season. She holds her a rising junior at the University of Illinois at MEd and BFA in theater arts from the University Chicago, where she is pursuing a BA in theater of Texas at Arlington and her BS in speech design and technology. Lena recently finished Summer Theatre, Ocean State Theatre, Main State Musical Theatre, Utah Valley University, and The University of Memphis. Select costume design credits include: The Wild Party, She Kills Monsters, Spring Awakening, The Sparrow, Mr. Rickey Calls a Meeting, Next to Normal, and The Crucible.

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stitching costumes for UIC’s 2017-18 season, which included productions of The Last Days of Judas Iscariot, Tartuffe, Intimate Apparel, and Florissant and Canfield. Having been released from the horrors of studying, the Chicago winds have now blown Lena over to Ohio for the summer, where she is incredibly excited to be working her first season in the OLO costume shop. KAYLEE ROSE TAYLOR, assistant costume shop supervisor, is pleased to be making her Ohio Light Opera debut this season. She is a recent graduate from the University of Nebraska at Omaha. Her past credits have included: wardobe supervisor and sitcher at Kingsmen Shakespeare in Thousand Oaks, CA, wardrobe supervisor on Opera Omaha’s Stranger from Paradise, wardrobe supervisor for Talisman Production’s Sitting Bull’s Last Waltz, along with numerous productions as costume shop manager and first hand at the University of Nebraska

at Omaha. More can be found at her website: KayLeeRoseTaylor.com EMILY WALLACE, stitcher, is thrilled to be joining the costume shop for her first summer at OLO. Emily is currently seeking her BFA in costume design and technology at the University of Cincinnati–College-Conservatory of Music, from which she plans to graduate in December of 2018. In previous summers, Emily worked at Oberlin-in-Italy as the costume assistant in 2017 and at Maine State Music Theatre as the costume intern in 2016. This past year, Emily worked at Robby’s Quality Alterations and at Boy Scouts of America as their seamstress in Cincinnati. Originally from Houston, she attended the High School for the Performing and Visual Arts, majoring in musical theater. Working in the costume shop after school was how she began her passage into costuming and made her decision to continue working behind the scenes.

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STAGE MANAGEMENT ALEXANDRIA (ALEX) GANGER, assistant stage manager, eagerly returns for her second season as an OLO technician. Born and raised in Goshen, IN, Alex obtained her BA in English from Goshen College in 2016. Despite studying English in undergrad, she has been pursuing a career in stage management after managing her college’s production of Godspell (2012) in the fall of her senior year. Outside the theater, Alex can usually be found curled up in a chair somewhere with a book. If you can draw her away from her book though, Alex would love to talk to you about her other hobbies and interests, including knitting, board games, graphic novels, and rubber ducks. At the end of the summer, Alex will be moving with her husband, Ben Ganger (OLO carpenter), back to Goshen. PAULINE HUMBERT, assistant stage manager, recently graduated from the University of Cincinnati—College-Conservatory of Music (CCM) with a BFA in theater design and production-stage management, having just returned from a semester with Sarasota Opera, where she acted as assistant stage manager on its productions of Carmen and Tiefland. An Ohio native, Humbert has worked at numerous companies in many different capacities, including production stage manager for Cincinnati Chamber Opera’s productions of La vida breve and Il matrimonio segreto, assistant stage manager for Opera San Antonio’s La bohème, and stage management intern for Cincinnati Opera’s La bohème and Song from the Uproar.

The summer of 2016 was spent working within La Musica Lirica’s 17th Annual International Music Festival, including serving as production stage manager on the tour of I dialoghi delle carmelitane, as well as production assistant on tours of La Traviata and Falstaff to six cities throughout Italy and the Republic of San Marino. RACHEL KOBERNICK, production assistant, is incredibly excited to be a part of the OLO production team. Although she is in the process of receiving a BM in vocal performance at the Eastman School of Music, she has always been interested in all aspects of what it takes to create an amazing performance—on or off the stage. At Eastman, Rachel has worked as an assistant stage manager for various opera scenes programs as well as two fully-staged productions. Rachel originally hails from West Chester, PA and, although she doesn’t dabble in many non-music related areas, is receiving a minor in Italian and has a deep love for peanut butter. Rachel is a student of Robert Swensen. LOUIS MARKOWITZ, assistant stage manager, is overjoyed to join OLO for a second summer. Last year, as an assistant stage manager, Louis got to wrangle beer steins in Heidelberg, push on a librarian’s porch in Iowa, prep picnic baskets in France, and work on a variety of other amazing and crazy things. This past season, he worked at The Juilliard School in NYC as a stage management apprentice. Louis is a proud graduate of the University of Pittsburgh’s theater arts department.

PROPERTIES HANNAH DAINS, props artisan, is originally from Los Angeles, but finally experiencing some Midwestern charm as a student of Washington University in St. Louis, where she is studying sociology, writing, and drama. Hannah has previously worked as a props artisan for productions of August: Osage County, Aunt Dan and Lemon, and The Mousetrap, and as props master for Noises Off. In her other life as a writer, Hannah’s poetry has been published by Simon & Schuster and her university, and her plays have been produced in Los Angeles and won awards from the Dramatics Club of St. Louis. IAIN JOSEPH, run crew, is a rising senior at the College of Wooster, where he is studying music composition. He is happy to return for his second season with OLO. This past year, he worked in the scene shop for the College, building 78 Box Office: 330.263.2345

sets for Eurydice as well as for various senior productions. Before attending the College, he was part of the drama club in his high school in Massillon, OH, notably as stage crew for Hello, Dolly! and Beauty and the Beast, and playing 1st horn in the pit orchestra for 42nd Street and The Wizard of Oz. He is excited to become familiar with the shows being performed this season. JENEVIEVE LEE, properties artisan, is excited to be returning to the Ohio Light Opera for her second season. She recently graduated from the University of Wisconsin—Green Bay, with a BA in theater. Prior to this season, she completed her capstone experience as the properties designer for Silent Sky. Once this summer is complete, she hopes to continue her work growing as a properties artisan.


RODERICK McCLADDIE-McLEOD, properties master, is excited to be spending his first season with OLO. A native of Philadelphia, Roderick is pursuing a BFA in scenic design at The Pennsylvania State University. Previous credits include properties master for Penn State Centre Stage’s productions of 110 in the Shade, Twelfth Night, Barbecue, and Kiss of the Spiderwoman. Other projects of note include Cabaret, Camelot, and My Fair Lady (Fuse Productions, State College, PA) and scenic design for Cabaret and The Laramie Project (St. Joseph’s Preparatory School, Philadelphia).

season. Daria spent the past year in the scene shop at the College, making sets for productions like Medea and Eurydice. Free time is spent drawing, writing, swimming, or translating Latin, with a goal, in the near future, of publishing some fiction. Having spent a semester in Edinburgh, Daria hopes to return after the summer for a more permanent continuation of the experience.

MAYA RICKARD, run crew, is excited to be a part of OLO this season. This native of Wooster is earning a BA in musical theater at Ashland University and is expected to graduate JULIET MERILLAT, run crew, is excited to in December of 2019. She is anticipating her experience her first season with OLO. She has role as scenic designer for Chekhov’s The Three been doing theater since high school, and while Sisters, which will be preformed next spring on continuing in college, this is her first stint with a professional company. Hailing from Michigan, the Hugo Young Stage. She is also preparing to Juliet now spends most of her time as a theater attend KCACTF in January as an Irene Ryan nominee. student at the College of Wooster. RILEY WOODS, run crew, is new to the Ohio Light Opera team this summer. A recent graduate from Goshen College Theater Department in Goshen, IN, Riley is now a lighting designer and has plenty of experience both in education and professional theaters. Favorite lighting designs include Kindertransport, Legally Blonde, Julius Caesar, Godspell (2012 version), Tape, Eurydice, Mother Hicks, The King and I, How to Succeed in Business without Really Trying, The Boys Next Door, and The Marriage of Figaro. Riley also completed a senior theater recital in 2017 titled A Night of Light and Dance, which included being lighting designer for a lighting and dance version of Romeo and Juliet and also the Senior Dance Showcase. The goal was to tell the story through DARIA OBERHOLZER, run crew, hailing from lighting, movement, and music, rather than the Cincinnati, has just graduated from the College actual lines. Working on run crew at OLO will of Wooster with a degree in classical studies, be great experience and will help tremendously and is ready to carve a niche as part of OLO this in future designs. RACHEL MONTGOMERY, props artist, recently graduated from Oakland University in Rochester, MI with a BA in theater. She is excited to start her post-collegiate career at the Ohio Light Opera this summer. Her work includes: The Life (properties designer), Freckleface Strawberry (scenic designer), Carrie the Musical (properties designer), and Spring Awakening (scenic artist) at OU, along with Noises Off (assistant properties designer) at the Lake Dillon Theatre Company. One day Rachel hopes to work on Fun Home the Musical. Starting in August, Rachel will be the properties intern at Meadow Brook Theatre. On her days off, Rachel can be found hiking and working on her photography.

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ELECTRICS TREY EIKLEBERRY, master electrician, is excited to be returning to OLO for his third season. Born in the local village of Shreve, OH, he recently graduated from Bowling Green State University, earning his bachelor’s degree in technical theater. While in college, Trey became fascinated by all aspects of theater and even film, but found his true passion within theatrical lighting design. He attributes this newfound dream to his astounding professors and mentors, who continue to inspire him daily to pursue that goal. Aside from playing with lights, he enjoys dabbling in reading, fencing, playwriting, and catching a quick nap whenever possible. LOGAN LOWE, electrician, is excited to be returning to OLO for his second season. An upcoming junior at Eastern Illinois University, he is currently studying musical theater with a special interest in lighting design. This past year he designed lights for the production of Gruesome

Playground Injuries. He also enjoys acting and recently performed in the dramatic comedy She Kills Monsters by Qui Nguyen. In his spare time, he enjoys spending time with friends, listening to music, and playing D&D. RACHEL PICKERING, electrician, is super excited to work with Ohio Light Opera this summer as an intern. Born and raised in Birmingham, AL, she has just finished her freshman year at the University of Montevallo, pursuing a BFA in scenic and lighting design. She has worked as an electrician on UM’s productions of Hair: The Tribal Love Rock Musical and Urinetown: The Musical and was production electrician for the university’s production of Rapture, Blister, Burn. She was able to design her first show this spring for the Acting BFA Showcase at her school, and couldn’t be more excited to start a professional career.

ADMINISTRATIVE/FRONT OF HOUSE STAFF EMILY ANDERSON, front of house manager, is overjoyed to be returning to the Ohio Light Opera for another exciting year with the company. Emily is a rising senior at the College of Wooster, studying English and music. Over the last year, Emily completed the beginning stages of research for Wooster’s senior capstone Independent Study project and hopes to complete a series of graphic short stories in the spring. Emily loves to play video games with friends, embroider, draw, and hang out with Ollie the cat. GRACIE DELOLLIS, house manager, is thrilled to be here for her first season at Ohio Light Opera. Gracie graduated from the College of Wooster in 2016 and has lived in Wooster ever since. She has a passion, inspired by her mother, for all things music and theater, and is excited to work with OLO to help spread that love of theater to the Wooster community and beyond.

There is a story behind everything we eat.

Connect with your food's story. Learn about the family farm growing our greens year-round at www.localrootswooster.com/greens Downtown Wooster • Ashland

80 Box Office: 330.263.2345

IMOGEN CAMPBELL HENDRICKS, box office assistant, is delighted to be working with The Ohio Light Opera in her second season. A music and English double-major at The College of Wooster, she works year-round with the OLO office to bring the season together—you may have spoken with her on the phone. A resident of Virginia, Imogen has spent past summers at the Kenyon Review Young Writer’s Workshop and the Virginia Governor’s School for the Visual and Performing Arts. She studies the oboe under Cynthia Warren. BRENDAN LEMKIN, house manager, hails from Ann Arbor and looks forward to a first season at OLO. Brendan is a rising senior at the College of Wooster, studying music theory and music history, with a focus in early electronic music and musicians. As a busy member of Wooster’s music community, Brendan organizes and runs events for various student groups, as


well as working as an usher for the Department of Music. Spare time is spent studying piano and playing the synthesizer. SANDY McILVAINE, front of house staff, is celebrating her 18th season working year-round with OLO. She can’t believe how lucky she has been to be a part of this wonderful company for so long. Thank you to Laura Neill for giving her this opportunity all those years ago and for her continued friendship. Sandy and her husband live in Smithville with their faithful companion Denali (goldendoodle). Sandy and John celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on July 20th. They met while students here at COW and were married in the historical chapel on the campus. Thank you to John for all of your love and support.

HELEN ROOKER, box office assistant, is a recent graduate from the College of Wooster. Her previous work includes stage management for several productions in Wooster, including the premiere of Latins in La La Land by Migdalia Cruz and Water by the Spoonful by Quiara Alegría Hudes. She has toured both within the United States and internationally as production stage manager with Teatro Travieso’s Women of Ciudad Juárez by Christina Michaus. She is thrilled to put her BA to good use by returning for her second season at Ohio Light Opera. REBECCA SNEDEKER-MEIER, assistant to the executive director/front of house, is thrilled to be here for her fourth season at Ohio Light Opera. Rebecca is a recent graduate of the College of Wooster, where she studied theater

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and mathematics. She worked in the OLO box office during her years (and summers) in Wooster. She was also a member of the public relations team for COW’s theater and dance department and served as dramaturg for several productions. During her final year at the College, she researched the relationship between a regional theater’s income and its geographical location. This study fueled her passion for arts administration and she is excited to continue her journey at Cleveland Play House this fall as a theater management apprentice. ALEXANDRA SWIGER, box office manager, is delighted to be retuning for her sixth year with OLO. Alex is a graduate of Ohio University, where she studied communications and worked with the athletic department marketing office. As a year-round employee of OLO, she gets the fantastic benefit of interacting with patrons for more than just the summer, as well as enjoying the returning faces of both patrons and company year after year. Alex lives in Massillon with her husband Travis, (almost) one-year-old twins Colin and Charlotte, and dog Hank.

◦ Design/Build

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Management

◦ Heavy Manufacturing ◦ Distribution Centers ◦ Corporate Office ◦ Aircraft Hangars ◦ Renovations www.FreemanBuilding.com 82 Box Office: 330.263.2345

YOU CAN FIND

OLO ON


A Festival Symposium on the Lyric Theater Tradition

Taking Light Opera Seriously TUESDAY, JULY 31 - FRIDAY, AUGUST 3 TICKETS — $55/DAY — $175/WEEK

CALL 330.263.2345 FOR TICKETS LIVE CONCERTS: JULY 31—HIGHLIGHTS FROM VICTOR HERBERT OPERETTAS In the musical theater world, it was huge news: the unearthing in 1935, from a New York warehouse, of the musical scores for three unproduced Victor Herbert musicals. One of these, Seven Little Widows, with libretto by Rida Johnson Young—who had already teamed with Herbert for Naughty Marietta and would later join with Sigmund Romberg for Maytime—had been scheduled for production in the 1912-13 Broadway season, but was eventually abandoned. This concert will feature world-premiere highlights from this show as well as a selection of songs drawn from Herbert’s more than 50 stage works. AUGUST 1—SONGS FROM THE CUTTINGROOM FLOOR The path from conception to opening night of an operetta or musical was typically a long one, with songs reworked, reassigned, deleted, or added to fit the evolving demands of the show and its stars. This two-hour concert, presented by members of the OLO cast, will feature discussion and performance of songs that were originally cut from or added to shows of this season’s repertoire. In celebration of OLO’s 40th anniversary, the concert will also include cut/ added songs from many of the 136 shows from past seasons.

AUGUST 2—JACQUES OFFENBACH’S THE THREE KISSES OF THE DEVIL Targeting headon its mission to produce rare works, and in contrast to the comic goings-on this season in Offenbach’s La Périchole, OLO presents the composer’s 1857 Les trois baisers du diable, a serious musical foray into the fantastic and supernatural, accompanied by a superb Offenbach score. The work—in spirt a descendent of Weber’s Der Freischütz and ancestor of Offenbach’s The Tales of Hoffmann—deals with a woodcutter Jacques, his wife Jeanne, a bagpiper neighbor, and the devil incarnate Gaspard, who, to free himself from Satan’s grip, must get Jeanne to declare her love for him three times. AUGUST 3—OHIO LIGHT OPERA: THE NEXT FORTY YEARS If you ever entertained the thought that, in producing 141 works over 40 seasons, the Ohio Light Opera has just about exhausted the repertoire … think again! There are countless works that the company is champing at the bit to do … this two-hour concert provides an opportunity to hear songs from musicals and operettas that might very well appear in future seasons at OLO. From Vincent Youmans to Jerry Herman to Kander and Ebb to Stephen Sondheim, or from Maurice Yvain to Robert Stolz to Pablo Sorozábal to Viktor Jacobi, this concert will, we hope, convince you that, at OLO, treasures yet await you.

The Ohio Light Opera thanks Michael and Nan Miller for their contribution to this summer’s symposium.

The Jewel of Ashland County Arie Lipsky, Music Director & Conductor

401 College Avenue Ashland OH 44805 419-289-5115 www.ashlandsymphony.org

BOOKS IN STOCK used & rare books

Mention “Ohio Light Opera” and receive 10% off the purchase of a single adult or senior ticket. ohiolightopera.org 83


SYMPOSIUM PRESENTERS INCLUDE:

SYMPOSIUM TALKS:

STEVEN DAIGLE is Artistic Director of Ohio Light Opera and Dramatic Director of Eastman Opera Theatre. In his tenure at OLO, he has expanded the company’s scope to include early and mid-century American musicals, introduced more than 73 new titles to OLO’s repertoire, stage-directed scores of productions, and created new performance editions for five Kálmán operettas and 2014’s revelatory Dream City and The Magic Knight by Victor Herbert.

TALKS BY STEFAN FREY

STEFAN FREY has written definitive biographies of the three giants of the Silver Age of Viennese Operetta: Franz Lehár, Emmerich Kálmán, and Leo Fall, as well as an illustrated history of Munich’s Gärtnerplatz Theater. He teaches at universities in Munich and Vienna, is a constant contributor to the press and to radio programs on operetta, has created liner notes for many CD releases, and been involved in operetta productions throughout Germany. MICHAEL MILLER is the chair of the Ohio Light Opera Board of Directors and the president of Operetta Foundation, which has produced staged versions of long-forgotten shows and released more than 30 CDs and DVDs of rare operetta and early musical comedy. RICHARD NORTON is the co-author of American Musical Theatre: A Chronicle and the author of the three-volume A Chronology of American Musical Theatre, which reproduces complete playbill information for every musical that has played Broadway since 1866. He has contributed to numerous musical theater publications, including a German monograph devoted to White Horse Inn, and is currently authoring a book on Frederick Loewe. LAURENCE SENELICK is Fletcher Professor of Drama and Oratory at Tufts University and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His many books include Jacques Offenbach and the Making of Modern Culture; Soviet Theatre: A Documentary History; and The Changing Room: Sex, Drag and Theatre. He has directed productions for the Boston Lyric Opera, Boston Baroque, Castle Hill Concerts, and other organizations. DOMINIC SYMONDS is Professor of Musical Theater at the University of Lincoln, UK. He is the author of We’ll Have Manhattan: The Early Work of Rodgers and Hart (2015) and Broadway Rhythm: Imaging the City in Song (2017). He is also the coeditor of the scholarly journal, Studies in Musical Theater. Dominic writes and directs professionally: highlights include directing the Moldovan state premiere of The Magic Flute (2006) and writing and directing his own Sweet FA (2009).

84 Box Office: 330.263.2345

Cloclo: Franz Lehár‘s Last Encounter with the Light Muse When Franz Lehár began to compose his lighthearted operetta Cloclo, he interrupted the composition to begin work on what is regarded as a turning point in his oeuvre—the operetta Paganini, his first stage work without a happy ending. But is there really such a significant distinction between these two seemingly so different operettas? Béla Jenbach and Franz Lehár‘s Jewish Collaborators Béla Jenbach, the author of Cloclo, was not only one of the most important and interesting librettists of modern Viennese operetta, but also a paradigm for the many Jewish artists in that business. Born in Hungary, he became an actor at the Burgtheater and later on teamed with Leo Stein, librettist of The Merry Widow, with whom he wrote Kálmán’s Die Csárdásfürstin. At the end of his life, he lived, persecuted by the Nazis, in a ménage à trois with his Christian wife and his Christian lover. We gratefully acknowledge the Heuer Foundation for generously supporting our symposium this year SESSION

TUESDAY JULY 31*/**

Morning Coffee: 9:00 a.m. Morning Session I: 9:30-10:30 a.m. Break Morning Session II: 10:45-11:45 a.m.

Lyric Theater Roundtable 1 Host: Steven Daigle 10:30–10:45 a.m. Operetta Film Presentation

Lunch Afternoon Session: 1:00-1:45 p.m.

Evening Session

Laurence Senelick The Red Périchole

Concert Highlights from Victor Herbert Operettas 8:00 p.m.

*Boxed Lunch available—$12/day, $40/4 days. **Cocktail Reception & Dinner—$55. Shuttle service to and


TALK BY RICHARD NORTON The Comeback of Fifty Million Frenchmen: Vintage Cole Porter Rediscovered in Secaucus Not a revue, not a comedy with songs … Cole Porter’s first successful full-length musical comedy, from 1929, was long considered lost, its score, orchestration, and script largely abandoned for 53 years. Why it is important as a breakthrough work for Porter—a signature work if ever there were one—and how it was both lost and found in Secaucus, New Jersey in 1982, make for an interesting tale … Ohio Light Opera to the rescue! TALKS BY LAURENCE SENELICK The Red Périchole In the early 1920s, in the immediate aftermath of the Russian Revolution, the Moscow Art Theatre created a Musical Studio to stage light opera using Stanislavskian principles of acting and directing. One of its first productions was Offenbach’s La Périchole. This talk will show how it was given a revolutionary interpretation and how it was greeted when it toured to New York. The Offenbach Century Offenbach’s operas were a significant force for cultural change, both in his own time and to the present day. His work offered an alternative, WEDNESDAY AUGUST 1*

irreverent, sexualized view of life which audiences around the world found liberating, both personally and socially. In the theater as well as in the spheres of literature, art, film, and even politics, the composer inspired cutting-edge innovations. This talk will demonstrate how his influence on modern culture has been undervalued. TALKS BY DOMINIC SYMONDS More than Johnny One-Notes: The Many Successes of Rodgers and Hart Babes in Arms is one of Rodgers and Hart’s most celebrated shows, from the zenith of their golden years in the mid-1930s. By this time, however, the pair were already seasoned veterans, with around 20 full-scale musical comedies under their belts. This talk will explore some of the highlights and lowpoints of their illustrious collaboration. All Possible Worlds: Bernstein on Broadway Leonard Bernstein is a towering figure in American musical history, contributing not only some of the most enduring Broadway shows, including Candide, but also gaining international recognition for his classical works, and for conducting the New York Philharmonic. This talk will consider some of the achievements that have formed his remarkable legacy.

THURSDAY AUGUST 2*

FRIDAY AUGUST 3* 

Concert Songs from the Cutting-Room Floor (part 1)

Laurence Senelick The Offenbach Century 9:30-10:15 a.m.

Concert Ohio Light Opera The Next Forty Years (part 1)

10:30–10:45 a.m.

10:15–10:30 a.m.

10:30–10:45 a.m.

Concert Songs from the Cutting-Room Floor (part 2)

Concert Jacques Offenbach’s The Three Kisses of the Devil 10:30-11:45 a.m.

Concert Ohio Light Opera The Next Forty Years (part 2)

Stefan Frey Cloclo: Franz Lehár’s Last Encounter with the Light Muse

Richard Norton The Comeback of Fifty Million Frenchmen: Vintage Cole Porter Rediscovered in Secaucus

Dominic Symonds All Possible Worlds: Bernstein on Broadway

Dominic Symonds More than Johnny One-Notes: The Many Successes of Rodgers and Hart 6:30-7:15 p.m.

Stefan Frey Béla Jenbach and Franz Lehár’s Jewish Librettists 6:30-7:15 p.m.

Lyric Theater Roundtable 2 Host: Steven Daigle 6:30-7:15 p.m.

from off-site dinner is included. ohiolightopera.org 85


THE COLLEGE OF WOOSTER The College of Wooster is America’s premier college for mentored undergraduate research. Since 2002, U.S. News & World Report has asked college presidents and deans which colleges provide the best undergraduate research opportunities and senior capstone experiences. Only two have made both lists every year: Wooster and Princeton. The presidents and deans also ranked Wooster seventh among all liberal arts colleges where “the faculty has an unusually strong commitment to undergraduate teaching.” Founded in 1866, Wooster enrolls approximately 2,000 students, who choose from more than 50 academic programs in the sciences, humanities, business and the arts. Wooster offers an excellent, comprehensive liberal arts education, culminating in a rigorous senior project, in which each student works one-on-one with a faculty mentor to conceive, organize and complete a significant research project on a topic of the student’s own choosing. Through this distinctive program, every Wooster student develops abilities valued by employers and graduate schools alike: initiative, selfconfidence, independent judgment, creative problem solving, and strong written and oral communication skills. Almost a third of Wooster’s students play intercollegiate athletics, a third perform in at least one musical group, and a quarter are involved in theater and the arts. Notable Wooster alumni include award-

86 Box Office: 330.263.2345

winning filmmakers Duncan Jones ’95, director of Source Code and Moon, and J.C. Chandor ’96, writer and director of Margin Call and All Is Lost; Jennifer Haverkamp ’79, director of the Environmental Defense Fund’s international climate program; Donald Kohn ’64, former vice chairman of the Federal Reserve; Laurie Kosanovich ’94, general counsel for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; and Sangram Sisodia ’77, director of the Center for Molecular Neurobiology at the University of Chicago.


Experience international Lyric Theater classics in the charming atmosphere of Wooster, Ohio “Renowned summer festivals within driving distance once didn’t seem so far away. Shaw and Stratford in Canada, and even Ravinia in Chicago, remain magnets for those who are high on theater and music .... It’s a relief to know that a day trip to seek artistic replenishment need not crush the budget. One of the most reasonable and delightful destinations is Wooster, where The Ohio Light Opera is in its 30th season of operetta merriment.” Donald Rosenberg, The Plain Dealer

“It’s nothing less than remarkable that ... [The Ohio Light Opera] singers and instrumentalists gather from around the country to arrange a seasonal platter of rotating repertory — Viennese operetta, Gilbert & Sullivan shows, classic American musicals — that these indefatigable performers serve with style through the months of June, July and August.” Elaine Guregian, The Beacon Journal

ohiolightopera.org 87


DINING, ACCOMMODATIONS & SHOPPING Dining

Secrest Arboretum........................ 330-263-3761

BayLobsters Cafe & Fish Market.......................... 330-601-1200

Wayne County Convention and Visitors Bureau................... 330-264-1800

Blue Barn Winery & Vineyard...... 330-844-0381

Wooster Country Club................. 330-263-1890

Broken Rocks Café & Bakery...... 330-263-2949

Shopping

City Square Steakhouse................ 330-262-2489 The Henry Station........................ 330-264-2226 Matsos Family Restaurant & Pizza..................................... 330-264-8800 Olde Jaol Steakhouse & Tavern.................................. 330-262-3333

Books in Stock............................. 330-262-2665 The Cheese Shoppe...................... 330-264-6214 Coblentz Chocolates.................... 800-338-9341 Everything Rubbermaid............... 330-264-7119 Friendtique................................... 330-262-2012

Pine Tree Barn.............................. 330-264-1014

Local Roots ................................. 330-263-5336

Quince Bakery & Cafe................. 330-816-0233

Lynch’s Irish Imports.................... 330-601-0160

TJ’s Restaurants........................... 330-264-6263

Motts Oils & More...................... 330-601-1645

Tulipan Hungarian Pastry and Coffee Shop........................ 330-264-8092

VHSource LLC............................. 917-815-8899

Accommodations

Wooster Chocolate Company....... 234-249-2462

Bed & Breakfast

White Jewelers............................. 330-264-3324 Wooster Gift Corner.................... 330-264-6117

Black Squirrel Inn......................... 330-317-6627

World Crafts................................ 330-857-0590

Gasche House Bed & Breakfast.... 330-264-8231

Services/Manufacturing

Market Street Inn......................... 330-262-4085 Mirabelle Bed & Breakfast........... 330-264-6006

Foxfield Preserve Natural Cemetery................................... 330-359-5235

Cabins/Campgrounds

Freeman Building Systems............ 330-264-3424

Meadow Lake Park...................... 330-435-6652

Kendal at Home........................... 440-835-8681

Hotel/Motel

Kendal at Oberlin......................... 800-548-9469

Best Western Wooster Hotel......... 330-264-7750

Postnet......................................... 330-345-7447

Hampton Inn Wooster................. 330-345-4424

Ray Crow Cleaners...................... 330-262-5010

Hilton Garden Inn Wooster.......... 330-202-7701

Seaman Corporation.................... 330-262-1111

Rodeway Inn................................ 330-262-5008

United Titanium........................... 330-264-2111

St. Paul Hotel............................... 330-601-1900

Wooster Eye Center...................... 330-345-7200

Wooster Inn/ The Wooster Inn Pub................ 330-263-2660

Banking/Financial

Entertainment/Attractions

Commercial & Savings Bank........ 330-263-1955

Ashland Symphony...................... 419-289-5115 Canton Symphony........................ 330-452-2094

Critchfield, Critchfield & Johnston, Ltd........................ 330-264-4444

The Cleveland Orchestra.............. 216-231-7300

Edward Jones (Portage Rd.)......... 330-264-2168

Meadow Lake Park...................... 330-435-6652

Edward Jones (Riffel Rd.)............ 330-262-3572

The National First Ladies’ Library ........................................ 330-452-0876

Farmer’s Trust Company.............. 330-439-4495

88 Box Office: 330.263.2345

Briggs Financial Group................. 330-264-2811


GILBERT & SULLIVAN

H.M.S. Pinafore THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA J. Lynn Thompson CONDUCTOR

Steven Daigle ARTISTIC DIRECTOR

43 COMPLETE RECORDINGS

AVAILABLE ON CD

Tomás Bretón La Verbena de la Paloma

André Messager Véronique

Reginald De Koven Robin Hood

Lionel Monckton The Arcadians

Rudolf Friml The Vagabond King • The Firefly

Jacques Offenbach The Brigands • Bluebeard

Gilbert & Sullivan Utopia Limited • Patience • Princess Ida The Grand Duke • The Gondoliers The Mikado • Ruddigore • The Sorcerer The Yeomen of the Guard The Pirates of Penzance • H.M.S. Pinafore

Sigmund Romberg Maytime • Blossom Time

Victor Herbert Dream City and the Magic Knight Eileen • Mlle. Modiste Naughty Marietta • The Red Mill Sweethearts • The Fortune Teller Emmerich Kálmán The Bayadere • Sari • Autumn Maneuvers Countess Maritza • The Violet of Montmartre A Soldier’s Promise • Miss Springtime Jerome Kern The Cabaret Girl

Franz Schubert Das Dreimäderlhaus John Philip Sousa El Capitan Oscar Straus The Chocolate Soldier Johann Strauss A Night in Venice Carl Zeller Der Vogelhändler Compilations Gems from The Ohio Light Opera, Vol. 1 Gold and Silver

These recordings are mastered and adapted from our summer productions. Most are released as two-CD sets and are available in the lobby during the season and in finer book and music stores. Patrons may also call The Ohio Light Opera at 330-263-2345 to purchase compact discs or visit www.ohiolightopera.org to view CDs and to order online. Available on DVD: Kálmán: A Soldier’s Promise, Herbert: Mlle. Modiste, Kálmán: The Duchess of Chicago, Herbert: Dream City and the Magic Knight, Kálmán: The Little King, Kern: Have a Heart.

ohiolightopera.org 89


COMPLETE REPERTOIRE 1979-2018

THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA — STEVEN DAIGLE, ARTISTIC DIRECTOR Richard Adler & Jerry Ross The Pajama Game...................................... ’18 Daniel Auber Fra Diavolo................................................ ’88 Lindsay Warren Baker & Amanda Jacobs Pride & Prejudice....................................... ’06 Ralph Benatzky & Robert Stolz White Horse Inn......................................... ’05 Irving Berlin Call Me Madam.......................................... ’14 Annie Get Your Gun.................................. ’16 Leonard Bernstein Candide...................................................... ’18 Jerry Bock & Sheldon Harnick Fiddler on the Roof.................................... ’09 Tomás Bretón La verbena de la paloma............................. ’99 Emmanuel Chabrier L’étoile................................................. ’91, ’08 Federico Chueca & Joaquín Valverde La gran vía................................................. ’99 Noël Coward Bitter Sweet......................................... ’93, ’98 Reginald De Koven Robin Hood............................................... ’04 Leo Fall The Dollar Princess.................................... ’95 Madame Pompadour.................................. ’11 Rudolf Friml The Vagabond King.............................. ’87,’04 Rose Marie................................................. ’03 The Firefly.................................................. ’06 Edward German Merrie England........................................... ’84 Tom Jones.................................................. ’92 George & Ira Gershwin Of Thee I Sing............................................ ’09 Lady, Be Good!.......................................... ’13 Oh, Kay!.................................................... ’15 Primrose..................................................... ’17 William Gilbert & Arthur Sullivan The Gondoliers....... ’79, ’82, ’85, ’88, ’92, ’96, ’01, ’06, ’13 The Grand Duke.......................... ’81, ’95, ’03 H.M.S. Pinafore...... ’79, ’80, ’81, ’82, ’83, ’84, ’85, ’87, ’90, ’93, ’98, ’02, ’06, ’09, ’13, ’17 Iolanthe..... ’79, ’81, ’84, ’87,’91, ’98, ’05, ’10, ’18 The Mikado...... ’79, ’80, ’81, ’82, ’84 ’85, ’88, ’92, ’95, ’00, ’04, ’08, ’12, ’16

90 Box Office: 330.263.2345

The Pirates of Penzance........ ’79, ’80, ’81, ’83, ’84, ’86, ’89, ’94, ’99, ’03, ’07, ’11, ’14 Ruddigore......... ’79, ’82, ’85, ’88,’95, ’02, ’09, ’15 Trial by Jury.... ’79, ’80, ’81, ’84, ’86, ’89, ’98, ’11 The Yeomen of the Guard.... ’79, ’81, ’84, ’86, ’90, ’97, ’01, ’08, ’15 Patience............ ’80, ’83, ’86, ’91, ’97, ’04, ’10 Princess Ida.................... ’80, ’85, ’94, ’99, ’07 The Sorcerer............ ’80, ’82, ’86, ’89, ’96, ’05 Utopia Limited........ ’80, ’83, ’87, ’93, ’00, ’12 Reynaldo Hahn Ciboulette................................................... ’90 Victor Herbert Naughty Marietta ............................... ’89, ’00 Eileen......................................................... ’97 The Red Mill.............................................. ’01 Sweethearts................................................. ’02 Mlle. Modiste............................................. ’09 The Fortune Teller...................................... ’11 Dream City and The Magic Knight................ ’14 The Lady of the Slipper................................ ’17 Richard Heuberger The Opera Ball........................................... ’90 Emmerich Kálmán Countess Maritza............ ’85, ’89, ’94, ’03, ’17 The Gypsy Princess...................... ’86, ’93, ’10 The Bayadere.............................................. ’98 Sari/Der Zigeunerprimás............................ ’01 Autumn Maneuvers ................................... ’02 The Violet of Montmartre.......................... ’04 A Soldier’s Promise/Der gute Kamerad....... ’05 The Duchess of Chicago............................. ’07 Marinka: The Mayerling Story.................... ’08 Miss Springtime.......................................... ’12 The Little King........................................... ’14 The Little Dutch Girl................................. ’16 Jerome Kern The Cabaret Girl........................................ ’08 Oh, Lady! Lady!!....................................... ’14 Have a Heart.............................................. ’16 Eduard Künneke The Cousin from Batavia..................... ’00, ’02 Charles Lecocq Clairette/La fille de Madame Angot............ ’89 Le petit duc................................................ ’00 Franz Lehár The Merry Widow........... ’83, ’90, ’96, ’04, ’11 The Count of Luxembourg............ ’88, ’97, ’10 The Land of Smiles.............................. ’90, ’03


Giuditta...................................................... ’94 Gypsy Love................................................ ’95 The Czarevitch........................................... ’08 Friederike................................................... ’15 Cloclo......................................................... ’18 Mitch Leigh Man of La Mancha..................................... ’05 Alan Jay Lerner & Frederick Loewe Camelot............................................... ’00, ’11 Brigadoon............................................ ’02, ’15 My Fair Lady....................................... ’03, ’14 Frank Loesser Guys and Dolls........................................... ’12 André Messager Véronique................................................... ’97 Karl Millöcker The Beggar Student............................. ’87, ’96 Lionel Monckton The Arcadians............................................ ’98 Otto Nicolai The Merry Wives of Windsor..................... ’95 Ivor Novello The Dancing Years..................................... ’16 Jacques Offenbach The Brigands................................ ’83, ’92, ’03 La Périchole................................. ’84, ’93, ’18 La vie parisienne........................... ’85, ’99, ’16 La belle Hélène............................. ’86, ’94, ’09 Bluebeard............................................ ’87, ’07 Orpheus in the Underworld.......... ’88, ’91, ’01 The Grand Duchess of Gerolstein......... ’89, ’13 Christopher Columbus............................... ’95 Robinson Crusoe........................................ ’96 Regrets Only/M. Choufleuri................ ’96, ’98 The Island of Tulipatan.............................. ’05 Evening Wind............................................. ’11 Cole Porter Jubilee........................................................ ’11 Silk Stockings............................................. ’13 Can-Can..................................................... ’15 Kiss Me, Kate............................................. ’16 Anything Goes............................................ ’17 Fifty Million Frenchmen............................. ’18 Richard Rodgers & Oscar Hammerstein II Carousel..................................................... ’01 South Pacific............................................... ’04 The Sound of Music.................................... ’07 Oklahoma!................................................. ’08 The King and I........................................... ’13 Richard Rodgers & Lorenz Hart A Connecticut Yankee................................ ’12 Babes in Arms............................................ ’18 Sigmund Romberg The Student Prince.... ’82, ’85, ’92, ’99, ’07, ’17 The Desert Song........................... ’86, ’95, ’08

The New Moon............................. ’91, ’97,’06 Maytime..................................................... ’05 Blossom Time............................................. ’12 Franz Schubert & Heinrich Berté Das Dreimäderlhaus................................... ’02 John Philip Sousa El Capitan.................................................. ’10 Oscar Straus The Chocolate Soldier.................. ’88, ’98, ’12 A Waltz Dream........................................... ’91 Johann Strauss A Night in Venice.................. ’81, ’91, ’99, ’09 The Gypsy Baron.................. ’82, ’89, ’00, ’13 Die Fledermaus............... ’86, ’92, ’97, ’05, ’14 Wiener Blut.................................. ’87, ’93, ’98 The Merry War........................................... ’01 The Queen’s Lace Handkerchief................. ’06 Jule Styne & Stephen Sondheim Gypsy......................................................... ’10 Arthur Sullivan & F.C. Burnand Cox and Box.......... ’79, ’80, ’81, ’84, ’89, ’96, ’99, ’11 Arthur Sullivan & B.C. Stephenson The Zoo..................................................... ’99 Franz Von Suppé Boccaccio............................................ ’83, ’02 My Fair Galatea......................................... ’90 Heitor Villa-Lobos Magdalena.................................................. ’92 Robert Ward Lady Kate................................................... ’94 Robert Ward & James Stuart A Friend of Napoleon................................. ’05 Kurt Weill Street Scene................................................. ’90 Kurt Weill & Ira Gershwin The Firebrand of Florence.......................... ’99 Kurt Weill & Ogden Nash One Touch of Venus................................... ’15 Meredith Willson The Music Man................................... ’06, ’17 Quade Winter & William Gilbert Thespis....................................................... ’96 Quade Winter & Frank Desprez The Carp.................................................... ’99 Robert Wright & George Forrest The Great Waltz......................................... ’94 Song of Norway......................................... ’96 Kismet........................................................ ’10 Carl Zeller Der Vogelhändler......................... ’93, ’94, ’07

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2018 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Over the last 39 years, the staff at the College of Wooster has been instrumental in Ohio Light Opera’s success. Without their enthusiasm and support of our endeavors, the Company would not function as seamlessly as it does. The “in kind” services and “hidden assets” over the years have made it possible for OLO to exist as a unique part of the educational mission at Wooster. We acknowledge them with grateful hearts for their support and assistance.

HEARTFELT THANKS go out to: Ben Small, Gail Smith, and John Schambach for your tireless work on behalf of the company all year around. S Dave Griffith of Lowe’s Home Improvement store in Wooster for his tremendous support of the company. S Jayne Churchmack for her guidance and leadership for the symposium. S Mark Horowitz, of the Library of Congress, for your year-after-year support of OLO’s research efforts in the library’s Music Division. S Michael and Nan Miller for your never-ending commitment to the company. S Spiro Matsos for being our #1 patron and supporter. S Staff of the College of Wooster for 40 years of supporting the OLO company. S Steven Byess for your editing of orchestrations and music arrangements. S

Dawn Schirm, Executive Director 223 W. Liberty • Wooster, OH 44691 • 330-262-2012 M-F 10-5 • Sat 10-4 • Closed Sunday

Donations always needed & accepted during business hours All profits go to Ohio’s Lifecare Hospice to provide an ongoing source of revenue for patient care in Wayne County.

92 Box Office: 330.263.2345


TICKET INFORMATION & PRICES Season Subscriptions: Subscribe for the Season! Choose four, five, six, or seven performances at a discount from individual ticket prices.

Individual Ticket Pricing (Musicals/Operettas) Single Tickets......................................................... $54/$50 Students (ages: 16-23).................................................. $20 Children (ages: 3-15)....................................................... $10

Subscription Rates (Musicals/Operettas—Price Per Ticket) 7 Different Performances................................... $47/$43 6 Different Performances...................................$49/$45 5 Different Performances.................................. $50/$46 4 Different Performances...................................$52/$48 Ordering Tickets: The Ohio Light Opera accepts Visa, MasterCard, and Discover Card. You may call 330-2632345, order tickets online at ohiolightopera.org, or mail your order to the box office at: The Ohio Light Opera The College of Wooster 1189 Beall Avenue Wooster, OH 44691 If you have requested your tickets to be mailed, you will receive them at least one month prior to the performance. NO REFUNDS. NO CANCELLATIONS. Box Office Location & Hours: (Please note the locations of our winter & summer offices) January 10-May 18, 2018: The Ohio Light Opera The College of Wooster Westminster Church House 353 East Pine Street (Corner of College Ave and E. Pine St.) Wooster, OH 44691 May 21-August 11, 2018: Freedlander Theatre 329 East University Street Wooster, OH 44691 Monday-Friday........................................ 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Saturday*................................................... 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sunday*................................................................12 noon-3 p.m. *Weekend hours begin June 9, 2018 24-Hour Order Online: Visit our secure website, ohiolightopera.org, to view available seats, order, and pay for your tickets. Group Discounts: Last year, more than 2,000 people saw Ohio Light Opera performances with our group discount plan. (Musicals/Operettas) 20-46 people........................................$51/$47 per ticket 47-100 people....................... $50.50/$46.50 per ticket over 100 people................................. $50/$46 per ticket Put together a group of people and come to Wooster for an afternoon or evening of operetta—a joy for all at wonderful savings! Call the Box Office at 330-263-2345 or

330-263-2329 to order tickets for your group. Our group sales coordinator will be glad to assist you with your plans. Ticket Exchanges: You have the privilege of exchanging tickets, subject to availability, within the 2018 season. Tickets being exchanged must be RECEIVED in the ticket office no later than 48 hours prior to the performance date on the original tickets. Exchanges may be made in person or by mail. There is a $3.00 PER TICKET charge for exchanges. No other exchanges are possible. Unused Tickets: Ticket holders unable to use or exchange their tickets may notify the ticket office so that those tickets can be resold. These “turnbacks” make seats available to other music lovers and can provide additional income to the Opera. Lost Tickets: If you lose your original tickets, duplicates can be made for you. Student Tickets: Patrons may purchase tickets for children and students. Babes in arms will not be admitted to performances. Air Conditioning: Freedlander Theatre is air conditioned. Some Ohio Light Opera patrons might like to bring a sweater or jacket to wear during the performance. Decorum Reminder: Freedlander Theatre is an intimate space. Please keep in mind that talking during the overture and/or throughout the performance is distracting to fellow audience members as well as to the performing company. Also, please refrain from opening noisy candy or gum wrappers during the show. Please turn off all noise-emitting devices before entering the theater. Photography and recordings of any kind are prohibited. Late Seating: All performances begin promptly at 2 p.m. for matinees and 7:30 p.m. for evening shows. In deference to the comfort and listening pleasure of the audience in the house, late-arriving patrons will not be seated while the performance is in progress. Latecomers are asked to wait quietly until the first convenient break in the program, when ushers will assist you into the theater. These arrangements are at the discretion of the house manager in consultation with the artistic director and performing artists. Thank you for your cooperation. Pre-Performance Talks Friday and Saturday Evenings at 6:30 p.m.: Enhance your enjoyment of the evening’s performance by learning lesser-known facts about the show’s history and tips to recognize the unique special pleasures of each show. We feature lecturers seasoned in the experience and study of operetta. No reservations are necessary. Lectures begin promptly at 6:30 p.m. and are held in the Lean Lecture Room, down the hall from Freedlander Theatre Lobby. Check for signs in the lobby for the location of these informative and free gatherings! A Festival Symposium on the Lyric Theater Tradition: Daily Price........................................................................ $55 4 Day Price.....................................................................$175 See pages 83-85 for details and schedule

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THE OHIO LIGHT OPERA 2018 PERFORMANCE CALENDAR SUNDAY

MON

2PM

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

2PM

2PM

7:30PM

THURSDAY 2PM

7:30PM

FRIDAY 2PM

7:30PM

SATURDAY 2PM

7:30PM

June 16 ★ Pajama Game*

 June 17

June 18

June 19

June 20 Pajama Game

June 24 June 25 June 26

June 27

July 2

July 3

July 9

Babes in Arms

Candide July 15

July 16

Babes in Arms July 22

July 17 Iolanthe

July 23

July 24 Pajama Game

Iolanthe July 29

July 10

July 30

July 31 La Périchole

Cloclo

June 28

July 4

July 5

July 18

Pajama Game*

July 20

July 26

July 27

La 50 Million Iolanthe Candide* Périchole Frenchmen

★ Cloclo August 1 Iolanthe

August 2 50 Million Frenchmen

June 30

July 7

July 14 50 Million Iolanthe* Frenchmen

July 21

La 50 Million Babes in Périchole Frenchmen* Arms

Candide

Pajama Game

August 3 Candide

Babes in Arms*

Pajama Game

Aug 6

August 7 50 Million Frenchmen

August 8 Cloclo

August 9 La Iolanthe Périchole

August 10 Pajama Game

Candide*

Pajama Game*

July 28 Pajama Game

Babes in Arms*

August 4 Cloclo

Festival Symposium On The Lyric Theater Tradition, July 31-August 3 August 5

Pajama Game*

Pajama 50 Million Game Frenchmen*

July 13 Candide

July 19

July 25

Cloclo

July 6

July 12 ★ Iolanthe

★ La Périchole

June 23

50 Million Babes in Frenchmen Arms*

Babes in Arms

★ Candide

July 11 Candide

June 29 Pajama Game

50 Million Frenchmen

POPS CONCERT July 8

June 22

Babes in Arms

Babes in Arms July 1

June 21 ★ Babes in Arms

La Périchole*

August 11 Babes in 50 Million Arms Frenchmen*

★ Indicates an Opening Performance * Indicates a Pre-Performance Lecture at 6:30 p.m. prior to Friday & Saturday evening performances. Informative & Free!

Freedlander Theatre, 329 East University Street, Wooster, OH 44691

OLO 2018 Festival Special Events June 16 Opening Night Gala. The audience is invited to celebrate the opening of our 40th Summer Season by attending our Opening Reception in Freedlander lobby following the 7:30 p.m. performance of The Pajama Game.

July 12 Kids' Day, IOLANTHE 1-2 p.m. Lean Lecture Room (in Wishart Hall, adjacent to Freedlander Theatre). Crafts, songs and fairy magic will be aplenty as children will learn a lesson in Gilbert & Sullivan from the cast of fairies and peers in Iolanthe!

July 4 Pops Concert 7-8 p.m. Downtown Wooster

July 31-August 3 A Festival Symposium on The Lyric Theater Tradition Individual day, full week and concert tickets available, see pages 83-85 for more information.

For more detailed information regarding our events, please log on to ohiolightopera.org or call The Ohio Light Opera box office at 330-263-2345. 94 Box Office: 330.263.2345


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God Save The Queen In keeping with the tradition established at the Savoy Theatre in London, we will sing God Save the Queen before each Gilbert & Sullivan performance.

S

God save our gracious Queen, Long live our noble Queen, God save the Queen: Send her victorious, Happy and glorious, Long to reign over us: God save the Queen. S Queen Victoria attending a performance of The Mikado. Photo by Matt Dilyard, from the 2012 Ohio Light Opera production.

The Ohio Light Opera 2018 Program  

Celebrating Our 40th Festival Season

The Ohio Light Opera 2018 Program  

Celebrating Our 40th Festival Season