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MAKING 2015 BUILDING A FOUNDATION FOR THE FUTURE 2O15 PRESIDENT’S REPORT LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS

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“I’m always thinking about creating. My future starts when I wake up in the morning and see the light.” Miles Davis

Monroe Hall re-opened in October 2015 after a three-year renovation.


MAKING PLANS A M E SSAG E F RO M T H E PR E S I D E N T

For more than a century, Loyola University New Orleans has provided our students an outstanding academic experience rooted in 500 years of Jesuit ideals and values. We prepare our students for success in their future personal and professional lives, helping to set them on a path for continued spiritual growth and providing a cultural experience in one of the greatest cities of the world. Our aim, in the words of St. Ignatius Loyola, is cura personalis, or education of the whole person—mind, body, and spirit. The year 2015 marked a period of reflection and re-invigoration designed to ensure that we preserve our rich legacy as we evolve in a smart, responsible, and strategic way. We’re looking beyond our walls, opening doors, and laying the groundwork for Loyola’s innovation, re-imagining existing programs and defining our future. The complete renovation of Monroe Hall, home to state-of-the-art laboratories and new art facilities, is symbolic as we push full STEAM ahead, investing in science, technology, pre-engineering, arts, and mathematics programs. A center of learning at Loyola for more than 45 years, the building also now includes cutting-edge design and studio art spaces, where students study sculpture, welding, printmaking, painting, drawing, and graphic design. Its magnificent update brings new chemistry, physics, and biology laboratories, as well as a 3,000-square-foot rooftop greenhouse. Together with music industry studies, our new digital film and popular and commercial music academic degree programs are drawing great attention from first-year students, and we’re on track to roll out new academic programs in Fall 2016. Food studies, an emerging science that spotlights the great heritage of New Orleans, and new environmental studies programs will help to enrich our academic offerings and to support the global community. Years from now, we will look back at this year as one of transformational change. Making an impact, making things happen, making a difference: We’re changing the game. W I T H PR AY E R S A N D B E S T W I S H E S ,

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WHAT’S NEW AT LOYOLA Loyola University New Orleans is in a period of unprecedented expansion. The complete renovation of Monroe Hall, for instance, gave the building an additional 114,000 square feet and two new floors, including a rooftop greenhouse. Our strategic plan, Transforming Loyola 2020, emphasizes the importance of experiential learning to go along with such expansion. So in the wake of updates to our infrastructure and with the support of contributors to our Faith in the Future campaign, Loyno has committed to investing in new programs that offer increasingly relevant skill sets and hands-on training to our students.

MAKING ROOM OUR NEW PROGRAMS INCLUDE: DIGITAL FILMMAKING (1) Bachelor of Fine Arts College of Music + Fine Arts COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS (2) Bachelor of Science College of Humanities + Natural Sciences POPULAR AND COMMERCIAL MUSIC (3) Bachelor of Science College of Music + Fine Arts BUSINESS ANALYTICS (4) Bachelor of Business Administration College of Business

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RECOGNITION FOR EXCELLENCE One of the Jesuit ideals that guides our university is pursuit of excellence. At Loyno, we push ourselves to be the best at everything we do, to equip our students with world-class education and experience— and the world has noticed. This year especially, our students, faculty, and staff have made waves nationally for their accomplishments in academia and related programs, and as always, we look forward to the future excellence signaled by these accomplishments.

MAKING OUR MARK

Fulbright Scholars (1) The Fulbright Scholar Program has awarded grants to four Loyola University New Orleans students to study abroad for the 2015-16 academic year, the highest number of winners the university has ever produced. Nearly one-third of the 14 Loyola students who applied for a Fulbright Award this year received one. Loyno’s Fulbright scholars are Molly Alper ‘14, Joseph Patrick Dougherty ‘14, Mara Steven ‘15, and Dimitri Staszewski ‘14. Staszewski, who earned his degree in music industry studies, is one of five students in the U.S. to receive an ultra-elite mTVu Fulbright Award, which recognizes research on an aspect of international musical culture and focuses on contemporary or popular music as a cultural force for expression. Mass Communication Awards (2) The School of Mass Communication received an astounding 86 awards in the 2014-15 academic year, including 79 awards for Loyola’s 93-year-old student newspaper, The Maroon; three Addy Awards from the Advertising Club of New Orleans; and three professional prizes awarded to Loyola Student News Service. The calendar year 2015 was a record-breaking one for the School of Mass Communication, bringing The Maroon’s prestigious Pacemaker Award, often referred to as the “Pulitzer Prize of student journalism,” and the Bateman team’s ninth win at the Public Relations Student Society of America’s annual Bateman Case Study Competition, more than any other communication program in the U.S. Both of those wins will count toward the school’s 2015-16 academic year awards. Physics Feat (3) The American Physical Society included Loyola professor emeritus of physics Carl Brans’ paper Mach’s Principle and a Relativistic Theory of Gravitation as one of 32 landmark papers on general relativity in the past 100 years. Brans’ paper, which offers a modification to the theory of general relativity, is included alongside the work of minds such as Hawking, Oppenheimer, and of course Einstein on a list that marks the centennial of Einstein’s theory of general relativity.

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LOYOLA IN THE COMMUNITY At Loyola, we teach our students to be men and women for others. We believe in commitment to service; in linking faith with justice; in educating the whole person: body, mind, and spirit. As an institution, we take pride in providing opportunities for our students to improve their communities for future generations and also in our faculty and staff who lead by example and honor our commitment to these values.

MAKING AN IMPACT

“Hackcess” to Justice (1) As part of New Orleans Entrepreneur Week, the Loyola College of Law hosted Hackcess to Justice Louisiana 2015, a two-day “social justice hackathon” at which coders and developers around the city competed competed to develop technology that would increase underprivileged citizens’ access to the justice system. Shakespeare in Uganda (2) Associate professor of theatre arts Artemis Preeshl was awarded Magis and Strength in Diversity grants to teach underprivileged students in Uganda. Through the Teach and Tour Uganda program, Preeshl spent three-and-a-half weeks at Stawa University in Kampala, Uganda, teaching Shakespeare. In addition to teaching the students about the playwright and his work, Preeshl taught voice and speech and introduced the students to unfamiliar Shakespearean English phrases. By the end of the course, the students were able to perform a staged reading of scenes from Much Ado About Nothing to the community. Center for Entrepreneurship and Community Development (CECD) (3) The College of Business’ Center for Entrepreneurship and Community Development (CECD) has launched several exciting projects. The CECD, created as a link between students and the New Orleans entrepreneurial community, has committed itself to training innovators and entrepreneurs who will revitalize our economy. As part of that commitment, Loyola will host Idea Village’s annual IDEAcorps consulting challenge, an exclusive MBA student experience through which teams of students will help founders of New Orleans-based startups to advance their companies in four days during New Orleans Entrepreneur Week. A new Loyola Venture for NOLA program places Loyola students in project-oriented internship teams with local early-stage, high-growth potential companies. In Summer 2016, the center will launch the Loyola Code Academy, which teaches in-demand technical skills to students and recent graduates from nontechnical backgrounds.

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WHAT’S GOING ON AT LOYOLA “Something feels different here.” That’s what people say when they first step onto our campus. Its openness fosters a lively New Orleans culture that feels truly student-made. And to ensure an experiential education to our students, we’ve worked to keep the city’s celebratory tradition alive and to marry it with the culture of high art found in its history–but also to provide state-of-the-art programs and facilities that attract visionary talent. A vibrant campus life, a unique regional identity, and an eye toward the future: There are things that can only happen at Loyno–a campus of makers building their way to the future.

MAKING IT HAPPEN

Virtuoso Violinist (1) Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, a violinist internationally acclaimed for her passionate performances, daring interpretations, and dedication to her craft, led the School of Music’s Resident Artist program this year. In addition to teaching masterclasses and leading performances, Salerno-Sonnenberg is working to transform the university’s chamber orchestra into a conductor-less ensemble, which Dean Anthony DeCuir said would “empower our musicians, demand a higher level of preparedness, and give our students an increased degree of authority in their ensemble playing.” Top Hits (2) Harry Connick Jr. released a song written by associate professor of music industry studies Jim McCormick as the first single on That Would Be Me, Connick’s new album released by Columbia Records. The single is titled “(I Do) Like We Do” and has a country sound and instrumentation (including acoustic guitar, horns, and organ) that surprised fans but that Connick pulls off with his trademark versatility. McCormick, an acclaimed songwriter who teaches the Art and Craft of Songwriting at Loyola, wrote the song with Nashville songwriter Jay Knowles and calls it one of his favorites. Master Naturalists (3) Professor Bob Thomas, director of the Loyola Center for Environmental Communication, founded the Louisiana Master Naturalists of Greater New Orleans Chapter (LMN-GNO) to offer students hands-on training in conservation ethics and certification as master naturalists. The program offers 10 workshops in which those enrolled will take field trips into nature to identify conservation concerns and learn how to think like naturalists. Space Act (4) The College of Business has signed a Space Act Agreement with NASA that will partner Loyola MBA students with Stennis Space Center engineers to commercialize a new technology patent. The partnership is part of NASA’s Technology Transfer University (T2U) initiative, which seeks to engage business students to use NASA intellectual property and spur economic development and growth. Loyola is one of the only schools in the U.S. to have signed such a deal with NASA, and the program spotlights Loyola’s emphasis on experiential learning as the university continues to anticipate the future. Five students will work with NASA engineers at Stennis Space Center, providing communication, marketing, and business-planning strategies for new technology. Under the guidance of Loyola professors, students will apply the new Lean LaunchPad business model to a patent they select from the portfolio at Stennis. In just four months, the students will use the model to develop a business plan that takes the new NASA technology from patent to market. Uptown: Downtown (5) Loyola University New Orleans and House of Blues New Orleans partnered this fall to launch Uptown: Downtown, a student-run concert series that will be a recurring event each semester at the historic French Quarter venue. Student ensembles in Loyola’s brand-new popular and commercial music program perform in the end-of-semester showcase and gain skills in creative entrepreneurship by promoting and marketing the event, a new tradition. “The Loyola Department of Film and Music Industry Studies is such a special place,” says House of Blues marketing director Mark Roberts. “We are inspired by the talent, creativity, and ambition of its students. House of Blues wants to provide an opportunity for those talented individuals to pursue their areas of focus at the next level.”

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OUR BEST AND BRIGHTEST Loyola shines as an institution because our faculty, staff, students, and alumni carry its values from generation to generation. They make incalculable contributions to our mission locally and globally, and they honor us with their accomplishments both on and off campus. We’re proud to call them our family and to showcase the many strengths of our community.

MAKING IMPRESSIONS

Electric Girls (1) In June, Flor Serna ’15 launched Electric Girls, a program designed to encourage young girls to develop an interest in STEM-related fields. The program, which grabbed the attention of national incubator 4.0 Schools, launched last summer in three camp sessions at Loyola and continued this fall at St. Martin’s Episcopal School in Metairie. In the program, girls earn badges for mastering skills such as soldering, wiring circuits, and using a drill–and then passing them on to a classmate. Serna hopes to expand the electrifying new program across the Greater New Orleans metropolitan area and beyond. Blurred Lines (2) Richard S. Busch, J.D. ‘90, won the nearly $7.4 million copyright lawsuit Marvin Gaye’s family initiated against Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams over the single “Blurred Lines,” which the family alleged too closely copied Marvin Gaye’s 1977 song “Got to Give It Up.” The case marks one of several high-profile wins by Busch that have had far-reaching impact on the music industry. He told his story this fall in a special visit to Loyola’s College of Law. Loyola’s Got Talent (3) David Castillo ’10 made his national television debut in August as part of VOX, a vocal quartet featured on America’s Got Talent. The group received a standing ovation, and all four judges voted to move the group to the next round. Comedian and America’s Got Talent judge Howie Mandel noted the power of the performance, adding that people would think of the classically trained opera singers as “the classiest boy band there is.” In the five years since graduation, Castillo has performed at world premieres, at West Coast premieres, and in leading baritone roles with a host of major opera companies and orchestras–and has received several national awards for his performances. New Faces (4) Six new trustees began serving August 1 on the Loyola University New Orleans Board of Trustees. They are (from left) Margaret M. “Peggy” Condron ‘69; the Rev. Paul J. Fitzgerald, S.J.; the Rev. Francis W. “Billy” Huete, S.J.; the Rev. Timothy R. Lannon, S.J.; Henry R. Muñoz III ‘14; and the widely sought-after political contributor, pundit, and public speaker Mary Matalin, who co-hosts the nationally syndicated radio program “Both Sides Now” and alongside her husband, political consultant and analyst James Carville, is the author and co-author of several best-selling books.

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2014 –2015 UNIVERSITY CABINET MEMBERS The Rev. Kevin Wm. Wildes, S.J., Ph.D. President Marc K. Manganaro, Ph.D. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Jay Calamia Vice President for Finance + Administration John T. Sebastian Vice President for Mission + Ministry Bill Bishop Vice President for Institutional Advancement Roberta E. Kaskel Vice President for Enrollment Management M.L. “Cissy” Petty, Ph.D. Vice President for Student Affairs and Associate Provost Laura Kurzu Vice President for Marketing + Communications Tommy Screen Director of Government Relations Gita Bolt, J.D. General Counsel

CLASS OF 2019 PROFILE 667 Enrolled students 3.52 Average GPA 53.8% above 3.5 82.0% above 3.0 575 Average critical reading SAT score 543 Average math SAT score 25 Average ACT score 64% Female 36% Male 42.6% Ethnic minorities

19.8% African American 18.7% Hispanic 3.5% Asian 4.6% Other (Alaskan/Am Indian, multiracial, other) Our students come from: 40 States/Territories 7 Countries 60% Out of state


RANKINGS The Princeton Review’s “Best Colleges” #2 Lots of Race/Class Interaction #2 Town-Gown Relations Are Great #4 Best College Newspaper #13 Best College Library #14 Best Quality of Life #18 Easiest Campus to Get Around U.S. News & World Report “Best Colleges” #9 Best Colleges for Veterans in the region #11 Best Regional Universities in the South #12 Best Value in the South #15 Best Online Graduate Nursing Program in the Nation Business Insider’s Best College Campuses In America 2015 Loyola University New Orleans was ranked #13 among college campuses in America. The list combined rankings of more than 100 colleges for categories including college libraries, dorms, campus scenery, quality of life, and more. College Raptor Hidden Gem 2015 College matching platform College Raptor Inc. named Loyola University the top “hidden gem” for the state of Louisiana. The distinction is defined as high-caliber colleges and universities that receive fewer than 5,000 applicants per year but have a total enrollment of greater than 1,000. #15 CollegeChoice’s Best Catholic Colleges and Universities Loyola University’s ranking was based on factors actual college freshmen said were most important to their college decision, including academic reputation, financial aid offerings, overall cost, and success of graduates in the post-college job market.

2014 –2015 REVENUES AND EXPENSES REVENUES 2014–2015 Tuition and fees, net of aid Gifts, grants, and contracts Investment income Auxiliary enterprises Other sources

$72,473,759 $2,033,743 $8,639,400 $11,965,870 $402,681

$95,515,453

EXPENSES 2014–2015 Instructional $42,281,958 Research $320,503 Public service $1,819,643 Academic support $10,066,591 Student services $8,953,496 Institutional support $25,063,768 Auxiliary enterprises $7,404,549 Net before Transfers Transfer from Reserves Transfer (to) Plant Net after Transfers

$95,910,508 –$395,055 $1,919,000 $1,000,000

$523,945

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Office of the President 6363 St. Charles Avenue New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 www.loyno.edu

Loyola University New Orleans, a Jesuit and Catholic institution of higher education, welcomes students of diverse backgrounds and prepares them to lead meaningful lives with and for others; to pursue truth, wisdom, and virtue; and to work for a more just world. Inspired by Ignatius of Loyola’s vision of finding God in all things, the university is grounded in the liberal arts and sciences while also offering opportunities for professional studies in undergraduate and selected graduate programs. Through teaching, research, creative activities, and service, the faculty, in cooperation with the staff, strives to educate the whole student and to benefit the larger community. Cover illustration by Jonathan Lopez, graphic design senior at Loyola.

Presidents Report 2015  

For more than a century, Loyola University New Orleans has provided our students an outstanding academic experience rooted in 500 years of J...