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LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS PRESIDENT’S REPORT

WINNING 2017

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Love is shown more in deeds than in words. – St. Ignatius of Loyola

COVER & INSIDE COVER: The Loyola baseball team attended a Christmas camp in an isolated Mayan village in southern Belize where they taught children and coached sports.

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A Message From the President Dear readers, “More in deeds.” That’s at the core of our university’s Jesuit mission in more ways than one. We believe in deeds, yes, and we see it in our focus on experiential learning. We see it in our action against injustice. Our care for community. We, like Ignatius did, spread love through our actions. But – we also believe, essentially, in that other word: more. Or, as St. Ignatius called it, magis. The Jesuit ideal of magis means striving for greatness, for more. At Loyola University New Orleans, we strive for this magis in everything we do. This year, Faith in the Future became – by far – the most successful fundraising

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campaign in Loyola's history. And with Project Magis, we watched our university prepare for change – a new digital age and with it a technologically adept cohort that remains intellectually curious and intent on making the world a better place.

In many ways, we witnessed the beginnings of that transformation. In this report, I think you’ll see that – the awards, accolades, and national attention. It seems like everything we did this year – as a university, as individuals – someone noticed. The world noticed. But more than that, what I’m most proud of are the interpersonal connections we’ve focused on maintaining. We’ve broken down barriers between departments, between the administration and students. We’ve created a campus committed to clear, open

communication and sharing of information. And as a result we are working together more collaboratively than ever before. I’m so proud of the work that’s already been done, and I know that our university is headed in the right direction and will continue to transform to serve the needs of future generations. This new direction marks my 14th year as president and the end of my time at Loyola University New Orleans. While it’s hard to say goodbye, I'm proud of what we've accomplished in my time here. I am excited for what lies ahead for Loyola, and I am optimistic about the future the faculty, staff, and students are creating for this campus. With prayers and best wishes,

Loyola University New Orleans

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Loyola University New Orleans

THERE IS SOMETHING SPECIAL AT LOYOLA UNIVERSITY NEW ORLEANS, an indefinable magic. We live in the city the New York Times just named the No. 1 Place to Go in 2018. We attract global talent like the Vienna Boys’ Choir to perform on our campus. We partner with huge organizations to create opportunities and facilities like the PanAmerican Life Student Success Center. This place – its magic – has been noticed for the opportunities it creates and the talent it produces, and we couldn’t be prouder to call it home.


RECOGNITION FOR OUR EXCELLENCE THE UNIVERSITY This year, Loyola University New Orleans received five Top 20 rankings from the Princeton Review and three Top 10 rankings from U.S. News & World Report. In addition to those rankings, which you can see in full on p. 19, we were named in the Fiske Guide to Colleges and were singled out specifically for our Executive Mentor Program, study abroad program, service learning, and campus dining, among other praises. We were also named one of MONEY Magazine’s Best Colleges for Your Money.

THE PROGRAMS While many of our programs earn national recognition, three of our programs were singled out this year for their particular excellence. The Princeton Review chose our Joseph A. Butt, S.J., College of Business as one of its outstanding business schools, calling it one of the best at which to earn an MBA. It said the same of our College of Law, naming it one of the most outstanding law schools in the nation and calling it one of the best institutions at which to earn a law degree. Additionally, U.S. News & World Report ranked our School of Nursing’s online graduate (master’s and doctoral) degree programs as one of the best.

EXCELLENCE IN ACTION All of the accolades received by our university and its programs mean nothing if we ourselves don’t live our mission of excellence and service and take our talent into the world. This year, we’re proud to say that Loyola was named a top producer of Peace Corps volunteers as well as a top producer of Teach for America volunteers. We’re also pleased to announce that our Upward Bound program, which allows local disadvantaged high school students to graduate and prepare for college, received a renewed five-year federal grant worth more than $2.2 million. Plus, we were named in the Princeton Review’s 2017 Guide to Green Colleges. And we got to see more than 50 acts composed of members of the Loyola community perform at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival – every day of both weekends featured members of the Wolf Pack! Loyola University New Orleans

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e h t t s Ju g n i n n Begi The students – ultimately, they’re the reason for everything we do. And every day on our campus, we feel lucky. We’re there for the next Steven Spielberg’s first film. Or the next Neil deGrasse Tyson’s first experiment. Or the next Toni Morrison’s first book. We watch genius unfold, encourage it, and nurture it. We see our Jesuit education’s focus on experiential learning yield results before our students even graduate. And above all, we’re astonished at the talent that walks casually on our campus every day.

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Loyola University New Orleans


MAKING HEADLINES Students from our School of Mass Communication received 10 accolades from this year’s Society of Professional Journalists Region 12 Conference, including wins in the categories of Breaking News Reporting, Editorial Writing, and Sports Writing. Our student newspaper, The Maroon, was one of only nine to be awarded the SPJ’s Mark of Excellence for Best All-Around Non-Daily Student Newspaper, and at the 2017 Louisiana Press Association’s Better Newspapers Competition, its student journalists won a total of 18 awards, 10 of which were first place awards. The wins included first place for general excellence; first place for best website; and first place for The Maroon’s new podcast, The Wolf of Loyno. We’re also proud to announce that The Maroon was ranked as the nation’s No. 2 Best College Media Outlet of the Year by the College Media Association. Loyola University New Orleans

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THE NEW STUDENT EXPERIENCE This academic year, we saw our first-year enrollment numbers increase by more than 30 percent. There is a Loyola experience these students have come to expect, including high instances of experiential learning and study abroad opportunities. (Every year, 30 percent of our students study abroad!) So – we decided to place an even greater focus on giving our students a jump start in their first year of college. In addition to the First-Year Experience – which encourages our freshmen to come together and engage with one another, faculty, and the community about a chosen topic – we created the Success Coaching program in partnership with the Student Success Center and InsideTrack. The program gives all first-year students the chance to meet one-on-one with a success coach to ensure they have the resources they need to have a great academic and social experience at Loyola.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S TEAM Caterina Picone, an English literature student, was inspired to “rewrite” Hamlet when she was in high school. At Loyola, she enrolled in Introduction to Digital Filmmaking and met film student Nick Ramey. Together, they made that rewrite come to life. Their film, Ophelia, just won first place in the Best Film Inspired by Shakespeare category at the 2017 Shakespeare Film Festival in Stratford-Upon-Avon, England, and were able to travel there to receive their prize, thanks to Loyola donor support. This is our focus on cross-collaboration in action: two ambitious students coming together from different fields and points of view to create a masterpiece before they even graduate.

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT CLASS OF 2021: This academic year, we saw our first-year enrollment numbers increase by more than 30 percent.

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Loyola University New Orleans

Patrick Murphree, a student practitioner in the Stuart H. Smith Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice, received the Outstanding Clinical Student Award from the Clinical Legal Education Association, or CLEA. As a student practitioner in the Children’s Rights Clinic, Murphree completed outstanding work for vulnerable immigrant youth. CLEA honored Patrick for his excellence in clinical fieldwork and for exceptionally thoughtful, self-reflective participation in an accompanying clinical seminar.


A BRIGHT FUTURE This year, Loyola graduates and students received five Fulbright award offers, and three of them accepted, becoming official 2017-2018 Fulbright U.S. Student Award recipients. Two of our students – both members of Loyola’s acclaimed Honors Program – had the rare opportunity to decline the award in pursuit of other exciting ventures. One of those students, Michael Pashkevich, turned it down to pursue a Ph.D. in zoology as a Gates-Cambridge scholar, an opportunity fostered by instances of experiential learning such as the BioBlitz, in which Loyola students and professors descended upon City Park to catalogue its plants, insects, and wildlife. In addition to the Fulbrights, five undergraduate students were selected from a pool of more than 1,000 applicants from 386 colleges and universities across the United States to receive the prestigious Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship to study or intern abroad during spring 2018. Loyola University New Orleans students are the only students from Louisiana universities to receive the honor this year.

Natalie Jones ’14 (theatre and languages and cultures) received a 2017-2018 Fulbright Award to teach in Argentina while studying regional accents and creating a database of them all. Jones also was one of the 30 percent of Loyola students who studied abroad.

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ALL-STAR STAFF

e v o Aband d n o Bey Our faculty and staff are leaders and pioneers, world-class scientists and musicians and thinkers – and above all, mentors. They forge real relationships with their students, collaborate on research projects, secure grants for programs and facilities. The guidance of both our faculty and our staff leads our students and our university to successes in areas ranging from film to medicine, athletics to law, music to physics, and so much more. And their tireless pursuit of their own work leads to achievements – championships, masterpieces, records, breakthroughs, awards, discoveries – that continue to demand national attention.

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Women’s basketball head coach Kellie Kennedy, who became the winningest coach in Loyola basketball history last year, was named conference coach of the year at this year’s Southern States Athletic Conference women's basketball awards banquet. She was also named Coach of the Year by the Louisiana Sports Writers Association. Under her leadership, the team ended its regular season at 25-5 overall, marking the highest number of regular season wins by a Loyola women's basketball team in program history.


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Laura T. Murphy, founder and director of the Modern Slavery Research Project and associate professor of English language and literature, has been instrumental in helping students secure Fulbrights and other prestigious awards.

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Loyola University New Orleans


FELLOW SCHOLARS

LOYNO ON THE RED CARPET

Two of our faculty members received prestigious fellowships to support their research projects in the humanities. Laura T. Murphy, founder and director of the Modern Slavery Research Project and associate professor of English language and literature at Loyola, received the John G. Medlin, Jr., Fellowship, which allowed her to pursue her book project titled The New Slave Narrative. Rian Thum, associate professor of history and an Asian studies scholar at Loyola, received the Center’s Trustees’ Fellowship and used it to pursue his book project, Islamic China. Thum also won a 2017 Alpha Sigma Nu Book Award for his book The Sacred Routes of Uyghur History. Both were named fellows of the National Humanities Center for the 2017-2018 academic year.

A few of our faculty members are making a serious run at the awards circuit this year. Bobby Rush’s Porcupine Meat – produced by Loyola’s Production of Recorded Music Instructor Scott Billington – won Best Traditional Blues Album at the 59th Annual Grammy Awards. Assistant Professor of Music Industry Technology Jeff Albert wrote arrangements for the horn section and played trombone alongside Popular and Commercial Music Instructor David Torkanowsky, who played keyboards on the album.

AWARD OF A LIFETIME Associate Professor Rheta LeAnne Steen, Ph.D., LPC-S, was given the 2017 Play Therapist of the Year Lifetime Achievement Award by the Louisiana Association for Play Therapy, or LAPT. She was surprised with the award during the LAPT’s annual conference, which was held on our campus. Steen is creator, founder, and director of the Play Therapy Center for Education and Research at Loyola, the only one of its kind in Louisiana.

Additionally, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences included Digital Filmmaking Instructor Garrett Bradley’s ALONE as one of 10 films, narrowed from 77, to be considered for an Oscar nomination. The short film, which spotlights the impact of mass incarceration on children and families, won Best Documentary Short Film at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Bradley is a recipient of the 2017 Sundance/Cinereach Art of Nonfiction Fellowship, a new opportunity for artists that debuted this year.

Loyola University New Orleans

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FACING CRISIS HEAD-ON Eric Eyre ’87 (communication) won a Pulitzer Prize this year for “courageous reporting, performed in the face of powerful opposition.” His articles for the Charleston Gazette-Mail investigated the wholesalers’ movement of prescription opioid pills into West Virginia, the state considered to be the epicenter of the nation’s opioid crisis, and found that the wholesalers continued to ship 780 million hydrocodone and oxycodone pills over six years into the state even as occurrences of fatal overdose rose dramatically. Additionally, Andreanecia Morris ’95 (communication), who was named one of New Orleans CityBusiness’ Women of the Year in 2014, was named Gambit’s New Orleanian of the Year in 2017 for her leadership over HousingNOLA. HousingNOLA, according to Gambit, is “an ambitious 10-year plan to address the city's affordable housing crisis.” She plans to “start with 3,000 affordable homes by 2018 and grow to 5,500 by 2021” as well as to “hold the new mayor and City Council to their promises of creating a more equitable city.” 14 Loyola University New Orleans


n i h t g n e r St s r e b Num The Wolf Pack – a network of dreamers and overachievers nearly 50,000-strong. Politics, acting, entrepreneurship, music, law, finance, science, literature, journalism, research, art, marketing, film – our alumni have made their mark on every field imaginable. Loyola graduates revolutionize their industries and create new ones – they change the world. And in addition to their individual achievements, the real meaning of Wolf Pack pride shines in moments of community. The moments in which the care of our Pack ensures that the generations after them have the resources to pursue new successes. Loyola alumni may leave our campus, our city, our state, or even our country, but they never leave our community.

Loyola University New Orleans

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LEGACY OF GENEROSITY

TENACIOUS IGNATIUS

Maedell Hoover Braud, beloved community member and longtime administrative assistant who passed away this year, left Loyola an astounding $10 million legacy gift. This generous and carefully planned gift will create $5 million in a new scholarship endowment for undergraduates and $5 million in a new scholarship endowment for law students. The scholarships will be awarded, based on students’ financial need and academic strength, starting in fall 2019. A strong believer in the value of a Jesuit education, Braud spent years building the gift that will now establish these MurphyBraud Scholarship Endowment Funds at Loyola.

Following six record-setting years, the Faith in the Future campaign is the most ambitious and successful fundraising campaign in university history. Maedell Hoover Braud’s $10 million gift puts the capital campaign at $85 million of its $100 million goal. In its final push of the campaign, Loyola launched the Tenacious Ignatius concept, encouraging donations to remaining areas of need – including the Multimedia Center and the J. Michael Early Studio, the University Honors Program, and the Chapel for the Tom Benson Jesuit Center, among others.

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Maedell Hoover Braud, seen here with President Emeritus Fr. James C. Carter, S.J., made one of the largest single gifts to Loyola in its history, $10 million.

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Rankings Loyola University New Orleans was again featured in 2017 as part of the Princeton Review's yearly 381 Best Colleges, with five Top 20 rankings and special attention among Best Southeastern Colleges. We also were singled out for honors among U.S. News & World Report's Best Colleges, which spotlighted us for Best Value and named us among one of the Top 10 universities in the South while highlighting our diversity, academic excellence, and programs for veterans. We are also exceptionally proud to be among the nation's Top 20 Fulbright Producers, according to the U.S. State Department, and named one of the nation's most environmentally responsible colleges by the Princeton Review, which included Loyola in its annual Guide to 375 Green Colleges.

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Loyola University New Orleans


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TOP

Fulbright Producer

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE’S BUREAU OF EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL AFFAIRS

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Lots of Race/Class Interaction

Best College Newspaper

in Regional Universities South

THE PRINCETON REVIEW

THE PRINCETON REVIEW

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U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT

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College City Gets High Marks

in Best Value Schools – South

THE PRINCETON REVIEW

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT

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Named among “Best Colleges for Your Money"

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MONEY MAGAZINE

Town-Gown Relations Are Great THE PRINCETON REVIEW

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in Best Colleges for Veterans

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT

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Best Quality of Life

U.S. President’s Honor Roll–For Community Engagement

THE PRINCETON REVIEW

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Statistics LOYOLA AT A GLANCE

CLASS OF 2021 PROFILE

3,858 Enrolled students 2,615 Undergraduates 581 Graduate students 82 Doctoral students 494 Law students 86 Continuing education students

801 Enrolled students 3.57 Average GPA 57% Above 3.5 86% Above 3.0

607 Average critical reading SAT score 571 Average math SAT score 25 Average ACT score

66% Female 34% Male 42% Ethnic minorities 15% African American 16% Hispanic 4% Asian 21% Other (Alaskan/Am Indian, Multiracial, Other) Our students come from: 47 States/Territories 18 Countries 52% Out of state 20

Loyola University New Orleans


2016-2017 UNIVERSITY CABINET MEMBERS

The Rev. Kevin Wm. Wildes, S.J., Ph.D. President David B. Borofsky, Ed.D. Interim Provost and Chief Operating Officer Leon Mathes Vice President for Finance and Administration The Rev. Ted Dziak, S.J. Vice President for Mission and Ministry and University Chaplain John Head, Ed.D. Vice President for Enrollment Management Laura Frerichs Vice President for Marketing and Communications Sybol Cook Anderson, Ph.D. Chief Diversity Officer M.L. “Cissy� Petty, Ph.D. Vice President for Student Affairs and Associate Provost Tommy Screen, J.D. Director of Government Relations and General Counsel Chris Wiseman, Ph.D. Vice President for Institutional Advancement Loyola University New Orleans

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Revenues And Expenses Revenues: 2016 – 2017

Expenses: 2016 – 2017 Instructional: Research: Public service: Academic support: Student services: Institutional support: Auxiliary enterprises:

Total: Tuition and fees, net of aid: $57,234,000 Gifts, grants, and contracts: $1,678,000 Investment income: $7,772,000 Auxiliary enterprises: $12,589,000 $391,000 Other sources:

Total:

$79,664,000

Loyola University New Orleans

$93,511,000

Net before Transfers: -$13,847,000 Transfer from Reserves: $15,265,000 Transfer (to) Plant: ( $1,500,000 ) Net after Transfers:

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$41,976,000 $244,000 $1,439,000 $7,970,000 $9,484,000 $24,773,000 $7,625,000

-$82,000


The Maroon, Loyola's student newspaper, was ranked as the nation’s No. 2 Best College Media Outlet of the Year by the College Media Association.

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OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 6363 St. Charles Avenue Campus Box 9 New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 loyno.edu

Loyola University New Orleans, a Jesuit and Catholic institution of higher education, welcomes students of diverse backgrounds and prepares them to lead meaningful lives with and for others; to pursue truth, wisdom, and virtue; and to work for a more just world. Inspired by Ignatius of Loyola's vision of finding God in all things, the university is grounded in the liberal arts and sciences while also offering opportunities for professional studies in undergraduate and selected graduate programs. Through teaching, research, creative activities, and service, the faculty in cooperation with the staff, strives to educate the whole student and to benefit the larger community.

Profile for Loyola University New Orleans

WINNING 2017—More in Deeds: Loyola University New Orleans 2017 President's Report  

We believe in deeds, yes, and we see it in our focus on experiential learning. Our care for community. We, like Ignatius did, spread love th...

WINNING 2017—More in Deeds: Loyola University New Orleans 2017 President's Report  

We believe in deeds, yes, and we see it in our focus on experiential learning. Our care for community. We, like Ignatius did, spread love th...